Float or Founder Podcast

Float or Founder: Episode 2 - Zack Yassin

June 03, 2019 Season 1 Episode 2
Float or Founder Podcast
Float or Founder: Episode 2 - Zack Yassin
Chapters
00:00:48
Introducing Zack Yassin
00:01:56
How is LA a better music scene than Toronto?
00:03:03
How has technology impacted the music indsutry?
00:03:55
How did Zack learn to connect with artists globally?
00:04:51
Talent versus hardwork: the truth.
00:06:09
How has collaboration impacted music today versus the past?
00:07:20
Has technology made it more competitive?
00:08:59
Talk of first songs Zack ever released
00:10:22
Favourite and least favourite things about the music industry
00:12:34
The process of being the creative director of Taizu's latest album
00:15:05
Is telling a story important to albums?
00:16:03
Diversity in music and the importance of having someone to look up to
00:17:18
What does it mean to "mix and master"?
00:18:40
What is the most fun and difficult part of making a song?
00:21:51
What is the best way to deal with creative differences?
00:23:45
What is your creative process?
00:25:48
Rapid fire round: wine, motorcycles, and Star Wars!
Float or Founder Podcast
Float or Founder: Episode 2 - Zack Yassin
Jun 03, 2019 Season 1 Episode 2
Float or Founder Recording, Inc.
We sit down at home with Zack Yassin, Creative Director of Taizu’s latest album who talks about the Toronto versus LA music scene, diversity in music, and how the music industry is today.
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

We sit down at home with Zack Yassin, Creative Director of Taizu’s latest album. Zack talks about the Toronto versus LA music scene, diversity in music, and how the music industry is today.

Yes, you can hear our dogs in the background. 

Check out Taizu's new album! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpBs3XYA9Ag&app=desktop



Support the show

Samantha Lloyd:
0:00
Hey everyone! We want to welcome you to the Float or Founder podcast. This is a Toronto based podcast featuring local founders across all markets. We are your hosts, Samantha Lloyd...
Lisen Kaci:
0:10
And Lisen Kaci. We're going to be bringing you interviews with exciting and hardworking founders. They will be sharing their experience, creating and leading a company.
:
0:19
Thanks for listening.
Lisen Kaci:
0:20
Hello, Lisen Kaci here with Float or Founder. I'm here with Samantha. And Creative Director, Zack Yassin.
Zack Yassin:
0:27
Hello.
Samantha Lloyd:
0:30
So Zack - are you happy to be here?
Zack Yassin:
0:32
I'm very happy to be here!
Samantha Lloyd:
0:33
We are very excited to have you. Thank you for coming down to Toronto today.
Zack Yassin:
0:37
Oh, no problem.
Samantha Lloyd:
0:38
So, I heard you just got back from LA.
Zack Yassin:
0:40
Yes, I did. Indeed.
Samantha Lloyd:
0:41
And do you want to talk about what happened there and maybe tell us a bit about what you're up to right now?
Zack Yassin:
0:47
Okay. I could do that. What I was down there for is I'm currently working with this artist named a Taizu. He's a rapper from Philadelphia. I recently executive produced his debut album, which isn't out yet (side note: at the time of recording it was not released but it has officially been released as of May 31 2019), but the first single just came out March 15th. It's called Practice.
Samantha Lloyd:
1:07
It's the perfect car jam!
Zack Yassin:
1:09
It is, it's a good jam. And so yeah, like I said before I executive produced the record, I came up with the album cover. I kind of help create ideas of what a video should look look like and things like that. And so we were just down there in LA, now that the album was done, mixed, mastered, setting up meetings. We set up a bunch of meetings with labels and other people to try to pitch the music to them.
Lisen Kaci:
1:37
So Zack, you just came back from LA and a lot of your relationships in the music industry have come out of LA. How would you say that that's a kind of a better scene for the music industry than Toronto?
