Made in Mexico with Hanna Jaff

September 24, 2018 Episode 138
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Made in Mexico with Hanna Jaff
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Hellblazerbiz
Made in Mexico with Hanna Jaff
Sep 24, 2018 Episode 138
Chris Gordon
Her first step was to educate herself, something that she dove head first into, receiving a Master's Degree in International Relations from Harvard University, and a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology from National University (California). She also studied at Columbia University in New York, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey, and La Sorbonne University of Paris. She traveled the world, meeting and connecting with immigrants and refugees to see firsthand what resources they were lacking. Whether she was in Iraq, Mexico, India or beyond, the biggest lesson she learned was that they longed to learn English - one of the most universal languages - so that they can communicate better with the outside world. In 2013 at the age of just 25 years old, Hanna created her own non-profit, the Jaff Foundation for Education. Their mission is to teach English to immigrants, refugees, and the less fortunate, launch nondiscrimination campaigns, and aim their attention on world peace and education. Through her foundation, Hanna has authored three English-learning books and volunteers at refugee camps, where she teaches English and has donated 22,000 of her books to immigrants, refugees, and the less fortunate in Peru, Kurdistan, Iraq, Mexico, India, and worldwide. In the past five years the foundation has grown exponentially - having hosted more than 200 charity events worldwide, benefiting more than 120,000 people. Today, the foundation has more than 7,000 active volunteers. (https://hannajaff.com/en/organization/). Hanna speaks at international conferences on topics such as human rights, immigrants, refugees, peace, and the importance of education, mainly to raise awareness and motivation. Hanna has been a speaker in over 70 universities, schools, and institutions around the world. In 2017, she was twice a TED speaker at TEDx Nishtimanin Erbil, Iraq and TEDx Ciudad de Puebla in San Andres Cholula, Mexico. In addition to her own foundation, Hanna has been active in many other initiatives and non-discrimination campaigns aimed at bringing peace and teaching people on a global scale to respect one another's race, skin color, national origin, gender, disability, religion, sexual orientation, social class, political views, and age. She organized the first "Kurdish Festival" in Mexico, the biggest one ever held outside Kurdistan, attended by 80,000 people in four days. She also conducted a We Are One campaign in support of war victims in the Middle East. Her projects promote tolerance and public awareness about eliminating hatred. Her great humanitarian and activism work has also garnered her many accolades and awards. Entrepreneur (Mexico) named her one of their "30 Under 30 Successful Mexicans" in 2016. That same year she was recognized at the St. Gallen Symposium (Switzerland) as one of the "200 Leaders of Tomorrow Under 30". Other honors include: "Philanthropist of the Year" (Groupo Sexenio), "5 Women Transforming Mexico" (Nivel Uno Magazine), named one of the "50 Most Admirable Mexican Women" (CARAS Magazine), one of the "15 Most Influential People in Politics in Mexico" (Reforma Newspaper), and awards in philanthropy, women's empowerment, leadership, and academic achievements by the Kurdistan Garmiyan Regional Government.
Show Notes Transcript

Her first step was to educate herself, something that she dove head first into, receiving a Master's Degree in International Relations from Harvard University, and a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology from National University (California). 

She also studied at Columbia University in New York, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey, and La Sorbonne University of Paris. She traveled the world, meeting and connecting with immigrants and refugees to see firsthand what resources they were lacking. Whether she was in Iraq, Mexico, India or beyond, the biggest lesson she learned was that they longed to learn English - one of the most universal languages - so that they can communicate better with the outside world.

 

In 2013 at the age of just 25 years old, Hanna created her own non-profit, the Jaff Foundation for Education. Their mission is to teach English to immigrants, refugees, and the less fortunate, launch nondiscrimination campaigns, and aim their attention on world peace and education. Through her foundation, Hanna has authored three English-learning books and volunteers at refugee camps, where she teaches English and has donated 22,000 of her books to immigrants, refugees, and the less fortunate in Peru, Kurdistan, Iraq, Mexico, India, and worldwide. In the past five years the foundation has grown exponentially - having hosted more than 200 charity events worldwide, benefiting more than 120,000 people. Today, the foundation has more than 7,000 active volunteers. (https://hannajaff.com/en/organization/).

 

Hanna speaks at international conferences on topics such as human rights, immigrants, refugees, peace, and the importance of education, mainly to raise awareness and motivation. Hanna has been a speaker in over 70 universities, schools, and institutions around the world. In 2017, she was twice a TED speaker at TEDx Nishtimanin Erbil, Iraq and TEDx Ciudad de Puebla in San Andres Cholula, Mexico.

