Whinny Tales: Horse Stories, Pony Legends and Unicorn Yarns

Welcome to Whinny Tales: Let's Meet Bruce and Julianne

September 25, 2019 Julianne Neal with Bruce Anderson Season 1 Episode 1
Whinny Tales: Horse Stories, Pony Legends and Unicorn Yarns
Welcome to Whinny Tales: Let's Meet Bruce and Julianne
Chapters
Whinny Tales: Horse Stories, Pony Legends and Unicorn Yarns
Welcome to Whinny Tales: Let's Meet Bruce and Julianne
Sep 25, 2019 Season 1 Episode 1
Julianne Neal with Bruce Anderson

     Whinny Tales is a brand new podcast that will introduce listeners to a whole new type of equine awareness and education. Based on the work of Bruce Anderson, a native of Trinidad and Tobago, Nature's View is a system of self-discovery with horses as a metaphor for your partner, your employer, your family, your friends...just about any other person or situation. Each podcast episode will feature an aspect of Natural Humanship, as well as interviews with other horse professionals, EQUUS Filmmakers or authors, members of The Marley Project, and many other "pony tales." Bruce Anderson has spent a lifetime creating a system that can be used for self-improvement, corporate or management training, law enforcement training or even a horse/human foundation. Podcast host, Julianne Neal, is a 33 year Educational Administrator in the Arts and has worked with Bruce to develop Nature's View Programming for 20 years. 

Show Notes Transcript

     Whinny Tales is a brand new podcast that will introduce listeners to a whole new type of equine awareness and education. Based on the work of Bruce Anderson, a native of Trinidad and Tobago, Nature's View is a system of self-discovery with horses as a metaphor for your partner, your employer, your family, your friends...just about any other person or situation. Each podcast episode will feature an aspect of Natural Humanship, as well as interviews with other horse professionals, EQUUS Filmmakers or authors, members of The Marley Project, and many other "pony tales." Bruce Anderson has spent a lifetime creating a system that can be used for self-improvement, corporate or management training, law enforcement training or even a horse/human foundation. Podcast host, Julianne Neal, is a 33 year Educational Administrator in the Arts and has worked with Bruce to develop Nature's View Programming for 20 years. 

Speaker 1:

Welcome to Whinny Tales. I'm your host, Julianne Neal, and we're here with Bruce Anderson and friends with all of our favorite horse stories, pony legends and unicorn yarns. Tune in each week to hear from Bruce with Nature's View training tips as well as conversations with some of our favorite horse lovers. Remember, The Joy's In the Ride! Good morning! And morning to you, Baby. Well, it's so funny because this is going to be the first episode of our podcast, Whinny Tales. And so of course we had to start it off by explaining some things and, letting our viewers know, o r actually our audience, some of them will v iew and some of them would be just listening, but to let them know what it is that we do and why in the world we thought we should have a podcast. Anyway, so I say again, good morning. I'm speaking with Bruce Anderson who is the founder of Nature's View and Natural Humanship. And Bruce, w e're sitting, you can hear the birds in the background, the chickens pecking around outside. We're sitting on the back porch. Why is it that you start your mornings here on the back porch every day?

Speaker 2:

I guess the long and the short of the story is because this is my peaceful place. And from here what's cool is the view. I looked back into what I call the little meadow, which was like a little hollow. And when I looked through the screen, the first thing that comes into play is a little pond that we've built and how this is trickling water. And then behind that I have this hanging bench from this big old Oak tree that has a lot of stories to tell about our journey. And on that bench I have different things hanging it , which also tells stories. And then to the left of it, we have this makeshift bird feeder out of Gatorade bottle and it's kinda cool to watch the birds in the morning eating there. And then the chickens all congregate around here. You hear the crows going on, you're listening out for the hawk that likes to attack my chickens. Um, you can see the horses down in the fields of times. Looking up, waiting to see when you're coming to feed them. So there's just bunch of nature running around here.

Speaker 1:

Okay. I wanted to talk a little bit about the podcast and so to introduce some things, we're going to be speaking with people that we meet along the way and people who have been a part of the Nature's View journey and also some with, with the folks that we meet through the EQUUS Film Festival or through other work that we do. And so I think it's going to be an exciting time and I'm excited because the cover of our podcast features a specific horse named Winnie. So tell me, tell me , um , who is Winnie and why is he important to you?

