Then and Now Preterist Podcast

Fall of Masada (AD 73)

May 25, 2014 Ed Stevens
Then and Now Preterist Podcast
Fall of Masada (AD 73)
Chapters
Then and Now Preterist Podcast
Fall of Masada (AD 73)
May 25, 2014
Ed Stevens
After Titus dismantled Jerusalem, gathered its spoils, and dispersed its captives, he left Judea to join his father in Rome. He commissioned Bassus and Silva to capture the three remaining rebel fortresses of Herodium, Macherus, and Masada. The Roman soldiers overturned every stone of the temple building in order to get the gold and silver that had melted into the cracks, unwittingly fulfilling Jesus' prophecy that there would not be left one stone upon another (Matt 24:2). The temple vessels and furnishings were taken to Rome by Titus. Herodium and Macherus offered little resistance, but Masada fought to the bitter end. We use evidence from archaeology, Josephus, Hegesippus, and Yosippon to support the idea that the Eleazar in command of Masada was the same Eleazar b. Ananias who had started the war and held the temple during most of the war. This same evidence suggests that Eleazar was the Man of Lawlessness that Apostle Paul referred to in his second letter to the Thessalonians. Those three historians talk about how Eleazar and his forces on Masada were ultimately defeated by the breath of the Lord's mouth and forced to be slain. If you wish to have the free PDF written lesson outline for this podcast, simply email us to request it (preterist1@preterist.org). Be sure to mention the date of this podcast when you contact us.

Support the show (https://www.preterist.org/donate/credit-card-donations/)

Show Notes
After Titus dismantled Jerusalem, gathered its spoils, and dispersed its captives, he left Judea to join his father in Rome. He commissioned Bassus and Silva to capture the three remaining rebel fortresses of Herodium, Macherus, and Masada. The Roman soldiers overturned every stone of the temple building in order to get the gold and silver that had melted into the cracks, unwittingly fulfilling Jesus' prophecy that there would not be left one stone upon another (Matt 24:2). The temple vessels and furnishings were taken to Rome by Titus. Herodium and Macherus offered little resistance, but Masada fought to the bitter end. We use evidence from archaeology, Josephus, Hegesippus, and Yosippon to support the idea that the Eleazar in command of Masada was the same Eleazar b. Ananias who had started the war and held the temple during most of the war. This same evidence suggests that Eleazar was the Man of Lawlessness that Apostle Paul referred to in his second letter to the Thessalonians. Those three historians talk about how Eleazar and his forces on Masada were ultimately defeated by the breath of the Lord's mouth and forced to be slain. If you wish to have the free PDF written lesson outline for this podcast, simply email us to request it (preterist1@preterist.org). Be sure to mention the date of this podcast when you contact us.

Support the show (https://www.preterist.org/donate/credit-card-donations/)