Adoring Winnipeg

Prairie Knot

October 02, 2019 Season 1 Episode 4
Adoring Winnipeg
Prairie Knot
Chapters
Adoring Winnipeg
Prairie Knot
Oct 02, 2019 Season 1 Episode 4
SafetyNetStudio

On this episode, Janelle sits down with Kelsey from Prairie Knots. Since opening in 2015, Kelsey has been committed to offering customers hand made, high quality products. Her dedication to quality and positive customer experience has only grown stronger over the years, which led to the new line of Giant Merino Wool products.  Kelsey delights in crafting products that integrate usefulness, beauty and timeless design using renewable resources.

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Show Notes Transcript

On this episode, Janelle sits down with Kelsey from Prairie Knots. Since opening in 2015, Kelsey has been committed to offering customers hand made, high quality products. Her dedication to quality and positive customer experience has only grown stronger over the years, which led to the new line of Giant Merino Wool products.  Kelsey delights in crafting products that integrate usefulness, beauty and timeless design using renewable resources.

Social Media:


Prairie Knots

Prairie Knots Instagram

Adoring Winnipeg

Adoring Winnipeg Insta

More great podcasts at SafetyNetStudio.com

Support the show (https://www.safetynetstudio.com/plans-pricing)

Speaker 1:
0:07
Welcome to adoring Winnefeld, your guide to exploring and shopping local. Here's Denelle. Hello.
Speaker 2:
0:17
Welcome to the adoring Winnipeg podcast. My name is Jenelle and I'm the host of this show and owner of adoring Winnepeg. Um, by now you've probably heard me say this enough, but if you're new to the show or during Winnipeg is here to help you find local Winnipeg businesses for all your needs. Um, so I started this podcast as a way to give you the listener, an inside look at my members. The owners of these businesses help you get to know them and their products more so you can find out if their services would be the right fit for you. Today I have Kelsey joining me. Hi Kelsey. Hello. You are a wife, mom of two young children, psych nurse, knitting. Extraordinary. You know those big fluffy blankets I post all the time. Those are hers. So the owner of Prairie naughts, that's the name of the company and cofounder of the version five podcast.
Speaker 2:
1:03
Yeah, that's a lot of stuff. It sounds like a lot when you say it like that. Yeah, it is. I'd like to start off by you maybe just telling us a bit about your story. How did all of this come to be? The wife thing that started early on? I just said basically I've just always been interested in mental health. I've found, um, my personality, I'm just pretty good at connecting with people. So that was an easy choice for me. The SEG nursing thing. As I got a little further into my career, I realized that I'm, uh, the kind of person that takes a lot of things home with me and I carry pains and tragedy, all that sort of story with me, which was really impacting my own mental health. I started knitting as a way to cope with that because I was drinking a lot.
Speaker 2:
1:50
So I'm, knitting was kind of my escape from that because both of your hands are busy, so there's no time for drinking, you know? And I was just knitting things for myself, for friends, for family, and eventually people just kind of showing more interest in it and asked me for business cards. I'm like, well, I don't have any business cards, like whatever. And you know, you're freshly married, whatever, you don't have kids yet. And I figured, okay, I'll give her a go. So I made some business cards, signed up for a couple of markets and uh, then I just kinda started to hone in on the wool aspect of it and got into the big chunky like you were saying, found my little niche within, within the uh, knitting scene. Cause there is a lot of knitters and Winnipeg for sure. Uh, but yeah, so that's kinda what brought me to that part of it.
Speaker 2:
2:33
And then just connections that I've made throughout the years. A good friend of mine wanted to, uh, start something up. She was looking to do like a curated photo shoot and she wanted me to style the set with some big chunky knits and things and she was gonna do the hair and then, um, Nancy was going to do makeup and Nancy have made beauty company. I'm sure you guys all know her. But anyway, then it kind of just blew up. And instead of doing one single photo shoot, we decided to start a podcast. So that's how version five was born. And uh, we just been rolling with that ever since. But yeah, pretty much. That's it. That's me. So you said you started that as a coping mechanism. Um, how, what, what kind of stuff did you start with? Cause you said you didn't go straight to those big [inaudible] or you're kind of trademark.
Speaker 2:
3:22
