Armchair Historians

Kevin Kuharic, Part 1, The Mysterious Frenchman and All Stay Safe and Wash Your Hands

April 28, 2020 Anne Marie Cannon
Armchair Historians
Kevin Kuharic, Part 1, The Mysterious Frenchman and All Stay Safe and Wash Your Hands
Chapters
Armchair Historians
Kevin Kuharic, Part 1, The Mysterious Frenchman and All Stay Safe and Wash Your Hands
Apr 28, 2020
Anne Marie Cannon

In episode 1 we talk to my dear friend Kevin Kuharic, executive director of Hotel de Paris Museum, about entrepreneur and hotelier Louis Dupuy and the things Kevin has discovered about Louis's interest in sanitary science and how he proceeded to implement his knowledge into practice at Hotel de Paris in the late 19th century. It's a timely discussion in which we compare notes with today's reality and practices in the face of the new world pandemic.

We also talk to 6-year-old Finley about his thoughts on the Coronavirus, how it has affected him and his family and his message of hope for everyone.

Additional Resources

Hotel de Paris website

The Influence of Epidemics on Hotel Keeping

Hotel de Paris Facebook Page

Hotel de Paris Youtube Page with Hotel de Paree playlist

To Support Armchair Historians:

Patreon

Ko-fi



Show Notes Transcript

In episode 1 we talk to my dear friend Kevin Kuharic, executive director of Hotel de Paris Museum, about entrepreneur and hotelier Louis Dupuy and the things Kevin has discovered about Louis's interest in sanitary science and how he proceeded to implement his knowledge into practice at Hotel de Paris in the late 19th century. It's a timely discussion in which we compare notes with today's reality and practices in the face of the new world pandemic.

We also talk to 6-year-old Finley about his thoughts on the Coronavirus, how it has affected him and his family and his message of hope for everyone.

Additional Resources

Hotel de Paris website

The Influence of Epidemics on Hotel Keeping

Hotel de Paris Facebook Page

Hotel de Paris Youtube Page with Hotel de Paree playlist

To Support Armchair Historians:

Patreon

Ko-fi



Speaker 1:

Thank you for joining us today for armchair historians. I'm your host, Ann Marie Cannon . Armchair historians is a Belgian rabbit production. Stay up to date with us through Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, wherever you listen to your podcast. That is where you'll find us. You can also find [email protected]

Speaker 2:

welcome. Welcome to our very first episode and thank you for finding armchair historians. I'm so excited about this new podcast and especially about my guest on our first episode. I do want to let you know that Belgian rabbit productions produces another podcast, last train leaving Belgium, which is supplemental to a documentary of the same name that I am also working on. For more information, go to last train, leaving belgium.com and you can also follow on social media, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Last train leaving Belgium offers a closeup look of children caught in the crossfires of world war two specifically in Belgium. One more thing before we get started, I just want to remind you to be sure to listen through to the end of the podcast where you're going to find a very special ongoing segment. We're calling the kids corner for now. Today. My great nephew who's also a great nephew is going to be talking about the Corona virus. Let's get on with what we're here for. Q, the background,

Speaker 1:

the music, the music is your first clue and I'll give you one more mysterious Frenchmen .

Speaker 3:

[inaudible] welcome

Speaker 2:

