Running the Bases with Small Businesses

Reset Lounge - Relaxation Center

May 31, 2021 Randy Rohde & Beth Johnson Season 1 Episode 29
Running the Bases with Small Businesses
Reset Lounge - Relaxation Center
Show Notes Transcript

Running the Bases today with Beth Johnson - one of four founders of the Reset Lounge - a unique spa and relaxation center focused on wellness.  Reset Lounge supplies a range of wellness offerings so that you and your family can feel better, be healthier and have a space to take a pause and *breathe*.

Beth shares the story of starting a business at the start of the COVID Pandemic.  How does a high-touch-based service continue in business during a shutdown?  Beth and partners faced a number of challenges in operations, service, and revenue - learn how they overcame the struggles and look to expand in the coming year!

We round the bases on a number of topics, but really focus on personal wellness, building a business and selecting the right people to join the adventure!

Learn more about the Reset Lounge and wellness services at https://www.resetlounge.com/

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Randy:

I'm Randy Rohde. I'm fascinated with entrepreneurs and small business owners. Plus I love baseball. Every show I sit down with the small business owner and we discuss their running the basis of entrepreneurship. We throw the ball around on strategy management, execution and innovation, plus. A little fun baseball tart. Hey, thanks for joining us today. Settle in, grab your cracker jacks and you know what they say? And it is a great day for her ball game. And, uh, it is, , I usually don't even say dates, but it is St Patrick's day. So we're going to be, uh, you know, hopefully keeping the Blarney to a minimum, but we'll, uh, we'll certainly have the gift of gab today. I'm Randy Rohde. This is running the bases with small businesses and today, very fun. We have a, a, a very interesting guest, I think, in a video. With 3 million downloads. So w w we got to get the scoop on that. This is her third business venture that she's launched. She is a former technology consultant now in the world of wellness. Welcome to the show. Beth Johnson from reset lounge. Welcome back. Me, Randy. Yeah. Yeah. Very good. Glad to have you in the, uh, in the studio on St. Patrick's day,

Beth:

I did kiss kiss the Blarney stone. So look out.

Randy:

All right. So you've you are all ready. All right. So before we get started, tell us about this massive video, right. That you participated with them.

Beth:

It wasn't my vision of my 15 minutes of fame. I can tell you that actually I have four boys and one of them is a YouTuber. And one of his first videos, because I am feeling very gullible. He pranked me about a tattoo and, um, 3.4 million people found it amusing, I guess I don't really understand the YouTube world, but I'm in it. I guess, the expression that you had, like I think, so there were a lot of comments about while your mom's pretty nice where I felt like I was boiling over, but yeah. It was a little glimpse of my household.

Randy:

That is fantastic. Well, I'm honored. And then I've got such a YouTube star in the studio, so this is terrific. All right. So reset lounge. So that is an interesting name probably, and perhaps perfect name for this last year that we've gone through. Right. Who wouldn't like to maybe reset that entire last year. Why don't you give us an overview of what the lounge is, what you guys do today?

Beth:

Well, I mean, the simplest thing I can say is that it is a place to feel better. And the name really evolved. Reset kind of describes everything. We're trying to provide a reset for your body, a reset for your mind. Our modern world is pretty chaotic and there's a lot of inputs. , so we just thought it was, we would curate things to help you reset regardless of what you particularly needed. We'd have something for you. And lounge really was because we didn't want to be boring. We want it to be a place of community and we want it to be a place where you feel comfortable and not overwhelmed. Um, but relaxed. So that's really the name and the evolution I find kind of interesting, cause it was a big pivot in my career. Um, it's formed by four women and between us, we've raised 11 children. They're all in their twenties now. And we've been friends for a long time. And when I thought about why I would get involved, basically I ran through the list of all the life events we've been through together and all the. The joys and really a lot of tough stuff and reset brings together some things that we all wish we had when we were facing those tough times.

Randy:

So that's so very intentional, very thoughtful and purposeful, , almost just a, uh, a rebirth, a little bit of a as what it is a real it is.

Beth:

And we find a lot of B words fit, repeat, you know, the more you do the better it is for you. Relax.