I would almost say right now. Yes. Yeah, absolutely. Um, so when I first started I was doing a lot of like just scarves and um, baby blankets, that sort of stuff. A lot of baby things cause everybody's always looking to spoil babies. Right? So, um, I found like a lot of people would just messaged me and asked me if I could do things for them for little gifts and things like that. So that's how that started. And after doing a couple of markets and stuff like that, I found that there was so much that the knitting market was so saturated and everybody was knitting the same things. Like you would literally go to one booth at scattered seeds and then two booths later is someone making the exact same hat, exact same price. Like how do you choose right to serve Smiths? Yeah, exactly. And when you have two young children and a marriage and a career like other than that, it gets to be really time consuming to make all of those things.
Speaker 2:
4:16
So all of a sudden I found myself like I was just almost drowning in things to make all the time. So it's like, what can I take away from this? What can I focus on? And I actually, it's a funny story. I got rejected from a really big market once and you know, my ego was like totally hurt after that. But I took the criticism and realized that, you know, like there's something to learn from that. So what they had said was that I was doing too much. Oh, okay. At first, like I said, that was hard to take, but afterwards I realized, you know, there's a lot of truth to that. Like, you can't stock one of a hundred different things when you go to a market, right? Like you can't make 20 pairs of baby booties and then like 20 blankets and yada yada.
Speaker 2:
4:57
So I kind of regrouped and that's when I got serious about, uh, Prairie naughts because before that it was just kinda like a whatever gig, you know? And, and I started really focusing on my Instagram page and, um, just beautiful. Thank you. It's all out of work. So, yeah. So honing in on that and um, just deciding that, you know, I was trying to do too many things, so that's when I kinda started to focus on using higher quality materials, you know, to set yourself apart from other people. Um, just using different material and making different things just because I couldn't compete with the people that were already established. What are some of the other things that you've chosen to keep up with? It depends because there's such a range of budget, right? So some people are looking for something small for people as gifts.
Speaker 2:
5:47
I tend to focus a lot on the big luxurious nets, but those are quite expensive. So when I do markets, I do try to have a good range of things. So I still make some like beanies and headbands, that sort of stuff. For the most part, I still use the big chunky wool and I make scarves out of that. Just like totally different style from other people. Yeah. And the blankets, of course. Anybody here doesn't know. I do ask my followers if they have any questions for my next guest. So I did have questions come in from Allie Jiro and she asks, what kind of needles do you use? Uh, so when I first started out, I didn't really know what to expect with that giant wall. So I bought these nitty needles from the UK and their baseball bats I was working out while you're admitting these things, it was just too much.
Speaker 2:
6:36
Um, so I don't even know what size those are, but they're like literally the size of your wrist. They're gigantic and they're wooden, so they're like 20 pounds. But then I kind of ditched them once I got the feel for the tension and all that sort of stuff. If you're familiar with knitting, you don't want it to be too loose or too tight. So once I kinda got a feel for what it should look like, I started just using my hands. Okay. Which makes it cool because then anyone can do it. Right? Yeah. If you can find the wool, which I actually seem to have trouble finding. So yes. Yeah. Um, the wool is very expensive and most of it comes from the UK. There's some that you can buy from other places in like Australia or something, but I've ordered wool from several different places and um, it just doesn't all feel the same.
Speaker 2:
7:18
Like the quality changes for anyone looking for that. A big chunky wool. I've actually started do it yourself kits. I was going to. Yeah. So if anyone's looking for it, it's nice because once you order it from the UK, you're paying for the shipping, which is huge. You're paying duties on it. Um, so by the time you get it, and I mean if it's just a passion thing for yourself, then that's great, but it can be really expensive so I can offer a better price for people and, and do it that way if, if anybody's interested in that, that's something that I want to just start offering. Yeah. If you just use your hands then I guess it makes it easier in that way too. Cause those knitting needles are like a hundred rocks. So if you, if you take that out of it and you know, the kits will include, um, like picture instruction as well as written instruction.
Speaker 2:
8:07