 

In addition to her own foundation, Hanna has been active in many other initiatives and non-discrimination campaigns aimed at bringing peace and teaching people on a global scale to respect one another's race, skin color, national origin, gender, disability, religion, sexual orientation, social class, political views, and age. She organized the first "Kurdish Festival" in Mexico, the biggest one ever held outside Kurdistan, attended by 80,000 people in four days. She also conducted a We Are One campaign in support of war victims in the Middle East. Her projects promote tolerance and public awareness about eliminating hatred.

 

Her great humanitarian and activism work has also garnered her many accolades and awards. Entrepreneur (Mexico) named her one of their "30 Under 30 Successful Mexicans" in 2016. That same year she was recognized at the St. Gallen Symposium (Switzerland) as one of the "200 Leaders of Tomorrow Under 30". Other honors include: "Philanthropist of the Year" (Groupo Sexenio), "5 Women Transforming Mexico" (Nivel Uno Magazine), named one of the "50 Most Admirable Mexican Women" (CARAS Magazine), one of the "15 Most Influential People in Politics in Mexico" (Reforma Newspaper), and awards in philanthropy, women's empowerment, leadership, and academic achievements by the Kurdistan Garmiyan Regional Government.

Speaker 1:
0:00
Hi my name is Hannan's job and I am here with Chris Gordon on Hellblazer. :
Speaker 2:
0:05
Good morning. Good Afternoon. Good evening and good night wherever you may be in the world right now. This is Hellblazer base and I'm your host As always the one the only Chris Gordon. Thank you all for tuning in. Whether it be on iTunes YouTube not being tuned in dot com Spotify Google Play or other means. How can each and every one of you and express my gratitude to you all for the support. If you're joining me for the first time welcome I hope you enjoy and we'll then proceed to listen to other episodes. If you want my returning guests thank you for your attention. I appreciate your support. Every single day this week's guest is exciting for me. She's a philanthropist a human rights activist. She's founded and runs her own charity to help refugees. She's an extremely intelligent lady with an amazing vision. She's also a speaker for tax as well. She's due to be seen on Mexico's first ever reality show Made in Mexico which is available from 20th September on Netflix in 100 90 countries worldwide. Please sit back and enjoy my chats with Hanna Joffe. Hey everyone I have the honor and the privilege of the company today for the philanthropist human rights activist campaign a charity runner politician and soon to be a reality TV show in Mexico. :
Speaker 3:
1:19
The absolutely amazing college. Hey Hannah. How are you. :
Speaker 4:
1:24
Hi how are you. Thanks for having me Chris. :
Speaker 2:
1:27
No no thank you. You're an absolute inspiration of being read up about you. Yeah yeah. I'm just absolutely and or to be speaking to you. :
Speaker 5:
1:36
Oh. Thanks so much. Thanks for the time. :
Speaker 6:
1:39
Ok so I have some questions for you talking about obviously your work as a philanthropist your charity work and things like that. And also obviously about your Made in Mexico what you're going to be appearing on soon. :
Speaker 7:
1:53
All right. :
Speaker 2:
1:54
OK so let's go and I'm going to say you're an American you're American born. But I've also read you I mean you know you have such an amazing cultural heritage. Can you expand on that for the listener and for me please. :
Speaker 8:
2:07
Right well I'm Orton's you know. So I'm an American citizen. And then my mother's Mexican and my father's Kurdish. From Iraq. So from the Iraqi part. So my whole life I grew up into three different cultures heritages religions languages ways of life. Values morals you know everything was always like three different. :
Speaker 1:
2:35
Scenarios so it was always like growing up. It was it was. Hard for someone that's young you know because you always had to balance and bounce from one you know one country to another. And it will always depended on who I was speaking to who I was. You know if I was talking to someone from the Middle East I was obviously Kurdish and Muslim and then I was in TV with the Americans I was American and. :
Speaker 9:
3:05
I was I was at a pillion school. So it was mostly Protestants and peacekeeping aliens and Christians. So it was like going to mass and it was a different religion as well. And then my mother is Roman Catholic. So it was always like. And then my mother's from one of my father's family is from the North Rock and most of them lived in Baghdad as well. So it is always like every day I would hear constant negative news you know. And that made me obviously in school have a lot of issues of discrimination bullying you know racism either because I was a woman or because I was young you know or because I was a Muslim or a Mexican. And you know all these insults of hate. I've been a victim. So especially when working in scenarios like in politics when you're working in a man's world where. :
Speaker 9:
4:02
You're with people so much older than you or with more experience thing you or you know or men in general. It was like I had to defend myself and it was always like I felt like people didn't really credit me. It was always like oh she's probably such and such as friend or you know it was never like I had like oh you know I respect her because she's the one that went to school and prepared herself and started from the bottom. And now she's in this job you know is always like living in a constant defending myself life you know whether it was personal family or whether it was workwise or you know being in the Middle East in refugee camps and you know it's just so so very very different you know. So it also lived in the East Coast US. I lived in Boston and New York as well. So I I have many experiences you know with West and East living in the U.S. and you living in Europe as well. London Paris so I have. I'm very much this person because of what I've gone through. So so yes I am a little bit of everything I guess. I have the. American Middle Eastern Latin and European in me. :
