The Trail Connection

The Trail Connection - 001 - Backyard Beginnings

September 12, 2019 Tim Garland Season 1 Episode 1
The Trail Connection
The Trail Connection - 001 - Backyard Beginnings
Chapters
The Trail Connection
The Trail Connection - 001 - Backyard Beginnings
Sep 12, 2019 Season 1 Episode 1
Tim Garland

Camping with my kids in my backyard and why I decided to share my experiences.

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/TheTrailConnection)

Show Notes Transcript

Camping with my kids in my backyard and why I decided to share my experiences.

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/TheTrailConnection)

Speaker 1:

Okay .

Speaker 2:

Everyone's bound to get lost sometimes, but often the journey back provides views that you wouldn't have gotten a chance to see otherwise. I'm Tim Garland and this is the trail connection podcast.

Speaker 3:

[inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible]

Speaker 2:

I want to take you guys back to the year 2017. It's pretty significant year in my life because , uh, that was the year I was turning 30, but it was also coincidentally one of the most challenging years of my life, not because of anything, you know, crazy. Um, you know, no trauma or , um, you know, a major life changing event other than the fact that , uh, I had gotten to a point in my life where I was really overwhelmed and , um, had gotten down a path that I didn't want to go down anymore. 2017 was a , was a year that I was turning 30, and I guess you could say I was going through a quarter life crisis or whatever, whenever you want to call it. Um, I had gotten to a point where I had so much on my plate that I was, I felt like I was drowning. I , um, I had worked really, really hard in my career to move up as quick as I could and, and achieve some kind of status that , um, I really kind of only put on myself. Um, and it was, it was materialistic , um, growing up, you know, I've always, I was always looking at my friends and, and what they had and you know, what they were able to do and comparing myself to, you know, where they were and where I felt I should be. And , uh , that carried on through my adult life too. And I don't know where this came from because I was not , um, I was not raised poor or , um, you know, in a, in a household where that's what we use to measure ourselves as material things. I'm not sure how I attained this viewpoint, but , um, I was always comparing myself to where I should be. And I had the sense of entitlement where like I felt like I was behind the eight ball or I was, I was not given the same opportunities that my friends and and others were. And , um, so I just began this process of trying to find a way to make the most money that I possibly can make and the shortest route possible. And , um, it kind of went against the grain on what I was raised about because my dad instilled one of the strongest work ethics possible into me and my brother. And , uh, he is absolutely the hardest working man I've ever seen in my life. And , um , so feeling like I , uh, I was able to cheat the system or, or, you know, take shortcuts to get where I wanted to go. I don't, I don't know where that came from cause it definitely wasn't from him, but , um, anyway, I got a chance to get in with a company that I worked for now. Um, and as soon as I got in, I mean there was a tremendous amount of opportunity for anybody who, who showed any kind of drive to move up very quickly. So I took it upon myself to do that. And so I just absolutely threw myself into my career. I , um , I would work extra hours, you know, sign up for overtime, all everything I possibly do to get exposure and get experience and an out shine those around me just to get an opportunity to move up. And so , um, I was able to do a lot of different things, you know, early on in my career , uh, with my current company. And um, one opportunity just provided another opportunity but not at some costs . Um, when I first started the year I started , um, I actually started the week after my first child was born and um, I got about three days with her before I had to go and start this brand new job. And from day one out of the gate, it was, I had to prove my worth. Um, I came in as a temporary employee and I had 90 days to , to prove that I was worth keeping. And then once I got through that 90 days, I got hired on from the company out of the temp agency and I had another 90 to again prove my worth. And so I, I threw everything I could into that job because it was a good opportunity. It was great money and it was going to save me and my family , uh, from, you know, financial struggle. So that kind of started this whole thing. And , um, it seemed like every time I got an opportunity to get a little bit more or get a little bit more exposure , um, it came with more time or more stress or more , uh , dedication to being present there. Um, and so very quickly into that first year I went on shift and was working swing shift. So rotating from days to nights and oftentimes putting