The Sportscasters Club Radio Show

Is Tony Romo worth $17 Million?

March 01, 2020 Rick Schultz Episode 9
The Sportscasters Club Radio Show
Is Tony Romo worth $17 Million?
Chapters
The Sportscasters Club Radio Show
Is Tony Romo worth $17 Million?
Mar 01, 2020 Episode 9
Rick Schultz

CBS recently re-signed their lead NFL color analyst, Tony Romo, to a deal worth $17 Million per season! But does he deserve it? We answer that question in this quick edition of the Sportscasters Club Online Radio Show.

Much more - including our sports broadcasting books, our 7-hour online course and tons of free articles and sportscasting tips at SportscastersClub.com

Also, join our free Facebook group - search for the "Sportscasters Club Community"

Thanks for listening! (and for subscribing, liking, sharing, etc, etc, etc)

Show Notes Transcript

CBS recently re-signed their lead NFL color analyst, Tony Romo, to a deal worth $17 Million per season! But does he deserve it? We answer that question in this quick edition of the Sportscasters Club Online Radio Show.

Much more - including our sports broadcasting books, our 7-hour online course and tons of free articles and sportscasting tips at SportscastersClub.com

Also, join our free Facebook group - search for the "Sportscasters Club Community"

Thanks for listening! (and for subscribing, liking, sharing, etc, etc, etc)

spk_0:   0:00
Tony Rome. Oh God, how much money to stay at

spk_1:   0:03
CBS? Welcome to the Sportscasters Club radio show, where it's all about becoming a better sportscaster on a better sports fan. And now your host, Rick Shults. Welcome to the Sportscasters Club online radio show. A little bit different format today. Just a quick little program to talk about the news recently that Tony Romo is staying with CBS, not only staying with CBS, but he will be the highest paid television analyst in TV sports history. $17 million a year for Tony Romo. And I've seen

spk_0:   1:00
so much over the past 24 hours on Twitter on Facebook on all the social media platforms, and it seems like most people are saying, Oh my goodness, how can you give $17 million to a guy broadcasting football and does he deserve it? And yes, he does, or no, he doesn't. So let's answer that question first. Does he deserve $17 million? My answer. Absolutely. Of course he deserves it. And there's only one reason why, because someone's willing to pay for it if someone's willing to pay you whatever it is for broadcasting a football game four doing your taxes for washing your windows for fixing your plumbing for operating on your heart. If someone's willing to pay you for that talent in that skill in that ability, then yes, you deserve it. If someone's not willing to pay you that, then no, you don't deserve it. It's a simple is that the market? The market dictates supply and demand dictates. Is someone willing to pay that price for your expertise? And really, when you look at Tony Romo, they're not. When you break it down, they're not necessarily paying him for the work that he'll do on these couple dozen football games in a season. They're paying for his expertise that he's developed over a lifetime and a career and expertise that came from a 17 years in the NFL, his expertise that came from 14 years in the NFL for his expertise that came from being in the broadcast booth already, his expertise from just being around football his entire life. That's what they're paying for. And so those 14 years in the NFL gave him ah, background that led to his position with CBS, and then his performance when he's there has made the executive say You know what? He's worth $17 million a year now to be our our lead analyst for NFL broadcasts. Now, at the same time, my philosophy is nobody tunes in to hear the broadcaster, and I think that holds true that that was a mantra, that Marty Glickman talk to us about it for them 20 years ago, 25 years ago. The only person who tunes in for the broadcaster is his mother, and I think that's true, because if I'm putting my feet up on a Sunday afternoon and popping open the chips and opening, ah, cold soda, I'm not tuning in because Tony Romo's broadcasts in the game I'm tuning in because I want to see the game. If it's Ah, game, I want to see a broadcast. I want to see if the Chiefs bills. I'm tuning in to see it. I'm not tuned in to see Tony Rome over Jim Nance or any broadcaster, for that matter. Kevin Burkhardt might be a special just because I've known him and I used to broadcast with him when I was in college and we called 2030 games together, basketball and football back when we were both 20 years old, 2122. Kevin might be the only exception to that, but I know a lot of broadcasters in the industry, and I don't necessarily tune in to hear them. Spero di, This is another. You know when when college basketball is on and Spiro is at the mike Just because we were classmates at Fordham, Maybe I tune in tear Spiro. It's probably more accurate to say I stay on the game to hear Spiro or Kevin. I'm not necessarily tuning in for that, and I think the same holds true for Tony Romo. I'm not tuning into a game based on anyone. Analyst John Madden was great. I really enjoyed Gruden also, some I like more than others. Tony Romo's fantastic, but I'm not necessarily tuning into the game specifically for him. So does he deserve the 17 million? Yes, he deserves the 17 million someone's willing to pay him for it, and the executives obviously feel that him being there as a credibility factor as an expertise that's going to increase the amount that that they're going to get over their TV partnership over the length of the term. It's at least a three year deal. And if CBS extends their partnership with the NFL, it could go much longer for Tony Romo. But 17 year? Not bad. He only earned more than that as a quarterback three times over his 14 year career. I think he made about 100 and 25 million over his 14 year career and now 17 million per. It's hard for for most fans to wrap their head around those numbers, but it basically comes down to Is someone willing to pay you for it? Do you bring that much value? And the feeling by the executives of CBS is that if if we have Tony Roma's part of our NFL package, we can charge that much more to advertisers to be part of it, and it's gonna make our entity in our franchise that much more valuable, and so they're probably right on that. But me as a sports fan, I never tune in just

spk_1:   6:23
to see a broadcaster. Advertisers have different needs in different thought processes when they're thinking about that. So Tony Romo, congratulations. Looking forward to another season and other three plus seasons of him calling games as an analyst for CBS. 17 year. Not bad if you can get it. And thank you for listening to the Sportscaster Club online radio show and also thank you for subscribing sharing this with any sports fan or sportscaster that you know. Thanks for listening to The Sportscasters Club radio show at sportscasters club dot com. Don't forget to subscribe, so you will never miss an episode. And thanks for liking sharing, posting reviews and spreading the word.