Randy:

So that is amazing then on, um, just kind of that, and I'm sure there's just wondering the full background story on the four individual women and as you've come together and probably want to tap into that a little bit here as we talk. Tell us about a little bit about some of the services maybe, and we'll get into that. So the reset lounge people are probably wondering, well, what is that exactly. We have been asked if we were a bar or not. So when I first heard I'm like lounge have, I didn't know, there was a lounge, you know, another lounge. And so, yeah. , so what are some of the services that you do?

Beth:

Well, we started with core services and offerings and our core services really are infrared saunas. Which are great for detoxification on your blood. We have salt therapy with assault cabin, so it's great for your respiratory tract who knew we'd be so concerned about her respiratory tract. Right? When we open, we have medical grade massage and compression chairs. And these things are fantastic and it's like, you have two people massaging you at the same time, but you also have compression in your arms and your legs. So it's great for your circulation and in today's world, you can get the benefits, the full benefits of massage without having to, you know, physically touch somebody. Right. We also have a therapy called new calm and it's neuroscience-based and it's FDA approved the only one of its kind. And it basically talks to your nervous system and brings you down to a chill level, that level right before sleep. It's amazing for anti-anxiety. It's amazing for all applications and all ages.

Randy:

Okay. I have to touch on that one here real quick, because, so what does that do? I mean, is it, is it a hands on is, uh, just sensory of some sort sensory.

Beth:

So it's, like I said, it was based in neuroscience. So you basically have a processing desk on your left. A pressure point on your left arm and that disc talks to your parasympathetic nervous system and that's what makes you chill. Right? Right, right. So it's like just slipping a little chill and then we do an eye mask and noise canceling headphones, and you hear music with binaural beats behind them. And we pair it with a really fantastic zero gravity chair. So you have no it's you meditate like a monk basically is my favorite tagline for it, but you have no pressure on your spine, so you're super comfortable. And then we give you a weighted blanket. So it's like, you're getting hugged and you're in a little cocoon. And you can do it for various lengths. The 20 minute power nap is kind of there. The signature and Stanford and Harvard have studied it. It's like two hours of restoration for your body. No kidding.

Randy:

No kidding. I love that. I think I definitely,

Beth:

I think we all need it and, and we really and we're now an affiliate for them so we can enable people to use it at home. It's awesome. It's awesome. I can do this at home as well. Yeah. We've got information on our website where you couldn't order it and they deliver the discs monthly. Yeah. But come in and try it at the lounge first, you know, the experience you'll, you'll see how you want to get set up and what it's like.

Randy:

Well, I am a big, big fan and user of massage and, uh, some of these, , things that you do, we, we, we don't have the. The medical grade compression massage chair at home, we do have one of those new kind of massage guns. Right? Yeah. Nice. Yeah. And, but I definitely am a big, big fan and just such an incredible difference in structure and, , and feeling. And you talk about reduction of it. Anxieties and, , to get to that kind of chill effort, I think any time that you do some of these services like that, that's an absolute, you just walk out of there and anybody who's experienced that, I'm sure you just walk out of there just feeling like, uh, that's like the weight of the world is just, we really are.

Beth:

I mean, if I had to say what our goal is, is that you, every person leaves feeling better than when they walked in and we've we've achieved that. And we also, um, started with personal training. So one of my partners is a really. Skilled personal trainer. And we believe in busting a sweat, you know, without the other things. And another partner of mine is a functional medicine, health coach. So all of these modalities fit together and you can have as much support or as little support as possible to achieve goals. Um, and then we've added in, you talked about that percussion therapy con we've added in, uh, assisted stretching. So we have a really talented, um, person who's been doing bodywork for a long time and she actually loosens your muscles with that percussion gun and then stretches you. Oh, we've had, um, I, one, one elderly woman is doing it once a week and she said she can get out of the chair easier, you know, so we do that. And then we've also brought in holistic services. So cranial, sacral therapy and things like that. And we also have some cryotherapy.

Randy:

That is something I want to hear about. So, because that is something I can't do at home. Uh, so cryotherapy, so tell me, uh, you know, what do you have the big tank? Is it a targeted therapy? What do you, how do you apply it or, , implement it?