Speaker 2:

tSo, the short end of the story or where the story in my head starts is where it ended.

Speaker 3:

You're listening to Whinny Tales. This episode of Whinny Tales On The Porch is brought you by Roslyn Moore and Clear Day Spa. Thanks for your support.

Speaker 2:

I'm not originally from here and I guess I'm an immigrant, not intentionally by the way. Um , a legal one now. Um, anyway, so I was working on this farm and I met their stallion which was just an incredible horse, not just physically, but mentally. And I met his offspring and I borrowed a thoroughbred mare and bred to this Dutch warmblood stallion. And not that it matters that he was Dutch warmblood or not, but it just happened to be and , um, had this mare and for many years she traveled with us. Um, a lot of people helped me with her along the way in her development, et cetera, along on the story is, Winnie is a second foal from this mare and I always saw her as the foundation male and , um , he was very special to us and , um, and one day I felt the need on Julianne's birthday to gift it to her, which is what we did. So Winston is actually the second foal from Rochelle. So yeah, he is sort of the continuation.

Speaker 1:

I thought it was cool to include him on there because he's part of the journey for , for both of us. And um, he has his own journey to now his brother Marley is the namesake. I guess you'd call it the , the face of our nonprofit, which is called the Marley project. And I, when we met you and I back awhile back 20 years ago , um, you were just about breeding Rochelle . And so we had , um, some conversations about that and the neighbor down the street had a really nice Arabian stallion. And so I remember that whole process of going through Marley being born and, and him as a little baby and we couldn't think of a name. And so, you know , we had that conversation about, I always say he's named after the Marley horses at the Louvre in France, but I think you're, you're sticking to the Bob Marley side of it. So, which is good cause , um , that means he's, he's got a little bit of both of us in there, but it was really , um, a , a nice , uh , journey for us to start the nonprofit and to be able to do some pretty special things as we , um, as we got that going. So Marley is Winnie's brother and um, I'm excited that I've been able to take Winnie and do my dressage stuff with him and he's just a great horse. And so I thought it was neat to include him in on, on the cover of the podcast. So you've been talking about nature and how it affects you in the mornings as you come out for your cup of coffee and getting back in touch with yourself. And I guess that was why Nature's View continued from just being, I always hear you talk about the story of finding, finding the beginnings of developing the system as you were searching for yourself and happened to meet Anne Shirley who's a friend of ours and she wanted her horses started I guess. And you kind of put that together. So can you tell a little bit about that? What, how that started, what happened, what you decided to do from there?

Speaker 2:

Well to me the catalyst from all of that was my passing and my mum . Um, now when I look back, it's not her passing, but the pressure of that I guess just sent me off on this tangent. Um, spun my life out of control and um, you just wanted to run away into the bush. We've done that was it, but it wasn't an ending either, you know, not the passing, no . That moment it was actually a beginning. Um, and I left the job that I had. I vow not to work for anybody again. Be csreful what you ask for. My story was that I was going to help horses survive in the world that we have created as opposed to the world we created for: People's world, Nature's world. And um, it's funny how at that point obviously I had a dog on a horse to look after , um, that would be Rollie and Rochelle , so had to have some income. Um, so the long and the short of it is I freelancing and horse wise and I would do whatever it took. And a friend of mine had lent me a book , um, by this particular author, which in reading the book the round pen came into play. So one thing led to another and I started working with these five horses that we now call starting horses because it's an ongoing process. Um, it, it's always happening. Um, and the word breaking just sounds like a contradiction to what your goal is. Kind of like surviving and perfection. Perfection to me is a contradiction to survival. Um, because if you're perfect, there's no more room for growth. So off I went on this journey and what I realized was in trying to help horses not realize what's his and her problem, I was a problem. And then I realized, well, it wasn't me, but my conditioning, which then allowed hope to come to life truly. Because now I realize this , if this person that I am is not really me, and the things that I'm doing is not really, you know, a fault of mine in a sense because who I am, but more because of what had been through and the conditioning done to me, I realized that I'd been conditioned to be this way, which isn't beneficial to survival. Um, and I thought if this was done to me, has it been done to anybody else? And what I realize it has been, and when I started this journey for the first four years, it was just about working with horses, not people. That's the last thing I wanted to work with. Um, and as I went down this road for the first four years, I couldn't put into words what I was experiencing. Um, it was more of a feeling. So it was like X , what I, I terminology now as it's like you mining for something and you don't know quite what you're mining for, but you are mining, you know, digging into finding out more about what it is you experiencing. What was interesting after the first four years, finally, the nature's view system came to life. I didn't come up with that name. That name evolved through the work. It wasn't Bruce Anderson's training program. It was Nature's View because this is what I found through the horse. I realize that the horse is helping me find what I call the spirit of my spirit, the me . Um , now it's a process. And what you have to go do, do is basically go back down the tunnel that you came up and through the horse he's helping you recalibrate your muscle memory, you know, and sort of I guess recondition you , um, or help you find the true you to allow you to be, you know, the steward that you're meant to be. Um, an a number of different things were going on at the same time. So very early on in this work that started to come to an understanding of that. And then when I finished or when I got to a point cause it never ends and the horse I side of it. Um, and it finally I finally understood it and I felt that the cycle had been completed to that point anyway, I suddenly realized. We still are helping me to help myself, to help others to help themselves , um , meaning the horses. But if it weren't for horses, what I realized that the horse was helping me. So therefore I realized now I had to show the best way to help the horses to show how the horse can help other people. And I don't say humans because I don't feel that we are as humane as we could be. Um, get back in touch with their humanity. So for many years traveling down this road, as things were evolving, you know, people would give it different titles. They would say it's natural horsemanship. And that felt, no, I don't really feel it's natural horsemanship because yes, in a sense I'm training horses, but I don't feel that I'm really training horses and I'm working with people. I'm not really training people. Then they call the gentling and so on and so forth until not too long ago when I said not too long ago, you get to this point in life that not long ago is like five years ago, you know , six years ago. Um, the word that evolved was , um, Natural Humanship, and I'm not trading horses, but in training horses, the byproduct is you are being trained in a sense and not trained, but being allowed the opportunity to get back in touch with your humanity, get back in touch with yourself, the youth , and in helping the horse before you can help the horse to the extent that you need to help the horse to survive in the world we created, you first have to get back in touch with yourself. So we're finally putting in the cart, you know, where belongs behind the horse, not in front of the horse. So to me, what I found was that in this work, you're not training , but you're giving them the three pieces that were missing consciously. We have them in us and on. So on one hand you've given them the three pieces. You're not training somebody and then giving them these three pieces at the same time. You're also helping them through the help of the horse to recalibrate that muscle memory. So there are two things going on when you do this work. One, consciously understanding the three pieces and to literally with the help of the horse started to recalibrate the muscle memory that has been altered to allow you to find that balance. And in so doing the horse is helping us to help ourselves get back in touch, not just physically, mentally, spiritually , um, but also altering our philosophy, which normally is what we do on this planet pretty much. To survive, to be successful, we need to take something that is less, careful with the word less , and use it to enrich yourself. And that has been our philosophy. And because of this philosophy, the byproduct of this I feel is for lack of better word, it has influenced our environment, physical environment in not a positive way. And it was interesting because yesterday I saw all these young people protesting in New York city. About the physical environment and that we need to do something to change. Once again, what I'm seeing because of the knowledge from the work is that we're putting the cart before the horse. Again, they are saying that we need to do something about changing what we're doing to the environment, which is fantastic, but guess what

Speaker 4:

[inaudible]

Speaker 2:

it's not just the physical environment around us that has been affected by this mindset that I call tyrant. It's a capital T at the beginning cup of tea at the end is not the word in the dictionary and what it is that's been altered besides the physical environment are people. We are just as affected as the environment is, but we don't realize it because you can't necessarily see it, but it's still affecting us. So to me, until we become consciously aware of these three things, it is fantastic

Speaker 3:

that they're doing what they're doing. But until you recalibrate yourself with the help of the horse, all those good intentions aren't going to be met to the extent that they need to meet, especially how quickly this environment is being affected physically until we recalibrate and fix all the cells. You won't be able to more than likely, and I hope I'm wrong, make the changes that you need to to start the change of the physical environment. And what's interesting is when you try to share that with people because of what was done to us, it blocks them from getting it because all they hear you saying is that they're making a mistake. And it's sort of fascinating for me is how do you get this word out? You know, which is not fascinating, but actually literally frustrating because when I tried to share this on a smaller scale to those who say that want to make a difference in life or in whatever career they choose, it's amazing how when you try to share this with them, it's like they shut you down. And for me it just becomes so frustrating. It's like, why do I keep doing this? If the people in power don't care, why do I care? So

Speaker 1:

back in, I would say back about 10 years ago or even further back than that, we started approaching people and you had some conversations with the police department here in Camden and I think that was the beginning of um, finding ways of sharing it specifically where you had groups come out. And at that time there was not a lot of talk in the equine world about um , horses being used for other things than just riding or whatever. There wasn't like, now when I, when I see things out in the horse world, there's a lot of talk of corporate training and working with veterans with PTSD and all that. But back when we were beginning this, you were, this was, you were cutting edge and there was not a lot out there with horses being used. So you had some conversations with our local police chief Joe Floyd, and I'm , from what I remember, he kinda thought he would tell you, yeah, yeah, let's do it. And then , um, we didn't really have anything going on with it, but then one day he finally said, all right, I'm going to send some of my officers out to see what it is you do. So what happened at that point when the officers came, how did that go and how did things develop after that? With our local police department ,

Speaker 2:

um, first of all, hats off to chief Floyd for him to climb onto this wagon and say that he's going to do it. That was big. Um, but then again, that shows the character of this person and how much he cares, literally cares about his people. And so yes, we, we started working with him and you, Julianne created a curriculum with their help or listening to through what they were looking for. And we were able to tailor a curriculum for them and it work .

Speaker 1:

I just remember that she , Floyd called you into his office after the officers came out and he said, I want to know what kind of mind altering drugs you have injected my captains with, because all they can talk about is that everybody in the department needs to come and work with you with these horses. And so even, you know, that's been 10 years ago, even 10 years later when you walk into the police department here, there's an officer that will come up random people and say, Hey, I want to come work with the horses because they've heard this tale for so long. So I think that was the catalyst in my mind. That was the catalyst having chief Floyd support. And as you said, he went up and presented in front of the officers in Columbia for, for their meetings. And um, this was about the time of current hurricane Katrina actually, because Alan Trapp was the training officer at the time that we worked with to develop the curriculum. And he , he reached out to people that were suffering from traumas following the hurricane and basically said, you know, this work helps with PTSD, this work helpful would help with your training officers as they work on, you know, our lesson plans were based on anger management and communication and body language and for , for what we call it in our horse work, its pressure but the police call it degree of compliance. And so, you know, we were able to translate the pressure side of it into the language that would mean something to officers as they were doing their recertification and, and that sort of thing. So , um, I just thought it was really special that the chief understood it and valued it so much that, you know, he, he continues to support us to this day. And so that, you know, over time from working with the police and working with , um, Greenville technical college, there was a professor, Barry Shreve that you worked with to have some workshops for his students on the horse work. And so they would learn lessons in the classroom and then come and

Speaker 2:

have a workshop day with you. And put it into practice. Connie Brown, you just been able to work with a variety, which is funny that you bring up Connie Brown because I spoke to her the other day and she's in a way to Egypt if I'm not mistaken to give a presentation, but apparently the organization that she's a member of or one of the organizations that she's a member of what they're talking about and what I do is what they're talking about. And she suggested that they need to talk to us.

Speaker 4:

[inaudible]

Speaker 2:

you're listening to Winnie tails . Thank you for your support

Speaker 1:

work with somebody like Connie and um, it's, it's a thing where you know, they're doing classroom work on whatever the topic is and then they come out and work with you. How in the past, how has that been a positive? How does that translate into helping them? Why would somebody want to come out and add this piece to what they're doing? So

Speaker 2:

Kalani Brown , that's just a cool name. It just flows . And when I think of Connie Brown to understand Connie Brown for me, yo , you have to understand where we started from with her. The way that we got together was because of this horse that she rescued. And the long, and the short of it is it goes back to nine 11. She was, was he nine o'clock, nine 11 victim. Um, and through this work it does help to break out of that. What she learned from that was that what the work talks about, how we're not reaching our full potential. So the reason why she brings us in is that these people that she's working with, it's not what they're doing, but the pressure created by what they're doing. Um , they're not reaching their full potential and no motto how much knowledge she infuses into them, they still won't be able to put that knowledge into work, into play because of our conditioning. And what she realized because of her own experience in the work , um, that this work will help them break down those barriers. So therefore these people of hers that she works with , um, because it's about doing the best job she can do. Um, by sharing this piece with them, I don't teach anything, but to me this piece is a key piece that's missing in society. I don't , this doesn't train you. It's almost like the pill that you take that allows a knowledge to come in without this pill. You acquire knowledge. You can accomplish the task that you're doing, but you're not going to reach the full potentials and get to your full potential. So it's not about getting to the full potential of your ability in that particular environment, but through that environment, reaching the full potential of who you are meant to be. Therefore allowing you to be the person that you are meant to be, that unique person. So it allows you the freedom to break out of the mood to be valued . Um, and Connie realizes this. So by bringing us in, she's using these techniques to help people to become stronger within themselves so they can now take these tools that she sharing with them to reach their full potential in this particular field. Um, so market trading, that was what I couldn't think of. Correct. Which is funny because every time I think of Connie Brown, I think of when she took us to New York city and I never knew that your palms can sweat. So because here we go into this building in New York city because my environment, first of all, first and foremost, I started this to get away from people, my environment, my church, Micah thedral is around Penn . I mean, and my, the only thing that I communicate with was, is with that one horse. So now I'm going to New York city, which is like all this pressure. And then you go into this building that belongs to, what's the guy's name? Bloomberg. Bloomberg, which, who is this? Bloomberg? All I know is like this famous person, whatever, multimillionaire . So the pressure wasn't so much that the pressure was here. I have been given this gift and given thank you rooster. Given this task to share this information with, with the world in my head, good, bad or indifferent sometimes. A lot of times I think, okay, I'm losing it big time and now I'm on this stage in this particular building.

Speaker 5:

Yeah .

Speaker 2:

[inaudible] one of the greatest cities in the United States fall us for the world and now I finally have the stage to share this information with.

Speaker 3:

So don't mess it up. So like I'm freaking out and she's going to give a talk on market trading.

Speaker 5:

Maka traded .

Speaker 3:

And so you're in this building and you have to go through all this security and you're now in the room with all these people sitting down watching you. Not only that, but it's been live stream, live streamed. And I'm sitting there listening to Connie give a talk and I don't even know what the hell she's talking about,

Speaker 5:

all the numbers

Speaker 3:

and yada, yada yada. And then it was my turn to go on stage and do my presentation. So here I am not wearing my short pants. I'm really out of things fall as four cause I have to wear these long pants or look neat and tidy and whatever. Not to say I don't look neat and tidy when I worked with my horses , but it's certainly not the same outfit. And I'm an Island boy. You know, it's like we are custom , uh, you know, flip flops if not barefoot and your short pants and your tee shirt . So now I'm in this suit and I walk up there with a briefcase, it's like briefcase. And then I popped the briefcase open and output, I pull the Lariat and then I do my little demonstration and blah, blah, blah, blah. And it was kind of interesting. Um, so yeah, that was, that was pretty wild occasion. Um, and so I've watched

Speaker 1:

you in, in these workshops scenarios where they've worked on all morning on knowing when to buy or when to sell or what they should react to or whatever. And so it's, I just think it's a great thing to be able to come out and practice that. And with Connie or with other people that you work with in this capacity? I've heard them say, Oh, it'll stop you in the middle of something in the round pen and say, okay, what you're doing right there, that's what you did this morning and you wouldn't sell or you know , you're not reacting this way or whatever. So it becomes a great tool for somebody who wants to get points across, who wants their people to be able to practice something or whatever. Um, and we've been doing some things with another , uh, core corporate training expert, a guru, I guess you'd say with Lynn Carn and creative spirits unleashed. How did you meet Lynn and how did all that start?

Speaker 3:

Before I go there, I want to stay in New York. Okay , sure. And, and you know, I was talking about how this is my journey and I was talking about when I went to the offices, how was having a hard time because I felt that I needed to not mess this up because this is I , this journey that I was on, you know, I'm on that. I'm sharing with others. This is my personal journey is not a job for me. Um, but one of the things that happened in this journey was for a lack of better word, we finally gave birth in a sense to the work and the way that that happened because as this thing grew inside of me, and the words started forming and the picture started forming and the work started happening. And so therefore you had all of this visual starting to happen verbal. Um, and not only that, but my growth, it finally got to the stage where I realized that I needed to get it out. And not just by working with people, but get it down on tape. Visual tape. Um, not just audio. I never sort of funny how we came across this guy from Trinidad where I'm from or should I say Trinidad Tobago. Um , with James O'Connor and with Juliana [inaudible] . Um, we created our little documentary called the edge. Well, again, with Julian's help , the edge was now going to be, the trailer was now going to be shown at the Equis film festival. Thank you very much. Lisa Doosan and Diana Darosa . Um, so the first year we went to New York city to the Equus film festival, it was pretty wild because finally I felt that I found a medium that could start sharing this message. So here we are in New York city at the Equus film festival, and I'm sitting down too in one of the five or six cinemas , um , that are showing all these films from all over the world to watch our trailer in New York city. And I get into the cinema and there are five people. All of a sudden that conditioning done to me , kicks in, which isn't beneficial to my wellbeing. And I start realizing or feeling that I'm failing, that, Hey , you're given this gift. You finally put it down on film or starting to, and there's nobody there to watch it. So you feel this terrible sense of failure. And this is what's so cool about this work. So the pressure created by all of this starts causing what I call , I guess for lack of better with the muscle memory, your conditioning to perceive that you're feeling. And , um , all of a sudden because of the work, it kicks in and stops you and you stopped recalibrating and you said , okay, here's person from this third world country that came up with this concept from nothing, put it on film. He's now in one of the greatest cities in the world. How can you possibly say that you are failing when look what you have accomplished? So in the past, none of that would've happened. I would have just seen myself as once again, I'm no good. But because of the power of the work, which has altered my muscle memory, my conditioning, my subconscious that in the past would've pulled me undo . Because to me, we have now been conditioned to feel, and it's not about the failure, but in feeling we don't get these kicks, one of them possibly even an endorphin kick. Um , that lets your body know that you're okay . So then we go out and buy something or self-medicate or all . So we can keep on moving forward. Um, in this case, this work helps you to find a natural way of doing that and not be dependent on things that we produce, I. E taking something that is less us and using them to enrich themselves and you fill in the blank. Um, very quickly I started to realize that's an old story and the reality is look what you have accomplished. So I just want to throw that story in since we were in New York city. Well and to continue that part of the story. I mean since then, that was in 2015 in November of 2015. The funny thing is, I mean when we started the talk of the film and then this Julianne really started finally and I'm grateful for being part of this journey. Um, well we just decided that the job at that, because if it wasn't for her, that part of the journey wouldn't happen. So I'll shut up now and she can see shit . But it's important for that AC that because we build, you won't say that and people need to know that. If it wasn't for you, this work wouldn't come to life. To the public, to the extent that it is coming to life, to the public. Oh , thank you . Because trust me, I for many reasons wouldn't have the ability to do this. Um, so go ahead. See what you want me to do. I was just gonna say we, the way it all started was kind of , um, synchronicity, I think was the word we were using at the time because one day I was just thinking we gotta do something to get the word out to people who are outside of our little

Speaker 1:

circle of friends and local Camden, South Carolina. What can we do? Let's create a little video for our website. And so at that time there was something going around on Facebook that was film footage of George Bovell who was a famous Trinny swimmer and very well known and popular and all that. And he had been doing some training swimming out in the wilderness , um, in Trinidad. And they captured footage of him saving a baby deer from out from under a waterfall or something to drowning. And he's coming up out of the water and this , this beautiful visual with the water droplets. And I had never heard of 4k or any of that at the time. And so I just knew and you knew, well, it's a type of filming, but I just knew that that was the visual, that was something that was very appealing to watch and that we wanted something of that quality, you know, work. If we were going to do a video, let's do it. Right. And so within a day, I think you had contacted the filmmaker, James O'Connor of the artist story telling and had this conversation with him on the phone. And um, it just, we hit it off with James and with Dylan canal , who was also with him and, and Miranda, his wife. And so it just became a really great partnership in creating this documentary. And I feel that it really, you know, from us go into Trinidad and then them coming up here several times back and forth, they were able to capture the work and to talk to people who had experienced it and they just did a beautiful job. But even in those early days, James said, you know, what do you want to do with this film? And , um, I had heard of the Equus film festival. I didn't know anything about it in reality, but I just said we're going to take it to the Equus film festival in New York city. And so when Lisa Dierssen was kind enough to accept us, I mean, this was last minute , um, the festival was in November and I think we got her the film at the end of October. And she just said, yeah, we'll show it. You know, it's too late for it to be in the competition part of it, but you send us the trailer will show the trailer for you. And so that was just the beginning of a fabulous relationship with Lisa and the whole festival. And, and since then, you know, that first time we had five people in the theater in New York. But since then, through this festival, we've been able to show the film and to promote your work all over the world, literally. And so it was just the beginning of something that's been a wonderful relationship. So from demonstrations at the LA equestrian center and you know, back up in headwaters where James lives now and just all over the place has been. It's been a great relationship. So I did want to go back to talking about Lynn carne and the work that you're doing with her and her people. Um, is that something that you could talk about for a minute?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Cause you a minute or two or three. What would you like to know about Lynn con ?

Speaker 1:

So she approached you , um, through contacts that we have in North Carolina and she was interested in the work and she came out with her daughter and um, I, I got the impression from conversations with her later that she was sold on the work the first day, but her daughter, not so much. I think it was pretty emotional for her, but they came around and um, had some breakthroughs. So just tell me a little bit about what happened with all of that and what they're doing now.

Speaker 3:

Lyndon Carn , Lynn carne came with her daughter. So it's sort of interesting when you have somebody come and look at the work. Because you got to do two things at one time besides everything else you all on one hand, you, you have to look at them as, and I don't particularly care for the word client and I guess a word will come up at some point, but you have to look at them from that perspective. But also you have to look at as somebody that you're going to be working with. So you want them to experience it on one hand as through the eyes of a client because of their client. But you also, from a professional standpoint how this is going to work for them. You also have to translate it to that. So it's a little bit of a juggling act when it comes to doing that amongst other things. And the actually came twice. Um, you know, one of the first things that I have them do is go put a Holt on the horse. And the thing about this work is not about getting the picture done, but within getting the picture done. The keyword there is in, in doing the picture, we capture moments and therefore within those moments, by capturing them, we capture the moment and then fall. They're able to see what they're doing in that moment and at that moment, because of the terminologies that we use, tyrant or alpha and tyrants simply means you're overreacting. Underreacting you're not doing what the picture calls for . So anyway, Lynn comes out with a daughter and we're going through this process and she sees something in this and my belief is what she sees as this, she does a really great job with the people helping to empower these people and giving them these tools to do their job more efficiently, effective, et cetera, et cetera, et. The only problem is when it comes time to putting these skills to work, the pressure created. See , we don't get, a lot of people don't see that concept. They think that it's this person when they did, here is a problem, but it's not this person or that situation. But the pressure created by, because of that pressure, it's us reminding you of past pressures and because you aren't consciously aware about your mental tools, for example, which is one of the three pieces that are missing, you are then not able to respond to the pressure of that moment and therefore you're conditioning your subconscious, yo, whatever you want to call it, your muscle memory takes over. And because of the conditioning done to us very early in our childhood, which has set us up to fail, you then can't put the tools that we will given to help you succeed into practice. Because a mechanism that allows that to happen has been, what's the big word, not altered but compromised because of our early conditioning. And until you recalibrate that and balance that alteration out to where the natural setting which was provided for you by nature, that man domestication has altered until we recalibrate, that you're not going to reach the full potential of who you are meant to be far less to , uh , the ability to accomplish what it is you are trying to accomplish at that particular moment. Because you are not in that moment. Even though physically you are in that moment, you are actually emotionally in the past because of the pressure of that moment which you don't really realize. So with that said, I believe that that's what Lynn encountered but that's also what the daughter encountered, which possibly caused the daughter to move away from this. But I feel that now she has more embraced at the, not all those , she has not returned yet but that's a whole different story. So because of this encounter that they both had, Lynn has now not only come back personally to do the work, which is as far as I'm concerned, that says a lot about the human being or this particular individual, but she's bought a number of her plants who have a number of people working under them to come encounter to encounter this work. That's kind of where we are right now in the journey with Lynn , which has now allowed Lynn the ability to what this work does, which is take one to a whole new level.