to our very first episode of armchair historian and today our guest is Kevin [inaudible] who is a dear friend of mine, but he's also going to give me street cred because he is actually a professional historian and I'm going to tell you a little bit about what his background is and then we'll start. So , uh , Kevin [inaudible] fundraises manages projects, monitors compliance with historic preservation standards and promotes history through heritage tourism. He serves as executive director of hotel de Paris museum, a site of the national trust for historic preservation. He's writing history and art appreciation books about Oakland cemetery in Georgia. In addition, mr [inaudible] has contributed to the books. James Novelli , a forgotten sculptor building, metropolitan Atlanta, past, present and future urban green innovative parks for resurgent cities. Atlanta's Oakland cemetery, an illustrated history and guide and cultural heritage tourism. Five steps for success and sustainability. Kevin [inaudible] has also received preservation awards from Atlanta mayors, Maynard Jackson, bill Campbell, Shirley Franklin, and Kaseem Reed . Why are you even my friend? Don't be crazy. Kevin appears on the screen before me wearing a Navy suit jacket, light blue dress shirt with the shades of blue and yellow modified Paisley pocket square took neatly into his suit pocket. So when I say, why are you even my friend? I mean in a self effacing tongue, in cheek sort of way. He's got an air of Polish in class about him. But when you sit down and talk to him and really get to know him, you find out that he is kind and warm and inviting. Not only does Kevin have a great sense of style, he's an accomplished professional in the field of historical preservation, but somehow for reason, unbeknownst to me, we have become good friends and partners in crime. Well, welcome to the program. Welcome to the program and thanks for being here.

Speaker 4:

Well, I appreciate the invitation. Looking forward to exploring a little bit of history with you.

Speaker 2:

So , uh , every program starts with the leading question, which is , uh, what's your favorite history?

Speaker 4:

It's not an easy answer for me. And so I've, I've put some thought into this. You were nice enough to give me a heads up and I waffled for a while and then I understood what the answer was and it changes over time. So when I was a child, I was very interested in Colorado mining towns and then when I left Colorado and began my career in Atlanta in historic preservation, became Victorian burial grounds and then moving back to Colorado to a mining town once again it became mining towns.

Speaker 2:

That's interesting out . I also forgot to say that , uh , Kevin is , uh , speaking to us through go to meeting app because we are in the day and age of coronavirus and we're all on stay at home orders from our governor in Colorado. So he is speaking to me from his home in Georgetown, Colorado and I am not the same room with them. I'm in my , uh , sound studio also in Georgetown, Colorado. That was a lot. You really gave a thoughtful answer to that question, which I definitely appreciate. We can't really talk about all those different histories today because we're limited in time. So I want to ask you, what is your favorite history that you're going to be talking about today?

Speaker 4:

Well, that would be Louie to please hotel de Paris and Georgetown, Colorado. The site that I operate

Speaker 2:

and specifically we're going to talk about something that's related to what we're going through in the world today.

Speaker 4:

That's right. It is topical for sure. I'd like to discuss epidemics and hotel keeping,

Speaker 2:

how, how uh, timely and perfect for the day and age. And that sounded stupid. So I'm cutting that out of it.

Speaker 4:

What I realized was , um , on the very last tour I gave before the stay at home order, I realized how much I discuss sanitary science, health and human safety on the tour. And we have for years, but it is so topical and so timely. It's really occupied my thoughts to the point where I went through Louie to police extensive library and pulled about five books off the shelves, dealing with , um, health and home keeping and sanitation. And I'm really trying to get into his brain a little bit , um, as, as we'll discuss, he was , um , a bit of a germaphobe and in my opinion.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So let's, let's stop there. Let's talk about , uh , Louis deeply and who he is. Sure . Tell us about Louis deeply .

Speaker 4:

He has many nicknames. He's known as the mysterious Frenchmen . He's known as the best cook in the Colorado territory. He has been called French Louie and the hotel Prince. He's also known as the oddest host in America. And his probably most elevated title is the father of domestic science and America or home economics, as we call it today. He was a freshmen born in Allen Sohn in Normandy in 1844. His parents were in keepers and at the age of 15, they wanted a better life for him than in keeping, so they sent him to a seminary for an education and an exchange. He had to become a priest. He did not find this to be as calling. So at 19, he orchestrated a scandal and was expelled. And that began his journey in life. He's really a great example of a young person who's undisciplined and their own worst enemy. And when he would create trouble for himself, his was typically the geographic cure, leaving the area and going to the next area and they're making a mistake there. And then leaving that area. So through a very circuitous route, he finds his way to Colorado, initially works in a warehouse in Denver selling Buffalo heads and hides. And then he goes back to some journalistic roots of his and he becomes first a paper boy or a newspaper carrier for the Rocky mountain news. And then when it's discovered by the editor of the news that deeply can write , he sent to the high country to write about silver. So this is how we get him up into our area of Breckenridge and Dillon and silver plume and Georgetown. Um, he was two things in the mining camps. He was a reporter and a camp cook. And so this is how he gets his reputation of being the best cook in the Colorado territory. But after a falling out with the editor of the paper, William Byers over immigration, which another very topical subject , um, buyers was anti-immigration and publishing articles to that effect. Uh, Depuis was an immigrant working for buyers and felt , um, uncomfortable. And so that friction led him to quit the paper, become a miner . And then , um, in short order, he was nearly killed in a mining accident in which he was , um, he lost sight and is permanently in his left eye, but he saved other men's lives. And so this was really his big crossroads in life where he could once and for all reinvent himself in the West and he decides to go back to his roots, go back to his end , keeping roots and embrace , um, really his, his personal DNA. And so he opens a little first-class French restaurant in a hotel and a former bakery called Delmonico bakery. And , um , eventually becomes world famous for his cooking, his and his hosting.

Speaker 2:

And that becomes

Speaker 4:

hotel de Paris, the legendary hotel to Paris,

Speaker 2:

the legendary hotel de Paris. That was a lot of information that I feel like I'm going to keep going back and listening to because you have hit on so many concise points and you know how much I love people who can consolidate a lot of information into a few words. And there was just so much information in that. And how did you get drawn into Louis Dupuis and his story? Uh, specifically , uh, the, the one thing we're going to talk about today is has interests in sanitary science at this time.

Speaker 4:

I think what appeals to me most about Louis Depuis

Speaker 2:

is his

Speaker 4:

resilience and his belief in himself. He didn't always have the best opportunities, but he gets to a place in his life where he is going to make a change and to become disciplined and he starts to reap the rewards of that. So he was a very undisciplined young man creating trouble every step of the way for himself, not so much for others. And which I think a lot of us can relate to that. Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. And , um, he's really kind of a self made man or a Renaissance person if you will. And so I really appreciate the uh, soul searching that I think he does, especially when he has a brush with death. I think that soul searching is something that not everybody does in his or her life, but I think it's a very necessary exercise to understand oneself, take ownership of what you can, get rid of things that maybe are baggage and really hone in on who you are. Another part of the story that I really like his story is that he goes back to his roots and this is where he finds his greatest success. He's interested in many things and he's thrown into many arenas, some of which he's comfortable with, some he's not. And he ends up coming back to the beginning and that's where, how does he come back to the beginning when he's nearly killed in a mining accident. He is then recuperating under the care of nuns here in Georgetown, sisters of Saint Joseph, Saint Joseph, Missouri. This was before they built a hospital in Georgetown. They were taking in charity cases. So he becomes a charity case of the church. And by then he had lost his faith in the Catholic church. So he was groomed to be a Prince or

Speaker 5:

[inaudible] take two.

Speaker 4:

He was groomed to be a priest, but it was not his calling. So the way he gets out of this obligation to be a priest, because in trade he gets a formal education. He goes to the cathedral at the seminary at SAIS France, and this is where he was boarding and where he was being schooled. And he decides to commit sacrilege against the sacrament. And the way he does this, he's in a mass or conducting communion. He accepts the communion, wafers, chews on it and spits it out onto the floor of the church. This is just a great example of a young man who's creating trouble in his life. His response to the consequences is the geographic cure. He leaves the area and he goes to Paris and he really of course, doesn't know what his future holds. And so he goes to his roots a little bit. He, he goes back to a familiar part of his life, which is , um , hotels and restaurants in keeping, and so he gets employed by a hotel restaurant in Paris. Um, I have the feeling it might be cafe Della PEI , which is still in business. It's right there by Lopera. He was washing dishes, so he was at the bottom rung of his career and that he decides to become an apprentice cook training to become a chef. But after about a year of formal training, and of course, remember he brings with him the experience of cooking and keeping from his youth. Um, so he's got that DNA and that he's got some formal skills, but he doesn't feel it's for him. And so he quits cooking after about a year and he becomes a journalist in London, England.