Beth:

Sure. Well, we don't have the, you notice I called it the reset. It works, right. It's going to fit in with your, how you speak when we were. Choosing our service providers kind of our vendors. I mean, I basically said, look, ladies, if there's something I can blow up the building with, we probably shouldn't do it. So we don't. Yeah. Or give somebody frostbite. So we do not have the tanks. I mean, they're wonderful. It's just not something we decided to provide. So we have localized cryo. And with that, we can stress areas of inflammation and pain and kind of help with the symptoms of those. So there's a, there's a treatment. Um, we have athletes that come in and, you know, have an area that they need need some help with Don every week, basically. And then it also does some more beauty related treatments. So, um, there is a component of feeling good about yourself that has to do with achieving goals and feeling like you look your best. So it can do some anti-aging facials and some slimming and toning and things like that. . Yeah.

Randy:

How cold does it get? So this is, so you would do like an isolated application of the cryo. What is that like? I'm trying to, is it like, just, you know, below freezing, is it hundred degrees below the gold?

Beth:

So it depends on it's specifically programmed for what you're doing. So there's a range based on what you're doing, but it can go as low as like negative eight degrees and it, it, for me, Yes, it feels a little bit cold. It's a little bit like when you were a kid and maybe your sibling put a snowball down your back, you know, that it felt really cold for a little bit. And then, then it gets better. Um, but generally it's a pretty easy service to, to take and we have lovely people doing it. So, , we also compare new calm with it. If you feel like you want to try to meditate deeply or relax, actually with the facials, a lot of people fall asleep. It's very. Very late cryo facial. Yeah. It's just, it's cool. And it's smooth over your skin and you're in this beautiful room we know with low lighting and yeah,

Randy:

I would fall asleep with a snowball on my face. So what's a typical visit. Like, you know, if I were coming to reset first time, Do you mind if I just call it reset or the reset lounge? Cause I don't want to diminish the brand here. You call it the reset. All right. So if I were coming into the reset, which I like, what's a typical visit for me. So if I've never been there, I'm like, Hey, I'm here. I want to wait.

Beth:

Right. So generally what I would say is as most people we encourage to try the four core services. So we call it the round trip. So medical grade must, you know, do the massage chair, the salt. The sauna and the new calm, and that gives you a good overview. Sometimes when we're giving a tour, we'll actually just pop you in the massage chair for five minutes, because nobody can believe it's as good as it is. And then generally people branch out from there, they get interested in the other things we're doing. They meet some of the, like our, uh, Debbie who works with us, who does cranial sacral therapy or other holistic kind of Eastern medicine based things. And they go from there.

Randy:

Is your targeted audience coming into this because, you know, you mentioned just a few different kinds of people. , well, I would say categories, maybe people, , what have you found at this point is your target audience?

Beth:

Well, it's a, it's a good question. And it was, um, something that as a team, we had to focus on pretty specifically when we started, because our target audience really is everybody. We're very, very interested in helping teens and tweens. Um, there's a lot of stress in that segment, but we recognize that you cannot market to everybody, especially on launch. So we chose the, the female 35 to 55 as our main target, because we felt like they made some health decisions for their families. And that's where we started focusing, but you know, it is true. We have all ages and as we evolve, I think what's in my brain is I'd like to pivot a little bit and talk about, um, areas where we can help like detoxifying from mold or active aging. There are a lot of things in stories that we have now to draw on for marketing that can help us get more messaging out. But yeah, if you look at our audience, Um, we're about 30% men come in. I'd say that's just anecdotal, right? 30, 70 men to women. Um, if you look at our engagement on social and things like that, we've definitely got, we've definitely got a good 35 to 55 women, right on the man's side. It's interesting. It's a much more even. Chart and it's sort of twenties and thirties are bigger ones.

. Randy:

Well, I can only speak from my own personal experience and I'll just say that, that a female group of that 35 to 55, , My wife is not that old by any means. Um, they definitely drive the engine, , I think, and certainly in my house. So what's the most popular service people come in. So in that, is it kind of tied into that age group? I'm curious. What is that? Some facial,

, Beth:

I think by appointment volume, it's the massage chair and the sauna is pretty close.

