ESD, Sustain Me!

Episode #3 Featuring Roberta Eaglehorse-Ortiz and Recognizing and Honoring the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

May 06, 2020 Joe Culhane Season 1 Episode 3
ESD, Sustain Me!
Episode #3 Featuring Roberta Eaglehorse-Ortiz and Recognizing and Honoring the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls
Chapters
ESD, Sustain Me!
Episode #3 Featuring Roberta Eaglehorse-Ortiz and Recognizing and Honoring the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls
May 06, 2020 Season 1 Episode 3
Joe Culhane

Roberta Eaglehorse-Ortiz, is a Member of the Oglala-Lakota Yomba-Shoshone Tribe And enrolled in the Lower Brule Souix Tribe, she’s the founding Farmer of Wombyn’s Wellness Garden, and previous Executive Director and Full Circle Doula for the Oregon Inter-Tribal Breastfeeding Coalition which she also helped create. She’s a mother, a daughter, a wife, an herbalist, farmer, friend, educator, activist and oh so much more.

We had a wonderful talk and I welcome you to tune in.

And I send so much love and gratitude to Roberta Eaglehorse for taking the time to share stories and provide education from such a refreshing perspective. And the message of resilience, especially in regards to the indigenous storyline is beyond inspiring. Please check out Wombyn’s Wellness Garden on their Facebook page or website, as well as Oregon Inter-Tribal Breastfeeding Coalition for the work they do that continues on as well. And I wish to take a moment again to note that yesterday was the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, this issue is serious and I ask that you do what you can to learn more about this issue and contribute to this cause if you can. There is a lot of reckoning that needs to be done on these lands and understanding and learning more about the issues connected to settler colonialism that brought us to this point in our shared story. We face multiple crises at this time, and while the pandemic is certainly the one that is the most in our face, the climate and environmental crisis is also being seen everywhere we look. The roots of a lot of the devastation we face is disproportionately affecting communities of color and the native populations of these lands. Let us acknowledge that and embrace the wisdom, knowledge, and education that is coming from these communities as well. They are on the front lines and have shined through the darkness with incredible stories of resilience, we have much to learn from these amazing communities. I am grateful for them.

Show Notes

Roberta Eaglehorse-Ortiz, is a Member of the Oglala-Lakota Yomba-Shoshone Tribe And enrolled in the Lower Brule Souix Tribe, she’s the founding Farmer of Wombyn’s Wellness Garden, and previous Executive Director and Full Circle Doula for the Oregon Inter-Tribal Breastfeeding Coalition which she also helped create. She’s a mother, a daughter, a wife, an herbalist, farmer, friend, educator, activist and oh so much more.

We had a wonderful talk and I welcome you to tune in.

And I send so much love and gratitude to Roberta Eaglehorse for taking the time to share stories and provide education from such a refreshing perspective. And the message of resilience, especially in regards to the indigenous storyline is beyond inspiring. Please check out Wombyn’s Wellness Garden on their Facebook page or website, as well as Oregon Inter-Tribal Breastfeeding Coalition for the work they do that continues on as well. And I wish to take a moment again to note that yesterday was the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, this issue is serious and I ask that you do what you can to learn more about this issue and contribute to this cause if you can. There is a lot of reckoning that needs to be done on these lands and understanding and learning more about the issues connected to settler colonialism that brought us to this point in our shared story. We face multiple crises at this time, and while the pandemic is certainly the one that is the most in our face, the climate and environmental crisis is also being seen everywhere we look. The roots of a lot of the devastation we face is disproportionately affecting communities of color and the native populations of these lands. Let us acknowledge that and embrace the wisdom, knowledge, and education that is coming from these communities as well. They are on the front lines and have shined through the darkness with incredible stories of resilience, we have much to learn from these amazing communities. I am grateful for them.