in anywhere from 70 to 80 hours a week, you know, working , uh, most, most times, five to six days pretty consistently and sometimes even seven days a week rotating. And , um, it wore on me. It , uh , it wore on me physically. Um, you know, anybody who's ever worked shift, work, whole understand the toll that, you know, flipping from nights and days takes on your body and your mind to . Um, but , uh, I just, I got really consumed with , um, you know, putting in the time and getting the experience, but it was all with the excuse of, you know, this is temporary. You know, I've only had to do this for a short period of time to get the experience so I can make it to the next level. And I would, I was constantly using excuses like that. And , um, I worked shift for about two years, two and a half years, and , um, got overlooked a couple times for some opportunities, but , uh, it was just because I didn't have the experience. And , um , during that time we had our second child and , um , this type of lifestyle , um, really took a heavy toll on , on me and my wife and our relationship. Um, it took a toll on my spiritual relationship , um, and I just found myself feeling really lost , um, and alone. Um, you know, I was around people all the time. Um, and I was around my family when I was home, but I wasn't never , I was never there. I was either sleeping or falling asleep. Um, and I , I was missing a lot of my infants and toddlers lives , um, by, by working the schedule and working on shift. And so I came to a point where my wife and I sat down and I just told her that I would start looking for day shift opportunities, but it probably was going to come with a pay cut. And , um, at that point in time that didn't matter. Um, I just want in time with my family and I just wanted to be , uh , around her and around my babies. And so , um, a time an opportunity came and I applied for it and I ended up getting it, which , uh, jumped into out of operations into a , uh, environmental health and safety role. And , um, that was a beautiful day. I remember it like it was yesterday. My wife and I were in the front yard with our two kids and they were running around in the sprinkler and , um, just being, being silly. And , uh, I got the call that , uh, the interview had gone well and they wanted offer me the position and I remember hanging up that phone and just tears streaming down my face and , and hugging my wife as tight as I could and telling her that , uh , you know, I did it, you know, and gotten, I've gotten to the point where I'm on salary, I'm off of shift and this was going to provide an opportunity for me to get into a higher paying role and have the time to be there at night with them and be able to go church with them on Sundays and Wednesdays and, and , um , be at home to sleep in my bed with my wife every night. And , um, so I began that role and um, everything was great for about three months. And then , um , another opportunity presented itself that required more time and more dedication, longer hours. Um, but the promise was more money. And so me following this passion that I had to get us some kind of lifestyle that we needed, that some kind of status that I felt like I deserved jumped head on into that and began the exact same thing that I just tried to escape by getting off of shift only now it was, you know, working all the daylight hours and coming home and kissing my , getting my kids getting height or kissing them while they're already asleep. And I'm again just passing out and waking up the next day to do it again. Every conversation that I had had to do with work, every stress or, or thing that upset me had to do with work. I had gotten to a point where I had a work phone and was needing to monitor emails that came through, you know , um, to, to see what the potential was, you know, safety potential if we needed to. Um, dig into it a little bit more and, and that timelines began, you know, with certain events that happen . So I felt like I had to be attached to my phone and I was for , uh , way too much, way too much. And so , um, again, this kind of went on for some time. Um, but an opportunity presented itself, I had gotten the experience that I needed to get , uh, interviewed for the position and I ended up getting it. And , uh , it was at another plant that was further away. It's actually two plants that I oversaw and a lot more responsibility, a lot more exposure, not so much more money, but , uh, you know, it was, the potential was there still, and , uh, so I took it and I jumped right in and continued this downward spiral. And , um, all along the way throughout this process, I pushed a lot of people away out of my life. Um, friendships dried up and kind of went away and distance was created. Um, not because I didn't care about these people just , but because they were , um, not, not as important as my job at, at the moment. And , um, then I, every waking moment that I had outside of work, I was dedicated to my, my immediate family, my wife and my kids. But even when I was