Randy:

The idea of this massage chair, really, it feels like two people are it does.

Beth:

And you also go back into zero gravity and we do the weighted blanket and you have soft music playing. I mean, we. We actually feel like I should have some candles. There are there in the background. We've had someone call us the den of mothers. You know, we, we just mom, everybody up when they come in.

Randy:

Can you tell you and your, your, your voice is well it's just so in your, you know, your cadence is so calming when you said that new column. Oh, it's so good. I can feel it right now. Yeah. Yeah.

Beth:

You definitely need to come in. You know, it'll be a nice experience for you, for sure.

Randy:

Any surprises of people that have come in?

Beth:

I would say personally, I mean, we have such an awesome group of clients, but I was surprised most by the over 75 or 80 age group. Um, we have somebody who trains in their nineties. Good for them. And um, if you think about some of the things we have. The personal training as you age is really about functional fitness, right? So we've got women in their late eighties doing planks. And part of the training is making sure the cadence of how you walk is still firm and balance and being able to get up off the floor. Right. And, um, the massage chairs are really good for active aging. Right because it gets your circulation going. We also have this full body vibration plate. It's people always referenced in the fifties, you know, where they had that exercise thing with the band around your waist and shake you. This is just a plate, but it's really good for bone density and balance. And so that surprised me a little bit and that trend is continuing. And like I said, with the assisted stretching, we have a woman who really she's doing training. And she said noticeably, she could get up out of a chair, easier. You know, I want to be active when I'm older. So that's been cool. We've had athletes. We've had, um, we actually, the first weekend we were open. Uh, a makeup artist found us. They were shooting Judas in the black Messiah in Cleveland, which is up for an Oscar and the whole cast, not the whole cast, but many of the actors came and we had a private event for them and they walked in just, they were going into their final shoot week and they were exhausted and it's intense, you know, the scripts and texts. And by the end, we were dancing in the gym together. They were totally refreshed. The men, you know, even the male actors were getting like, The facials, they were all loving new, calm, you know, we were just flipping them between rooms. It was a blast. We're like, wow, this is the first weekend. Terrific. Is that what a way to open, right? Yeah. Well, it's a great way. And actually the makeup artist, Sean Richards is up for an academy award as well. So. Well,

Randy:

shout out to them and maybe guys shout out to you guys as well. We just want to give it up to the reset to get us rolling. It was pretty fun. How fun is that? Well, I know, you know, you mentioned so that the whole cast came and you're dancing around and stuff. So I know it center the research team out to go , go check out the reset. What what's it about? And , the feedback was. A fabulous space and not just on the services, but you actually have space where you could do events there. Um, yeah. And so hopefully here in maybe, you know, in the next month or two, that life gets normal and you know, you can start doing some things like that, even. I think that's, that's fabulous.

Beth:

We do private, uh, one of the things that has really helped us through this 2020 is, uh, we do. Have private events so that if you want to come in with your quarantine bubble, you know, the people that you're, you're comfortable with, you can rent the space out for an hour and a half or two and a half hours and bring your own food. And we just rotate you through things and it's safe, you know?

Randy:

I can't think of a better combination getting a massage and having food would be perfect. Or drinking. Yeah. For your beverage maybe. Yeah, that sounds like a great night to me. All right. So Beth, it's that time? Do you like, I do like baseball. I know how good I'm going to be at this. This little phone episode called the stretch IRA. And, um, but the research team to work a little bit as well to try to, uh, come up with something that would be. Yeah, kind of in the ballpark of what it is that you do. Okay. All right. So we'll see how this works. All right. So I've got a couple of questions. I've got a great story and old dig into this, but here's just the first question. You have an idea of the average massage therapist salary in the MLB,

Beth:

in the MLB. Oh, I'll say. 80,000,

Randy:

you know, pretty close. Just a little bit below that at 71. No kidding. All right. So that was very good. See that wasn't 200,000, so that was good. So I've got a great story though, on the first massage. Well, presumably the first massage therapist in the MLB have any idea. On this guy, or even when, when do you think that they see that? So this he is touting himself as the first? I shouldn't say touting. He's just saying presumably he was the first hint he's alive.

