Armchair Historians

Joolz Guides host Julian McDonnell and Liam's Favorite History

May 18, 2020 Anne Marie Cannon/Julian McDonnel
Armchair Historians
Joolz Guides host Julian McDonnell and Liam's Favorite History
Chapters
Armchair Historians
Joolz Guides host Julian McDonnell and Liam's Favorite History
May 18, 2020
Anne Marie Cannon/Julian McDonnel

In this episode we talk to YouTube celebrity Julian McDonnell, host of Joolz Guides, about his favorite bit of London history. I'll give you a hint: it has to do with one of the funnest royals. For our Kid Wisdom segment we talk to 9-year-old Liam from Denver, Colorado who tells us about his favorite history which has to do with the Unsinkable Molly Brown.

Resources

Joolz Guides website

Joolz Guides YouTube

Tom Carradine Vintage Pianist and Musical Director, often performs old time music for Joolz Guides videos.

Lil' Lost Lou Musician and Julian's sister, Lou is currently working on putting an EP together of music she's written for Joolz Guides. Some of the tunes are already available as downloads on all the usual iTunes / spotify etc, but do check out her website, her music is amazing.

Liam's Drawings As promised! Here are some of Liam's amazing artwork.

To Support Armchair Historians:

Patreon

Ko-fi

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode we talk to YouTube celebrity Julian McDonnell, host of Joolz Guides, about his favorite bit of London history. I'll give you a hint: it has to do with one of the funnest royals. For our Kid Wisdom segment we talk to 9-year-old Liam from Denver, Colorado who tells us about his favorite history which has to do with the Unsinkable Molly Brown.

Resources

Joolz Guides website

Joolz Guides YouTube

Tom Carradine Vintage Pianist and Musical Director, often performs old time music for Joolz Guides videos.

Lil' Lost Lou Musician and Julian's sister, Lou is currently working on putting an EP together of music she's written for Joolz Guides. Some of the tunes are already available as downloads on all the usual iTunes / spotify etc, but do check out her website, her music is amazing.

Liam's Drawings As promised! Here are some of Liam's amazing artwork.

To Support Armchair Historians:

Patreon

Ko-fi

Anne Marie Cannon:

Thank you for joining us today for armchair historians. I'm your host, Anne Marie Cannon, armchair historians is a Belgian rabbit production. Stay up to date with us through Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Wherever you listen to your podcast that is where you'll find us. You can also find us at armchair historians.com. Also, won't you consider becoming a patron of the show? In an effort to keep armchair historians commercial free, I have decided to work with Patreon. Now if you mosey on over to www.patreon.com, backslash armchair historians, that's historians with an ass You can find out more about supporting the show and about exclusive patron content that you will have access to you can chip in anywhere from $1 to $15 a month or just make a one time donation. He will be helping me to keep the lights on and if you can't make a donation. That's totally cool. I just hope you will continue to listen to our free podcast. I recently spoke to YouTube celebrity Julian McDonald. He's the host of tools guides. That's j OLZ guides. For more information go to Jules guides.com. Julian has over 140,000 followers on his YouTube channel. He was gracious enough to accept my invitation because as he said, You sounded like a normal person. I'm not so sure about that. As I was doing the introduction, in the actual interview, I totally screwed up. I'm so embarrassed because I mispronounced his name as McDonald with a D, even though I had it written down correctly, and I knew what it was so embarrassing. Anyway, so I went back and recorded the introduction post interview. So without any further ado, our guest today is Julian McDonald. Julian is an actor, filmmaker, and YouTube channel celebrity from London. He has appeared in television commercials, stand up comedy street entertainment shows, and he even ran away with the circus once. Julian is award winning documentary filmmaker. His films include my evil trade, and my personal favorite, take me to Pitcairn. He has a degree in philosophy from the University of Manchester speaks Italian and French. He's a musician who plays piano guitar and sings. Julian also ran his own radio show on Riverside FM in Hammersmith and Fulham as well as doing voiceover work and audio books. He has his own production company, Josie productions, his YouTube channel jewels guides, that's j WRO. l z guides, boasts 140,000 followers and has a regular slot on the londonist tools guides features Julian donning bowler hat, umbrella in hand, wearing a vintage tailored jacket and skillfully tied cravat showing viewers around London. The show is described as many videos which take you on some unusual London walks to all the places you wouldn't find in your average guidebook. Not only are they informative, Julian draws upon his mad performance skills to make them quite entertaining. Jules guides it's not your normal travel videos by any stretch of the imagination. Julian McDonnell, welcome and thank you for being here. Oh, well, that was quite some introduction. Goodness. I mean, I think the what you've actually done there is you found a lot of information from my,