doing that, the quality of, of life , uh , wasn't that great because I wasn't that pleasant to be around to be Frank. Um, I was typically in a bad mood or stressed out or something or tired and so , um, probably wasn't the greatest husband and most definitely wasn't the greatest dad , um, for a period of time. And , um , during the same time period of pushing people and things away. Um, you know, I D I didn't feel close to my church family cause I was not really present when I was there, not involved. And , um , also felt like I, I didn't have any way of , um, escaping anything, all, all of the hobbies or all the interests that I had had over the years. Um, I had turned into entrepreneurial activities to where they were going to bring in some extra money and absolutely right now , uh, I needed to be bringing in extra money. And , um, so every waking moment I was doing something that was dedicated to monetary gain. And so 2017, it hit. And , uh, that was the hardest year I've ever had because that is the hardest I've ever worked. And that's also ironically the year that I got the worst rating I've ever gotten in my life. And , uh, some of that was politics, but I think a lot of that was because I was spread too thin and I had too much on my plate and very disorganized at home and at work. And , um , like I said, I just kinda hit a breaking point. And so one night I sat down with my wife and I , I just told her, honey, I've got to do something different. I've , something's got to break. And , uh , I can't keep doing this. I feel like every dime I'm making is already spent. I feel like every, every opportunity that I have to make more money, it's not helping us get ahead. It's , it's only causing more strife between you and I. And I feel like I'm stressed out all the times where I'm always hollering at the kids for being frustrating or something and , uh , I don't want to do this anymore. It's not worth it. And , um , so I told her that I'm going to begin a process of pushing a lot of stuff off of my plate. Um, I'm going to be simplifying my life and starting out. I've got to find some outlet. I've got to find some way of getting an escape when I feel overwhelmed and, and pushing things out in that way. Then letting them build up inside and then blowing up on you and the kids. And so , um, she agreed that that was something that I needed to do and she supported me just like the wonderful woman she is as she supports me in everything that I do. And , um, so I started that process and um, this big event came up for the years. Like the one single thing I was working towards all year for w for work that came and went , um, missed the Mark by just this much. And it was really devastating because of how hard I worked. But like I said, some politics were involved there. Um, but , uh, after that event, I just decompressed and took some time to just figure out what I was going to do. And , um, so I took some time and I sat and I thought about all the things that I like to do growing up. And I thought about some of my best memories , um, you know, camping out in my backyard, you know, and my parents house and um, taking trips to the river to go canoeing or kayaking. And , um, I kept back to this one memory of , uh , going to Wiki Wachee Springs , um , up in North Florida. And my buddy and I were with my family and we, we rented a couple of kayaks and we had so much fun just zipping all over the river on those things and jumping out of trees and swimming. And , um, so I decided this, that's what I'm going to do. So , uh , leading up to my birthday , um, which is in October, it's coming up. Um, my , uh, my wife had asked me, you know, what I wanted to do or what , what I wanted for my birthday. And I told her I just want money from anybody who's willing to give me anything. They were planning on giving me anything. I just want some money to go towards buying a kayak and that's what I want to buy. And , um, she said, all right. And so she put the word out and my family was very supportive that year. And , um, they, they contributed and I was able to get , uh, get a little kayak. And so in the process of doing that , um, I was like, Oh, you know what, man, it'd be so awesome to start getting some like minimalist camping gear, you know, some small lightweight stuff that I can pack into kayak and I can go on some river camping trips and, you know, that'll be, that'd be awesome. And so , um, I started looking on Amazon and online and trying to come up with some, some wishlist and some, you know, shopping lists for some different things, buying some accessories for my kayak. And , um, I just kinda stumbled across , um, backpacking gear. And , uh, I grew up growing up, man. I hiked all the time and I fished and camped and , um, but I never got into backpacking for some reason. I never, it wasn't that it didn't interest me, it just wasn't on my radar. And so , um, I , um, I got super stoked about that and was like, man, I've got to start getting some of this gear. And , um , you know, I can do some hike and