The Brad Weisman Show

America's Credit Expert - Rondi Lambeth

February 22, 2024 Brad Weisman, Realtor
The Brad Weisman Show
America's Credit Expert - Rondi Lambeth
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Have you ever felt the weight of financial stress pressing down on you, clouding your future?  Our latest conversation with Rondi Lambeth, known as America's Credit Expert, offers an exploration into the transformative power of credit literacy.  Rondi, a former firefighter, narrates his compelling journey to becoming a beacon of hope for those drowning in credit despair.  He emphasizes the often-overlooked link between financial hardship and personal well-being, sharing a tale woven with tragedy and grit, and reminds us that a poor credit score is not a life sentence but a challenge waiting to be overcome.

Understanding your FICO credit score might seem as complex as decoding an ancient language, but we break it down with clear, actionable insights.  We delve into the reasons why an archaic model like FICO Model 2 still anchors the mortgage industry, how inquiries and new accounts affect your creditworthiness, and the distinct landscape of building business credit.  This episode is a treasure trove of strategies for entrepreneurs and anyone aiming to navigate the waters of credit scores and emerge financially stronger.

Finally, strap in for an emotional ride with the story of a former medevac helicopter pilot, whose resilience in the face of near-fatal accidents and a grueling health battle brings new meaning to the word 'survivor.'  His experiences, from paramotoring with Navy SEALs to experimental treatments for catastrophic injuries, lay out a blueprint for tackling adversity. Through his calm, strategic response to life's chaos, this expert teaches us not just how to survive, but how to thrive amid the most daunting of life's challenges.  #creditexpert #creditscore #rondilambeth #bradweisman

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Welcome to The Brad Weisman Show (formerly known as Real Estate and YOU), where we dive into the world of real estate, real life, and everything in between with your host, Brad Weisman! 🎙️ Join us for candid conversations, laughter, and a fresh take on the real world. Get ready to explore the ups and downs of life with a side of humor. From property to personality, we've got it all covered. Tune in, laugh along, and let's get real! 🏡🌟 #TheBradWeismanShow #RealEstateRealLife #realestateandyou

Credits - The music for my podcast was written and performed by Jeff Miller.

Speaker 1:

From real estate to real life and everything in between, the Brad Wiseman show and now your host, Brad.

Speaker 2:

Wiseman. All right, there we go. We're back in the studio. I am super excited about the show. This is definitely going to jump back into the real estate realm, which we haven't done for a little bit, but we're going to talk about some interesting things that go on with credit. We have the America's Credit Expert right here, streaming in the studio with me. His name is Rondi Lambeth and we have all kinds of stuff to talk about. So, rondi, how are you doing?

Speaker 1:

I'm doing absolutely incredible.

Speaker 2:

That's great. That's good. So I want to get into that. You have had some serious situations go on in your life, but we're going to go into credit for a little bit, but then we're going to jump into some of the things that you've had recently happen to you. How did you become America's Credit Expert? I mean, what does this mean and who trained you and how do you know so much about credit?

Speaker 1:

At the in 2006,. I was a fireman, I worked for Littleton Fire Department. I was on the busiest rescue in Denver and Denver area and one day I got off shift I turned on my phone and I had just dozens of voicemails from my mother. So I call her up and she told me by my little brother, who was also a firefighter in Oregon had an accident. And so I assumed it was an accident at work, because you know we get hurt all the time. And after I started talking to her I find out my brother was behind on some bills, some medical bills, some credit cards, you know, your typical stuff. When he was young, he was 26 years old. So I grew up really, really poor no running water, no electricity. We got our food out of a dumpster. I'm the oldest of 11 kids. I left home when I was 15. So I wasn't super close with my mom because my mom, you know, had us living with the guy that used to beat the living crap out of us and put us in the hospital and torturous and was just really abusive. So I left and with her calling me, it was kind of odd. So come to find out my little brother had shot and killed himself. Oh no, and over a couple thousand dollars. Because of money, Because of money, oh, that's terrible. Yeah, money. That girl friend broke up with him because you know he stressed out about money. So I kind of went into this, I don't know and I wanted to help more people. I'm already a firefighter of the year. I'm on the busiest rescue in Denver, saving, you know, 10 to 12 people a day. But I wanted to do more and I wanted to go out and help and I did some research found 50,000 people kill themselves every year and they leave in their suicide note. It has to do with money. It's the number one cause of divorce, number one cause for heart attacks, disease, cancer. I mean stress from money problems is really the root of all evil. It's not money, it's the stress of money, yeah. And so I started down this path of helping people with money and I didn't know a lot. You know, I was a young I was 30 something years old at the time so I bought an entire set of law books from the NCLC, which is National Consumer Law Center, and I essentially put myself through law school based on specializing in credit. And I bought several thousand dollars worth of these law books and they specialized and focused on lawsuits against credit bureaus, banks and collection companies. And what went wrong? Yeah, and they did wrong to allow the consumer to sue and sometimes get up to $50 million. Wow, white V Experience a $50 million payout. So that's how I got involved in credit repair and helping people with credit. I started a nonprofit. I started doing these weekly seminars, got trained by Joel Bauer on how to do public speaking and stage stage speaking, et cetera. Started a radio show in 2010, had attorneys from all over the world, all over the nation, fly in to the radio station in San Diego and I talked about credit. And then, next thing, I know I'm nationally syndicated and now, 16 years later, have helped over half a million people increase their credit scores.

Speaker 2:

Wow, you know, and I think you know when you, when you say the word credit, you know to anybody and I know it's from, obviously, selling homes. That's what I do it is always that that everybody thinks that once they get into bad credit there's no way to get out. And I think that's. And if you think about that, if there's anything in life that you feel like you're in it and you can't get out, I can understand how people feel. The only way to get out is to not be here. You know what I mean. Seriously, that's like when people get really sick, sometimes they'll, they'll take their lives because they feel like there's no out, there's no way to get past this. So it really as much as you would think for for you and I, we'd be like all right, I'll, I'll get my credit back. You know that's not a big deal I'll get, but a lot of people don't realize that it is repairable, it's fixable, you can be, you can get it back to a 700, 750, 780, whatever you want. It just takes time.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, anything placed on a credit report can be removed from a credit report. Anything bankruptcies, charge off, short sales, collections, judgments, repos anything can be removed from a credit report because it was placed on the credit report. The key is just knowing how and what to say, when to say it, how to say it, where to send it, to get it removed and it's removed permanently. And what I want people to know is bad credit is a choice. You don't have to live with bad credit. Good point I get messages almost well. I get messages every day on how we change someone's lives. Like I said, in 16 years, we've helped over half a million people get into homes, start businesses, get business funding for their business and every week no exaggeration, brad every single week I get a message from someone that I saved their life. Thank you, every single week. People, I get them and it's you know. I have a million plus followers on social media and they'll be like hey, I started listening to you, I did what you told me to do, I followed your advice on your podcast or social media, I fixed my credit, I got married, I got a house, I got a business, I got kids. I mean their whole life changes based on their credit score, because it's the number one thing in your financial world is your credit score, and anyone can have a high 7,500, 800 credit score pretty much at any time if you know what it is, that FICO wants you to know and how to manage it, and I was trained by FICO in 2010 and there's less than a dozen of us still out there active in credit that's a FICO certified credit professional.

Speaker 2:

So can you go? What's FICO? I mean, a lot of people don't know what that is, so explain what FICO is.

Speaker 1:

FICO is the Rolls Royce or the gold standard for credit scoring models. It was developed by Bill Farron and Earl Isaac in 1956. One was a mathematician, one was an engineer. They created a very complicated algorithm that predicts the future, and they predicted the future billions of times since 1956.

Speaker 2:

And what I mean by predicting the future. You say predicting the future. I've never heard of it said that way. That's unique.