Speaker 2:
5:24
So I think I can only speak for my own experiences but that's sort of why I am the way I am is such a fascinating heritage or English just because you call your and I think you're in the perfect position to take this forward as you are because you've got an insight obviously into the two main religions at the moment which are the ones which saw the thousands of years of have been had against each other. I don't personally see it because both worship the same God and the Koran for example teaches more about Jesus and Mary mentions it more than the Bible does but never mind mine. And I can see where the PRAO Mahal that would have been for the prejudice especially growing up in America. And obviously then when you're looking at the Iraqi side of the different conflicts that you could have internally right. I mean yeah I mean as I said you know obviously you've been raised in San Diego there with the Catholic mother and your father would be there could be going over to Iraq as well. What an amazing upbringing and a range of cultures you were part of. :
Speaker 1:
6:34
Yes Mexico as well. And then it was always like with Americans in Europe. I always had to defend both my heritage because it was either Mexico. Something was going on negative or you know. :
Speaker 9:
6:51
You know we have you know we have a war on drugs here and cartels and a lot of poverty and unemployment and a lot of issues. And at the same time in Iraq there's also going on a war. And so it was always like in school I had to defend the the Muslim religion and saying like well that's that's not what it's about. And it's not about terrorism it's not about you know killings or wars you know and then at the same time Mexicans you know it was you know I was in high school when 9/11 happened and I remember it was a lot of. Tension you know and and being Mexican growing up in a border city as well you know so. :
Speaker 10:
7:36
So yes I can I think I speak for many people in the U.S. that are you know interfaith marriages as marriages as are children from mixed you know heritages that it is hard you know to not have a hundred percent of something because it's always like half the people will always be disappointed you know. :
Speaker 11:
7:59
And if you don't for instance I'm philanthropist and I do my best wherever I can go. And I don't pick and choose her for anything. You know in particular I just wherever I am I do my best you know and a lot of people have actually use that against me and said well why are you helping heards more why don't you help the Mexicans more and wiring helping you know the homeless in San Diego or women in the east coast and that's I'm like I mean I know only one person. :
Speaker 12:
8:32
I do what I can. But it's always like there's there's constant disappointment because there's that other side that expects that you know so. So it's it's hard sometimes. Yes. :
Speaker 6:
8:44
I mean I can't imagine the kind of prejudice that you grew up with. I mean I'm a white male. :
Speaker 13:
8:48
Yes. Yeah. :
Speaker 14:
8:51
I mean the way political things. I mean I'm not going to say anything but the way things are at the moment I guess it can be really is just sad. :
Speaker 15:
8:59
It's really sad especially now that our new things have to have escalated in that hateful way towards people and in the last year two. So you can see that a lot more now. :
Speaker 2:
9:19
I mean I really don't understand all this hatred in the world. I really don't. I mean as far as I'm concerned we are one race we are one human race. So it doesn't matter the color of your skin doesn't matter which country you come from. Which language you speak how you look who you worship if you worship anyone at all. We are one people we should all love each other and work together and be like that. I just don't understand it. :
Speaker 7:
9:45
Yeah. :
Speaker 9:
9:47
That is what I focus on in my conferences and my campaigns. It's rather nondiscrimination campaigns so I have a charity and NGO and we help refugees and immigrants. The reason behind that is because my father always helps refugees. My mother always helped immigrants because I had relatives that were refugees and I had relatives that were immigrants so I was always close to that act. :
Speaker 4:
10:12
And I always felt like I was sort of a second generation both immigrant and refugee though because I've volunteered on children homes. :
Speaker 16:
10:20
And I volunteered and lived on. I'm not a volunteered on refugee camps and shelter homes. So I've actually been one I can't say that but I've been a volunteer one. And and I know that frustration of being on sort of your life is on pause you know and waiting for the opportunity to go home or to hear your next generation. :
Speaker 17:
10:43
And it's hard and that's where I focus on on refugees and immigrants and I actually have English books I wrote. It's sort of a self-taught English book. :
Speaker 18:
10:55
So I used to you know give food water blankets to immigrants and refugees and then I said well why can't I just give them something that maybe they can keep around more you know. And there's so much waiting around that instead of you know giving them something to eat will have something we can learn Nino and. And actually I think the greatest accomplishment accomplishment you can have is not winning an award or getting a diploma. It's more of people after saying I learned some basic English. :
Speaker 19:
11:24
Thanks to your book you know and that's the best thing someone can actually give you you know success for me is how many people have a better life because you exist and you managed to improve at least one person's life in your lifetime. :