Um, and I mean if you needed help, obviously I would send you a message, whatever a video if you needed. But yeah, so it's kinda cool because anyone can do it that way. Her other question was how long does it take to make, so I guess that could fall in the DIY kits to you. What, what are you looking at? Everything depends on size and like I have full weighted blankets where the wool that I get is totally unspun a giant roll. And you just start knitting up with that. But I also do halfway to blankets. So that means I have to like split all of the wool first and after you split it, it gets kind of a frizzy. So then I have to felt it by hand. So there's a lot of time behind the scenes. If I just picked up a thing, a wall and started knitting a blanket, I could do it in a couple of hours.
Speaker 2:
8:52
But the work that goes into like behind the scenes before all of that, um, can take quite a bit of time. Whereas like if I made a scarf out of it, I could do that in half an hour. You talked about like the splitting, is that just a preference? I don't know anything about knitting. So those big blankets, they're very heavy. Like one of those blankets could be eight 12 pounds. Some people like the chunky look. By the time you get to 12 pounds, like that's really expensive, right? You're paying 45 bucks a pound just for the material, not the labor, not the packaging, anything like that. So you can still get a really chunky look if you split the wall. And then that way it goes a lot further. It goes twice as far. Right. Um, and it's way cheaper. So it's just a preference. We had talked a little bit before the show about what topics you wanted to touch on.
Speaker 2:
9:39
So before we move into things not related to pairing odds, I just want to know if you had anything else you kind of wanted to add here. I don't know if it's so much just like Prairie knots related or just, you know, like starting a small business on your own. Um, it was pretty challenging for me because a lot of, uh, the market scene is full of, uh, people that do that full time. Yup. It's their main source of income, so they're very dedicated to their job. The maker life. It's hard to break into that scene if you're just doing it on the side for fun because everybody expects you to be like an established business. If you apply for any of those big markets, they want to know what your website is. They want your Instagram handle. They want, uh, like really professional photos and all that.
Speaker 2:
10:21
And so if you're just starting out, that can be really daunting. If you're interested in doing that, don't let that get you down and just, uh, you've got to start somewhere, right? Like I now go back and delete my old photos on Instagram because they look like shit or whatever, you know, it's like, so you wore then though, I have some friends too, but the products change and stuff and you know, you just grow, uh, in that, in that way. So don't, uh, don't not do something because it's, it's kind of intimidating is kind of where I'm going with that. But the, you grow outside your comfort zone kind of a normal, yeah, exactly. Yeah. So how long have you been doing this for them? Um, I started [inaudible] in 2015 actually. Okay. But the, uh, wool products actually started when I got pregnant. I started trying to make better products because I wanted my kids to use like higher quality, you know, like more hypoallergenic cause the Merino wool is hypoallergenic and it's, um, it's very soft on the skin.
Speaker 2:
11:26
I found that some kids get irritated with the blended walls and stuff like that and it's just so much warmer. It's very nice that way. So, um, I think that was in 2016 that I started with the Merino wool products and I pretty much haven't looked back. Yeah. If you're interested, I've got, um, a whole lineup of markets coming up. Definitely. Yeah. Um, so there's a, the scattered seeds is the first one that I'll be at and it's my first time doing it. Solo did it with the, a Etsy Manitoba little gig there before, which was nice to get your feet wet because you didn't actually have to be there for the four days. I remember seeing my baby was like a couple of weeks old, three weeks old. So this year I'll be doing it. I'll have a nice big booth. So if anyone wants to come and say hi, whatever, look around either just shopping so he could say hi to me too.
Speaker 2:
12:17
And picking up the do it yourself kits. We'll be rolling out there. Um, and those are really nice gifts because we live in a time now where everybody see something and they're like, Oh, I can make that right. But like you said, they don't know where to get the wool or whatever. So, uh, feel free to come by and pick one of those up for someone you know, or for yourself if you're interested, come and have a chat with me. That'd be great. I'm so scattered. Seeds in October after the Thanksgiving weekend. It starts on the Thursday I think is the pre shop runs till Sunday. And then afterwards there's the Springs Christian Academy Christmas market and I'm doing a holiday pop up with, uh, the Sage Creek fundraiser for the children's hospital. Okay. So, and that's I think the first weekend in December, but don't quote me on that. Check my Instagram for for a full schedule.