Zack Yassin:
1:49
Well, I don't know if I would say it's better. I mean that's just because I'm a Toronto fan. I love it here. I am a Drake fan, the 6ix and so on. You know, it just, the energy out there is insane. Like you can just walk into a restaurant and there's, you know, some director over there and a songwriter over here and people just want to make something. They want to be creative. And that's something that's really beautiful that's down there that Toronto doesn't have yet, but it's building here. That's one of my goals for my career is to build that here in Toronto. That's why I've always said I never want to move to LA as much as I love it there, and the sun, and the warmth and the energy there. I want to bring that up here, like so many of the biggest artists today have been doing And I just want to continue building that. But it just so happens, as it's been for years, you know, everyone is down there. But that is changing now that the industry is changing. It's different.
Lisen Kaci:
2:56
Do you also think that technology and the ability for us to connect almost immediately with those people all over the world has changed that?
Zack Yassin:
3:04
Exactly. No, that's exactly right. I mean, for instance, I record a lot of music in my bedroom and I work with musicians from across the world. THis one singer I have on maybe six of my songs, she's from Argentina and we just connected online. I've never met her in person, but we've collaborated closely on a lot of things. One of my old collaborations, this guy named Phoenix Keys is based out of the UK. Never met him, but we've worked on a lot of stuff. So that's, yeah, that's exactly how the industry is going. You don't need to be specifically in New York or LA or wherever. You just need to know how to access the right people and find your team.
Samantha Lloyd:
3:49
How did you learn how to do that? How did you learn that that was part of the process - reaching out to people across the world?
Zack Yassin:
3:56
Um, I would just say out of desperation (laughs). You guys know, because we've known each other for a long time, it's been years and years of searching for people around here, working with local artists. You reach a certain point when, you know, you're lucky if you find a team right around you where you're from, you're very lucky and I had to expand that search because I wasn't finding what I needed here. So yeah, it was out of just desperation of: I need to work, I need to find people to better myself and my craft and I just so happened to find it all over the world rather than at home.
Lisen Kaci:
4:42
Would you say that being able to push through a lot of hardship, would you say that is one of the most important things in making it in the music industry?
Zack Yassin:
4:51
I would say that's the most important thing. I said this before to many other people. I don't believe in talent. I don't. That just won't cut it. I've met so many artists who have the most beautiful voice, they can play any instrument. They're much better than me at singing, writing, producing, whatever. But they don't have the drive that it takes to work past everyone and anyone around you. That's what it takes. Like I, I've just seen it. Proof is myself, I can't sing. But a lot of people ask me to write their songs for them and their melodies because I'm just working so hard at that one thing, and it's so key. It's the only thing that has gotten me to where I am is grinding. I don't think any of it has been talent. That's just the very first step is you having talent. Okay. That maybe gives you some access, but that's barely anything. You need to be outworking everyone.
Lisen Kaci:
5:55
So, I noticed that a lot of songs nowadays are a lot of collaborations and you were talking about how a lot of the music that you make is in collaboration with a lot of people. So would you say that's been a change lately in the music industry where it's a lot more important to work with others than it has been in the past?
Zack Yassin:
6:10
So it's just more evident today. It's always been like this, back to Frank Sinatra. He never wrote a song. It was a room full of five, ten writers. It was a room of an entire orchestra laying down the music he was singing to. Now it's just now that everyone has access, everyone has the same access, everyone has the same laptop, everyone wants credit. So now you know who produced that beat, you know who played the drums or whatever. And now what you're seeing is rather than there being the head Honcho, the artist, the true artists, the Frank Sinatra, you're seeing that producers are now the artist, as well, because they have that access. That's just where the industry has gone it's so open to everyone that you don't need to look a certain way or sound a certain way because you can just write a song, find a collaboration and do it. But it's always been there.
Samantha Lloyd:
7:14
Has [that] made it more competitive for you or do you think that it's only brought good?
Zack Yassin:
7:19
It is, I would say it is more competitive because everyone's making a beat. Anyone that's making music in their bedroom right now
Lisen Kaci:
7:30
You would say the barrier to entry to making music is lower.
Zack Yassin:
7:34
Yeah. It's way lower. Anyone can do it and a lot of people luck out and get a big song right away. But naturally I believe that that Kinda like, it's stays relatively the same. Uh, naturally those people who, that even though there are more people who have access and more people who are working at it, it'll always be the same amount of people who are working that just extra little bit.
Samantha Lloyd:
8:01
Okay. And to kind of switch gears, do you want to take us back to when you started in this whole process?
