Sustaining Creation - Now!

Story of Remarkable Time To Be Alive (without news segment)

November 12, 2019
Sustaining Creation - Now!
Story of Remarkable Time To Be Alive (without news segment)
Chapters
Sustaining Creation - Now!
Story of Remarkable Time To Be Alive (without news segment)
Nov 12, 2019
Terry Gallagher
What can we learn from our life experiences in this remarkable time to be alive that would move us to embrace a sustainable future for our kid.
Show Notes Transcript

What can we learn from our life experiences in this remarkable time to be alive that would move us to embrace a sustainable future for our kid.

Note this particular episode is abbreviated in that it does not include the news segment. 



Support the show

Speaker 1:
0:05
[inaudible]
Speaker 2:
0:05
our story this week is entitled. This is surely a remarkable time to be alive. And it comes from my pondering after hearing a broadcast about the 21 children that are suing the federal government over denying them the right, because we're not responding to climate crisis. And there was something that one of the mothers said, one of the kids, she was Reverend Melanie Oman, and she said this was an extraordinary time to be alive. And by that she meant that at no other time in human history has immense so much what our actions and our decisions are of the next few years in terms of whether human civilization will continue. So I've been pondering that and I've moved from the term extra Arie time rather to using the term remarkable. One of the reasons is extraordinary is one of the synonyms were remarkable, remarkable. Connotates a little bit more. If you look in the dictionary, it says it's something worthy of attention.
Speaker 2:
0:58
It's striking. It's used in such like a remarkable coincidence, but it's got synonyms of extraordinary, exceptional, amazing, astonishing, astounding hour. And the list goes on and on and on. But what it also connotates to me is that this will be a time that future generations will back upon and remark on how well or how bad we did to make their future livable. It's a B era of time or future generations where we marked that we were very brave and we acted and we sacrificed to that they would have a future where they will remark we were evil indeed. So to tackle this weighty subject to just how remarkable of a time it is, I want to tell you story about my shoulder that seems like a silly thing to attribute to, but it's kind of like a metaphor for these time. So the story, my shoulder goes back a few decades, almost 30 years and it has to involve with a time when I was a scout for my son's troop.
Speaker 2:
1:55
And so we were very active troop. I would take them out camping every month, but they were also into other activities. And so one of the things I love to do when we're camping, when they had free time, was poorly captured a flyer, which is a non aggressive form of a war game played without weapons. But they, the older Scouts wanted to take it up a notch besides wearing camouflage that they did and you know, decorating their faces and all that in order to capture the enemy's firing. They got involved in other activities outside Scouts, which involve pink ball flights and a after me and after me to take them to a paint ball facility. And so I finally relented. And so do you know if you're going to keep older boys involved in these things, you've got to understand their interests. And so I took him to this paint ball facility, what was in actually an old warehouse in downtown Detroit and management and an old automotive pine.
Speaker 2:
2:48
It might even have been the old Dodge mean. Anyway, a company had taken over it and rented a facility and per a, she, you could run equipment and engage in a, an elaborate paint ball battle. And so, you know, I was dubious about this, but I didn't want the boys who go down there by themselves. And so I and another assistant scout master went and took the odor boys down to this and we rented our goggles. You gotta have goggles to protect your eyes from the paint balls and you have to run a paintball gun of course, which is a gas powered gun that shoots a paint ball Projecto and use pink balls. So you can obviously see that somebody was hit or not hit. And my Scouts were decked out in all kinds of camouflage and ways to hide themselves. And I was just therapy in a goofy old Scoutmaster watching all this go on.
Speaker 2:
3:35
But they pulled me into it and I wouldn't let them go out in the facility and engage in these games unless I could see what would happen here. And the only way to do that was to actually participate. So I run in my goggles, I run into my paint ball gun and I got a supply, a pink balls. And what I rented was, I thought it was a typical equipment for today, which was a single shot paintball gun yarn. And you get one shot and then you have to load it up and you get one shot, you have to load it up. And so we went out and we are all engaged in excited chatter about what a fun day it was going to be in a old warehouse was set up with barricades to mega look. I like an urban street fighting. So or kind of thing.
Speaker 2:
4:15
And you know, we were walking through it and sneaking through it and trying to be, you know, unobtrusive and, and practicing shooting at each other or things, you know, and would come around this corner and up from this, behind this one, barricade comes a group of guys and they are automatic weapons. I didn't know that there were automatic paintball guns, but there were automatic weapons and they fired us and they stung. And so to protect myself, I'd go behind a concrete pillar, but Oh great fear and trepidation. And I responded so fast that I didn't do it very well. In fact, I collided with that concrete pillar on my way down and found out as an engineer I knew already, but had to find out physically when a shoulder meets a concrete pillar, the pillar isn't what gives your shoulder does. So I messed up my shoulder pretty good and I had to sit out the rest of the day.
Speaker 2:
5:06