camping trips and I can do , um, I can do some backpacking and I can also do , um, my kayak camping and stuff. So I started, started getting some gear. And so over the next like six months , um, after I turned 30, you know, I , um, I continued this process of pushing stuff off my plate at work and pushing my , pushing some stuff off my plate, extra things that I had that were distracting. They were focused on purely just bringing in extra money. And , um, instead of buying some meals out, I would buy some backpacking gear or some camping gear or something. And any extra money that I made from, you know, my side gig and doing t-shirts, then I would , uh, I'd throw at this camping and hiking hobby. And so , uh , a few months in , um, you know, I, I told my wife, I was like, you know, I would really like to do , uh , kind of a multi-day trip sometime soon. And , um, you know, once I get all the gear, I , I kind of want to do a section, the Appalachian trail or something like that, you know. And she was like, okay , you know, that's crazy, but you know, you, you do you , um, but you know , she's like, well , if that's something you want to do, then I'll support you. And so , um, I kind of , I had kept it in the back of my mind. It wasn't something that was like a burning desire right at that moment, but it definitely was something I wanted to continue to think about and plan . So , um, leading up to , um, about midway through 2018, I had gotten quite a bit of gear. I'd gone on camping pretty much every chance I got. Um, the cold weather that we had down here in Florida and I found a secret spot that I go to every now and then. It's close by the house and I've taken, took , you know, taken several of my friends and family members with me there and , uh, really just enjoyed it thoroughly. Um, and it, it kind of accomplished, you know, what I was, what I was wanting to do with it. And so , um, I was talking to my wife about all this and, you know, I was just like, you know, I really, I really appreciate the fact that you are allowing me to do this so much because I'm already gone a lot from, you know, day to day from work for work and , um, you know, you got a lot on your plate. I mean, at this point we've had, we had three kids. Um, I know there's a pattern here. They just keep, they keep coming. Um, but we had, we had three kids at the time and um, her and I were , uh, we're doing pretty well with our relationship and everything and she just so, so supportive of this effort. And she just owned me. She said, Tim, I'm willing to let you take the time to do this now because it's an investment in us. It's an investment in our future with our kids. And this is something that you can fall in love with now and learn and grow in and when they're old enough experience the things that you love with your kids who are starting to love the same things. Um, and so I really took that to heart and , um , kinda use that as my motivation to, to keep going. Not so much because I was losing interest, but, but like built a flame inside of me that like, she was absolutely right. Like this is something that I, I need to get well versed in so when my kids are old enough we can do this and they can have memories that are going to last their lifetime. And so , um, that kind of continued my desire to do this Appalachian trail trip and it became more of a burning desire at that point, after that conversation. And so , um, it was still kind of early summertime, a little too warm to do it. Um, and I still, I needed a few more pieces of gear that I was saving up for. And so , um, around July, August timeframe , um, I happened to be talking to a buddy of mine at work at the church. And , um, he , uh, he was talking to me about this camping spot that I wanted to try out. Um, he takes his families to his family to every now and then, and , um, we just got to talking about hiking and backpacking and stuff, and he was like, Hey , um , you know, I've, I've done it quite a bit, you know, but I've never done , um, any like the major trails or anything. And I was like, well man, I'm really wanting to do the Appalachian trail or at least part of it, you know, would you want to do a section of it with me? And he's like, yeah, you know , that sounds like a blast. I've never done it before. I've done hiking similar to it, but I've never done it. I've always wanted to. So yeah, that'd be cool. Just let me know kind of when you're wanting to do it. So I kept that in the back of my mind and kept prepping for this trip. And , uh, so I remember one day specifically, I was sitting at my dining room table and my wife was in the kitchen to my left washing dishes and I had the map spread out on the table. I was measuring out my route and I was calculating the mileage between shelters and kind of laying out what I would do each day. And , um, I just stopped what I was doing. And I looked up at her and she was like, what? And I said, Hey mom , I'm doing it. And she's like, what are you talking about? And I said, I'm accomplishing a goal. And she