Speaker 20:
11:40
Then you had a successful life. :
Speaker 18:
11:41
And I think that my book it's a very basic English I mean I wrote it myself I'm not a teacher or are like that but I before I was buying books from you know from bookstores. And I was like you know what I might pain someone else. You know I should just write it myself that I could just put it online for free. Anyone who wants to you know. Print it. And you know I've given around 22000 to refugees and another 50000 for Mexicans and immigrants from know the southern part. And so that's how I started. And then my conferences have been nondiscrimination because you know as this the charity is is refugees immigrants which that's what I read. I feel I represent and that my conferences are part of that charity which are awareness because I think that the only way to eliminate hate is awareness. And people sometimes are very easy to judge because they've never seen it or lived there or have an issue close to to you. So I feel that people that when they judge either political view culture or religion sexual orientation or disability you name it. Gender you know. :
Speaker 21:
13:04
It's mostly because they haven't been you know they haven't read more or seen more about it. And I kid you not if you have if you stepped foot on a refugee camp and sit with victims. :
Speaker 17:
13:16
I don't think any country in the world would close their borders you know because it's just it's too strong of a feeling you know and and every single person that you speak to in in on camp whether it's a it's a shelter an immigrant home or a refugee camp you will empathize with them you know because of their stories and everybody has a different story behind and that's sort of what I do on my conferences. That's what I did on my Ted. :
Speaker 18:
13:44
Ted x conferences and I've been in over 70 universities where I've given talks and I sort of say well I know many people can go to a refugee camp or an immigrant home. :
Speaker 16:
13:56
So I'll probably I'll I'll be the voice you know. All I'll talk about that and it's mostly on non-discrimination. :
Speaker 18:
14:02
It's you name it. I've touched it. I've talked about it whether it's bullying whether it's gender equality whether it's refugees immigrants political views. You know it's a we one campaign. It was funny that you said we are one because that's what my the name of my campaign is. Though. :
Speaker 22:
14:21
We are one campaign. Does it matter where you're from who. :
Speaker 18:
14:26
Or what you believe in. Or you know who who who you believe you are are you meet Miss creativity. Anything. We are all one one. You know one race so that's what campaigns are about. :
Speaker 6:
14:41
Briefly before you said they said about all the questions I was going to have for will use Well I in on that I'm slobbery you just feel free to stalk me. :
Speaker 2:
14:55
She started this so-called ramblings of a Hellblazer because I rambled on and I can talk to for Britain and I'm sure you'll find out that what we are about is fucking seriously talking about now we are one race. I mean you know we're not born to hate something you don't see babies hating each other just because they are different. Color is taught. It's ingrained by adults you know that's when we're born. We love everybody and everybody. I think that's how we should continue. :
Speaker 7:
15:27
Yes. :
Speaker 15:
15:31
Nelson Mandela says if you're if you learn to hate you can learn to love. That's what favorite sayings. :
Speaker 2:
15:37
Yes that's a really beautiful sign. I've heard it before and is Nelson Mandela is someone who would know exactly from the way he was treated for all those years. You let me. You are very very passionate about human rights and the rights of immigrants and refugees and you fold frequently volunteer in refugee camps in Iraq. How do you find these experiences seeing people forced to live in such horrid conditions. :
Speaker 23:
16:01
Yes it's just hard because some people don't really realize that this is going on the other side of the world and the victims refugees don't choose to be. You know they can be doctors they can be engineers they can have an education they can have a good job. :
Speaker 24:
16:22
They have you know they can be retired you know and they can be students can the women you know and he knows of the circumstances of their country they have to leave and live in a foreign country where they don't speak the language. You know there is about 60000 refugees a year in U.K. I believe. :
Speaker 4:
16:41
I mean I don't the ones I've been able to work didn't want to go to UK. :
Speaker 9:
16:48
You know they were happy to be with them and with their schools and with their jobs and you know earning a good life and and now they have to go somewhere else where they are discriminated and they know the language and they don't know how to use a tube. And you know they don't. They don't find a good salary or work or anything you know. :
Speaker 23:
17:10
And and it's it's very sad to see that because many of them of refugees have been separated from their families. For instance just as immigrants have as well and and have lost their families because of what what they are really believe and you know for instance I've spoken to many women that that just because they had a different faith because they weren't Muslim you know they their families you know were victims of you know. Of terrorist groups. So it's very hard and and many harassments happened as well you know and on campus sometimes you know the proper education isn't given you know because it's so it's so overpopulated or you know limited or or you know many of them can't have medical attention. :
Speaker 24:
17:58
