Adoring Winnipeg

Bow and Arrow Furniture

November 03, 2019 Season 1 Episode 5
Adoring Winnipeg
Bow and Arrow Furniture
Chapters
Adoring Winnipeg
Bow and Arrow Furniture
Nov 03, 2019 Season 1 Episode 5
SafetyNetStudio

Amy from Bow and Arrow joins the show to share her origins and woodworking specialties.  Handmade wood furniture and home goods.  Bow and Arrow is focused on being sustainable by sourcing domestic woods and creating work that stands the test of time in design and durability. 


Social Media:

Bow and Arrow


Bow and Arrow Insta


Adoring Winnipeg

Adoring Winnipeg Insta

More great podcasts at SafetyNetStudio.com

Show Notes Transcript

Amy from Bow and Arrow joins the show to share her origins and woodworking specialties.  Handmade wood furniture and home goods.  Bow and Arrow is focused on being sustainable by sourcing domestic woods and creating work that stands the test of time in design and durability. 


Social Media:

Bow and Arrow


Bow and Arrow Insta


Adoring Winnipeg

Adoring Winnipeg Insta

More great podcasts at SafetyNetStudio.com

Support the show (https://www.safetynetstudio.com/plans-pricing)

Speaker 1:
0:07
Welcome to adoring Winnefeld, your guide to exploring and shopping local. Here's Denelle.
Speaker 2:
0:16
Hello and welcome to the adoring Winnipeg podcast. My name is Jenelle and I'm the host of the show and owner of adoring Winnipeg, an online source to help you find local Winnipeg businesses for all your needs. Um, I started this podcast as a way for you to get to know the owners of these businesses and their products so you can find out if their services would be right for you. Today. I have Amy from bone arrow furniture joining me. Hi Amy. Thanks for welcoming me. Thanks for being here. Can you explain to us what bow and arrow furniture is? What do you do? It started off with refinishing furniture in my basements with one light bulb. I'm just re-imagining furniture from its original, um, sort of instead of refinishing to bring it back to your grandmother's glory, it's your still your grandmother's sentimental piece of furniture, but we're updating it to your life.
Speaker 2:
1:03
And then I started, um, doing some carving and just posting that. And that seems to be something that people are really interested and I'm doing a lot more of now. How did you get into this? Um, when I was a kid I started the carving. So that was never something that I expected to be an income. That was just sort of a hobby. Like my parents gave me a Jack knife and said, go away, we've got chores to do. So then you start whittling stuff. And um, I did try to build stuff with my dad. Mostly I had ideas and then he would build it part way through my hairstyling career. I realized I really liked certain aspects of it, but I didn't like all aspects of it. I would have liked to have made my income doing the work while not being with my clients.
Speaker 2:
1:42
So I just kinda thought more about what medium that would be. Cause I, I love working with my hands and it could be any number of things. And when I just thought about the clientele that comes with woodworking, they're really warm people. And, um, yeah, so I went to school in Ontario for six months to learn traditional furniture. Making. The stuff you do is very, you mentioned traditional, it's very handmade, right? Like as far as I know from following you and stuff doesn't look like you use too many power tools or things like that. Yeah, I have been doing, especially because of the program that I went to, he's what I always describe him as a refined redneck. He's got a lot of like he is a graphic designer. He designed the logo for a Labatt blue that was used. So he is in this marketing world.
Speaker 2:
2:25
But then he left and went to traditional woodworking, all hand tools. And so when I first got into school, that was very much my mindset. But also he had drilled into us that whole time that we will never make a living or it would be very hard to make a living doing what we're doing. But then so as I've transitioned now I'm thinking more hybrid is a more realistic approach to it because let's be honest, that the masters had access to those. They would have used them. They use the tools that they use because that's all they had available. If they could have saved their body, that deterioration of the repetitive, they would have taken advantage of it. So yeah, I incorporate both. So parts of the work that I want to feel more intuitive, I use my sharpen tools and parts that I just need to remove bulk and get through it.
Speaker 2:
3:10
Then I use my power tools. Still lots of love into every piece then. Cause like you said, you want to have that control with your hands. Absolutely. And it's not still not automated. I'm still using the power tools with my hands. But yeah, I'm saving my hands. So the name bow and arrow, where does that come from? Well, funnily enough, um, I was thinking more of the logo than anything. Okay. And I was probably in a phase where I was thinking about tattoos as well. So I was thinking about the play on words. Also hair salons coming from a Harris industry, they are always like plays on words or terrible puns. So I guess that was partially in my head. So I was thinking of bow and arrow and when I thought of the logo with a ribbon with an arrow through it, that was really beautiful to me.
Speaker 2:
3:55