Speaker 2:
13:08
Yeah, exactly. Um, you had mentioned talking about the pressure of social media, so I think that's something we've all felt at some point in time, whether you're a business owner or not. Like I said, I mean, when I started Prairie knots, it was all about the knitting. And, uh, basically in this last year I've kind of embraced the personal side of a business owner maker as well. So not every single post now is about knitting or even if it is a knitting photo. Uh, I opened up a little bit more about myself or my values or whatever because I just really want to speak to the audience. Like I don't want people to think this is just a business account because for me, I mean it is, but it's also my creative space. So I like to talk about whatever like woman empowerment and feminism and all those good things, but also just like being a good person.
Speaker 2:
13:59
Like don't be a shitty person. There's no room for that. We don't need that. You know, we need good people in the world that are supporting each other. And I just feel like there's room for everybody. Like once you start getting into this like community over competition mindset, uh, it's so freeing. Like you stop comparing your feed to everybody else's feed and you kind of find your own flow. But also like just learning how to take good pictures. And then some days you're like looking at your feet and you still think it looks like garbage, but somebody else thinks it looks great, so it's like, you know, it's nice or you know, you go to post a new photo and you have no idea what to write under it because you just, there's so much build up and pressure to like write something meaningful and captivating to everybody.
Speaker 2:
14:42
In some days I'm just like, Hey, here's a cute photo like it or don't like it, whatever, you know? Yeah. Which is kind of the hard part, right? When you have that, especially on a business side, when you do have that low engagement, it's like what am I doing wrong? What can we make this better? And you just get a backlash. You get obsessed with looking at how many likes you have on a photo or you know when you're a business account you can click that little view insights and it shows you how many times somebody sent your picture to somebody else or saved it to their phone or whatever. And you get so wrapped up in that. On the flip side, my business never did better than when I was actually checking on that. Right. So you're more mindful of what you're posting and um, then you're also keeping tabs on like what does well and what doesn't do well, what colors do people like.
Speaker 2:
15:28
But even then like, I mean some, some people are so good at it and like I said, it's their full time job. Right? Like I'm literally taking pictures with my kids screaming in the background. It's like just, you know, just like shut up for like 10 seconds or getting their hands in the pictures. I know she is [inaudible] I swear to God I'm a really good mom. Okay. Everybody, like we just all have our days. Anybody who's a parent will understand. Yeah. Yeah. Thank you. Don't judge community. Some people are super good at posting stories all day and they just know what to say. Like I have to give a shout out to my good friend Sarah. She has been so helpful for me and aiding that process of honing in on one thing and you know, like just doing one thing and doing it well instead of trying to do and building a business.
Speaker 2:
16:09
If you have questions like, feel free to reach out to me, like I'm not going to say no. I mean if you asked me who my wall supplier is and if you can have their number, I'm probably gonna say no. Uh, yeah. Well that's fair. But if you just like, if you have some questions about getting started, and I mean, by no means am I like very well established. Like, you know, I've got whatever, two and a half thousand followers on Instagram, like it's not like I'm a Insta famous or anything. That's good. That's what I really my address off for that, you know, like that was hard hustle. Like I know I've done that shift personally where I'm just like, you know what, this is, this is what I'm going to put up. And that's just the way it's going to go. Yeah. I don't know if people like it or not, but yeah.
Speaker 2:
16:47
Taco people think whatever you do, you never get a please everybody, right? Go. Yeah. Do you? Yeah, for sure. You had talked about some parenting and specifically said mom, but I think it goes for both parents as well. Some pressure there. I don't know if it was just what you're doing as a parent or if it was the pressure of trying to be a career person at a parent or a bit of both. Everything. All of it. Yeah. I'm trying to be a good parent, but then you feel guilty like trying to focus on a career and then if you have a side hustle like I do, it's like people just kind of look at you like, Oh, you know, but every day kids come first, which kind of makes it hard because then you fall behind in things in your personal businesses and whatever.