It's very frustrating to be in a country where you know I was once in a situation where I was at a hospital and there were hundreds of victims. And there was there wasn't enough medical supplies. :
Speaker 23:
18:09
You know it's almost like you want to scream and shout because you want to play God at that moment you know. It's it's. And he can't. And and I kid you not. It's like why doesn't the whole world you know you know this you know or or feel that you know and see this and you don't have to be Muslim or Iraqi or refugee. You know you have to be an immigrant or have someone that you love going through that's for you to feel it you know you you we're all human. You know we're all race like you say and. And this is what I'm trying to promote awareness. And sometimes my conferences like I said before like have left more of an impact. I was just one person I didn't have any I didn't have a famous last name in Mexico or this company behind me or you know some boyfriend or husband to help me or anything I was just by myself I graduated from college and Master's. :
Speaker 25:
19:14
And all I had was my resume my academic resume. :
Speaker 23:
19:18
And this is why I pushed so much for education. Because what opened the doors to me wasn't who I knew it was. It was my education. And. Obviously it was an easy it wasn't like I knocked on one door and I got a job you know it was after probably 100 and then I started this NGO and one person became to two people three three became four. And now we're in 18 states. 7000 volunteers. :
Speaker 4:
19:46
And you know it's it's almost like you know you know it's not like I had people promoting me on TV. :
Speaker 23:
19:54
You know it was just my social media and. And I think that good. And success is an education is contagious. You know when you see someone. A story like instance mine you know and how it was five years ago. And and I and my bucket list and my goals have been slowly you know being won by Mark. You know and. :
Speaker 11:
20:18
And people. At the beginning when I asked them Can you print my book. It's a dollar to print and a key give me I don't know 10 20 hundred. And no one gave me a big fat check. You know it was always I'll print you a hundred. But you has to be in that area and I'm like I don't care where I'll give them to you again. Are you on e-mail. And it was hard because in the beginning people judge you by. Well. :
Speaker 4:
20:51
You know even in the phone calls. What company are you calling from. No company. Which job. None. It's just me. Oh and. And then once you passed that appointment and you're actually sitting with someone that can help you sponsor you. It's like well let me see the NGOs resume. What have they done. What have you. You know people don't trust you know just someone oh trust me just because I say you know they want to see how many events you've done in the fundraising events you've done in the past how many people you've helped how many people are behind you. Like it wasn't easy in the beginning you know. And the beginning is always the hardest. And and then you know from one job you have to put your 100 percent in one job nor to you know get another get promoted get promoted. Well you know it's it's never luck you have to work for it you know and I focus on education and I focus on English because I've seen immigrants and refugees struggle with that and sometimes limited in job opportunities because of that. So just because of the circumstances of maybe being border with the U.S. or you know. :
Speaker 19:
22:02
Or finding asylum in English speaking countries. So it's it's I thought that well the first thing is let's all be let's all speak English which is the universal language you know and. And that's what I started you know because I thought about books like Math and History and you know and science and stuff like that. But I'm not going to be teaching science and math when I'm not a. :
Speaker 4:
22:29
Major or anything of that. So I just focus on English. And thanks to that I think we've had positive results where people at least could communicate a bit better when they got to their country of their destination or you know City or wherever they move to. :
Speaker 17:
22:49
So that's something that that that I've been working on and passionate about and promoting education and my Constance's are are very much like that where you don't have to have a job title a last name or company or anything behind you. You just need to work great you know and prepare for it and keep. :
Speaker 11:
23:10
Always like being seeings. You know not dropping out and and never feel like OK I got to this. That's the dead end. You know it's always let's try to work always more for more you know and and you don't have to be part of my NGO. You know you can be your own NGO. You know I have to start a charity to help others you know. Like you said you helped someone you know give them a hand and help her. :
Speaker 19:
23:39
You know you know it's just it's just you know the bare minimum I'm sort of asking and that's something I learned from my father's faith from the practice. Charity is one of the pillars of must being a Muslim. So about sort of you have to give 2 percent of your income to the less fortunate. So that's that's sort of I think I really am grateful for the person that I that I was born in. The family I was born in. The situation that was born in because I think that that made me open to you know insensitive to so many other you know. You. :
Speaker 21:
24:17
Know unfortunately there's so many discrimination out there that if I weren't born in this family maybe I'm not. So I'm happy to be sort of that voice. :
Speaker 16:
24:30
And if I can do that voice and maybe things to you know putting myself out there and saying what you know other people may not know. And in return I'll benefit one or two people at least in my life. :
Speaker 26:
24:44
And you know I am happy with that you know. :
Speaker 21:
24:47