Zack Yassin:
8:08
I mean, technically I wrote my first song when I think I was 14. I started playing piano when I was 14. I was just writing every day, tons and tons of music and I don't write like that anymore. It was kind of me just like figuring out what I'm doing. And then I think I was 17 when I recorded like my, it was like my first professional recording, in an actual recording studio and I mean it's on SoundCloud, but I don't want anyone to hear it. (laughs)
Samantha Lloyd:
8:42
(laughs) We're linking it!
Lisen Kaci:
8:47
There's something when you start a business called the MVP and it's always said if you're not embarrassed when you launched it, you launched too late. I guess for a mixed day it could be similar.
Zack Yassin:
9:01
That's so true. Like, I mean, there's probably a thousand songs of mine recorded somewhere that are just so bad. So awful. I had no idea what I was doing. I wasn't...it's... I's given me PTSD thinking about it! (laughs)
Samantha Lloyd:
9:22
Your idea of bad in music is definitely not our definition of bad.
Zack Yassin:
9:22
Right. But it, I mean, it took me years of that because you need to do that to become a good songwriter.
Lisen Kaci:
9:30
Yeah. It's only a mistake if you don't learn from it.
Zack Yassin:
9:33
Exactly. When I was younger, I would look back at all those songs and I would be angry because I was like, they didn't get me anywhere. They're horrible songs. But in hindsight, now that I'm a bit older, I can see like every one of those songs helped build what I'm able to do today and from not just the writing component, but I realized what I didn't even know when I was younger. I was also producing those songs myself. And then I learned how to mic a piano or mic someone singing. I learned how to do all of that. Then I realized, Oh, I'm actually coming up with music, video ideas and album art ideas. And that's what creative directing is. I just didn't know that was the job title yet. It couldn't have happened any other way - it needed to go this way.
Lisen Kaci:
10:17
Cool. What would you say is your favorite and least favorite things about the music industry?
Zack Yassin:
10:23
It's just... The music. I mean, I just love being creative. It's not just about songwriting for me, it's everything. And eventually it won't just be the music industry. For me, it's going to be film, it's going to be technology, it's going to be everything. But with music, I just love the art form. It's the thing, the first thing I ever found, that I could relate to. It's the first thing that made sense to me. I was never good in school. I struggled a lot, but when it came to music, I was like, oh, that just makes sense. It's just easy. That's how everyone, a lot of people, feel about music. Just the creativity I feel and the feeling you get after you write a good song and record it. There's nothing better than that. That's my favorite thing. But my least favorite thing... I can go on forever about my least favourite thing. But my least favorite thing, it's just so...
Samantha Lloyd:
11:21
The politics?
Zack Yassin:
11:22
Yeah, just like any job, really, the politics. There's what record labels think they are today. It's changing - record labels know they're failing. But they feel like you need to be a certain way, you need to make a certain type of music. You need to keep up a certain appearance on social media. I hate that stuff. I don't like social media anything. It's a joke to me. I don't take it very seriously because I think it should be the music. I understand why it's there. I work a lot with social media and marketing through there, but ultimately I don't like it. I just want it to be music.
Samantha Lloyd:
12:06
[Social media] is just the fluff around it. Do you want to talk about the process around being the executive producer on the latest album by Taizu?
Zack Yassin:
12:13
Right. So, the way that came about, yeah? I actually want to talk about this on a platform like this too, because I didn't know Taizu. I didn't even meet him. I emailed him in October. That was the first time I communicated with him. The way I heard his music was my buddy, Jay down in LA, hadn't met Taizu before. He kept on telling me, oh this guy is an incredible rapper, listen to his music. One day when I was down there in October in LA I asked Jay to send me all of Zu's music like from his finished songs to his work in progress demos and in that one day I listened to everything. There was supposed to be an EP of four songs that was coming out. And when I heard all those songs, I naturally just heard a story.
Zack Yassin:
13:08
I took a few songs in the work in progress folder we have, I took some finished tracks and I said, this feels like an album to me. It feels like a body of work rather than an EP or a single or whatever. And that's how it began. And I didn't ask anyone for permission for this. That's key to this.
Samantha Lloyd:
13:31
Ask for forgiveness.