Julian McDonnell:

from my website, which I must have written a long time ago and I was trying to impress everybody. And you know, when you know, when you're trying to buff up your CV and you write loads of stuff in it, say, Well, I know the radio station and all this stuff. What do you what do you want to do? I'm afraid I haven't revised anything. So you'll just have to tell ask me what he wants to know. Okay. I Well, first of all, how are you doing in lockdown? I'm alright. Yeah, it's not too bad. It's quite a nice day in writing a book, you know, so it's not vastly different from how life normally is. Okay.

Anne Marie Cannon:

Um, what are you writing just something to

Julian McDonnell:

Go with the videos. Okay, London guide book. Okay, cool. I really enjoyed London lockdown. So at the time of the interview, London lockdown was the most recent installment of jewels guides, in which Julian takes us for a little walk along the River Thames in London, sans his camera guy during the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. Oh, thank you very much. That's good. It was, um, I was there a year ago, at this very time. And it was nothing like what it looked like in lockdown. Yeah, well, I mean, that's thing. It's actually quite nice. So I quite like it all I empty and you know, I haven't been feeling 100%. So I've that's a bit annoying. But yeah, it's really pleasant. Without loads of people in the streets and out of cars and all the nice on polluted air. It's stressful going to do shopping?

Anne Marie Cannon:

Not nice going into shops, a lot of people. Are you freaked out about the germs and all that or do you wear a mask? No, I don't wear a mask. But yeah, I mean, a no, no one wants to catch it. You know? Yeah. Well, we were sick. My boyfriend works for one of the ski areas in Colorado here. And he got sick. And we think he probably had it. But of course, there's no test. So we don't? We don't know. We'll hopefully get you know, no idea whether you got it. Yeah, he had all the symptoms. Oh, unfortunately, he didn't, you know, get really, really sick. But and I didn't have any symptoms. Knock on wood. I hope so. I help you let's, let's get let's do this thing. The question that I'm going to ask you and I have no idea what you're going to say is, what is your favorite history?

Julian McDonnell:

My favorite period of history, just history in general, whether it's a person a place an events, time play time period? Oh, gosh, it's difficult. It's difficult to say I rather like there's a couple there's a few of them. I rather like King Charles a second, I think he might have something to do with the fact that we actually have some sort of record of it, you know, like as in first hand account because of Samuel peeps. By the way, I'm not really an expert historian or anything, in case you think I am. I'm not I'm just a bloke who makes films about London. I don't. And that's kind of that's what I'm trying to do with the new podcast is to talk to people who like certain things about history, you get excited about history. I my first interview was with the historian but

Anne Marie Cannon:

and he's one of my best friends. And we he's really got a great sense of humor. So right there, I'm referring to episode one, which is in three parts. And if you have not listened to it already, I highly recommend it. I had the pleasure of speaking to Kevin cuchara, who is the executive director of the hotel to Paris Museum in Georgetown, Colorado. I'm just interested in people who are interested in history talking about

Julian McDonnell:

I like I like London history, I suppose. I mean, that's because I live here and I like wandering around and looking at things which are weird or sticking out of a wall or some strange sort of monuments that everyone's ignoring, and just things like that. I like thinking about the people who are now dead who have drank in the same pub as me, you know, it's that those pubs are very historical. I like those things and, and yeah, the time around. Charles the second because he was he was quite fun. I think he was quite,

Anne Marie Cannon:

I don't really know too much about him. So maybe you can just tell me

Julian McDonnell:

Well, well, what happened was is that they chopped his his dad King Charles the first there was this revolution, and they chopped his head off. And then they had this bloke called Oliver Cromwell, who was in charge of something called the Commonwealth, I think they called it and that was for about 10 years or so we had this kind of Commonwealth we didn't have a king. Anyway, so he started acting a bit like a king. I think and, and they all got fed up with him in the end, and I think they got rid of all of Oliver Cromwell because he was so miserable. He he broke down the globe, Shakespeare's Globe Theatre because he didn't like they were puritanical. They didn't like theaters. They didn't like having fun even like breweries. Didn't like beer. I don't mean just

Unknown:

boy. Yeah.

Julian McDonnell:

Anyway, so they, they got rid of him. I think he ended up being hanged. In the end. I think they hang them. Oh, well, I know what well, but then. Then they decided to reinstate King Charles the second. And King Charles. The second was was a lot of fun. And he likes to go out. And so he opened up all the theaters. And he did. Yeah. Played lots of games and had lots of mistresses and he was a

Anne Marie Cannon:

Yeah, it was like getting rid of prohibition.

Julian McDonnell:

Yeah, exactly. He was party time and he had those lovely those lovely dogs as well King Charles Spaniel, which are named after him. And actually a bit and it's just interesting. Well, because it was so long ago. When was it? Oh my god. 1600s in the 1600s. And we got Samuel peeps is famous bloke who wrote a diary around that time. And he writes all about the Fire of London, the Great Fire of London that happened around them the plague, which is quite apt at the moment.

Anne Marie Cannon:

So as Charles King when the fire happened,

Julian McDonnell:

yeah, he also writes about the time when they dug up all over cromwells body. That's right. I don't think Oliver Cromwell was actually hanged originally, but because much afterwards, they exuse exhumed his body he hanged him Yeah, at my burn gallows and, and Samuel peeps, writes in accounts of this, this hanging of a dead corpse, she says was pretty grim. So he Yeah, that's a nice, nice time. Well, I mean, time in history of sorts of characters. Yes. There's a character called john will called john wilmont, the Earl of Rochester. He was actually played by Johnny Depp in a film called The libertine Have you ever seen? Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. He's a great poet. And he used to write lots of satirical poems and rude bawdy poems about the royal family. But King Charles quite liked him actually. He actually he famously had a bunch of people beaten up. Yeah, there was another poet called john Dryden. He got a load of his mates to beat him up in an alleyway in Covent Garden. I just like the fact that these things all happened around that time, and it's just, it just seemed very decadent and Well, a lot of things you could make a film out of Anyway,

Anne Marie Cannon:

what about it struck struck a chord with you

Julian McDonnell:

a lot of the stories whenever I'm wandering around London and finding out something interesting or fun that happened, because I I only like, I like to make videos about stuff if there's a fun anecdote to tell. And whenever there's an anecdote to tell, I always look at it and then I discovered it happened during the time of King Charles a second, which I just find there's so many things about it, like for example, His he, he had so many mistresses, and he had that mistress called Nell Gwynn there was a famous actress at the time. Our royal family always like getting together with actresses for some reason it's so but we've got the Duke of Cambridge at the moment. We had the King Edward the seventh he went off with a with Lily Langtry was an actress. She was an actress, and oh, yeah, and then there was a King Edward the eighth who abdicated over I know, she wasn't an actress. She was an American. So so so I like um, but I like the fact that he had, for example, that there was there's a house in power mouth, all the houses in power mouth, on one side of the road, they all belong to the crown. Except one house because King Charles is number 79 power matters. See that King Charles his mistress. She wanted a house near near the palace. And so he gave her that one. But she said, I want to own it outright, I want to own the whole, you know, freehold. I want to know and not just like a lease because he gave her a long lease on the property. And she said, No, otherwise you give me a give me a freehold. Otherwise, I'm no more than rookie. And he had to come back to her by acts of Parliament. And, and then it got passed down through her family and then sold off or whatever. And

Anne Marie Cannon:

so it's not a family anymore.