Beth:

Uh, so I would say the first one. Okay. That's perceptive by the way. That's 72.

Randy:

Not quite that far back, actually. Yes. So here's a great story. So Russell nu-uh back in the early, actually in 2000, um, always wanted he's a massage therapist, always wanted to be working in baseball. And so he got. A client who was with the Arizona Diamondbacks. And he started working with that particular client, that client, then that player referred into some of the other players. And after, , working with several, the diamond bags just hired him as a regular employee. And then after the war, during the 2004 season, the diamond backs ended their season. Boston, uh, the Boston red Sox, Curt Schilling reached out to Russell and said, I think you could help us as we're coming into the post season. And so Russell went to Boston, worked with the red Sox during the 2004 post-season. And if you happen to know. Baseball a little bit. That was the year that Boston, uh, won the world series as well. And wow. And so he's been in, he's been with and with Boston since, so he is the only massage therapist as well to, uh, have five world series rings. Good for him. How about that? So that's pretty cool.

Beth:

The other athletes were like, you know, back in my day, we didn't have massage therapists.

Randy:

Yeah. So I think that's a great story on this guy. So congratulations to you, Russell. And, uh, you know, maybe we can get them to chagrin to hang out at the reset with us at some point when that'd be fun. All right. Well, let's get back into it. All right. So. I understand you guys opened December of 19, January of 20 great timing, right? Not your typical first year of business. Walk us through. What does that look like for you? How have you guys had to accommodate to pivot? , kind of through COVID I'm sure it's been challenging.

Beth:

Well, it has been, but you know, we've put our minds to figuring it out. I mean, launching is hard anyway. And it's exhilarating and it's all those things kind of in a basket. Right. And, um, we had been really pressing hard. So from concept to open, it was nine months, which is pretty fast for building walls and, you know, getting equipment. Well, I would imagine as well as like equipment and installation. Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. So we felt really good about the trajectory and, um, , just to frame this, going into the launch, we felt chagrin falls was our place to start because we all live here and we knew the community and we wanted this reset to be a place of R and D as long, you know, so that we could figure out our good model. And then our plan was to have a second location with an 18 months and then potentially franchise. So we went into our launch. We're scaled for a bigger organization, our systems, you know, the way we're platformed across all things, procedures, you know, we've, we've got it all there. And then it was, it was a real pinch when we had to close, but we knew we had to, you know, we want to protect our clients and we want to protect our staff. So. Going into the close. We also kind of knew that we got it wrong a little bit on staffing. We're a little top heavy. We were making adjustments anyway. And we really tried to use that time to communicate really well with the customers we did have and do right by them, you know, so that we could hopefully. Have them return and be happy with us at the end. So we put memberships on hold without being asked. You know, we reached out, we, we tried to do everything we could for that client base. , , then we really worked, you know, we worked to, we didn't have a lot of data, but I'm kind of a data person and we wanted to see if we could spot trends, you know, with our client base, really drill down our financials to see what. Seem to be making the best margin and why. And we took the time to evaluate where we were and try to figure out how to round things out for the future.

Randy:

It's hard because you were only open three months. Yeah. Right. Um, so it's hard. You didn't have a, probably a huge pool to draw from a data standpoint. So how so you closed? So probably like mid March. I remember that weekend, like so vividly,

Beth:

we were supposed to have an event on March 11th. I kind of pulled the plug two days before because we knew it was coming. So how long were you closed? Um, I'm trying to think. I think we reopened. Woof. I don't remember. It was either may or June. We kind of followed the protocols for both gyms and salons and you know, like we don't have a real fit with the category. So we just tried to follow what made the most sense in aligning with. Our services.

Randy:

So you're open and you're still all operating as business. So obviously you've had to kind of address this interesting business climate with some creativity. And you kind of mentioned a little bit. He looked back at it, looked at data and I think that's always great advice for any. Business owner, obviously look at history, look at trends, look at the data points because you can identify. , I had a great financial officer that worked in a company that I was with and he always drilled into me. Listen. Every number tells a story. And so you just have to look for it. , and, and I truly believe that. So, , and I think it's great advice. So you've done all, you did some of that introspection, you looked, you re-evaluated, you reopened may June. What did you do differently than what you started out with? I'm curious then w w any big wholesale change or just some tweaks?