Zack Yassin:
13:32
Exactly. I listened to all the songs. I wrote out an email of like, this is what I feel should be done. This is an album to me. These are the singles, this is how it should look. And it's history from there. As soon as I sent that, I was part of the team and that was the beginning of the process of executive producer. After that, it turned into, okay, how do I get this mixed and mastered? How do I finalize this project? But before that I had to make sure each song was elevated to the best. An executive producer doesn't necessarily make the beats from scratch. I didn't make a single beat from scratch on this album - two other producers made most of the music. This guy, Rishi and this other guy, Rush, great, great guys, great producers. I would take their beats and they, I'm so thankful for these guys, they gave me permission, they trusted me with their music and let me tweak things, elevate things, add additional instrumentation to get it to a point where I believed it was great. That's the executive producer's job is just making sure everything is as great as it can be.
Lisen Kaci:
14:52
Awesome. Cool. You were talking about how you felt the album told a story. How important would you say that is to music in general? And Tell us what made his story stand out to you.
Zack Yassin:
15:05
So everyone in the music industry, the business people, will tell you albums don't mean anything anymore. It's all about singles. That's how it's been and I just strongly disagree. My favorite artists, my favorite musicians, have bodies work like Kendrick Lamar
Lisen Kaci:
15:23
J Cole.
Zack Yassin:
15:24
J. Cole. I've listened to music forever. It's like I just appreciate the body of work and I think that's important for every artist that has lasted through the years. It's about their bodies of work. It's not about just one single. You're not listening to like the one Drake single from 10 years ago. I just want to create bodies of work that what's really important to me. And when I heard Zu's music, I just heard a story that actually reminded me of the first time I listened to a Drake album. I heard a cohesive body of work, with an intro and outro, little interludes in the middle and whatever.
Speaker 2:
16:00
And the thing that struck me about him is, you'll hear it soon enough, but as you guys know, he's an Indian artist, Indian-American. I've never met or seen another Indian guy, a guy who looks like me, making that quality of music. I really felt when I saw him and I heard his music, I feel like this is the beginning of a movement for people who look like me. I've told you guys, I've told everyone I know, I didn't grow up with anyone I could relate to or who I could look up to and be like, that's what I want to be. Noo one was creative who looked like me and that's what Zu can be for a lot of people. And that's what I saw as like, okay, this guy doesn't only just have these party songs, like the single we just put out, Practice. He has like heartfelt soulful music about things that anyone can relate to, songs that reminded me of Drake. The random B-Side songs that like make you feel like you know who Drake is. That's what I heard when I heard Zu's music and I was like, I need to be involved somehow.
Samantha Lloyd:
17:11
And I'm going to ask a silly question. What the heck does that mean to mix and master?
Zack Yassin:
17:18
(laughs) Okay. So, to simplify both of these things. To mix is to take all these recorded instruments. They're never real instruments anymore. But say you're recording a rock band, it's taking the guitars, the bass, the drums, the vocals, and then making sure everything sits together perfectly. Just making sure the puzzle sits well together. I mean that's as simple as you can get. And mastering to simplify that, is just making it loud, which I don't like just saying that. What mastering used to be, it used to be the process of how do you get this music we recorded on tape and turn it into a vinyl? How do you mass produce this tape and put it onto a disc? But that's what it used to be back in the day, which it blows my mind how that was even a thing. How do these people think of that? To take music from tape and put - I don't know. But yeah, to simplify it makes it loud and projects the sonics. So it feels full when you hear it. You can hear a mix and it could sound full, but a master sounds like it's radio ready after it's mastered.
Lisen Kaci:
18:31
Yeah. Very cool. What would you say is the most difficult part of making a song and what's the most fun part?
Zack Yassin:
18:41
So, the most difficult part is finishing a song. Period. I can't tell you like how many songs that have that it's just like one chord progression and maybe like a verse or one line. That's just how it goes.
Samantha Lloyd:
18:56
I think that's consistent in every business.
Zack Yassin:
18:59
In everything it's exactly that, right. And it's hard to stay in it. I mean this is also part of the skill of being a songwriter is to stay that emotion or to be able to access that emotion later on. That's something you have to build if you want to be a great songwriter. I know a few who are great at that. That's probably the most difficult part. And the best thing about... What was the other question?
Lisen Kaci:
19:27
What's your favorite thing about writing a song?