So so I hope others can do the same. You know at least I know today that there's 70000 volunteers out there that many of them said that if they weren't heard my conference room or heard about me they wouldn't beach Lancz. :
Speaker 12:
25:02
So I mean man helping others giving conferences out there so I'm happy with the results. :
Speaker 2:
25:08
So I mean you can see discrimination even in my hometown where I am we've got. Syrian refugees have been there and they don't want to come you know they want to be back home. But those only there's one it was just a simple thing that I was in the shop or ulcers all over the other side of the road from the shop. And one of the young mothers said four kids and pushed her and she was struggling to open the door she couldn't open the door. Three or four people just walked by. Looking down on auks I've had comments about that before but people say I was just looking down saw some kind of move when I'm away jumped across the road and you know just what happened and open the door and through it goes you know she's just a mother she the whole open help. This was a before you know one human really cares what we should be. :
Speaker 7:
25:58
Right. Right. :
Speaker 27:
25:59
And you and you if you grow up in a country like the U.S. where you see so many nationalities and it's just like U.K. you know I live half half the year in London and Knightsbridge and Chelsea and at a fair. And it's. It's you. I think you hear every language in the world. You know it's like. :
Speaker 4:
26:19
And but you still have discrimination. You know imagine that countries that don't have so many you know people from from foreign countries. :
Speaker 27:
26:28
You know it's it's it's it is hard you know so. So I think the best thing to eliminate is awareness. That's that's what I do. That's why I give conferences you know and then if if people maybe read more about it and hear more about it then I think that that will eliminate. :
Speaker 15:
26:50
And you know you know improve. :
Speaker 2:
26:53
So it's further expanded on the outside feel. How do you manage your emotions. Because I mean I'm I'll be a wreck if us or to be honest. :
Speaker 8:
27:03
So since I was a kid I when I was at refugee camps or close to immigrants or I used to draw and write my emotions so I have a diary since 2001 and every thought every experience I've ever had I wrote it down. And I would also draw for instance if I was seeing victims of war because of religion I would draw. :
Speaker 28:
27:31
Clothing that would inspire that message of peace. :
Speaker 11:
27:35
And for instance I would if I was seeing a war on Muslims and Christianity and Judaism I would because I've been to Israel as well. And and I would draw together all the symbols. You know we are one. :
Speaker 18:
27:52
And not only that but also the political views like for instance the wall or the bands or immigrants welcome or AMIC or refugees or you know sexual orientation gender equality or disability any anything on bullying or discrimination. :
Speaker 12:
28:12
So I have that is a dream like I would draw and I would say if only we can um you know not only do a conference but if I can wear a T-shirt that has a message instead of just fashion and somebody can read it and then maybe google it more or you know look into it more. You know I'm all about like promoting and awareness so I have that I started that idea. And I was 14 and up to this last year that's my. We're one campaign that some have been working on and it's a dress with a message. So I have a clothing line now and thank you and hope you like it. :
Speaker 22:
29:00
Barely launchings please don't be too hard on me. :
Speaker 21:
29:04
I have no experience in fashion whatsoever but obviously it's obviously something that I want people every time you know you sort of just wearing a white T-shirt maybe wear something that says something on it and then and obviously when somebody buys it there's going to be an educational as well you know where it says this item comes because of this. You know this is you know if you buy an immigrant T-shirt there's such and such. You know this is the problem that's going on that you know it's something educational and hopefully I'll be able to have some funds donate because of that campaign as well. :
Speaker 12:
29:41
So that's that's the new foundation campaign. First of is English we're not going to start with English we still we still don't know. But this is that. Five years we don't read books. And now we're going to focus on this. We are one campaign that finally I I I got put together. :
Speaker 2:
30:03
So oh that's fantastic. All right the clothing line goes well. Well I was going to say I do want to do the screenings and premieres. I know you stand in front of everyone so will go buy one of your T. And next time I'm out public speaking somewhere oh when are you all t shirts with pride and advertise your charity on there. :
Speaker 7:
30:22
Yay. :
Speaker 2:
30:23
KP Yeah but I mean the thing is we shouldn't be having to. And that sounds awful. I mean I really want to promote your T-shirt and promote your website and your charity because it's such an important message and an important thing that you are getting across that you would do it for everybody. The one thing I want you know it's bonus bonuses we should we shouldn't be in a society where we have to do this. And that's such a shame. I mean I'm live in London and yeah I mean it's I see discrimination that's happening every day as well. :
Speaker 6:
30:53
Yeah I mean say discrimination and you do see troops and people and it's horrible and those people feel so sorry for anyone who has to go through that. :
Speaker 29:
31:01
And also just the pay rule on women in the it is mostly what men. :
Speaker 30:
31:12
Yes. :
Speaker 31:
31:13
Correct. So yeah it's still just racialists. That's a huge thing at the moment to get equal. :
Speaker 30:
31:21