Beth:

One of the biggest was we really thought our business would sustain itself better without. So much personal training. And so we really ramped that up. And one of my partners, Beth, rowel really stepped in and did an awesome job. The difference with reset is we're not a gym where you kind of just walk in and can work out. It's specifically built for personal training. So it's very safe. You know, you're in there either by yourself or we can take a group of up to four, you know, and it's a 50 minute session and everything sanitized in between and no one else has coming in your space, you know? So, so that for us, with being able to, it's largely a brick and mortar business. So bringing up that revenue stream for us was really important. Um, we also. We're lucky in the fact, the way we designed our space is it was private anyway. So you're not in a massage chair in this open, you know, room. We changed our booking system so that nobody who didn't know each other could book into that room together or new calm.

Randy:

That's interesting. You even say that cause that in my mind as well, I was kind of thinking, well, you know, you're doing the services that you're providing a really somewhat isolated anyway. Yes. Yeah. I'm not doing a group massage chair, right activity here,

Beth:

and that's why it felt safe. Um, we also added in, we aligned with a functional medicine practice and we now do vitamin infusions. So that has been, I think what really resonated with us is that as bad as this pandemic has been, it has absolutely highlighted why taking care of yourself both mentally and physically is important. So everything we provide helps reduce inflammation helps reduce stress, helps you better prepared, you know, to fight a virus. But from a business perspective, we still have that brick and mortar, right. , it's, it's a drag, you know, and, um, a lot of our space, as you said, was kind of open and the events we conceived of can't happen yet, but they'll come back, they'll come back. And then we started actually kind of like a sister organization where we're working on now, a curriculum to help build resilience in kids. And so it's an educational component that doesn't need to be delivered. At reset. So that's exciting. That's going into peer review next week, actually. And then we also, with one of our very good clients developed a corporate offering of how some of our services can be chosen for wellness programs for companies. So that's something that we are turning towards as well, to help with expansion,

Randy:

a couple of great ideas there. I think reaching out and working with kids and what you can do, because I think so much of, , the modalities. So much of the principles that you're focusing on, I think are absolutely applicable and conserve kids in a special needs. This last year. , cause I, I really feel for kids young, uh, individuals right now because of the crampiness, uh, , I'll use that if that's a word on, , their social and development stages right now is, is so hard. So I think that's a terrific outrage and the other end of that on the corporate side, because I do think that some of these services and whether you. I think, , deliver outside of the lounge at corporate offices or create corporate events, , for, to host at your site as that will come back as well. So I think those are great approaches. Yeah. We'll see how they go. Yeah. So I'm sure. So during this COVID year, I'm sure you probably have had to tap into a few of them. Those services yourself. I probably should have tapped into more, Randy. Honestly, the sanity going. Wow. No, it's it's needed. Yeah. So you mentioned the partners and I want to touch on that because so many of our listeners that are running businesses, they have partners and important people that, um, they're working with. So give us a little bit of background maybe on, so there's four of you folks who are partners. How did you come together? Were you friends before? What was that intersection and how does it work with four? That's a lot of partners for women. Yes. Well, I wasn't going there, but for women, right? I mean, it's very interesting.

Beth:

It is. And, um, yes, we have friendships. Uh, you know, between us that are 20 years. So, as I mentioned, a lot of this is because we've seen, you know, and even though our target market started at the age band of women, right. Our real, our real passion is for the kids. , so it started with Vicky Childress who. Kind of res she kind of had that idea. She's a true entrepreneur. She's got ideas, you know, and, and, and the rest, you know, I just helped make it happen I guess. But, um, she has a brother who's a PhD in psychology and she visited his practice in Indiana and his approaches come in, but leave time for an appointment, you bust a sweat, get on a bike, do something. Then we'll sit on the couch, you know, and talk. And then afterwards, give your time yourself time for some reflection. And that resonated with her. And then, , Lee Krasinski is a functional medicine, health coach, and she's very well versed in, you know, how to keep yourself healthy. She kind of overcame her own health issues through food. You know, food is medicine and, and then Beth rowel, as I mentioned is a very talented. Personal trainer and she had a spin studio. And so the team really started to come together with the expertise and passion around anxiety reduction, keeping healthy. And I, at that time was exiting my last. Consulting firm. And so they came to me and said, well, Hey, you know, you think you could help us do this. And I thought, wow, that's really different. Let me think about it. And I realized I'm the perfect client, right? Like I'm a stressed yeah. Middle age, you know, like I need a lot of help. So that's really how it came together. We all had complimentary skills, but what's interesting is that two of us really had to be in the workforce. And two of us really didn't. And so we were also bringing together some interesting perspective, you know, that we've, we've learned a lot through the year, a lot of good stuff.

Randy:

So it's interesting dynamics then, because you're bringing in obviously friendships. Yep. And jumping into business and investment and money being put up and commitments. What happens? How does the partnership work? Do you have the kind of work divided amongst you? Do you have specialties? You focus on what happens when you've difference of opinions? Right

. Beth:

Well, I think they probably thought I was a little crazy, but one of the first things that I sort of kind of worked with the group on is coming up with a roles document. And it really is, you know, every company needs certain things. It doesn't matter your industry, you need finance, you need legal, you need HR, you need, you know, the list goes on.

Randy:

I had, uh, a local attorney on. And I think this was his quote. You're not really a business until you have an attorney. There you go.

Beth:

And hopefully a good one, but, uh, that's a shout out to you. There you go, Henry. So I, I felt it was super important that we define what it even takes to run a company. You know, because sometimes the ideas are so great, but you've got to operationalize things. And I also thought it would be important for us to kind of know our lanes. And so we kind of put our names next to those lanes and we decided what we needed to hire. And it also helped us drive out, , the job description for the folks that work with us and the expectations we have for customer service and things like that. So that was a start. We also, you know, we're not organized as even equity partners, but we organized ourselves to have an even vote. , so there is some structure of like, if we, if we do have an issue where we don't have agreement, you know, what do we do with that? Um, but we really don't like to get there. We'd rather pause. And let some things marinate if we're not quite on the same page. And, and then I find, if we get a little analytical about it, then it can become clearer for people on which way we want to go. Sometimes you can't just run with your emotion. So that's kind of what we do is we take it back to like, you know, Why is this coming up and what can we do about it and how can we analyze it a little bit? And sometimes even we'll switch roles for a bit, just so that you can see what's involved with when somebody else's doing not too often, but they try to make sure that, that we come to agreement on bigger stuff, all aligned. And we're also not there the same amount of time, right? So we're, we're all investing different amounts and the actual, you know, presence at the business.

Randy:

So the way that you have it outlined and defined, and I think that's probably the way that it does work is because you haven't defined. And so you kind of eliminate the ambiguity a little bit. And so, yeah, so that creates a. Just like raising kids, you know, they need to know the boundaries where, and how do I operate? And I feel better than

Beth:

well, and, and we do love each other. So if something, if something comes up where it's just, it's just a thing for somebody, right. We're usually like, all right. Yeah. It's my first business for, at the end of a meeting, everybody goes, I love you. Let's go. Let's go hit the salt. Yeah. Yeah.

Randy:

So. COVID is going to be behind us. I, you know, I'm very optimistic in that, in the sense of least of kind of our current world that we've lived in and the lockdowns and all of the restrictions around it. What do you see for the reset lounge moving forward? Certainly you're going to have some challenges, but what do you think? , okay. , in six months from now, this is where I think we'll be, and this is what's going to happen.

Beth:

Yeah. We're excited. I think that in six months we're going to be rocking on some of the things we thought we'd be able to do, but, you know, we really didn't. So with launch, we didn't do everything at once that we planned like the events and things like that. So I do think that we'll be able to exercise more of our, our ideas. And for me, I'm just excited to actually get a full year of, of. You know, data behind us. Right. I still worry a little bit about how seasonality is going to impact us and things like that. And, and, uh, you know, we need to learn those things and hopefully soon we can get back on track for a second location. Oh, great. Yeah. Yeah.