Speaker 2:

Okay. I want to backtrack there for a second because as you can see in the video, which if you're just listening to the podcast, you won't see, I am wearing a bra and I'm wearing the bra in honor of Louis Dupuis , but also in honor of my , uh, personal heritage , uh, French. My mother , uh, grew up in France. Uh, she was half Belgian, half French. And when you were talking about Louis Duffy go into seminary, that just, it triggers so much in me because I am a former Catholic. I was raised by a French woman who was, you know, raised in the, the traditions of the Catholic church. And I eventually leave the Catholic church, but at the same time I do, there are similarities in my story. I do come back to the Catholic church for comfort at times, like when my father passes away and the rituals of the church. And um, there's just, there's a lot for me personally that I can relate to. Uh , Louise story cause since we're friends and you are the executive director of the hotel de Paris, I know a lot about him. I love that I can just walk up the street and hang out with you when you're giving tours during the day or you know, go to all the events there. And part of it is my own, you know, connection to the heritage. And I love that about him. I love. I also love the fact that yeah, this is your job, but it's more than just your job. And what I know from you is that, you know, there's other museums in town or museums that we talk about and there's executive directors who don't necessarily connect to the person in history whose story it is the way that you connect to Louie . And that's one of the things that I love about listening to you talk about Louie and I never get sick of it. It's because you're constantly finding new things, the details. You're always learning new things. You don't know everything about him and you're open to learning new things about him and you're constantly sharing that information with uh , the public and the people who come to the hotel. What is it that resonates with you as a person about Louie's story,

Speaker 4:

his resiliency and his ability to embrace opportunity? Um, in a nutshell, I would say second chances. His story is really about second chances and that meshes so well with the Western experience of reinvention. People were just looking for an opportunity. I think we're all looking for opportunity,

Speaker 2:

especially up here in the mountains in Colorado and Georgetown. I see that a lot and I, I have that experience as well. I came here because I was looking for a change, looking for an opportunity in my life. And um, I think it's interesting that he comes here and I mean he does it all. He does it all. He's first he's in seminary, then he's working in restaurants in France and then he comes, Oh, and then he's a journalist. You were just starting to talk about his journalism career in France and then it's almost like he comes back and goes through all the paces again, but with the new, the new perspective of his experiences and his age and um, it's, it's almost like he, he's constantly refining himself based on his history and what he's learned from his history.

Speaker 4:

He's a person who is self-critical after he does his soul searching, he holds himself to a standard and it's self-imposed. He expects things of himself and he becomes accountable not only for his present, but he tries to mop up his mistakes of the past. I mean , an example of that is the unfinished education. Um , when he leaves the seminary, when he gets to a point in his life where he has free time and expendable income because of his business success at the hotel, what he does is he invests in a large personal library, which was once described as the finest in the state and it has survived in tact and still onsite at the hotel. And what he does with this, of course, it is a status symbol for him because of the immense investment in a resource like that, a personal resource like that. It's not a public library, it was a personal library, but he's using it to go back and finish his education on his own. And so this is that accountability and that structure and that discipline that he was as a young man. And the best example is how he really goes back and expect something from himself. He does this in several arenas in his life. One is education, but one other arena that he leaves really for last and never really masters is his relationships with women. He gets to that in his fifties when he does decide to get married? No, he, I would describe him as a womanizer and as a Playboy about town. Sounds like my grandfather. The Frenchman . So is there, what else do we need to know about Louis deplete . You started telling us about, I think I interrupted you. You were talking about how he went to, I think you went to Paris. Where did he go to be a journalist? He went to London and worked as a journalist for about a year. His assignment was reviews and translation, so he spoke four languages, his native French, Latin because of the church, German and English. And then after a year of working in England, he decided that he wanted to come to the United States. And that was about 1867 so the American, excuse me. So the American civil war was over. He wanted to come to the States and so he returns to France. He goes to the port city of LA, he gets on the American vessel. Harpswell Harpswell interestingly was constructed in 1855 in Harpswell, Maine. And it was constructed by slaves . So it was a slave guilt ship, not a slave ship, but a slave built ship. And it was for commerce and passengers. It was carrying freight across the Atlantic between New York and France. And um, so it's transporting goods and passengers both directions. And this is how he gets to the United States and goes into journalism in New York city. But he's young, he's foreign. No one knows his name, so you would be writing articles that he sells. So freelancing basically, but his plan falls apart and he suddenly broke and desperate and he's desperate enough to plagiarize. He takes someone else's article and sells it to the editor of Frank. Leslie's illustrated newspaper, the biggest newspaper of the day. And of course the editor recognizes the article as someone else's. And so this is more trouble that is created. And again, the response is the geographic here. And so he moves from New York , um, um, courtesy of the U S army by enlisting in the U S army. And what I haven't told you is that he , uh , has two names. And this is why. Yes, this is why he , he's known as the mysterious Frenchman . So his given name is eight . All Francoise Gerard , but he takes on the name, the alias, the assumed name Louis Depuis . Um, due to his, his trouble in the army. So he enlisted in the army to get out of New York. He's shipped West. He first lands in Fort Riley, Kansas. And after that he makes his way to the Wyoming , uh , territory to Cheyenne, Wyoming to Fort Russell , which today you would know as Warren air force base . He was a clerk in the army. So it was sort of a cushy post that he had. He would have been assigned to clerk because he was literate. He was working as a journalist. So he speaks four languages. He reads any rights, but there were problems with the army at that time. Of course, Cheyenne being so distant from Washington, D C there was very little oversight. So here in the West, the desertion rate was one third, quite high. So what year was that again? This would be about 1869. And he ends up eight . All Francoise Gerard enlisted man deserting the U S army at Fort Russell . At that time, the punishment for desertion was execution. And so a very serious offense, this is when Adolf Francoise Girard adopts the name. Louis Depuis not legally just begins calling himself that and it's really to save his own skin. So he becomes a man . Do you know why he picked that particular name? I haven't fairy about this name. Louis Depuis . I did some research and I found an 18th century Louis [inaudible] who was a scholar and translator. Well Adolf Francoise Girard was a scholar in translator, so I and French. And so I feel that that was enough of an overlap that he saw himself in this other person and uh , took on that name. He would refuse to talk about his past. He would say something along the lines of what past, what's past is unimportant. I only look towards the future. So this keeps people at Bay.

Speaker 2:

That's a very French thing too. I'll tell you, cause my mother would say very similar things. She never liked to talk about the past. Not that she really had anything to hide, but it was a thing. And I'm wondering if that's, I mean, I'm just saying it's a very French thing because of my own experience, but it seems like there is a certain kind of attitude there,

Speaker 4:

you know, nose to the ,

Speaker 2:

uh , full steam ahead kind of thing. I dunno . But of course he does. He does have something to hide. He doesn't want to be executed. I mean that was, that was , uh , that was a drastic solution to , uh, his situation. It's , it's like he keeps getting, making these decisions and getting in more and more hot water.

Speaker 4:

Right. And what's interesting , um , because I know no , his secret , um, and of course we, we, we share it , um, through our tour and , and interpretation of the site. So it's no secret any longer. But , um, there are people who still survive to this day by doing something similar. They start, they , they do a geographic cure. They start calling themselves by a different name and it tends to work for a while. Um, but I think people typically, if they live long enough, get to a point where all must be revealed. There's an indication I have that Louise started to soften a little bit in his fifties and began sharing a little bit more about his past with some of his friends and confidence and family members. I think there were, I would say there were at least three people who knew that Louis Dupuis was sort of a concocted character, a persona. Um, then that would be a relative who worked for him. The housekeeper was a French housekeeper, Sophie galley who was a short tail relative. She would have known him as Adolf . It was keeping a secret in order to , um , you know , protect him.