Zack Yassin:
19:28
My favorite thing is just, I mean, it's a cliche, but it really is therapy. You guys know me, too. I talk a lot about everything that's going on in my life, like from the good and bad and the ugly. I always talk about that stuff and songwriting and taught me that. No one taught me that. But I was writing things down into music and I was like, why can't I? And for me it became a philosophy of, if I'm saying this in a song and I want people to hear it, why can't we just talk about anything openly like that? So, that's my favorite thing, communication is my favorite thing in the world. A lot of people rely on music to express their feelings. I feel like not everyone does this, but I feel like people should. You don't need a song to communicate your full emotion. You can just talk to people. People should know that, but I mean, music helps.
Samantha Lloyd:
20:28
People rely on music to kind of express their feelings.
Zack Yassin:
20:31
Even in my older productions. My buddy Kevin Deets could tell you like, I would layer, I'd write a song and the production on there would be all the tracks. There'd be like hundreds of tracks on one song. And to me, it was more of like a kind of working on myself thing where I realized like I was insecure about what I was saying. So I was covering it with all this production. I was over-producing it, adding all these different layers just to keep it interesting because I wasn't secure in what I was saying. And that's part of the songwriting too. You need to be confident in what you're saying, your lyrics. Something I'm working on today in production is simplifying everything. Instead of 120 tracks, Zu's entire album is maybe 15 tracks the most in one session. Practice very simple song production-wise but it gets a message across and it gets an energy across which, uh, to me that's the skill of songwriting and producing. It's that.
Lisen Kaci:
21:41
As a transition, what would you say is the best way to deal with creative differences when you're working on a project with people?
Zack Yassin:
21:50
So, that's a good question. I would say the best thing, again, it's communicate. Like we're all adults here, we're all, you know, professionals. The way I handle it personally is I'll just say, this is why I don't like that and here are the reasons why, or, let's build off that, it's not quite there yet. Let's kind of grow together. Sometimes that's worked, sometimes the person is down to be like, okay, you're right, let's collaborate. Let's elevate what we're doing. Sometimes it doesn't, and I mean, I'm victim of that too. I do the same thing. The best thing to do with creative differences is just communicate. There's always a way around it, a compromise. And if you're in charge, sometimes you have to be like, you know what? No, I know this is the right thing to do, trust me and hopefully the people you work with, the team you're around does trust you. For instance, for like this album, there were a few songs on there where I would add a few things or changed the arrangement and even Zu as well as the producers were unsure of what I was doing. But I was like, listen, trust me, this is going to be the best thing. And I explained why, I would obviously base it off reasoning. It's not just based off feeling, I have reasoning behind it and at the end of the day they did trust me and now that the music is done, they're really happy with how everything sounds.
Lisen Kaci:
23:32
Awesome. I was going say, can you talk to us a little bit about your entire creative process from fresh, like no tracks laid out, to a finished song?
Zack Yassin:
23:46
Right. So, this continues to grow and everyone, every songwriter, any creative person will tell you it's always different. Now that my role has kind of evolved from building something from scratch, I kind of take the base, the baseline and grow it. By the way, first it all begins in the songwriting process, like with a piano or guitar or something. For me I feel like any song should be, if it's a good song, it should sound good with just a piano and your melody when we're talking about pop. Not rap, rap is different, but for pop it's like, you need your melody and just one instrument. It needs to be strong. Once you do that, once I do that, I would like go in and open up a session and usually by then as I'm writing. I can hear what it needs to sound like from the drum sounds to the piano, to the synthesizers. That's also a skill you learn over time. Especially if you know your toolkit, you know all the tools in front of you. Then it's quick. So if I write a song on, on my piano, I'll know the tempo and the drum pattern I want, I'll quickly go into pro tools, I'll open up the exact instruments I hear in my head that I know I have already and start building from there. Once I open pro tools, it could be anything. Usually I lay down, I find the tempo and then I lay down the main chord progression and then I build off that. Once I have a bass track, I'll have a singer come over and lay down of rough vocal for me because I cannot sing. And then once I have a rough vocal, I continue to build the track then the melodies. So once you have the, that rough vocal there, you can finish the track. Once you finish the track you get a real vocal on it. And then the mix/masters, so on.
Samantha Lloyd:
25:48
Cool. We can take it away.