Speaker 2:
17:30
And I mean sometimes there's a lot of tension, right? Because you're trying to prioritize things that are important to you, but not everybody gets that right? Like, sometimes my partner and I butt heads about that because something's important to me and he's like, it's a podcast like this, relax. And I'm like, well yeah, you know, like these are things that are important for me and my mental health. Like you know, I do these things because they bring me joy. I'm passionate about it. But I find that, yeah, just trying to be a parent and trying to be an entrepreneur and trying to be a psych nurse and trying to be a wife and make sure that there's food on the table for everybody. It's, it's daunting sometimes. There's just so much pressure to be good at everything. I'm in the similar position with the full time job, the side hustle, the podcast, the two kids.
Speaker 2:
18:13
So, so I get it. And then you got to make time for socializing and drinking beer. Like there's just not right. This is my socializing and drinking beer. My, my side hustle is my socializing and like, and I said it before on a, on our podcast that basically I didn't leave my house. Like I did not leave my children. I took them everywhere. We did everything together for one whole year while I was on mat leave. The only time that I would take to myself was to go and record those podcasts. Oh wow. So that was like my me time, you know, once a month. Yeah. And it still wasn't you time, you moved there with four other people, you didn't get that alone time to Oh yeah, I need my alone time. So yeah, I guess I'm a pretty extroverted person that, you know, it's, it feeds my soul to, to connect with other people other than a two year old, you know, constantly challenging me with her SAS and stuff.
Speaker 2:
19:04
Yeah, I understand that one. Then just on the pure parenting side, I find there's so much pressure to do things a certain way and Oh yeah. After the first kid it's like, Oh, I'm going to make all their baby food myself and like pureeing everything and whatever organic, this organic that and people are like judging you. If you use one of those like food squeezer poaches and the second kid, you're like, well, here's a Nutrigrain bar. Well, you know what works and what doesn't, what you have time for and what you don't. Right? Yeah. At first I tried to make more food and stuff and I was like, it didn't end up saving me any money. The ingredients on the other stuff was still seemed pretty good. Yeah. That was just my personal choice too. Right? It was just you can't, it's what worked for us. You cannot do it all. And then I tried to think about like people back in the day, I'm like, we all survived. We're all here and we're all fine. And I think that awareness of like food and preservatives and all that kind of stuff. Yeah, way better now. Definitely. And it was right. Like I grew up in a household where like my mom would pop something in the microwave, like covered in saran wrap and now I'm like, Oh my God, who does that?
Speaker 2:
20:12
We're all here. We're all good. Do you remember that? We're even lucky to have those options if you don't have the time to make Ord the no. Or if you don't know how or whatever to make your kids own food or whatnot. At least we have options. Yeah, most of them are pretty good. Kids are just so expensive. So I mean you do what you got. That's exactly do your best and that's it. It's good enough. So you had also wanted to talk about the importance of mental health. Man, I don't even know where to start. I wasn't sure either. Honestly. I just feel like we're getting so much better as a society and talking openly about mental health, but I'm also kind of ignorant to the fact that there are so many people that are really hush hush about it still because I work in the environment, right?
Speaker 2:
20:57
So we're all very open about it. My friends and I, we all talk about it. Um, but there is still this big piece of, of society that isn't really into that. You know, I grew up not knowing that one of my relatives had a mental illness and this whole time for like 19 years, I just thought this guy was a Dick. And then finally it kind of comes out and I'm like, I can understand now. Like, yeah, you know, everybody has a flaw or an issue, but mental health is not a flaw. It's just, it is what it is. You know? It could be anything from a chemical imbalance in your brain to like a traumatic experience that has really impacted you. And I feel like we need to talk about those things because everybody's going to run into something like that at some point in their life and everyone's going to need help, right?
Speaker 2:
21:51