Rights so that's that you and I don't think it's only in the Cape. I probably everywhere you know I think it's has been highlighted in the UK. :
Speaker 32:
31:30
I know a very famous radio deejays just quit because he was put in the spotlight as being the highest paid male earner and the BBC and stuff like that. And they said that was part of the reason I'm not thinking well if it's because you were just annoyed that you got your salary shown when the person who was with you was not even anywhere close. You know. Yeah it's awful. I got I'm not to name names I don't know about that. Listen to this today. But you know you know I mean you're right. :
Speaker 31:
32:05
This is a quality across the board and it should be people you know women are do the same jobs you are. You've got women pilots women fighter pilots women pilots women chief executives. So why is that any different to the moment you think it's stupid. Correct. Understand. And you think. :
Speaker 27:
32:27
Women are the Peshmerga Kurdish army fighting ISIS. So yeah I'm really proud of. :
Speaker 31:
32:36
Yeah you get women in the Israeli Defense Force as well as you know women fighting there as well. But fighting ISIS women fighting ISIS. That's just we don't hear about that because the news doesn't like the news won't pick it up. Not sure I think. Actually I think there was there's a news article or a similar one time when they actually sat with a platoon of female Kurdish fighters who fight in the mall that I can't remember it was last year or the year before. It was quite yet our embassy and on television actually it was a bit of good news but it's a little it's just a sign of awareness and education get people out there and pass that message on and that will stop discrimination everywhere across the board. I think even you know sex and stuff like sexual orientation is will say you know even that kind of thing that still lives around is what we're in 2018. So you know I'm supposed to be a forward thinking race of people and people just let people live the way they want to live. In fact go for it not respect you know tolerance. :
Speaker 13:
33:49
You know exactly. :
Speaker 4:
33:51
Unity you know we need we need unity we need respect and we need tolerance. :
Speaker 31:
33:55
That's what we need. Saraki you sound like a broken record saying no no no. So move on. A few questions now about made in Mexico. Now this is a reality TV show. It's the first Mexican reality TV show coming out. So that's pretty that's a pretty big thing in itself. What can you tell me. :
Speaker 33:
34:16
What's the show about. :
Speaker 34:
34:21
I think that I can't tell you much but what I can tell you that I think that the reason I wanted to be part of something like this is because a lot of people have a sort of stereotype of what Mexico is. You know and we you know I've been in the U.S. East Coast West Coast you know lives in Europe as well. :
Speaker 35:
34:43
And every time I would say I was Mexican either in the Middle East or you know anywhere it would be like it would always be like a negative comment. :
Speaker 13:
34:59
You know the expression you know it wasn't like oh you know it was more like oh you know. And I think that there's what you said about the media it's that there's all these negative shows about Mexicans that drug cartel shows. And maybe the worst of that and obviously you know we have those issues like any other country you know. But it's not the whole country. :
Speaker 34:
35:34
You know there there are more good people than bad in this country. And we are hard workers and we are honest and we are family oriented and you know we are fun people and we are you know and very warm blooded people you know. And and that's something that when I heard there is to be a show like this I got really excited because I wanted mind you know Asian friend my middle eastern friend my European friend my North American friend you know two South American friends see another side Mexico. :
Speaker 13:
36:10
And that's I think that's something that people once they see the show will will realize. So I'm excited for the show and I'm really happy I was a part of it as well. :
Speaker 32:
36:25
Fantastic. When you say though just let people know it's also be shown in 190 countries in 22 languages. So this is going to get out there and people will have so much exposure for that will survive. :
Speaker 36:
36:39
Are you nervous by that. I am I once I finish I was like Did you know when I was getting myself into. :
Speaker 31:
36:48
I mean that is a lot of people who are going to see that now. :
Speaker 34:
36:53
Well I already saw my social media and the media that people have had and obviously an opinion. And but you know what I respect that. :
Speaker 13:
37:02
There's always going to be positive and negative people commenting and I can't be afraid of that you know and I did know that there was going to people that were going to disagree. You know so I sort of just took a chance and I really hope for the best and they hope. :
Speaker 37:
37:21
You know I'm not I'm not an actress and it's me. :
Speaker 15:
37:24
So I hope people once they see my story maybe I can get more people to actually you know be philanthropist and and remove that in their heart. This movie Nixon the talk that was mainly my main goal. :
Speaker 26:
37:46
Honestly I I never really dreamed about being this reality you know world lying. :
Speaker 34:
37:58
No it wasn't never my intention anymore more. You know I can get my story out there. It's another platform for you. Yes. :
Speaker 32:
38:07
So I hope everyone enjoys it honestly and I hope there's more lovers than haters so I'm sure they will be 20 28 so this month isn't just about two weeks away it's coming out. Yes. So I'm sure in the UK Netflix of all watch out for and I'll keep in touch and let you know I'm sure of your comments please. :
Speaker 36:
38:25