Speaker 1:

Your credit score. Let me show you something. I'm gonna switch this over, if it's okay. Yeah, sure, go ahead. So your credit score, your FICO credit score, is 300 to 850. Can you see that there?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, if you move a little bit, that's fine, that's great, great right, there's excellent.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, 300, 850. But if you put a period between the zero and the eight that's a 30% to an 85%, that is all your FICO credit score is Is what is likelihood oh interesting Of you paying your bills on time over the next two years? If you have a 300 FICO score, which is just a score, there's hundreds, literally hundreds, if not thousands, of different scores. There's trans risk, paydex, liquid, Antella, vantage. I mean, I can keep going. Yeah, but FICO is the gold standard. It's kind of like in real estate there's real estate agents and then there's real tours. Yes, exactly right.

Speaker 2:

Yeah absolutely.

Speaker 1:

It's not the same thing. No, a real tour is a professional. It belongs to the real tour association. So FICO, the gold standard, 300 to 850, 300 represents there's a 30% likelihood that you'll pay your bills on time.

Speaker 2:

Wow, I never thought of it that way.

Speaker 1:

That's all it is. Yeah. So now, when you look at your credit score, you got a 770, 77% chance you will pay your bills on time over the next two years. That's amazing. Why is it not 1,000? Because there's not 100% chance you'll pay your bills. You could die, yeah, you could lose your job, you could get cancer. So that's why they just made up the number. They just pull it in 1956, they're like ah, 300, 850. And then they trademark it.

Speaker 2:

You know it's funny. One of the questions I had for you was what is the top score? So the top score is 850.

Speaker 1:

For most FICO models. Now there's 11 FICO models. What you use as a real estate professional or what mortgage brokers use is FICO Model 2, which was developed in 1996. So imagine us using our computers with Windows 95 on it. Yes, it's not going to work very well. The reason they're still using FICO Model 2 is because the government says they have to. Oh, interesting, the government wants your and oh, it sounds crazy. I'm not going to put on a tinfoil hat and go down that road, but the government wants you to pay more in interest than you normally have to, and so they force mortgage companies use FICO Model 2, which was developed in 1996, prior to lendingtreecom, prior to creditcardscom, and inquiries have an extremely large impact on your credit score. Credit cards have an impact and your FICO Model 2 score will always be lower than your FICO 8, 9, 10, or 10T, which is the new versions.

Speaker 2:

So they do that because that's to say, you go buy a car or a house or whatever and you go and you get credit pooled three, four or five times those inquiries. I never understood this either. This is a good point those inquiries. How does that affect my credit score?

Speaker 1:

Well, depending on what model you're in, most banks are using FICO Model 8 for car loans, student loans, credit cards. Mortgage companies are the only ones that use FICO Model 2. Gotcha so FICO if you have one inquiry, or 100 inquiries in a 30-day window, it counts as one inquiry On the credit score. However, it'll show up on your credit report and you'll be denied credit because you have too many inquiries, but it doesn't impact the credit score. What impacts the credit score is opening the new trade line, because 90% of all late payments 90% of all late payments happen within the first two years of the account being open Interesting. So when you have a new account, show up on your credit report. Fico is going to automatically deflate or reduce your credit score because they're trying to predict the future. What's the likelihood of you missing a payment over the next two years? Well, you got a brand new car loan. Much higher likelihood of missing a payment. So they lower your credit score. It's not the inquiry.

Speaker 2:

It's the new account. Yeah, they're just basically saying, okay, he's got, he's got a new payment now that he might screw up on. Exactly. Yeah, it's incredible. Follow me. Now. What about a business? What about if I, you know, you have an LLC or something like that? How are we scoring that? Is there a way to score a business credit?