So yeah, mostly that was it. Out of all this stuff you do with the painting and the carving and everything, what's your favorite? Probably the carving. I think it still surprises me that that's something that people value when people shriek in delight at something I've made and then they're always amazed at the softness of it, which is the funniest part to me, cause softness. I'm like, Oh, that's just sandpaper. Um, but yeah, just the skill that it's, I've taught myself and I, when I'm working on something, you usually, if I have a really big project, I allow myself a distraction of like a little labor of love project. What actually is the whale that you, you picked up from me. So that was a distraction and my meditation where I noticed my breathing going into a nice rhythm and I can get into a flow state, whereas building furniture I'm having to do like fraction math and yeah, there's a lot more friction in there.
Speaker 2:
4:46
Yeah. So do you have a favorite piece that would stick out to you that you've done ever? I think my favorite is always the next one that I'm excited about, so I've got some ideas of the next carvings that I want to do that I'm just kind of going through a bottleneck of moving myself and my business physically. So once I'm through that, I'm going to have some little indulgence projects that I want to work on that are gonna incorporate painting and carving. Okay. Something new. Yeah. Speaking of the, the carving in that end of things, do you have a favorite wood to work with? I know that might be a weird question, but, uh, no. And that's good. I like Walnut a lot. I try to stay with domestic woods a lot just for the purpose of sustainability. I don't want to be exploding the rainforests.
Speaker 2:
5:30
Having said that, I do have a stock of exotic wood from somebody that was gifted to me. But yeah, typically it's Walnut. It's nice and dark, it's domestic and it's soft enough to carve and it smells amazing while I'm working with it. Does that one say for the bunnies? She has bunnies at home guys. I don't know. That one's not safe for the bunnies. Poplar is, which I can, which is good for the carvings that I'm going to paint. So okay. The wood chips are safe for them. I'm excited to see what these new pieces are going to be. Yeah. Do you have any kind of advice for someone who wants to learn how to carve and stuff? The main thing is just get started. Like there's a lot of armchair carvers out there like that I've noticed from with my spoon carving is lots of people have watched so many videos but they've never tried it.
Speaker 2:
6:16
Yeah. And just getting started and being patient with yourself. Like you're going to make a lot of ugly things before you make anything good. But I like, yeah. Get started. Take a workshop with somebody, get the tools in your hands basically. Yeah. So then how can we get our hands on some of your stuff? Um, well currently, so I've, I've just closed my store friends. Um, so I'll be moving back to like smaller scale items away from the furniture and if it's furniture it'll just be custom work. So online Instagram's the best place to check what I'm always up to. Usually I post my progress as I'm working on something. Typically by the end of it, especially with the carvings, I can tell there's usually two or three people which somebody who's going to grab it so often those more sought after things, don't make it to the website.
Speaker 2:
7:03
Okay. But yeah, Instagram is probably the best bet. And what's your Instagram? My underscore bow and arrow. So as you know, uh, before any podcast recording, I asked my social media followers if they have any questions for my guests. So this next question actually comes from Amy. I'm from I am love project. And her question is what are the challenges of being a woman in business, if any? Kay. I saw this ahead of time and it's definitely something that I've been thinking about. And the first thing I want to say is I only know what being a woman in businesses, I don't know what it's like being a man in business. I can only speak from my experience and what my perceived comparison is. This specifically the business I'm in is more male dominated and transitioning from a female dominated more feel good industry. That's been a really big change for me.
Speaker 2:
7:53
Uh, I find that I'm getting a lot of should [inaudible] you should do this, you should do this. And that's been harder for me. Okay. Just to like there's, I'm very resistant to suggestions. I'm, I know very much what I want to do and which direction I want to go. And the men's way of helping is a lot different than women's way of helping. So that's been harder for me. Okay. And again, I can only speak from my perspective, but I think there is less confidence with women starting off than with men. Like when men do suggest those things, even though I am so strong in my opinions, I still always question it. And even going to the, the hardware store, the helpers at the hardware store, which are retired from, I don't know what, but typically they're retired and hobbyists, they'll tell me what I need and I'll question myself and I'll buy it and it won't be what I need because they actually knew what I needed.
Speaker 2:
8:43