You can be on. I'm not sensitive so it's so go. Yeah. :
Speaker 31:
38:38
I'm sure it will be yes. It's great to see something like that saying like you say in Mexico are in a great lie. I mean because like they say it's only stupid drunk shows that come on and it's like oh it just pinpoints on the wall. But I mean I know plenty of people I know several people who are Mexican and I know people who've been out to Mexico and one of the most beautiful countries that they've ever been to. They just returned. I mean obviously they've traveled further than just the holiday resorts in Cancun the stuff they them to go out into the country some more and see that this just is phenomenal. It's a huge history there as well which I really want to get there first. :
Speaker 38:
39:18
Oh rich history and culture and you know food and music. And you know you go to these permits that are thousands of years old. :
Speaker 34:
39:31
And you know you read about the Mayans and the Aztecs. :
Speaker 38:
39:34
And you know when we were conquered by Spain and you know it was like there's so much history in this country and it's beautiful you know and. And obviously I can compare my lifestyle my life with that with the U.S. and Europe which is very sort of other businesses and everyone's sort of very warm you know and we have these family reunions that maybe in the U.S. It could be like oh you know there's actually an occasion like the birthday or Christmas or you know or a holiday or you know or you know. :
Speaker 9:
40:14
Something going on Fourth of July or you know you name it. :
Speaker 36:
40:17
It's like any given Sunday or you know any given day you know. :
Speaker 39:
40:24
And it's really nice. And I think being Mexican is is something beautiful. I can say that probably about any country though but I'm just trying to focus on on the one I'm in right now and the show is about Botwin right now and every country has its you know its meekness. :
Speaker 15:
40:46
And Mexico has so much to offer and we have beaches and we have an amazing capital city that maybe some people don't even imagine that we have a city like this. :
Speaker 34:
40:59
And just by seeing the trailer some of my friends were like that Mexico City you know. And I'm like yes but isn't Mexican city you know and maybe some of them were thinking it was you know it was something else. :
Speaker 4:
41:15
So hopefully we'll get some people to visit after the show. :
Speaker 32:
41:18
Well hopefully as one of my dreams is to go visit all the other pyramids and things like that and learn more about that kind of culture because it's just is this is a culture that has thousands years old and predates most of us. You know I still go see that experience will be amazing. So one day I will want to save up enough money. :
Speaker 4:
41:39
I hope so. I hope so it really is incredible it's worth it. :
Speaker 32:
41:43
Brilliant brilliant because I've actually had a Corsair show twice. She's a Mexican actress at least for the moment in Hollywood and she's she's so already. :
Speaker 3:
41:54
She very very you know obviously active in promoting Mexico which is what she should be doing. It's great. So much positivity coming out of that country. And just to be seen. :
Speaker 31:
42:08
So you know it's like a torch made in Mexico and they can watch it just before a stop recording. And sadly because of Joe Johns is there anything you'd like to say to people who are watching or listening to this just one final message. :
Speaker 4:
42:25
Well I would really want to say what. :
Speaker 15:
42:28
Well I'm actually going to repeat when I send them out of experience and out of Michael's and my bucket list and you know everything was thanks to education. So I honestly never stopped believing what you what you want because I have been through many obstacles. You know I have been a victim of bullying of discrimination of harassments and. And you just have to stand up and keep going. You know and sometimes people say they're not strong enough and cruel. :
Speaker 4:
43:05
Something happens when you are really are and you can't really be afraid of what they're going to say or what they're going to think you know. Life is all about taking your chances and you don't get if you get an opportunity. :
Speaker 15:
43:19
You don't take it somebody else will. :
Speaker 25:
43:21
So that's sort of happened to me and I was like I don't take it from middle school you know and life opportunities and I worked so much. And finally there's something that I thought that you know. :
Speaker 40:
43:38
And so you will get results you know and sometimes it is frustrating because when you're studying day night in your master's degree and bachelor's degree and and working your ass off on you know these nine to nine jobs because literally it's how politics is and plan to be. :
Speaker 15:
43:59
And it's very tiring but in the end of the day it will be worth it because you will know that how many people live a better life because you it's it's you know and how many people there are better people because you know you don't have to become a philanthropist you can be a lawyer slash philanthropist you can be a reporter slash philanthropist. You can meet with your all be a philanthropist. You don't have to join a cause or a charity or an NGO. Every day you can be your own philanthropist you know. Well that's sort of what my last message is and just remember that true success is knowing how many people live a better life because it's managed to improve at least one person's life in your lifetime. :
Speaker 4:
44:47
Then you had a successful life. So that's my last message. My closing message though. Thanks for having me Chris. :
Speaker 41:
44:56
Thank you. That was amazing. Thank you so much for your time. Some smart people have spoken to everybody. Hope you've enjoyed listening to that. Joy Chutima this spring on Hellblazer is with the amazing Jeff.: