Speaking of Influence

Grounding Yourself for Presenting

June 23, 2020 John Ball Season 1 Episode 31
Speaking of Influence
Grounding Yourself for Presenting
Chapters
Speaking of Influence
Grounding Yourself for Presenting
Jun 23, 2020 Season 1 Episode 31
John Ball

One of the most distracting things you can do when giving any kind of presentation is to be shuffling about or unconsciously moving around your stage area. One of the things I see most often is what I call the speaker wobble and it makes you look nervous and ungrounded.
I'll share with you an exercise in this episode to help you ground yourself and stop wobbling and shuffling around on stage so that you only move with volition.
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Show Notes Transcript

One of the most distracting things you can do when giving any kind of presentation is to be shuffling about or unconsciously moving around your stage area. One of the things I see most often is what I call the speaker wobble and it makes you look nervous and ungrounded.
I'll share with you an exercise in this episode to help you ground yourself and stop wobbling and shuffling around on stage so that you only move with volition.
Make sure to subscribe for future episodes.



Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.
If you tune in regularly to The Loqui Podcast, welcome back. If this is your first time tuning in, great to have you with us. This shorter episode is going to be about an issue that commonly occurs in nearly all preseters, certainly when you are standing up and even if you are working in a remote location and doing your meetings online, it's still generally a good idea to be standing up if you can arrange your equipment in a way to do that, especially when you are delivering any kind of presentation. Now the issue is one of moving around. I don't know if you have ever watched speakers who aren't really used to speaking, but you may notice that they can pace around on the stage and they're not standing still and that you often see what I call the speaker wobble where it may sort of be almost balancing on one foot shifting backwards and forwards but certainly not looking very grounded. It tends to look like you're nervous and in most cases That's probably what it is. It's a bit of nerves but it's also a lack of attention to what a difference it actually makes when you are stood still. So this is something I would maybe call grounding. I think that's probably the most helpful word for it. And grounding in a very physical sense as in keeping your feet still on the floor. Now it's okay to move whilst you are presenting. In fact, it can be very useful. The whole point here is to move with volition not to be moving around unconsciously if you can help it. Now of course, if you can't help it from time to time, you can be forgiven for it, but it's going to make you look much more confident and it's probably going to make you feel much more secure. If you are actually a little more grounded on the stage, so that when you do move, it looks like a conscious decision to move rather than nervous shuffling. So if you ever watch people, you may watch them moving backwards and forwards whatever direction it is, but it's genuinely unintentional, it can be distracting, and you're probably going to think that they're super nervous. Whilst that's okay. I think it's still better to look a bit more confident whilst you are on a stage of any kind, even if it's a webcam stage. So in order to do that, I want to do a little exercise with you. It's an eyes closed exercise, just a little short visualisation that may help you to feel more grounded and at least have a little more conscious awareness of keeping yourself still and in one place. So please join me right now so long as it's safe for you to do so. Go ahead, please close your eyes. take a nice deep breath in through your nose and out through your mouth. Okay, I want you to do is if you can move on. up into a standing position. If you can't, if the best you can do is to have your feet just flat on the floor, do that. So make sure both feet are flat on the floor. If you're standing trying to send to your weight make sure that you evenly distribute your weight over your feet that you're in a comfortable position with your hands by your side. And I want you to now visualise large heavy chains coming out of your feet out of your legs sinking into the ground. Large enormous unending chains coming out of your legs through your feet. into the ground and going right into the air right down into the centre of the air. You imagine now these chains shooting all that way down there and wrapping themselves around the centre, they're locking themselves into each other. Creating a solid grounding for you. Making sure that you're not stuck. There is still some flexibility but you feel more weighted in your feet and more inclined to stand in a strong confident position whilst you are giving any talks or presentations. Just allow that feeling to sit, feel that heaviness in your feet, that when you do move, you will move with volition you will move consciously and you will end unconscious movement, so that you look and feel more confident, like the expert that you are whilst you are talking and presenting. Okay, go ahead, open your eyes clear that mental screen. How does that feel? Now, this is not necessarily what you would classify as hypnosis even if you worried that it might be. It really is just a visualisation but hopefully it does allow you to get more of a feeling of consciousness of your feet whilst you are here right now, if you do this exercise before presenting before giving your talk or presentation, you are more likely to feel a bit more grounded. Now. Like with all these things, So many exercises you could do, before giving a talk on presentation that may help you. I would encourage you to do this one for a little while, especially if you do notice yourself shifting around unconsciously whilst you talk. Because after a little time, you will probably no longer need to keep reminding yourself to do it. It starts to become your normality when you practice these things. So especially if you are giving regular presentations, do some kind of grounding exercise, either the one that we have here, you're welcome to play that back to yourself, or your own version of it. I've heard a version that is like your feet growing this tree trunks the ground. I don't use that one so much because it gives that idea of being stuck to the spot, as trees don't really do a lot of moving other than in Disney films where they may start walking. So generally, I think the chains with a little bit of ability to move around is a better visualisation for for me. So that's why I use that, But you're welcome to use whatever is going to help you feel more grounded. And as well as that I do recommend video yourself giving your talks or watch back a video presentation or someone else's videoing it and see where there is full volitional movement and where there is unconscious movement, and do your best to correct those. Again, this isn't about needing to be perfect with all this. That's not the objective. It's really just cleaning things up a bit, so that you look more professional, and you will feel more confident when you're giving your talk or your speech or your presentation. So it's all about the delivery, right? And you will feel much better. If you want to look like a pro. You have to do the things that pros do. And this is one of those things, watch some very high class experienced presentations and speakers and you will see that you don't get much unconscious movement from them. It's nearly always all volitional. That said, there are some amazing speakers out there who do all the things that speaker trainers tell you, you shouldn't do. And are still amazing. So there's really it's just about things that may improve your ability to present and to look more confident on stage. But remember, these are not hard and fast rules. They're just suggestions that probably will benefit you. Okay, so on my next episode, I hope you'll tune into this with a guy called Nick Diakanistasis and he is very similar to me a presentation skills trainer, and he specialises in working with people who are introverts. He's a super nice guy really interesting, funny as well. And if you don't follow him on LinkedIn, I do recommend that you start he will be in my next episode. later on today from recording this particular episode. I am speaking to Matthew Dicks, the author of 'Storyworthy'. If you haven't come across that book, check it out. If you get a chance to do that before you see the podcast episode, even better Because he is an incredible storyteller, and I know you're going to love that episode. So I hope you will stay tuned, make sure you like and subscribe for future episodes of the lychee podcast. Check out some of our amazing recent guests. I've just been getting confirmation from some fantastic people who have been dreaming about getting on my podcast so I'm thrilled you will be definitely don't want to miss out on any of that. So whatever format you are tuning into the podcast, please make sure you are subscribed and don't miss our future episodes. I will look forward to seeing you on another episode very soon. Have an amazing day and rest of your week.