Speaker 2:

So how do we know, how do we know about this? How do we know this, this secret? Is it something that you discovered? Is it something that has been known since, you know , when do we see this , uh, you know, in the books or whatever you want to call it.

Speaker 4:

He is, his secret identity is disclosed the day after he dies in the form of his obituary. So one of the three people who knew his secret past was a man by the name of Jesse Randall . Jesse Randall lived here in Georgetown, Colorado. He was the editor of the Georgetown courier, the local newspaper at the time. And because our Louis Dupuis was a former journalist, they had things in common, so they become friends and confidence. So he shares with Jesse his secret at some point. And then Louis gets sick in August of 1900 and it gets worse instead of better. He contracts pneumonia after five weeks of bed rest . And then when he dies, Jesse prints a lengthy obituary and the Georgetown courier, the day after Louie dies, it's the first time he's called the mysterious Frenchman and all is revealed. It is what I refer to as a warts and all account of Louie's life. It talks about the successes, but it does not shy away from the mistakes and the two identities.

Speaker 2:

So do you think that that was a betrayal of their friendship or do you think that was something that Louie , uh , approved of or would have approved of?

Speaker 4:

I really don't know.

Speaker 1:

Let's stop there for today with the Kevin [inaudible] interview, but stay with us because we have something very special coming up. You know what a podcast is?

Speaker 6:

Yeah. A podcast is like something that you listen to.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's exactly. So Ann Ann is starting a new podcast and it's called armchair historian. And every episode I'm going to have a kids corner where I talk to a kid about usually something to do with history. Finley and I talked about a lot of things in this interview, but for this episode I'm just going to include the part where we talked about the Corona virus and how it's affecting his life or his spindly likes to call it Corona. Okay. So this is my mask. So do you have a um ,

Speaker 6:

no, my moms , they know what this is for. Yeah. What's it for ? It's, it's to keep the virus away. What virus? The Corona virus.

Speaker 2:

Oh, okay. So tell me about that. What do you know about the Corona virus?

Speaker 6:

I know, I know. Like it kills people sometimes and yeah.

Speaker 2:

And a lot of times, a lot of times it doesn't kill people too. But the reason why we gotta be careful is because people who are, you know , vulnerable or sick can get really sick. Right. So that's why. So what have you been doing because of it? What has changed in your life?

Speaker 6:

I do an online school.

Speaker 2:

Oh, okay. So did you use to actually go to your school to go to school before the Corona virus?

Speaker 6:

Good. But like that, then we went out of school, then we , then we didn't go back to school yet.

Speaker 2:

So what's your favorite thing about staying home?

Speaker 6:

That I get to like build the , with my leg and stuff.

Speaker 2:

Oh, do you have any of your Legos? You can show me later and I'll put it up on my website for the podcast.

Speaker 6:

Okay . Because it's pretty cool.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I know you've called me a couple of times and showed me some of the cool stuff you have. Yeah .

Speaker 6:

What is a virus? A virus is something kind of sickness that spreads as if you like cough or anything. If you even like just cough into the air, those two people and yeah . And then what happens? And then they get the virus and then if they cough and another person gets it.

Speaker 2:

Wow, you're really smart. You know a lot about this Corona virus stuff. So what is the thing that you, you miss the most about school?

Speaker 6:

Um, I get to like that I get to play outside with my friends and , and I can't play with my friends. What's isolation? Isolation is like something where you have to like stay at home.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah . You have your mask there? Yeah. Do you know how to put it on?