Like, I just can't stress enough that, you know, we're all just people. We're all just human beings going through things the best that we can. Yeah. And you never know what you're going to get. You never know when something's going to hit you or you know, like for example, um, just the birthing process, you know, like, yeah, everybody experiences that differently. And like some people have postpartum, some people don't. And some people are so traumatized by that experience that they never have another kid or you know, like you just, it is what it is. And, and mental health facilities are looked at in such a negative way. And I mean, nobody wants to be there, right? Like nobody wants to have to go away from their home to get treatment and there's really not enough in the community for people that aren't necessarily in that place where they need to be hospitalized, but they need resources.
Speaker 2:
22:50
And so like, honestly, just like I said, be a nice person and you never know how far that's going to go for somebody or you know, like just a friend of yours who's afraid to open up about something, you know, like, like I said, we're all just people trying to get by. So I'm very passionate about mental health for sure. And there's so many different levels to it. There's so many different illnesses. I dunno. Do you have like anything specific you want to touch on? I just feel like this is a big can of worms. No, I just, it's not, I don't know a lot about, about your area, that kind of stuff that you would work with, but I know just general, even just going to see a therapist just on your own or whatever, there seems to be a rise in that as well right now being like, it's okay.
Speaker 2:
23:30
Like that's not, that's not a bad thing. That doesn't mean you're weak. It doesn't mean anything. Right? Like it just, if you need the help, it's there for you. Absolutely. And if I feel like it's something that I've learned in my old age of 28, it's like, you know, you get married to somebody and you think that that person needs to be everything for you and that person needs to be the one who supports you emotionally and whatever. But I've learned that it's okay to seek that support from other people. Um, and so like some people have friends and that's enough for them, uh, that they can talk to about those things. And some people have a therapist, uh, that they see or whatever and some people are medicated, whatever, whatever it is, it's okay to get it from different places than other people. If you think that, you know, mental illness has never been a thing for you, just wait because it could be, I, I just feel like you never know what's going to happen.
Speaker 2:
24:24
You know, like I read this thing once about how 20 people are in a room and this major life event happens and 10 people walk out of that room and they're fine, but then the other 10 are traumatized. Right? Like everybody handles experiences differently and those 10 Olivia, different levels of it as well. Right. [inaudible] handles it differently. Yes. And you don't know what else somebody has going, going on that they've, that they don't talk about and they don't share, so. Exactly. Yeah. No matter what you're going through, there are tons of resources that are available in an emergency situation. Like if you couldn't necessarily get to the crisis response center through HSC to seek help, you can also call like there's mobile crisis units. So they would come to you to see you and evaluate you and like basically just talk to you and see what's going on, where you're at, how much help you need.
Speaker 2:
25:16
There's tons of like hotlines over the phone that you can call or now I think they're even like text message responders and also like if you're just ever worried about somebody, you can literally present them to an emergency room or urgent care room to be assessed in that way as well. So there's lots of resources, but there's not enough, uh, definitely not enough. But if you ever needed anything like that, for sure, there's tons of resources. If you Google it, you'll come up with a bunch of stuff. There's specific websites and phone lines for like postpartum depression versus anxiety versus like, or mood disorders I should say. That sort of thing. So if you just Google I, I'm sure you'll find something, but don't be afraid to reach out. You had kind of talked a bit about balance, I believe. So, with everything that you have going on that we've kind of talked about, how do you find that or is there such a thing even?
Speaker 2:
26:07
Cause I haven't been a similar kind of thing going on. So if you have any tips for me, you just do what you can when you can. Don't put so much pressure on yourself. And I mean it's a perfect example. Like you have a full time job and adoring Winnipeg is a side hustle for you and I, I mean I shouldn't call it a side hustle. It's a, it's a side job, but you do it because you're passionate about it and once you start feeling overwhelmed and I'm just like pressure to accomplish certain things in a certain amount of time, you start losing that passion for it. So, uh, if you need to take a step back then do that when you need to. And I am the worst for this. I don't know if y'all know anything about any grams, but I'm a type eight and I don't admit that I need help with anything.