Speaker 1:

Absolutely yeah. So every, every business can establish business credit, but there's not a fair credit reporting act on businesses. So if I wanted to pull Apple's credit right now, I could pull Apple's, I could pull Microsoft HP's, I could pull Amazon's credit for $40 to go to Experiancom type in Microsoft, and I'll know how many bank accounts, how much money they have, who they have credit cards with, who they have airplane loans, all of it. There is no privacy for businesses. The problem with business credit is banks don't share that information with the credit bureaus. One, they don't want to pay the credit bureaus, because you got to pay the credit bureaus for them to report. And two, because there's no privacy. Wells Fargo doesn't want Bank of America to know that you got $3 million in your bank account with Wells Fargo. They don't want Bank of America to know that you have a line of credit with them, and so they suppress it. They don't report it. So it's a two-edged sword, though the biggest disadvantage of business credit is you have to build it. You have to go out of your way and go a specific order with specific vendors to get the credit score, calculate it and to build a credit report. The advantage of that is once you build your credit report and we teach people how to do this. But once you build your business credit, because Wells Fargo doesn't report you can get a loan with Wells Fargo, one with Bank of America, one with Chase, one with US Bank, one with First Bank. So what we specialize in is $100,000 microloans. So if you're a business owner and say you want to buy some multifamily or you want to buy an Airbnb or a piece of real estate, instead of trying to get a half a million-dollar real estate loan that takes all of this paperwork and you got to qualify, I can get you $500,000 line of credit with your business credit, with no financials, because they don't talk, there's no talking, so they'll know that you got $500,000 loans Unbelievable Then you can actually write a check, essentially line of credit, buy the house and then you refinance it and you know as a real estate professional a lot easier to refinance than it is to qualify originally. Because now you've got a tenant in there making them rent.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you have the asset already. The asset's there. It's not a matter of if they're going to give you the asset you already have it, you already have it Exactly. That's interesting. I do that about the. It makes sense, though, because these big like when you do LLCs and things like that there's no reporting, so there's no way for them to look and see that I have a loan with Wells Fargo or with Bank of America or whatever it would be. That's incredible, absolutely amazing. So tell me, what is you know? Years ago, they would say, to build credit and this is what we used to hear. When I first got into business, which is 30 years ago, they would say you have no credit. Okay, so no credit is sometimes worse than bad credit. Is that still the case?

Speaker 1:

It can be.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, Like young people, you know. They don't have a credit card, they don't have anything. What is their score? What is? How does it even score?

Speaker 1:

Well, it doesn't score. It'll say unrelated, unscorable. So when people say you know there's a famous radio show host, you can say his name, but I'm not going to say it. He says I have a credit, I have a zero credit score. It's not true, he's a liar. I've seen his credit report, he has an unrated credit score. There's no such thing as a zero. There is 300 to 850. It's not zero, it's either unrated, which is you are, which means they don't have anything. So your question was is no credit worse than bad credit? It depends. Yeah, if you're trying to buy a house, it's better to have no credit score than a 400 credit score. We appreciate it, because with a no credit score I could put you on a credit card today and Tomorrow you'll have a 750 credit score.

Speaker 2:

Just like that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I have over 5,000 credit cards that have access to from previous clients that I could put any of my clients on those credit cards $50,000 credit limits, 20 years of history yeah, I put them on tomorrow. It's on their credit report. Now they have a 750 800 credit score interesting, that's an interesting concept there, wow.

Speaker 2:

And then how do you? So? What do you do? Somebody comes into you and you're like, okay, how do they get in touch with you, do you do? Then have a payment thing. You say, okay, if I get your score to this, this is how much it costs. I mean, how does that work?

Speaker 1:

Well, we don't. We don't charge per score. It's a really interesting Concept and there's some people doing that right now, some credit repair companies. I'm not. I'm not, I don't own a credit repair company. I used to. Now I have a financial education Company. Yeah, we fix people's credit for free. Yeah, so you literally could go to my website, sign up, pay for your credit report, the credit repairs, absolutely free. If you want financial coaching, consulting, you want to. We have a $3,000 down payment assistance program for new homebuyers, even second homebuyers. With that, we have packages and we have, we finance all that for our clients. So for, like, business credit, we'll get you a couple hundred thousand dollars of business credit. Yeah, it's seventy five hundred dollars for the coaching, the tax planning, the debt settlement, the business in the box, and 250 grand of business credit $7,500 or $299 a month. So we have all the all different packages. Yeah, we're from 40 bucks a month, $300.