Julian McDonnell:

I don't even see my family anymore. But I think but but it's no longer in the in the royal families collection. So it's no, it's quite unique house and she also she has she had he fathered many illegitimate children. And one day I think he was playing with the child. And King Charles was was president and she said, Come over here, you little bastard. And the king said, Well, why did you call us on that? And he said, she said, Well, because you haven't given him a proper title. You have to call him a bastard because you which is what he is. And so the king ended up saying, Okay, I'll call him the Duke of St. Alban's spell Exactly. They all became Dukes, and got these titles or this bastard sons.

Anne Marie Cannon:

She was a savvy woman. I liked her.

Julian McDonnell:

Yeah, yeah, it was she was cool. She was

Anne Marie Cannon:

That's what I like about your videos is that it's what you just said, it's, you know, it draws you in, you know about history. And what just clicked with me when you were talking is there's that. You talk about stuff in a humorous way. And it keeps me engaged. It's not one of those dry, boring, you know, tourism videos. And so yeah, that makes a lot of sense. And I like, you know, the fact that you pick unseen parts of London that you wouldn't see. And there's so many of them isn't there, like I've been I lived in London in 2012. And I walked every single day, sometimes the same way. But I always found something new to look at and to be curious about. That's what I love about London. So someone wrote to me yesterday, that

Julian McDonnell:

was one of my subscribers, they said, Charles Dickens, he used to do that he walked around London so much in that, and he knew it so well, that if he if he saw a new piece of orange peel on the ground, if he had taken notes of it, I suppose the Victorians is the other side. Yeah, that because Victorian London, a lot of buildings are still here from Victorian London. And you can see evidence of it, especially if you look upwards. You see all these nice, old buildings. And I and we set we see so many films. And so we're so familiar with things like Charles Dickens Oliver Twist, and things like that. And that when you walk past one of these places, it's just really, it's really fascinating to see that they actually existed in full color back then they weren't black and white, kind of funny. Charlie Chaplin style walking funny, they were real places. So there's I recently was walking along and I found them. The the original workhouse, where, where Oliver Twist was based on the workouts that Oliver was sent to.

Anne Marie Cannon:

And it's still there.

Julian McDonnell:

No, it's been turned into luxury flats, I think.

Anne Marie Cannon:

But is it? Is it the original building?

Julian McDonnell:

I think building is still there. Yeah. And there's lots of these are the other one where Charlie Chaplin was was with his parents with his mom. And that that I go to that one in my video.

Anne Marie Cannon:

Later on in the interview, we'll talk more in depth about the time that Julian took to Charlie Chaplin's grandchildren on a tour of Charlie Chaplin's London, basically. So not only did he take them on a tour, he actually made an episode, which was released January 19 2020. On his YouTube channel, and it's called Charlie Chaplin tour. I believe, hands down it to date is my favorite. jewels guides episode.

Julian McDonnell:

I know that we've talked.

Anne Marie Cannon:

I know I I just watched your whole catalogue. Bob and I just watched it this weekend.

Julian McDonnell:

All right. Yeah. Well, I mean, that's, that's, that's so interesting to get because that was in Victorian times that he was there. I mean, it was like, um, and and to go there with his grandchildren. And and see this kind of place, which is real to that, you know, we're looking at a building which is now the cinema Museum, but they're looking at going well, my grandfather Yeah, to go into this workout. So they were really grim, horrible places and, and it's just like, you see in all these Sherlock Holmes films and these Charles Dickens stories, I don't know it like it's just, it's just, my history is just not particularly accurate. I don't, I don't care if I make the get the wrong dates or something. So I keep getting distracted, cuz I'm in front of a window, people will pass and wave at me and stuff. But, yeah, it's not to do with that. For me. I don't care whether it was in 1898 on the Fourth of July, I don't have to be accurate about it. For me, it's just interesting that some bloke called john came down here and he, you know, chop someone's head off in this alleyway. And it's things like that for me. And