Lisen Kaci:
25:49
Rapid fire.
Samantha Lloyd:
25:51
What is your favorite piece of clothing that you own?
Zack Yassin:
25:54
I have this song out under my own artist's name called, She Was. It's the only song I have out under my artist name just because I can't imagine anyone else singing it. So, that song I shot a video for it LA and then I had this whole idea of - it was a lyric video so I wanted the lyrics to be projected on the back of this jean jacket. But instead it turned into us making this jean jacket from scratch. I even have like the album cover of the single on like on the side of the jacket. I geek out about it everyday. When I was in San Francisco last week, I was like looking at, I was with my buddy Mitch and we were looking at a wedding venues together cause he just got engaged recently. We go to this one place, this beautiful mansion in the hills and these two event planners or whatever. As soon as I walk in, they're like what is that jacket? Where do I get one? I need it, I'm going to steal it from you. They actually got my email to email me to be like, can I buy this jacket it off you, please. So that felt good because I made that from scratch.
Lisen Kaci:
27:09
How many tattoos do you have?
Lisen Kaci:
27:11
Oh, uh, ne, two, three, four, five. I have five. That's all you need to know. I'm going to get a sixth one soon to celebrate the completion of the Zu album going. It's going to be awesome. Do you know what you're going to get? Yes. It's based on this one song. My favorite song, maybe of all time, on the album called Storyteller, which I am actually, I don't know Zu would want me to say this, but I'm directing the music video for that, which is very cool. It's an honor, it's a privilege. It's my favorite song and it's based off that. I can't do it justice without you guys hearing the song, but it's something to do with that song and it's going to be on my arm.
Lisen Kaci:
27:51
What's your favorite type of food right now?
Zack Yassin:
27:56
Sushi...? Sushi, maybe. I guess, I always fall back on sushi. You know, like anytime I'm craving anything, it's always sushi.
Samantha Lloyd:
28:07
Yeah, like an all you can eat, shove it your face sushi.
Zack Yassin:
28:08
Never not all you can eat.
Samantha Lloyd:
28:13
We don't understand people who don't eat all you can eat!
Lisen Kaci:
28:14
I don't eat until I'm full. I eat until I hate myself.
Zack Yassin:
28:19
Exactly! Exactly.
Lisen Kaci:
28:21
What was the last movie you saw?
Zack Yassin:
28:24
I watched, I started on the plane. I was watching A Star is Born and then it got too sad, but it was the second time I saw it. And it's even worse on a plane. I'm always crying on planes, in the corner, like, oh my God! My life! Yeah. So, A Star is Born.
Lisen Kaci:
28:42
What's the last song you listened to?
Zack Yassin:
28:45
Oh, I was listening to a song called my bed by Khalid.
Samantha Lloyd:
28:50
Where's your favorite spot in Toronto?
Zack Yassin:
28:52
It'll either be your place right here or my buddy Joe's place.
Lisen Kaci:
28:57
Wine or beer?
Zack Yassin:
28:58
Easy. Wine. I've never even had a beer.
Samantha Lloyd:
29:02
Talk about your first wine experience!
Zack Yassin:
29:04
Should I? Okay. So, I only started drinking last August, I'll tell the story of, yeah, like I was in New Zealand. Period. I was on this island called Waiheke Island. The only thing on here is just, just wineries and art stuff and things that I would love, bougie things. I was on top of a very beautiful hill at this place called Stone Ridge. I had my first wine tasting there and this beautiful Italian girl was doing the tasting with us. She was like, if you guys know anything about a wine, please tell me. She was so passionate about wine that I was like, oh my God, I think I'm in love with you. Because she's like, if you know anything, please tell me because I need to know everything. She moved to New Zealand just to learn about New Zealand wines. And she was the first person to tell me about all this wine I drank. The first glass I had was like, I didn't pay $800 for it, but it was from an $800 bottle of wine and... My bougie life began!
Lisen Kaci:
30:17
Coffee or tea?
Zack Yassin:
30:20
Usually neither. But tea if I have to choose.
Samantha Lloyd:
30:22
What's your favorite place you've ever been to?
Zack Yassin:
30:24
New Zealand, probably. That's the most beautiful place I've seen.
Samantha Lloyd:
30:30
What are you most excited for this year?
