The Eric Ibey Podcast

#21 - Amanda Kennedy

June 24, 2020
The Eric Ibey Podcast
#21 - Amanda Kennedy
Chapters
The Eric Ibey Podcast
#21 - Amanda Kennedy
Jun 24, 2020

Amanda L. Kennedy is Haudenosaunee and an Indigenous Woman Innovator. She is an Indigenous Youth and Women Activist, Innovative Consultant, Educator and Strategic Planner.  She is a self-taught, self-made, social entrepreneur and the Founder of two social enterprises based out of her First Nation, Oneida Nation of the Thames; Kuwahs^nahawi Social Enterprise and Yotuni Charitable Initiative, an Indigenous Youth-Led Social Enterprise.

Through Kuwahs^nahawi Social Enterprise, Amanda provides advocacy, education, consultation, facilitation, and holds space for healing and wellness through story-telling, sharing circles, smudging, and teachings. By utilizing her traditional and spiritual Indigenous ways, she mindfully bridges gaps in truth and reconciliation and connects marginalized, colonized, and Indigenous People and communities mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually.  Through guiding and mentoring, she inspires and empowers Indigenous and Non-Indigenous children, youth, and adults from all walks of life. Amanda brings forth awareness and innovative education creating diversity, inclusiveness, and positive change in a kind and gentle way.  

Yotuni Charitable Initiative was founded in January 2016.  Through Traditional Indigenous ways and innovative education, Yotuni C.I supports marginalized and colonized Indigenous youth and their families through various camps, projects, and services that lean on mentorship, leadership, culture, education, teachings, and ceremonies. Amanda gives youth a voice, bringing forth healing, wellness, and breaking vicious cycles of mental health and intergenerational trauma through positive change and growth.

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This was not an easy conversation for me, but it was an important one. The fact that it made me uncomfortable was sort of the point. As a White Canadian who has grown up close to Indigenous communities, I have seen the vicious cycles of racism, oppression, and negativity between White and Indigenous people. Truthfully, I know I've contributed to those cycles and I'm trying to do better. I'm not sure what the solution to these issues is, but I do know that through honest, vulnerable dialogue like this conversation Amanda and I had together, hopefully we can start building bridges instead of burning them down.

****

You can find The Eric Ibey Podcast on Instagram!

Show Notes

Amanda L. Kennedy is Haudenosaunee and an Indigenous Woman Innovator. She is an Indigenous Youth and Women Activist, Innovative Consultant, Educator and Strategic Planner.  She is a self-taught, self-made, social entrepreneur and the Founder of two social enterprises based out of her First Nation, Oneida Nation of the Thames; Kuwahs^nahawi Social Enterprise and Yotuni Charitable Initiative, an Indigenous Youth-Led Social Enterprise.

Through Kuwahs^nahawi Social Enterprise, Amanda provides advocacy, education, consultation, facilitation, and holds space for healing and wellness through story-telling, sharing circles, smudging, and teachings. By utilizing her traditional and spiritual Indigenous ways, she mindfully bridges gaps in truth and reconciliation and connects marginalized, colonized, and Indigenous People and communities mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually.  Through guiding and mentoring, she inspires and empowers Indigenous and Non-Indigenous children, youth, and adults from all walks of life. Amanda brings forth awareness and innovative education creating diversity, inclusiveness, and positive change in a kind and gentle way.  

Yotuni Charitable Initiative was founded in January 2016.  Through Traditional Indigenous ways and innovative education, Yotuni C.I supports marginalized and colonized Indigenous youth and their families through various camps, projects, and services that lean on mentorship, leadership, culture, education, teachings, and ceremonies. Amanda gives youth a voice, bringing forth healing, wellness, and breaking vicious cycles of mental health and intergenerational trauma through positive change and growth.

****

This was not an easy conversation for me, but it was an important one. The fact that it made me uncomfortable was sort of the point. As a White Canadian who has grown up close to Indigenous communities, I have seen the vicious cycles of racism, oppression, and negativity between White and Indigenous people. Truthfully, I know I've contributed to those cycles and I'm trying to do better. I'm not sure what the solution to these issues is, but I do know that through honest, vulnerable dialogue like this conversation Amanda and I had together, hopefully we can start building bridges instead of burning them down.

****

You can find The Eric Ibey Podcast on Instagram!