Speaker 2:

Where's the best place to find you?

Speaker 1:

Probably a fortress credit pro comm that's fortress like the castle credit, like your credit score than pro yeah Dot com professional. If you wanted to find me personally, just be ronty lambeth calm, which would be our one, di LAM Veth, or if you're lazy you can go to Google. I'm very, very lazy. I like copy and paste a lot.

Speaker 2:

But your name is not easy to remember, though ronty is not the most. Is that your given name?

Speaker 1:

That is my given name. My parents were hippies.

Speaker 2:

And I don't my mom come up with it. Somebody was smoking something I don't know.

Speaker 1:

But if you type in ronty r-o-n-d I credit it's you. You did a little bit of research. Yeah, I'm not very hard to find now.

Speaker 2:

You're not. You're not hard to find at all. Let's talk a little bit about and I want to talk about some a drink that I'm using that you might like. But let's talk about you. Two years ago, you had a major, major accident. This has not do a credit has to do with you and this is amazing. You were flying a you're a pilot, private pilot but you were flying up a power of motoring. I never knew what they were called, but it's like a power sail with a motor on it right.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, what happened more with the? It's a lawnmower engine yeah, propeller, and an oversized parachute yes.

Speaker 2:

so by the way, the way you just explained that, as a pilot myself, I don't think I'll be jumping into that seat. I mean, when you say lawnmower engine with a parachute and a prop in the back of some sort, that doesn't sound safe. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

I know I do some. Here's the whole story. I Was in the military. I was in a medevac helicopter for 15 years in the National Guard. I spent 11 years as a fireman. I was the first responder at Columbine High School shooting. I've personally been in four shootings two helicopter crashes, one airplane crash not including the one we're getting ready to talk about she's and so I had a lot. And then my dad or my stepdad used to beat the crap out of us and torture. So I had severe PTSD and I had it under control my whole life until two years ago, hmm, and instead of having one episode a year, I started having eight to ten episodes a day. Yeah, and so I'm very connected in the special ops world and Navy SEALs and stuff. So you ever read the book can't hurt me by David Goggins. I've heard it, I've heard of it. The guy that wrote that. His name is Tucker Max and he there's a whole movie made about his life. I hope they serve beer in hell. Yeah, that's his first book he read. But anyway, his wife Does PTSD therapy for the military. And so I went to Salt Lake Park City and I did PTSD therapy. Hmm, and the guy that was putting it on was a Navy SEAL. And After I went through it he's like, hey, you just did this PTSD therapy, why don't you hang out with us and the rest of the Navy SEALs and we'll go do paramotoring? I'm like what's that? He goes, you strap an airplane motor as lawnmower, yep, on your back, you start it and it launches you 15,000 feet up in the air. I'm like cool, sounds like a great time. Yes, sounds like a great time. Yeah. So first day was amazing Flying over Salt Lake, the Great Salt Lake, yeah there's over a thousand Buffalo Ranging, just free range wild animals in Salt Lake. And so here I am, the day before my crash. I'm flying within six inches of the herd of buffalo.

Speaker 2:

It's amazing.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, the second day on Launch I got up to 300 feet in, my engine quit. Not a big deal. I had a parachute, yeah, it's gonna say. Problem is Well, the instructor had us flying not the Navy SEAL but this guy that he hired. I had us flying in an area that had a bunch of buildings. The wind shifted, parachute collapse.

Speaker 2:

I felt three stories.

Speaker 1:

When I landed, my foot hit the ground and my foot stayed. My leg kept going, so I ended up ripping my foot off my leg, broke my ankle in half and I shattered my leg in over 20 places, for my knee to my ankle.

Speaker 2:

I Saw the screw, I saw the pitcher. There's like you have a lot of metal in your leg and your ankle a lot.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, my right leg for my knee down Include my ankles, all steel and titanium plates and bolts and yeah that that had been tremendous.

Speaker 2:

What was the next thing you remember after hitting? Do you remember hitting the ground and hearing that whole cracking and all that?