Speaker 4:

[inaudible]

Speaker 3:

You are listening to Whinny Tales. We thank you for your support. Julian is messing on a computer. I don't know what that noise was, but um, I don't if that's like a hint, but share this experience real life by sharing this work with people that have horses, you know, give riding lessons, et cetera, et cetera, to where you create the satellite farms that people have studied the work, train the trainer, and therefore now people can go to these different places and experience this work. And one of the locations that I feel is a great location because of how it's viewed by the rest of the world. Funny enough is The Bahamas. And I feel that now is a great time to do it because of what's happening. And one of the great reasons is if we keep doing what we're doing with the global warming, et cetera, et cetera, The Bahamas is one going to be one of the first landmasses that are going to be engulfed by the water. So instead of working on changing what's happening to the environment, we first have to change ourselves. And here's a great location to do that because in coming to do this work, not only do you encounter the work, but then you go out into the nature of The Bahamas and put it into practice. Um, so you're totally submerged into that nature, into nature and therefore, which is why we call it natural human ship. And through, by submerging yourself into that nature, you become more humane and really get a good plug in . And so when you go off to wherever it is in the world you live, you then start building upon that. It's going to have like, like I said, exploring and, and mining this and what I'm doing is processing it, but there are gonna be people who are gonna be even better at processing this to explain it to people even better than I could, which is fantastic, you know? Um, because the bottom line is this, the winner of all of this is not me, but what I first set out to do, which was to help the horse survive in the where we've created. Because this could not help a human to the extent that you can get the help if you do not involve the horse, not any other animal but the horse for numerous reasons. And in so doing by doing this virtual reality, it all will come back to the horse and people are going to realize that horses are actually more important now for human wellness if not survival for only three reasons.

Speaker 1:

And I think we'll leave with that question for today because that's a whole nother episode waiting to happen. So Bruce, thank you so much for talking this morning. I think it's been very special to have be surrounded by nature as we have this first episode of the podcast. So before

Speaker 3:

I go, I started off with sharing the porch with you and it's going to be cool that we're starting this podcast, that the first one is here on this porch. So right now what's happening as the sun comes up and we are facing East and we are looking at are the screen porch. Um, the chickens are all mingling around as I'm sure you heard through it. But then down in the hollow where the horses are, I could now start seeing the horses coming down and grazing as they're coming down. So it's kind of cool to see the light hitting them. And I could see Winston on one side, a Marley on our little rescue horse Mack , and they're all sort of making their way down as a breeze so it can approve to feel the cool air. I look at my thermometer and it says that is about 65 70 degrees, which is fantastic because it's the beginning of fall and it's just a really nice day . Um, so thank you very much , uh , Julianne for putting this together, allowing me the opportunity to share my journey with horses and thank you for sharing your all's always so willing to do that. So special. So here's the saying for the day from squeaky wagon steam, wicked chickens laid devil eggs.

Speaker 4:

I think we'll close with that. Thanks Bruce. Thanks him .

Speaker 1:

You're listening to Whinny Tales, the official podcast of Nature's View and The Marley Project brought to you by JA Media Productions.

Speaker 4:

[inaudible] .