goes, okay. And some of you are probably saying, okay, what's the big deal? You know, like people accomplish goals all the time, you know, but for me, if you know me and of course are close to me, then you know, that those opportunities have not been very regular in my life. And I'm very often , um , very often coming up with big plans and I'm a dreamer. I'm a big thinker, but very rarely do I see something to fruition. And that's a fancy way of saying that I'm a quitter. And that's a really hard thing for me to admit. That's a really hard thing for me to say, but it's a fact , um, and throughout my life in a lot of different things. Um, as soon as it got tough, for , as soon as it got to a point where I needed to do something , um, to continue to push on, I would just give up. And , um, so this was a big deal to me. It was emotional. It was something that I was absolutely going to see all the way through because I hadn't never done that before. And because of what I had mentioned about my kids and this being an investment in our future, I was absolutely gonna make it happen. And so , um, mapped out my route. Uh, I talked to John again and , uh, I just, I told him that , uh, you know, I , if you can make this work, this is something I really want to do. And um, he had to bend over backwards to, to, to make it happen. Um , pulled some strings and got some extra vacation and this guy went above and beyond for me. Um, I know that I expressed this to him, but he probably won't realize it until he sees this or hears this. But my wife pretty much told me, if you can't get somebody to go with you, you're , you can't take this trip. Like I don't want you doing this by yourself for the first time. And she was absolutely right to say that , um, because I definitely was getting in over my head for sure. But , um, John, I mean he rearranged his vacation and he even went so far as to letting us stay at his family's cabin up there in North Carolina and have his mom who lived up there drive us to drop us off and pick us up off the trail. And , um, it just, it meant the world to me that , that he did that and helped me accomplish this goal. And so we leading up to that point where we took this trip , um, this whole journey that I've been explaining for the last hour alone , um , was really inspiring to me and I was kind of watching things unfold as I was going through this process and just thinking to myself like, something, something special is happening to me right now. Um, my, my outlook is changing. My attitude is changing, my life is changing for the better. And , um , I've had this lifelong dream, I guess you could say. I guess it's an aspiration and so much a dream, but I've always wanted to write a book and I've never had the content to fill it up. But , um, I felt like this transformation that I was going through was inspiring enough to me that it might be interesting for others as well. So , um, I started the manuscript for this, this book, and I'm leading up to the trip to the Appalachian trail. Um, I kinda got some information cranked out and um, that trip was like the turning point to like complete that story and, and continue it on. And so it was not only an opportunity to get, to accomplish a goal, you know, for me and my kids, but it also was a way to help me kind of fulfill this other aspiration that I have to become an author. And so that was really cool. Everything about that from, you know, mid 2017 to about October of 2018 was really cool. It changed me in a lot of different ways for the better, I believe. Um, my wife saw a lot of changes in benefits to, to this new direction I was going and my kids had a happy daddy , um, and someone who was excited , um, about life again and not stressed out to the max. And , um, and so the , that all that was really cool. Um, and so after the trip, when I got back , um, you know, it was cold enough here to start camping again. And so I got a lot more trips under my belt when I got back here and , um, all the way through the end of the year. And another pivotal point , um, was new year's day of 2019. And , um , I'll never forget that. I sat straight up in bed at 4:00 AM and my mind was just racing, just thoughts all over the place about this thing that my wife and I had talked about, about investing in my future for my kids and for our family. And I was thinking, you know, a book is cool, but I want to document this in a different way because a lot can get lost in , in a book. Um, and I want something like almost in real time to document , uh, kind of what I'm going through because I mean, like I said, I've, I've hiked and I've camped and done outdoor stuff my whole life, but I never been a backpacker or like a through hiker or anything like that. And so all this was new to me, you know, to get into gear and, and learning about acquiring permits and like, you know, planning trips by mileage and getting your weight down in your packs and, and getting certain different types of freeze dried food that you can boil water and eat on the trail or snacks