Zack Yassin:
30:32
I'm excited for like just waking up tomorrow, and the next day and the next day. It's very difficult to answer that question because there are so many things I'm excited for. This year, like everything I've worked for, my entire life, is coming to fruition, so I'm going to say touring and just making music and directing music videos and creating art and buying a motorcycle and seeing the world.
Samantha Lloyd:
31:00
When did you get your M license?
Zack Yassin:
31:03
I got that I last year, last November, I think it was last November. It feels like a long time ago now. It was at least a year ago. Could be two.
Lisen Kaci:
31:15
Android or iPhone?
Zack Yassin:
31:15
So, that's a difficult question, too. I have an android but I am a laughing stock in LA. Everyone just laughs at me, points and laughs. I'm walking down the street on my phone, people stop and stare and be like, you're a freak. (laughs) Like no one has even heard of an android in LA. Everyone has a brand new iPhone 10 X or whatever it's called. And I probably should get one because I also have an old iPod touch that I still listen to music on.
Lisen Kaci:
31:46
It's a business expense at this point!
Zack Yassin:
31:48
I know, I know.
Lisen Kaci:
31:49
If you couldn't do music, what else would you do?
Zack Yassin:
31:53
Well I guess there's a few answers. I think I want to be a life coach. I want to life coach people, I feel like I'd be good at this. Like just someone who doesn't have a job, life coaching corporate people. That idea makes me laugh.
Lisen Kaci:
32:08
I love that. (laughs)
Zack Yassin:
32:09
So there's that. I guess like my side hustle has always been like acting. Which was wild, like this why my life is too crazy right now. Like, that's my side hustle? Acting in TV shows and movies?
Samantha Lloyd:
32:21
Where you're messaging on SnapChat on set at 4AM!
Zack Yassin:
32:27
Yeah. So I guess that, but I also love teaching. I'd love to open up, this is one of my goals still to this day, regardless of music or not, I want to open a school for music to teach kids how I learned music. Not specifically learn the theory first. These are the levels you go through. But like, what's your favorite song? Let's learn that on piano. Oh, see that cord, that's what you play. That's actually a C Major Seven chord. Learn through that so you don't get bored and you're not a kid being like, I don't want to write down notes, things like that.
Lisen Kaci:
33:07
What's your favorite car?
Zack Yassin:
33:09
Favorite car? Ferrari 458.
Lisen Kaci:
33:11
Your favorite movie of all time?
Zack Yassin:
33:13
I'm just going to say all Star Wars ever.
Samantha Lloyd:
33:16
Can you name any of the movies that you've been in recently?
Zack Yassin:
33:21
Um, I honestly can't even remember half the names. (laughs)
Samantha Lloyd:
33:26
(laughs) Look at you!
Zack Yassin:
33:27
I was in this show called Titans on Netflix. I was on the show called Umbrella Academy. The one I'm most excited for is like, there's that movie, What We Do In The Shadows. They're making a TV series of it, and I'm in that playing Bass Guitar. I'm in a Ska band.
Samantha Lloyd:
33:45
All right. That's it! So thank you for coming out to us. We were so happy to host you and get to learn more about your history in music.
Zack Yassin:
33:58
Well, thanks for having me guys!
Lisen Kaci:
34:00
Thank you so much for telling us what it takes to make it in the music biz.
Samantha Lloyd:
34:05
We wanted to thank you so much for coming in. We had such a great time interviewing you for Float or Founder.
Samantha Lloyd:
34:10
And thank you so much to our listeners. We are so excited to share more founder stories with you.
:
34:15
Until next time!
Introducing Zack Yassin
How is LA a better music scene than Toronto?
How has technology impacted the music indsutry?
How did Zack learn to connect with artists globally?
Talent versus hardwork: the truth.
How has collaboration impacted music today versus the past?
Has technology made it more competitive?
Talk of first songs Zack ever released
Favourite and least favourite things about the music industry
The process of being the creative director of Taizu's latest album
Is telling a story important to albums?
Diversity in music and the importance of having someone to look up to
What does it mean to "mix and master"?
What is the most fun and difficult part of making a song?
What is the best way to deal with creative differences?
What is your creative process?
Rapid fire round: wine, motorcycles, and Star Wars!
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