Anne Marie Cannon:

that's where I come from my history, because so my background is I have a master's degree in creative and professional writing. I also love history. So my thesis, my master's thesis was a work of historical fiction, because then you can take liberties, right? You can, you can make the story more interesting. And so I, I live in a town in Colorado, it's a National Historic Landmark District and what you were saying it's not the same because we don't have this, you know, we don't go back before 1859 but the town was founded in 1859. We have over 240 buildings in our town that are protected. So when you come to this town, you feel like you've been dropped back into the wild west, maybe a little bit more avant garde town but and I moved here for no other reason that I like the way it felt. And I like that I could walk around here and it's kind of not on the same level as London, but I'm always seeing new things and always finding out new history. And so I started a walking tour business, I do tours which the past pandemic is put the kibosh on but so,

Julian McDonnell:

yeah, well, if I come over there, I'll take a tour with you. I like American history, I don't know much about it. But whenever I'm there, if someone says to me, Hey, this is where this happens. You know, I want to go to the OK Corral, you say, I know. Yeah, particularly interesting places. Apparently, just some tiny little corner. But, um, but just the fact that it's so famous, I'd like to go there just because I've seen so many films about it, you know,

Anne Marie Cannon:

but so when you give a tour, you have to, you have to engage your you know, the people that come on your tour, or else it's I mean, if you ever bombed on a tour?

Julian McDonnell:

Well, you know, fortunately, you see, I'm not really a tour guide. I'm not really anything. I don't quite know what I am. I The thing is I just do the tours, because people want me to. And so for me, it seems more like people just want to meet me that the idea of the videos is not to be a tour guide it is to be entertaining. So I want to be a TV presenter, that's what I've always wanted to do. I just started doing this, I could prove to these stupid people in TV Land that I can do it. And yeah, and then I've ended up just finding that. Well, actually, why wait for some spotty, 21 year old to come and ruin my idea when actually, I've got an audience already waiting for me who already appreciate what I do. And so a lot of people who come on at all. It's almost like the hard work is already done. Sometimes I'll just go over a route, which they've seen in a video already. They know all the facts about it, they just want to be with me sort of laughing and joking. Half the time they want to talk. My sister says the secret is to keep them talking. If someone out people love to talk. So if you go on at all with somebody, get them talking about something. And by the end of it, they think that they feel like I've had a really good time because I've been talking so much.

Anne Marie Cannon:

That's a really good point. I'm gonna remember that. So I was doing the straight history tours, but somebody told me Oh, you should do ghost tours, people like ghosts tours, ghost tours, I sell so many more ghost tours. And I do the other

Julian McDonnell:

than a why everyone always asked me for those as well. But I just don't know about it. And the thing is, if I'm not interested in a topic, I just tell people keep asking me for Harry Potter tools. And I say, Well, look, I know I've done a video about it. But I'm not interested in Harry Potter. So I wouldn't, I wouldn't be fun. So you're better off going with one of the experts, you know, and but you're you've got your work cut out a bit more when doing a tour because, like, all I have to do is walk along some route that I already know. And I'll just point to a few things laugh and joke and complain about my health the whole time because that's all I ever do. But, um, whereas with you, you you don't know the person already. So, you know, you have a lot of work to do, you've got to win their trust and favor. Um, whereas I don't they already feel like they know me because they've seen

Anne Marie Cannon:

how did you develop your following?

Julian McDonnell:

I just I just thought videos. That's all it was it really, I've just I don't know, what happened is, it's really taken off in about in the last 12 months. It's going crazy. I mean, I've got 140,000 subscribers now. I didn't relations. Yeah, thanks. I don't know how that happened. I mean before. I mean, really, about two years ago, I was on something like 5000 it was crazy. But I mean, look, I'm not particularly surprised in the eye. I think my videos are good. Great.