Randy:

So that's kind of in the back of the mind, anyway,

Beth:

the dark days of being closed, we were like, Ooh, I don't know if we're ever going to be able to do that, but we're, we're feeling optimistic and we're feeling like what we're providing. Is unique, especially in the Midwest and that we've got something,

Randy:

you know, you say that because I think I lived in LA for a number of years. And that's why I'm like, this sounds like a very LA kind of yeah. And nothing against our listeners in Los Angeles. But this sounds like something that got transplanted from Los Angeles right here in the middle of it.

Beth:

And some of the research we did before we opened was in New York. It was in. You know, LA Seattle, there's a need for in our busy world. There's value in walking into one space and being able to achieve multiple goals.

Randy:

Right. That's a great statement right there. All right. So here we come. We're at the bottom of the ninth, it goes so fast, right. Path, year stressed. And it's probably like being in the reset lounge. It probably goes so fast. You think, but I just want to live here. Um, so I'm going to ask you the question because you really are right in it. I mean, you are, we'll call you a rookie here in your business. And typically I kind of ask, , At this point in the show, what advice do you have for rookies in the game? , others who are thinking of starting their business, or, you know, similar to you just been in the business for a short time. What kind of advice do you have for those folks as you've kind of looked back on this last year,

Beth:

I've thought of a few things actually. And you know, before this, I did help start two consulting firms. So I got a little bit of a track record. The one thing that came to mind for me is that. You really want to balance your passion and your hope with a dose of realism? If you don't have passion for what you're doing or hope for its success, you shouldn't start. Right. You just shouldn't start. But I think that the realism is being able to look at yourself and, and recognize if something needs to be adjusted to take the time to operationally really review your business and know what's happening with it. And why, you know, try to try to get there and, and put a little structure around it. The second thing is really picking your team. Well, you know, whether it's going to be a partner and employee or a service provider, that's kind of augmenting you small businesses hard, and sometimes you feel like, oh, yay. I can. Pay myself this month. And then next month you're like, oh boy. And it's also not structured in a way, , that maybe in a larger corporation, you have reviews and you have people that give you those attaboys and you need to surround yourself with people that can help your soul survive. The hard times.

Randy:

That is a wonderful point because I think. Too often. People don't think about that sometimes. And I've talked with so many business owners, whether on the show where, or with some of our own clients that they just feel like they're kind of out there on an island and they don't have, they don't necessarily get that positive feedback. Always like, you know, that was a great. Choice you made and deciding to do this or that for your business. They may get the accolades from there, clients that they're working with and like, oh, we love what you do. And we'll thank you. But you never quite certain if you're taking the right steps forward in your business. You're I think there's always that question, mark. And I think that is some great advice without surrounding yourself with a good support structure. Yeah. Yeah,

Beth:

you have to know yourself and what you need, because you may not get it in small business.

Randy:

You're not going to have the boss and pat you on the bank job. Oh, it's so prevalent. Box of chocolates. Great payroll run. What you've done with the business this year is just terrific. Yeah. Yeah. You need a little. You know? Yeah. I'll support. Yeah. All right. Anything else on your list? So you had, I don't think so. Don't underestimate how much money you need. I guess that's a basic, right, right. Yeah. That is a basic in life even. , all right. So the reset lounge, go check him out at. Reset, lounge.com , look for this, uh, all of their different services and especially the new calm neuroscience, uh, bio hack. That's pretty good stuff. Yeah. I think I'll have to check that out. Well, listen, Beth, so great to have you on the show. Thanks for coming in today. Yeah, it's been a very interesting to hear about the unique, um, Uh, services that you provide. I actually, I think you're the very first that we've had kind of in the wellness industry, even as a guest. So yeah. So I really appreciate you coming in. Yes. , and as we say, that's the ball game. So thanks for joining us today. If you liked her show, Hey, please tell your friends subscribe and review and we'll see around the boat. Running the basis with small businesses is brought to you by 38 digital marketer, a digital marketing agency, committed to client growth with lead generation higher conversions and increased. Sales connect with us today at 38 digital market.