But you know, we came all that way. I let the guys enjoy their day and then we left and I kept my shoulder, my arm kind of tucked into my stomach so that it wasn't moving. And I get home and the wife says, what in the world did you do to yourself and an ad and nothing, nothing. You know, I grew up at a time when males tried to minimize and the stupid things they'd done and minimize the damage that they caused by brushing it off the shoulder. Just kept Aiken and swollen and being a pain. And that intensified. And so the wife was concerned to the point when I wouldn't listen to her. She brought over an assistance account mentor of mine who is also a nursing hospital. And between them they managed to significantly instill me with the fear of what terrible things could hae happening if I had broken something in my shoulder and I did not seek treatment.
Speaker 2:
5:55
So reluctantly I and I went to the local emergency room and I sat out there for an hour and four day finally took the in and then they got me into an extra area and are set for another hour and they came out with the pronouncement that nothing was broken. I breathed a sigh relief, my stupidity at least in brig, anything. But then they added a comment that you really ought to go see your primary physician. I didn't have a primary reposition because I'm a male that doesn't like doctors. And he said, but you really ought to consider getting evaluated by an orthopedic specialist to make sure nothing else is going on in the shoulder. I said, okay. Right. And then they gave me a sling and I wore it home and I immediately ignore their vice and I treated a shoulder injury just like I do all my old sprains and all that from all the sports with some ice.
Speaker 2:
6:40
And then some heat treatments and then an occasional ibuprofen and after a few weeks we showed a regained its function. I was able to use it. And so I put that advice to seek an orthopedics specialist's opinion and treatment because well life has too many other concerns and priorities and so you know, I manage that crisis. It was over. I could get on with everything else and just forget about anything else. What I failed to fail to realize at the time was to acute versus chronic recycle. Yo, there are two broad classifications of health hazards or any hazards really and they're called chronic and acute. Acute are the things that affect you right now and the chronic are the things that develop over years and years and years. And so I had suggested we handled the acute hazard and so like most human beings, once I handled the acute, I didn't manage to pay any attention to the risk of the chronic.
Speaker 2:
7:31
And so the shoulder never did get treated because well, you know, life is busy. There's too many other concerns and priorities and we needed to move on around the same time as happening on my shoulders. Something was happening in Washington D C up on Capitol Hill and that was the climate scientist James Hansen. The leading climate scientists of our generation was testifying for the first time to Congress and what he testified was starting in 1988 James Hansen testified to Congress a climate change is real, it's human cause and we have to respond with urgency because it's already escalated to the point where they can physically measuring it happening in a general public momentary response. Once I saw that a news was, what did that guy say? What's this about? Climate change. But then shortly after that new cycle was back to nevermind what he said, cause his wife has too many other concerns and priorities and if it isn't biting us right now, we can ignore it because surely if it's not an acute problem, then it's not a problem.
Speaker 2:
8:29
Over the following decades, scientific warnings continued to escalate and it continued to be ignored by American public. No, for at least the next 20 years they weren't ignored around the world and in fact there were global actions trying to reach a consensus that took place in Japan and it took place in South America, but effectively each time that it was coming close to reaching a global decision to take action on climate change, it was the government to shut it down because we weren't going to let our economic wellbeing be dictated to by other countries over something that we could not see this whole global warming hoax as it was called at the time, seven years ago in 2012 I finally awakened myself to the climate issue as a result of my trip to Columbia and being shocked at seeing a village of people who were poisoning themselves, trying to mind gold and eke out a living and not realizing or not caring or not considering at any depth that what they were doing was poisoning their minds and bodies and waters and air and soil.
Speaker 2:
9:34
And so I came away from that. Reflecting on it, I realized it wasn't a problem, a one village polluting forever, a small area of this globe. It was the fact that our civilization, particularly our modern civilization, was just destroying the life systems of the earth. So since 2012 my ministry has been entirely focused on awakening people to this crisis. Oh, that's returned to my shoulder. Yeah, that story of my shoulder now, over the years I would get aches and pains and, and I could treat it with, you know, some rest. And in a little ibuprofen before five years ago, my shoulder began to cause me periodic episodes of trouble. You know, where my movement would be limited or it would ache and pain. I couldn't sleep well. So being the typical male and trying to avoid doctors, I'd tried some stretching exercises and I asked my daughter who's a PTA, if she had any ideas, she gave me some stretches that I could do.
Speaker 2:
10:27
And my wife, the nurse said, well, if you're not going to do anything else, at least treat it with the hot and cold pack treatment. And so I would do that and still kept that male stubbornness over medical treatment. I could move past out temporary issue or where to shoulder wasn't flamed and get back to normal life, but uh, episodes and frequency of it kept increasing. So I did Moro exercises. I did, uh, occasional ibuprofen when the last couple of years. It escalated to be a constant issue rather than a periodic issue where the pain in my shoulder would limit its mobility to the point that my arm was only functioning at about 30% of what it would normally do. Oh, I finally got about raising the question when my primary care physician, who over the last few years, my wife has gotten me to go to on a couple of times a year basis and I said, Hey doc, if were to look at the shoulder problem I got, what would be the process?