Anne Marie Cannon:

And I think what you said before about, you know, talk about what you don't you don't talk about things that you're not interested in and that's apparent. It's your enthusiasm and the humor all that comes across in my

Julian McDonnell:

body. I also edit out anything that's, you know, even a DOM I edit out I don't want I don't want to I want to just it to be an interesting film, you know, just something to keep your attention and to watch it now I've Yeah, anyway, I want it to be interesting and they take a lot of time to make I mean, it looks like they're just sort of rattled out but they take a

Anne Marie Cannon:

take How long does it take for you to do the editing to do the

Julian McDonnell:

video? I mean, even that one that I did this weekend, which actually had a lot of old videos in it, so I just chopped in old clips. Even that one so

Anne Marie Cannon:

I loved the narration by the way the narration was We're gonna stop here for today with the Julien MacDonald interview. But be sure to tune in next week for part two, when he tells us about the time that to Charlie Chaplin's grandchildren took a tour around London with him. And he tells us about the time he was a contestant on the show blind date. We still have our kid wisdom segment coming up, so don't go away. Today, we'll be talking to Liam, who's nine years old and lives in Denver, Colorado.

Liam:

Because you're doing a podcast show? Yep. Yeah. Do you know what the podcast what a podcast is? You could say almost like a show, except you don't really see the buddy. They're just talking about some particular subject. That's exactly right. It's, it's something you listen to my show is about history. Do you? Do you know what history is? Yes, um, history is, um, Fang is like events that happened in the past. Like a million years from now. This will probably be history, like the Coronavirus is spreading across like everywhere. 2020. That's right. That's exactly that's actually you said it better than I could have said it. I have three basic questions that I'm going to ask you. If I have questions when you're after you answer the questions. I'll ask you more questions. Okay.

Anne Marie Cannon:

Do you have any questions for me before we start?

Liam:

And the Friday night?

Anne Marie Cannon:

That's fine. That's great. If you have a question in the middle of it, then that's totally cool, too. And you can't say anything wrong. Everything you say is gonna be fine. Okay, so my first question for you is a question that I ask all my guests on the show. And it is what is your favorite history? Um, I would say maybe the Titanic. The Titanic. What's the Titanic on the Titanic was one of the biggest steam liners of the early 20th century. And so what do you like about that story? That history? Well, I like historical machinery in the Titanic is by far one of the most biggest machines ever documented in history. Really? Wow. So tell me tell me about the Titanic. What do you know about it? Well, I know that it was a anglish ocean liner owned by the light Star Line, a ship company. And it hit an iceberg on I think was April 15 1912. Some people say it was 88 or April 19 1912. But I think that's just because some other historical like thing happened, I think was the I think my dad called it the Oklahoma bombing. Oh, so people get those two events confused because they happen so close together.

Unknown:

Interesting.

Liam:

Yeah. And so, um, yeah, an iceberg that time. And the Titanic's actually um, one of the things that helps like modern chips these days be so safe because like that I'm accident helped. both English and American governments realize that there are need to be safer.

Anne Marie Cannon:

Liam is really smart. In case you haven't noticed, and he has a huge vocabulary for a nine year old. He obviously knows a lot about the topic of which he speaks. As I watch him through the computer screen. It's, it's like I can, I can almost see this battle between his advanced for his age intellect. And his sweet little kid persona, the image of him and the words coming out of his mouth are in congruence in some ways. Wow. So what happened when it hit the iceberg? Well,

Liam:

um, the impact of the iceberg so you know, you can only see an iceberg from top but there's actually a lot of it on the bottom. So the impact of the iceberg um, scrape the side of the Titanic for a few seconds. The reason why it sunk is because when the iceberg scraped it, loosen the bolts that hold held the plates together. Luckily, the crew put the fires out for before they reach the boilers. They did have like six The Doors but they couldn't close fast enough. If I was in that situation I just chopped the rope that was like holding the doors. Gotcha.

Anne Marie Cannon:

Slowly, you given a lot of thought to how you would act if you were in that situation.

Liam:

Um, everybody's instinct was more of to go up to the boat to try to see the iceberg. But in that, like, I'm not really how do you see if it's sinking or not, um, some people actually went down to the doorway of the engine room, and they looked in it and there was water, man, and this was like a feat maybe an hour or two after the iceberg hits the Titanic then those people who are smarter enough to check in the injury room, Noah was gonna sink actually the builder of the Titanic was on that ship. And he and he didn't even want to like, get out. He was just cuz everybody called it the unsinkable ship. And guess what happened? Some voyage, which, um, and ship terms means first, for some

Anne Marie Cannon:

reason, we had a weird technical blip right there. And we missed a very important point that Liam was making. So I just reiterate, you said it was its maiden voyage and you were telling me what that meant?