to get you through. And , and you know, water purification and all this stuff that like, yeah, I'm known about, but I've never like dove into, you know. And uh, so I had this idea for the trail connection and at the time I did not have a name. I just knew I wanted to do a podcast, a video podcast, to kind of document my journey on sharing experiences with more experienced people and learning and exploring and just capturing this incredible journey that I'm on right now. So that one day my kids can watch it and see that dad was going through a really hard time in life, but he turned it around. He found something to help with that. And it wasn't something that he already knew how to do. This was something he had to learn and he threw himself into it. And this is how he taught himself, you know, are taught, learned from others to get to accomplish a goal that he set. And so what does the trail connection? The trail connection is my journey to someplace beautiful. And like I mentioned, I don't, I don't want to just get there and show you what I found. I want to show you how I built it brick by brick and how I got there step-by-step. So that if you're at the same point in your journey on [inaudible] and you are trying to learn and it's intimidating and it's uh, it's difficult to find information that doesn't intimidate you or anything like that, then come along with me and let's learn together and let's share from the experiences of those that have been that been through the trails before, been down this path before and help use them as a guide to, to answer those questions that we have and , and show what really awesome things are out there. And I want to use the trail connection as a way to connect with God, connect with nature, connect with my family, connect with friends, old and new and all through a common interest in the love for the outdoors and being outside and experiencing the beauty that we live near and even places far away and document that journey. And so I am super excited to be bringing you along with me tonight. I am filming from my backyard and the intent was to have my kids camping in a tent right behind me while I shot this. But because we live in Florida and it's mid September and the weather's not cooperating, I got them posted up inside. But otherwise they would be out here with me. I'm soaking it up and listening to the bats and the owls and the crickets and everything else, all the other ambience that's in my neighborhood that you probably picking up on this recording. But I'm excited for what, what this project is all about and I'm excited about the journey that I'm beginning tonight and I'm excited to bring you along with me. And I hope that you share that same excitement and you're intrigued by this concept , uh , that it makes you want to follow along and join in. So if you haven't already, I'm going to give my shameful pitch here. Now. I , I've got just about every social media account you could have. I've got Instagram, Facebook, Twitter , uh , we're on YouTube and if you haven't yet, go check out our pages. Give us a, like, give us a follow , um, you know, subscribe to the YouTube channel so you can see these video episodes. As soon as they come out, we're going to be putting out some other content as well. And also , um, there's something else that , uh , I think is really cool that we're gonna be doing. Um, and we've got a , a Patrion account set up. So if you don't know what that is, I'm not going to take the time right this minute to explain it, but you should go check it out. Um, it's a patrion.com/trail connection and you can find us and there's some really cool packages there that you can subscribe to that will give you some exclusive content and some insight information. And it'll also help carry this thing along a little bit. So , um, I appreciate every single one of you that have taken the time to tune in and listen or watch or follow. And everyone who's already supported me that haven't, hasn't heard anything yet, they've only seen some pictures that I've put up with some, you know , thoughtful remarks in the caption. Um, but I do really appreciate every single one of you who's taken the time to listen to this because it's something that I'm very passionate about and something that I will be pushing so hard to make successful because I believe in it. So thank you so much for tuning in. I want to give a special shout out to chase Hayley for letting me borrow his GoPro and also for a to Seth Ryan for letting me borrow his VI , his audio recorder to get these first couple of episodes recorded until I can kind of get some things going. So big thanks to those guys. I really appreciate it. And again, thanks to everybody who is supporting me , uh , my wife and my children, you'd kind of understand what's going on. Um, and both sides of my family , um, both my, my parents and , and , and my wife's parents. So thank you so much and um , check back in a couple of weeks for episode two. And , uh, thanks again for tuning in. This is the trail connection.