Speaker 2:
11:18
And of course once you raise it with a primary care, especially one that dojo in his mind, air hold the barn doors, here we go. Because right away he ordered me into an X Ray to assess if he could see anything with an x-ray. He needed an extended physical examination, which involved quite a bit of pain in determining just what were the emotional limits and the, and from that he sent me to an orthopedic specialist who then ordered more tests. There were MRIs and then there was a CT exam and that led to and another orthopedic specialist, his time of surgeon. And here comes the diagnosis that an I now a total shoulder replacement, but there are complications to it because I have procrastinated too long to respond to the damage. And as a result that chronic condition is to back over into the acute where because I've ignored the issue, the arm is no longer being able to function.
Speaker 2:
12:11
The good news is, and notice three decades, our technologies rapidly improved in terms of medical technology and so they took that CT scan, which I had, which can measure precisely internal body elements and they sent it via the internet, which did not exist when I was young. They sent that scan, which was not possible until the last couple of decades over to Germany and there's a German lab that is using the CT scan to give them the dimensions to design the parts that have to go into my shoulder. Amazing technology technologies that did not exist before. In fact, a surgical procedure did not exist in this country until 20 years ago and now you know I'm going to be facing, we are living in a remarkable time, not just for medical investment technologies, but also for energy advancement technologies. So just like I'm going to benefit from the advancements in medical technology to rebuild my shoulder.
Speaker 2:
13:09
We have benefits that we can extract where we use the wind or the sun or the ocean or the ground or gravity or waves or tides. A plethora of things we can draw energy from. The do not pollute at do not heat up to go. We just have to choose who are just so I could with my shoulder. You have to choose to use the technology to the benefit. It's truly a remarkable time we're living in right now. Right? It's remarkable. Not just in terms of advancements, technological where it's remarkable because some of the life's historical questions, great questions that we thought were answered have now raised their heads again to be actively debated, such as lies versus facts. Right now we're living in a time, particularly in the U S where lies are common daily activities by our leaders and they're getting away with it. They're lies.
Speaker 2:
14:04
Count more than facts. How is that possible? But at the same time we're living in an era where opinions are valued more than knowledge. How is it possible that just because someone thinks something is this way that that's held with as much regard as a scientific knowledge? I had to tell you, I don't want a surgeon that just thinks that if he ever tried to do a shoulder replacement, he could do it. I want a surgeon that has gone specifically to school and had all the practice, so he's gained a knowledge so he knows how to put these parts into my shoulder. Not somebody who's going by guessing by golly, but we also live in a time where greed is valued more than ethics, where hate is surviving and overwhelming compassion, where our fear is freezing out. Our courage. This concept that we still haven't, the value of truth as an integral element to living as a society is something that we first were confronted with very obviously in the gospel of John 2000 years ago.
Speaker 2:
15:03
It's the 18th chapter. Jesus is in front of the Roman curator, punches pilot, and he tells him for this I was born and for this I came into the world to testify to the truth. Everyone who belongs to the truth listens to my voice pilot asked him what is true, what is true? That existential question should have been solved a couple of thousand years ago, particularly with our gain in scientific knowledge, but it's still a debate going back to my shoulder that the truth is I waited too long to recognize that I needed medical treatment for my shoulder, that I needed to act to stop the destruction of the joint. So even though I will undergo a remarkable advancement in joint replacement technology, my shoulder and its ability to function will never be at the same level. I won't be able to raise my arm over my head, but at least I'll get it above my waist, which is the current limit, but hopefully as a result of the procedure, most of the pain will be gone and it'll result in a better life that's worth experiencing.
Speaker 2:
15:58
Similarly, the truth is that we as a human society have waited too long to respond to the climate crisis, and while we have developed marvelous new technology to fight it, our future earth won't be the same as the one we experienced in our youth. We will lost some coastal cities because the oceans are going to continue to rise. We're going to have to accept lots of refugees from lands. We've made uninhabitable, and we'll have to learn how to adapt with change, but most of the pain, hopefully it will be gone from the current crisis and it'll still ultimately create a life for a kids worth experience. Our personal choices and life actions as well as our societies choices and actions in the next 10 years is going to determine how many people will die from the climate crisis and how many will live. Climate crisis has escalated to the point where it can now be seen from space as well from the evening news as well as in our backyards if we simply pay attention.
Speaker 2:
16:50