Speaker 2:
26:54
I am a stubborn person and I will do anything. And all like kill myself trying to do it. But, um, so this goes this advices for myself as well. But um, yeah, just, you know, like keep it light and if you start getting frustrated then take a step back because it's impossible to be 100% at everything all the time. Sometimes I'm, you know, like 95% family focused and then I can only give 5% to my side business. Um, right now I'm on mat leave, but I'm going back next week. So I'm like feeling all the, feels about that super anxious, uh, about trying to juggle it because I find every time I'm on mat leave, Prairie nods does really well. And then as soon as I, a little bit more time having kids at home gives you that much more time, but you're at home, right?
Speaker 2:
27:40
Yes. The a quick snap of the photographs, uh, while the kids are sleeping or you know, shipping a few orders. But I get very productive during that and just be honest about, uh, like how much you can handle. You know, I've got people that are waiting on orders for months and it's like, whoops, sorry. But you've got to own it. You know, like being honest with yourself and your, your customers or um, whatever your clientele is. Right. But no balance does not exist. I feel like it's something that everybody struggles with no matter what. There's only so much I feel like we're like, I know I am always balancing too many things so that that becomes the hard part of the balance. But like you said, this is what I, I do this part, they are doing Winnipeg part because of the passion and there's a lack there of at the day job.
Speaker 2:
28:24
So I want to keep this going because this is what, what brings me that joy, so, right. And once you start trying to push yourself too hard, that's when you experience that burnout. Yeah. And, and then everything goes to shit, right? If you can't divvy your time up appropriately and you're starting to give too much, then it's starting to impact your mental health and then you're going to start withdrawing or you're going to experience all of those really negative emotions, right. And then you're not going to be in a good place to be able to serve your family or your job or whatever. So I'm trying to find a balance is very important, but finding a balance is like, I don't know. Is that even possible? Yeah. Being able to switch it up a little bit when you need to, not being so strict on it and getting down on yourself if you being flexible and doing a step forward and one thing that brings you forward and everything else too, because you're probably in a better mental state if you get something off that list.
Speaker 2:
29:17
It doesn't have to be something from everything every day, but at least you get something done. Right. Absolutely. I don't know if that makes sense. Yeah, I know for sure. I was talking to a friend of mine and her whole shtick is like, you know, she's got her huge to do list and then from that to do as she takes a few things that might be 10 things or whatever. And, and then if she's having an off day, it's like, okay, what three things can I do from this list? And then you just, you know, you scrap the rest, the rest isn't that important and then you reorganize recenter the next day. So that's it. I'll just get you to remind people how they can find you. So all your kind of social media, that kind of stuff. My knitting Instagram is at Prairie Raynaud's, not so the K if you want a tune into the version five podcasts, we're at version underscore underscore F I V E on Instagram as well.
Speaker 2:
30:04
I've got a Facebook page for both of those as well. Email that's in the bio on my Instagram page as well. And to buy stuff. Um, you do have an online shop, right? Yes. Yeah. [inaudible] dot com that's it for today. Thanks for coming. Thank you so much for having us. Nice talking with you and I hope you guys enjoyed listening. If you like what you heard, please help me out and make sure to rate, review and subscribe so I can keep this podcast going. I hope to come back next time we'll, I'll be interviewing another Winnipeg business owner. Until then, don't forget to head to my website@duringwinnipeg.com to discover more local businesses and you can find me at Instagram and Facebook as adoring Winnipeg. If you missed any of the handles mentioned beforehand, they will be found in the postscript. Thanks Burleson.
Speaker 3:
30:48
Thanks for listening. Subscribe now to this podcast and check out other podcasts from safety net studio by visiting the website safety-net studio.com.
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