Speaker 4:

Okay. So after reviewing the tape a little bit, there were a couple things that didn't really come out as clear as I wanted them to in this first take , um , for our or original podcast. And , um, I just want to make sure that that information is, is , uh, distributed. Cause I know this is my first opportunity to introduce myself to everyone and I don't want the message to get lost. So just to clear up a little bit , uh , what the trail connection is. So I found that through camping and hiking and getting outdoors was a way of me finding myself again, reconnecting to like my core and my passion. Um, but that not, that might not be necessarily what you find , um, as an activity to, to reconnect. And so I don't want to alienate those folks that , that may relate to the message, but they don't find that same passion through , um, being outdoors. Um, I would encourage it because I think that being outdoors is really healthy and, and uh , for your mind and your body. Um, but again, that was just something that I found to be very helpful for me to , um, kind of pull myself out of the rat race and really reprioritize what was most important in my life, which is my family and, you know, my , uh, my spiritual walk and all of that stuff that , that needs to be at the core. Um , what I'm focused on. And you know, I've, I believe in hard work, I believe in dedicating yourself to your job, but there has to be a balance. How much you throw at that and how much you are able to , uh , walk away sometimes and just recharge and get rejuvenated. And so again, for me it's, it's being outdoors and , and connecting with nature and, and all of that. So the trail connection is just this passion that I have to balance my life. And , um, I think that others can relate to that message. I think that , um, you know, whether it be through just taking a short hike or a walk somewhere outside or , um, you know, whatever, whatever it may be, you , you might have something that they are very passionate about. I just, I want you to be encouraged to get connected with that. And so , um, for those of you who are interested in the outdoors and find the same passion and the same , um, revitalization, I guess you want to call it , um, by being outdoors and doing things like this and being adventurous and exploring and, and , um, just connecting with nature, then I would absolutely encourage you to continue following along with me and follow me on my journey no matter what stage you're at. Um, whether you've been hiking for six months or 60 years , um, you know, I would encourage you to follow along and , and join me within , in this, in this journey that I'm on. Uh, so in future episodes, what can you expect? Um, we're going to be systematically, including more and more , uh, influences into this show as we progressed. So this next episode that that'll be coming out in a couple of weeks, it will be me by myself again, but it'll show kind of , um, the area that I, I found of my escape to . Um, I'm gonna take you guys to my secret spot and , uh, kinda show you my site set up, show you how I, how I , um, talk about this type of meal that I will prepare when I'm out there by myself. And then , um, just kind of touch on again, the importance of being out there and sometimes in solitude to , uh, to really , uh , rejuvenate and reconnect. So that's going to be the next episode and then it'll continue to build. So third, a third and fourth and fifth we'll be starting to add in additional parties, people bringing in other people to contribute and that these types of episodes are going to be a lot more conversational based. Um, and really what I'm looking for is just a campfire discussion, just talking and hanging out and connecting with one another and uh, and just explaining experiences and preferences and all different kinds of stuff like that. It's not going to be really my take as an authority on any of stuff because it's still pretty new to me. Um, but I'm also going to be drawing a lot of feedback and information from, from folks who have been doing it for a long time or who have maybe had some really cool experiences that we want to share. And so that's the plan. Um, so if that type of stuff interests you, then absolutely hit the subscribe button, hit the follow button and every single time we post out something, you guys will be the first to know it. Um, plan on releasing an episode every two weeks , um, for the first season. And , uh , we're going to be doing a lot of cool stuff. We're gonna be doing some river camping trips. We're going to be doing some beach camping trips. We're going to be doing , uh , sections of the Appalachian trail and , uh, really looking forward towards the end of the season. Um , we're going to be trying to go out West for the first time for me and I'll be teaming up with some folks who had been out there several times before , uh, to bring you guys some really incredible content. So I'm looking forward to it and I hope that you guys are interested in following along. And , um, thank you so much again for tuning in for this first podcast ever of the trail connection. And I am so pumped to be connected to you guys and to push through on this journey. [inaudible] .