So we have to change how we live now. I've given you 48 action steps. You can find them if you don't have them on my website. Sustained creation.org 48 different action steps that you can take to bring about life change. Now let me tell you about my latest life change. It's kind of embarrassing to admit, but the first time and my nearly seven decades I've joined my very first grassroots political campaign for president and I'm finding out there are a variety of critical activities needed to be done, which you can choose from ranging across the whole entire introvert, extrovert spectrum. And so depending on whether you're introvert, there's some things you can do that you're comfortable with and the extra other things they can do. And you can choose the level of participation that you're able to commit to and do it in an area where you have the tools the you're naturally equipped to deal with.
Speaker 2:
17:43
So it's something to think about because democracy, I believe is the key to solving the climate crisis. And democracy doesn't work unless we all get actively involved in it. We can no longer look upon it as a spectator sport. For democracy to work, the people have to be involved. Going back biblical on you. We have to quit acting like the prophet Jonah, who when God told him to go to Nineveh and ran the other way and you got swallowed up by a fishing he ocean and he didn't respond to telling the truth to Ninevah until he got puked up on the beach. We got to move past that running away. We have to become like the early disciples who faced threats and the very real risk of opposing the power of Rome, the only disciples who overcame their fears and acted to spread the truth about a better way to live.
Speaker 2:
18:30
Can we do this? I believe we can. Our kids are counting on us doing this. That's our story for this week. I hope it was a benefit to you. Moving on to our wisdom quotes, going back to the gospel Mark DEA chapter for our first quote, it has Jesus telling his disciples, do you still not perceive or understand? Are your hearts hardened? Do you have eyes and failed to see? Do you have ears and failed to hear? And then turning to another wisdom, this one being 81 year old actress Jane Fonda following her arrest for the fourth consecutive Friday in front of the white house protesting your climb crisis this fall. She says, when you're older, what if you got the news? You're not in a market place where some guy who's scared of a strong woman. So you can rise to yourself and become who you are meant to be.
Speaker 2:
19:14
And you can be brave. I mean, there are older people with gray hair out there. Every Friday they get arrested with me that are just so great. Some of them are nuns and some of them are rabbis and some of them are just people who have come from different parts of the United States. They're old and it's just beautiful. She goes on to say, we are the last generation who can make a difference between life and death of the planet. It's an urgent crisis and we have very little time left to fix it. And our last wisdom quote comes from the great author Catherine Dean Moore from our book, great tide rising. She says they'll want to know the story of our time. Our grandchildren will this pivotal decade where we either found our way forward or did not. They will give our time a name. It is dad important.
Speaker 2:
19:55
They will wonder if we saw it coming. They will want to know how hard we really tried to stop the destruction. They will want an accounting. They will want a book fill with the prayers people prayed to want jars fill with the last of the things. The point is we are the ones who will create the story of our time. What would be in this remarkable age that we'll live in? What will our story be? Our, actually I am this week comes from sharing the message of climate hope. It's number four in that category and it says get politically active on the urgent need for federal regulations to reduce the emissions of co two and other greenhouse gases. As I told you, for me, it is now includes getting involved in a presidential campaign at the grassroots who, Oh, if that's not for you, you could choose to get involved in a voter's registration drive.
Speaker 2:
20:42
You could choose to get involved in a Senate or a state representative or a governor campaign. You could choose to get involved with an advocacy group and phone bank for this effort. If our democracy is gonna survive this remarkable time, then we have to return to the roots of what democracy means and that's by getting involved in this effort for a democratic government. On a very personal loan. And yes, it means to do so. We have to donate serious amounts of our time, energy, and our money to these efforts is as sacrifice with future generations who say, how could you do otherwise? Returning into Jane Fonda, her last talk, she says we have to be in the streets and shutting you down governments and necessary not just at the federal, over state governments, local governments, town councils. We have to be very brave and for 40 years we have marched and rallied and written and spoken.
Speaker 2:
21:34
Not enough has happened. So we have to up our ante a little bit and risk getting arrested through civil disobedience. But we have to not be afraid and we have to see this as the way good citizens of the United States need to act. We need to be in the streets making our demands heard. So what will you do in his remarkable age that we're living in? How will you make a difference? Can we make a difference? I believe we can. It's not to eight we can do this. That's our podcast for this week. I hope you will share it with others. Connect to sustaining creation now podcasts, so you can find them on our Facebook or on our webpage. Get them to sign up so that they get a notification every time a new one comes out because we're not consistent in the frequency when we do this, as I pondered different issues to talk about, I hope you find their benefit and pass amounts or others can join us in this most remarkable time in the human suicide [inaudible] on whether we have a future for our kids or not.
×

Listen to this podcast on