Speaker 1:

I won't say what. If you want to watch, it's all on Instagram, by the way, the whole thing Wow, start, finish. Um, I won't say what I said, but I'd said blank, that hurt. Oh. And then I tried standing out, standing up, and at that point I collapsed on the ground because my foot wasn't attached. And then the guys came over and they're like hey, we're going to call the fire department. I'm like, no, put me in the truck because it's volunteer fire department. I'm like I do not want to be in the back of an ambulance as they're driving through this cornfield bouncing up and down with my foot hanging off my leg. So they helped me in my truck and then they drove me to the hospital. And then I went there and they did surgery and gave me some ketamine which was absolutely incredible Ketamine and then I laid in bed for three weeks until the swelling went down. And then they did surgery and then I basically laid in bed for four months and wow yeah, you've spent a couple hundred grand on stem cells and a whole bunch of experimental therapy that within two and a half months my leg was 99% healed. The bone was healed, not the tendon. And I still struggle. I still can't run without pain, but I'm almost back.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, wow, you're lucky man. I'll tell you any higher than that you might not be telling the story. I mean if that would have happened at 300 feet. If it would have actually folded up at 300 feet, you wouldn't be really around probably.

Speaker 1:

And I think part of it, the reason I'm still here was I'm a pilot. Yeah, I spent 15 years on a Huey and we crashed twice, and so I have a superpower, and that is I don't get freaked out, yeah, and so I stayed calm the whole time. You can see it on the Instagram or the video.

Speaker 2:

I'm going to have to watch it.

Speaker 1:

I was like I'm going to land right there. That's where I landed, it's just I wasn't planning for the parachute to collapse on.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but here.

Speaker 1:

I am.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's amazing, unbelievable man, I'll tell you. And then recently, not too long ago, you had a heart attack. So you went through that, which you seem to be doing fantastic, and that's one of the things. It's funny that there's not much that I worry about or think about. Health wise Heart attack is the one thing that I always think is one of the scarier ones, because it can just come out of nowhere. Out of nowhere, you think everything's good and then next thing you know it's not.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I was working out. I'm very healthy. I work out a couple of times a day. I'm climbing Mount Everest next year. To give you an idea, nice, I'm a health nut, I'm a biohacker and in August I had an ultrasound down in my heart, my legs, everything is perfect. Yeah, and four weeks ago, saturday after Thanksgiving, I'm walking my dog. I get home, take a drink of water, feels like someone's ripping my arms off, like the brave heart moment. Yes, the brave heart moment when they're ripping his arms off. That's literally what it felt like. Wow, instantly pain. And I looked at my Apple watch. It's all wonky. The heart rate's messed up, the pulse. Ox, did you get the sweaty?

Speaker 2:

vomiting feeling. Nope, because that's one that people talk about.

Speaker 1:

I did not have a heart attack at that moment. Ok, I didn't have the heart attack until about 15 minutes later, when I was in the ER oh right, because I'm only four miles from the hospital, which is why I'm still sitting here. I had what's called the SCAD spontaneous cardiac artery dissection. I had three arteries in my heart spontaneously rupture. That doesn't sound good and they just ripped open and were bleeding out, and that's why it was so much pain, like someone was ripping my arms off, which then resulted in a heart attack, because then it tried clotting and then it blocked those three arteries. Unbelievable, unbelievable. It's really rare. It's about one out of every 10 million people have a SCAD. It's not health related, it's not diet related.

Speaker 2:

It's just the way it is.

Speaker 1:

It's stress, and I believe it was stress and COVID, because COVID creates a lot of problems for heart. Yeah, I was never vaccinated, but I had COVID a couple of times and they don't know.

Speaker 2:

They literally they don't know.

Speaker 1:

It's like Mayo cliniccom and you type in scad. They say it's common with young women in labor.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so how's the baby in labor, how's the baby doing?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, does not talk about men at all. Like it just doesn't happen very often. Fortunately, I was right next to the hospital and I got in and within an hour I had I was on the operating table fixing me up. Yeah, good, good, good, they're pretty good Well that's good.