And I was talking to one of my male coworkers about this or somebody who works in the shop with me of what his approach is. If the same thing happens to him. And he said, he literally just yells, I know more than you and away. And I thought that was hilarious because I would never think of being that bolder perceivably rude. And I think the reaction might be different if I did that then if he did that. But I'm curious. Fair enough. I'm not sure if I am up for trying it, but I thought it was pretty funny way of dealing with it. Yeah. So then that's like very industry specific kind of kind of challenges with, yeah. Being in a predominantly male industry, they're not maybe having the confidence that you know what you're doing or well even, yeah, I was thinking about it on the way here from a young age, like my brother had Lego and I always thought he's so creative I could never do this.
Speaker 2:
9:31
And I was his assistant and I was always giving him things. And so a lot of times beginnings of my projects start with a lot of hesitation and it takes me a long time to get over that to just start. So that's always my advice with people is it when you're learning, just start doing it. The mistakes you're worried about making are not the ones you'll make. You're going to make other ones, but until you start you won't know what those are. And then that would fall into the general like business challenge as well. Just absolutely start it. Yeah. Yeah. You'll hit stumbling box. They probably won't be the ones you specked, but it's inevitable. So just get going. What does like a kind of typical day look like for you? How do you have that, like business and personal life kind of balance? I start my day probably later than most people.
Speaker 2:
10:15
So I like to have a quiet morning. This is sort of a habit. I've started from hairstyling. I realized I needed about two hours before I interacted with people and before I was willing to be of service to someone. So I still like to have that quiet morning. Usually it's with my animals. So I'll go for a walk with the dog and then now that I have rabbits I go in and like read with the rabbits. Yeah. And then I go to the shop and depending on what project I'm working on, I'll work on some carving. I try to like treat myself if I'm feeling that I need some, some mental health time. But I still want to do some work cause I'm very, I'm a very productive procrastinator. Okay. So then I'll do some carving stuff and then I'll get into the actual project.
Speaker 2:
10:56
I would like my business to be more proactive. I'm currently still very reactive. I'm still trying to get my feet. I know very well how to make things, but the actual business side of things, I'm still have so much, so much to learn. So when it's time to do bookkeeping, that's very much a Ooh shit that needs to happen. This deadline's coming. I think most people will feel that way. It's still organizing that kind of stuff myself. So I get it. Coffee or tea if any. What's your favorite coffee from lilac bakery? Oh, there you go. It's very specific and sweet or salty. Probably. Typically if I have to choose one, it'll be salty. You do listen to other podcasts? I believe we kind of talked about it before. Do you have any favorites? Um, one of my favorite business podcast is called own it and it's these two lovely British woman who just riff about their business and their personal lives and they are quirky and hilarious and I, yeah, I really love their podcast.
Speaker 2:
11:51
Is there anything or anyone that motivates or inspires you? This probably goes back again to Instagram because that's where a lot of creatives get our insert inspiration. Pinterest, there isn't anybody specific, but I try to make sure that I'm curating the people who I'm following to always be, um, driven and motivational and prolific in their work. Yeah, they're selective on who you follow to give you the right and same in my personal life, I try to surround my people myself with people who are driven and, and that has caused me to close my social circle more and be more selective, which at first I kind of mourned, but the quality of life is, is better. So that's it for me. I'll just make sure that the audience can find you. Um, so if you want to list off the website, social media, again, all that kind of stuff, make sure we have it all down.
Speaker 2:
12:40
Okay. Again, the best places Instagram, which is@my_bowandarrowandthewebsiteisbowandarrowfurniture.com. Thank you so much for being here. Thanks for having me. Um, that's it for today. I hope you enjoyed listening. If you like what you heard, please help me out and make sure to rate, review and subscribe so I can keep this podcast going. I hope you come back next time when I'll be interviewing another one, a pig business owner, but until then, don't forget to head to my website@dorianwinnepeg.com to find bone arrow furniture and other local businesses and find me on Instagram and Facebook as a Dorian Winnipeg. If you miss them all the links for myself in boon, Eero furniture will be found in the pod screen. Thanks for this
Speaker 1:
13:22
[inaudible].
Speaker 3:
13:22
Thanks for listening. Subscribe now to this podcast and check out other podcasts from safety net studio by visiting the website. Safety-net studio
Speaker 1:
13:45
[inaudible] [inaudible]
Speaker 4:
13:45
video content for safetiness studio is produced by layer video imagery. Get your business an extra layer for promotional videos on social media. Create a music videos for artists or art projects. Contact layer video imagery. Go to layer video imagery.com or visit her on Instagram at layer vid imagery. Add an extra layer to your business would layer video
Speaker 1:
14:13
[inaudible].
×

Listen to this podcast on