Speaker 6:

Yeah. Yeah. I'm gonna put it on. Yeah. My mom made this, I kind of don't know how to put it on because my mom like C

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah , she has to try it. Let's see. Put it up to the camera so I can see. That's a really, that's pretty fancy. Now I want to see the green part. That's pretty fancy. And what do I have on my hair

Speaker 6:

gloves. So you don't, so if you like , like this is what we do sometimes at stores now people bring in like gloves and masks to the stores and stuff. So just so they don't get the Corona. Yeah, I have a bunch of lows .

Speaker 2:

So have you gone out since the um , since isolation?

Speaker 6:

Like do you mean like , um ,

Speaker 2:

no , the store or anything like that with your mom?

Speaker 6:

My mom has been gone to the stores just a little bit, but other than that we haven't been going out, but we haven't been going outside a lot. But there's not like out

Speaker 2:

and a really good place to go outside, don't you? You're surrounded by mountains and, and who's that behind you? That I see in the camera there laying on the ground. My dog . What's your dog's name?

Speaker 6:

Hopper's like her real name is just hops .

Speaker 2:

Hops is happy . Is like a , a fun name that you call or sometimes him, I always get confused. Hops is a boy, right?

Speaker 6:

Yeah. Sally, she's a girl.

Speaker 2:

God and ham just forgets.

Speaker 6:

Yeah, probably after like write it down to remember.

Speaker 2:

You know, it's what happens when you get older is it's hard to remember stuff. What else has been on your mind about this whole thing? Do you have any questions for me?

Speaker 6:

Not really

Speaker 2:

good . Okay. I like your bow tie. Thanks. You look great. You look real snazzy. It's nice to have something to get dressed up for, isn't it? Yeah . What you got there? You got another mask?

Speaker 6:

Yeah, I have two masks.

Speaker 2:

Those are cool if your mom's really, your mom's really talented isn't she? Yeah . How are your mom and dad doing through this whole thing?

Speaker 6:

Good. But yeah, kind of stressed.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's stressful. It's stressful for a lot of people. Yeah, it's kind of scary sometimes.

Speaker 6:

I really want to see my friends again. But like, like I wanna see my friends like, like in real life, not like on , on video because, because when I have this meeting at school, this is something that like I , it annoys me and that I'm like computers and stuff that the kids are on. Like it , it sounds like , like it sounds like, like it's just like people screaming my brain around.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I know. That sounds frustrating.

Speaker 6:

It's weird. It sounds like so weird sometimes

Speaker 2:

I noticed cause I've been doing a lot of video chatting with people and one of the things that I noticed is that sometimes I can't understand what somebody's saying and it sounds like they're talking under water , like rubber .

Speaker 6:

That's the same exact thing that happens then the old school

Speaker 2:

video school. Yeah. That's a new thing. Huh? Is there anything else that you wanted to talk about? Not really . Okay. Well you've been really informative. I'm sure that our audience is really gonna love , um, hearing about your thoughts on things. Do you have any questions ? Well , I don't know. I'm trying to think. I mean, if you think of something else, we can schedule another time to talk. Uh, what grade are you in? Findlay . Um , in kindergarten and take years old . What's your favorite color? Turquoise. Did you see what I'm wearing? I'm wearing turquoise today. Um , I am and I have turquoise in my dress. Yeah. Anything else you want to tell me about yourself that I can put in your bio on the podcast page that you want people to know and you wash your hands.

Speaker 1:

There you have it. Kid wisdom. You know, maybe that's what I'll call this segment instead of kids corner. Let me know what you guys think. You can reach out to me on social media. DM me through Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. Should I call the children's segment children's corner or kid wisdom or do you have a better, more catchy title for our kids' segment? Let us know. Thanks for joining us today. Be sure to join us next week for part two of the Kevin KU Herrick Louis Dupuis interview, where we discuss among other things how Louie incorporated the science of sanitary practices into the day to day running of hotel de Paris, ways in which he got it right and some questionable practices

Speaker 3:

[inaudible] .