Speaker 2:

Hey, you say you're into the health stuff. I had a question for you Are you taking any of the new tropics or have you read about the new tropics and stuff like the lion's mane, mushroom and all things Every day, every day, seriously.

Speaker 1:

Every day I take it. In fact, I got a stem cell patch on my neck right now. Interesting.

Speaker 2:

So I started drinking this thing called yeah, what's it called? Magic mind, and it's got the new trope. It's the new trope, it's got the matcha and it's got ashwagandha stuff. So what do you when you're taking any kind of a new trope, do you feel much better?

Speaker 1:

I do, and as long as I don't drink a bunch of caffeine I do exceptional. It's like limitless. Yeah, yeah, the pill, the pill.

Speaker 2:

So that's what I get out of it.

Speaker 1:

I take it every day and then I take a little bit of I, I microdose mushrooms at night.

Speaker 2:

Yep, there you go. Yeah, well, this has all that stuff in it. I'll tell you what I've known the clarity Like I feel, like I have a clearer mind from taking it and I don't drink as much coffee I drink like one cup now and I'll drink this with it Pretty amazing Boost my energy. I feel like my stresses last things like that. So I'll tell you. If anybody's out there wants to try something, I know you're trying. You're taking it. I think this is awesome, amazing Magic. Mind is what I'm using. So, if you get a chance to check it out, is there anything else you could tell me? If somebody's to end up to show somebody's having credit problems, what, what's? They should know that there's a fix for it. They can fix it. What? Any advice that you want to give them right off the bat?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I would say. If you're having credit problems and you know money's tight for you and you just want to have a higher credit score, if you go to my website, creditmojoai creditmojoai, we will let you use our software that's helped over half a million people fix their credit for free. You pay for the credit report, you put your username, password, the credit monitor in and our system will automatically create everything for you and do everything for you Absolutely free. That's amazing. The next thing I would do is, if you want a higher credit score, you need three credit cards on your credit report at all times, three Interesting Of three. You need to use those three every single month and you need to keep your utilization rate below 5%, not 30% Interesting. How'd they come up with 30%? Because that's what banks tell real estate professionals, mortgage brokers and everybody else. Because banks make more money, the lower your credit score. So they tell you 30 to 50%. If I go, the guys that actually create the score say 5%.

Speaker 2:

Because they have nothing in it. They're not making any money from that.

Speaker 1:

The banks are. They don't care what your score is. That's amazing. Banks make money from lower credit scores. So with all of that stuff, I give all that information away on social media as well. At creditmojoai. Creditmojoai, all of that is free, it's all included, and I do that because I'm trying to help people that are maybe in a situation like my little brother was. I don't want people killing themselves over a credit score, a financial problem, and then if you want coaching or financial assistance with business credit or down payment assistance on the house, of course we have those other packages that you can reach out to me on that.

Speaker 2:

Awesome man. I appreciate all the help with this. I learned a lot today. Seriously, what's amazing? I've been doing real estate for 30 years. I've been sold over probably 2,000 homes in that time and have done lots of loans and been right next to the loans being done and people have had credit issues and there's so much that we don't know, the public doesn't know. It's incredible. It's almost like there's secrets there. They want you to have bad credit and it seems like it is because the banks make more money when you have worse credit. Amazing.

Speaker 1:

It really is the banks. The lower your credit score, the more money the banks make, and that's really the unfortunate thing, the way the system is set up.

Speaker 2:

Unbelievable. Thanks so much for coming out here today. I appreciate it. I know our listeners were going to appreciate this. We will talk to you soon and get some updates on what's going on with credit. All right, thanks a lot, rodney. There you have it, rodney Lambeth man. I'll tell you what the America's credit expert and boy is that true. I mean, he is just giving us all kinds of information. You can go to his website. You can go anywhere you want. Just look up RONDI lambeth, l, a, m B E T H and he will help you out. All right, that's about it for today. We will see you next Thursday at 7pm, all right?

America's Credit Expert
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Credit Expert, Rodney Lambeth

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