Liam:

It means first time out to sea. So like the ships builder, he had called it unsinkable. And my dad said he wouldn't want to take the trip anywhere in mid April because another incident happened in mid April on the Apollo 13. accident. 1970 Oh, wow. Hmm.

Anne Marie Cannon:

So April, the month of April is jinxed. Yep. A little further along in the interview, Liam cites a source from which he got most of his information about the Titanic.

Liam:

It was like a audio book that was that I had no, it wasn't taking any liberties with fiction, or anything. It was just it was a nonfiction audio book. It's called a night to remember. I don't know if you've heard of it. It's

Anne Marie Cannon:

I think I have, but I don't think I've listened to it or read it. So maybe that's something we should check out. I'll put that book in the episode notes so that people can check it out. Okay. And so what else did you want to tell me about the Titanic?

Liam:

Um, the captain's name was Edward. Well, most people just call him called him Captain Smith. So um, Captain Smith was actually planning to retire after he sailed the Titanic. He actually didn't make it to any of the lifeboats. He didn't even want to eat this. He just stood on the bridge, which is like where you steer the ship with the steering wheel, and waited until the glass on the front of the bridge broke in some water in and I think he did die. Some people on the Titanic have claimed to see Captain swift like floating in the water, where they're survivors. So some people sounds like the ship. And then there were some survivors. Yes. Out of like 2000 in 300 people only 701 survive. Really think think it might have been more people who survive. I know it was more people who sampled the ship than the people who survive. And the reason that it is because the Titanic did not have enough lifeboats. Surprisingly, the amount of lifeboats wasn't paid, or back then wasn't based on the amount of people on the ship. But how big the ship was like, if they had different safety rules, more people would have probably survived.

Anne Marie Cannon:

So if there were more lifeboats, do you think that more people would have survived? Yeah.

Liam:

And after the Titanic sunk, they established this control, kind of like I'm saying, it's like, I'm in the Atlantic Ocean and an Arctic Ocean, they established like this Coast Guard kind of saying that, um, monitored conditions in the Atlantic Ocean.

Anne Marie Cannon:

So something good came out of a bad thing is what you're saying.

Liam:

Yes, that you can usually find something good that came out of bad things like World War Two, that was really bad, but Adolf Hitler was defeated.

Anne Marie Cannon:

That was a good thing. I agree.

Unknown:

I'm running out of words to say.

Anne Marie Cannon:

You're doing a great job. I think you're doing a great job. So was there anything else that you wanted to say about the Titanic?

Liam:

Well, um, yeah, there's one more thing and Why the Titanic actually did sank because because only two of the powers could reverse. It had three propellers. One, one big and too small, only the two small ones could reverse. And also nature had kind of something to do with it a little because like, the water was so cold. Well kind of created an atmosphere in the lookouts, because they didn't have like radar or monitors. They had lookouts, which are people who tried to look for danger, couldn't see the iceberg in time. I actually heard from my audio books that it was like a different story. That, um, they saw the iceberg um, on the horizon. They telephone the bridge, but the bridge didn't do anything for a while. Actually. They did turn they they steered the shift, but I think if they had only turned in, not put it in reverse, they might have made it not shrink. And the word some pretty grave acts on the Titanic that night. Miss Molly Brown, who's actually from Colorado, she lives in Denver, where I am, and I've actually been to her house. She earned the nickname Unsinkable Molly Brown. The reason why she earned that nickname is because she helped a lot of people to safety in the lifeboat.

Anne Marie Cannon:

So did she survive? Yes, she did.

Unknown:

And

Anne Marie Cannon:

well, I think that's all. Oh, that's a lot. I've learned a lot from talking about the Titanic with you. So there you have it. Liam's favorite history the Titanic. Be sure to tune in next week when Liam and I discuss our mutual love of England in double decker buses. Also remember to check out our Patreon page, as well as keep up to date with the latest armchair historians news on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.