The Women's Running Podcast

Ep 7. Jemma Lewis, This Girl Can Run Far

August 20, 2020 Esther Newman Season 1 Episode 7
The Women's Running Podcast
Ep 7. Jemma Lewis, This Girl Can Run Far
Chapters
The Women's Running Podcast
Ep 7. Jemma Lewis, This Girl Can Run Far
Aug 20, 2020 Season 1 Episode 7
Esther Newman

In episode 7 of the Women’s Running podcast, editor Esther Newman chats to Jemma Lewis, better known as This Girl Can Run Far. She’s a runner we can all relate to, having taken up running as an antidote to gym-going after the birth of her daughter. But the thing is with Jemma is that a) she’s really *really* good, and b) she’s incredibly down to earth. Here, she talked to me about taking on her first ultra with the proceeds of a last-minute modelling gig with This Girl Can, and how Joe Wicks has made her discover the benefits of strength training. She also talks passionately about how supportive the women’s running community is, and equally passionately about her love of Dairylea Dunkers. And if you want insider tips, she explains here how to stop your hydration pack sloshing about on your back, making you need a wee. Essential running advice right here.

Show Notes Transcript

In episode 7 of the Women’s Running podcast, editor Esther Newman chats to Jemma Lewis, better known as This Girl Can Run Far. She’s a runner we can all relate to, having taken up running as an antidote to gym-going after the birth of her daughter. But the thing is with Jemma is that a) she’s really *really* good, and b) she’s incredibly down to earth. Here, she talked to me about taking on her first ultra with the proceeds of a last-minute modelling gig with This Girl Can, and how Joe Wicks has made her discover the benefits of strength training. She also talks passionately about how supportive the women’s running community is, and equally passionately about her love of Dairylea Dunkers. And if you want insider tips, she explains here how to stop your hydration pack sloshing about on your back, making you need a wee. Essential running advice right here.

Unknown Speaker :

Episode Seven of the women's running podcast. I'm Esther, the editor of women's running. And in this episode I talked to Gemma Lewis, better known as this girl can run far. She's a runner we can all relate to having taken up running as an antidote to gym going after the birth of her daughter. But the thing is with Gemma is that a she's really really good. And B she's incredibly down to earth. Here she has a chat with me over zoom because we're still in lockdown while sipping a cup of tea and keeping a reassuring hand on her pet pug, not a euphemism, who occasionally peeked into view giving me slightly mournful looks while I took Gemma's attention away from him. She talked to me about taking on her first ultra with the proceeds of a last minute modelling gig with this girl can and how two weeks has made her discover the benefits of strength training. She also talks passionately about how supportive the women's running community is. And equally passionately about her love of daily dunkers. And if you want insider tips, she explains here how to stop your hydration pack sloshing about in your back making you need a Wi Fi. Essential running advice right here. Have you got the latest copy of women's running? If you're missing it, the easiest way to get hold of a copy is to go to our online shop at shop dot women's running.co.uk or you could get it delivered direct to your door every month by subscribing. If you prefer instant access then digital is V you can buy the digital edition at pocket mag comm or download the app to your phone or tablet via your app store and you can read it straight away wherever you are. For all the different ways to read the magazine. Go to shop dot women's running.co.uk So how have you been? How's lockdown been? You okay? I okay. Okay. It's been a very strange time, as I'm sure it has been for everybody. But I just feel for me personally, it's been an absolute blessing in disguise. And it's made me look at all the things that I was neglecting mostly my strength training, which I've just came out of quite a serious injury, I got injured just before Christmas last year with a back injury, which I had also the year before as well. And basically, it's just having a weak call. So having a weak core cause the back problem, and I just wasn't doing enough strength training to help with that, and core stability. So I kind of fell into it by accident because obviously I've got two small children as men, Rosalie who are six and eight, and I just started doing Jay wicks with them as ever as the whole country. Did. Just started doing his workouts, I just noticed that my body started to change. And I just started to get stronger. So I just kind of went from there really. So I started basically doing hit training five times a week, as well as rehabilitation work and starting running again. And yes, been a massive blessing. So I've just been too late. I mean, I've kind of, you know, the cool kids are calling in a glow up, but I'm just calling it the show up because if you show up, you're gonna get the results and I've got some fantastic results just by showing up every day, because I haven't got anything else to do. So I converted my marriage into a gym and just made the best of what's been, you know, quite a rubbish situation for everyone. So yeah, so what were you doing before lockdown? I was working and you know, just trying to squeeze everything in but this time Oh, really allowed me to focus on myself, I suppose. I mean, the children are obviously still here as well, but and definitely give me more time to focus on me and what I need to be doing. So that's been really good. So can you can you talk about who have you got there? Who's that role? Oh, sorry, is my elderly pug and if I put him down, you'll see he's very old. Very cute. Very old. But yeah, the bar down. He's quite used to like white table talks. So he likes to sit on my lap when I have my tea dates. So he thinks this is a tea day, which it kind of is. So can you can you tell me about your history with running and when you started? Yeah, cool. So I wasn't at people think that I've always been this crazy runner girl. Actually, that is not the truth. And that's not my story. So I used to run it school as everyone did it. He and I always seemed quite good at it. But then I left school and I never really ran again. And after, and then I got pregnant with my first daughter. And I gained quite a lot of weight. And the decision was made by me and my husband that I wouldn't return back to work because if I did, it was a full time position and childcare costs, it just wasn't going to be worth my while. And actually, I didn't want to go back. So I didn't go back to work. So I was left i'd gained three and a half stone with with us, me my first daughter, so I kind of needed to lose this weight, but I didn't have the fancy gym membership that I had when I was working full time. So I had to think of a way of losing this weight without spending any money. So I just naturally just assumed that I would just become a runner. But the problem is when you haven't ran, you can't just go out and run and there was no couch to five k back in 2011, which was when I had asked me So I just decided one day that I was just going to go out running but the problem is I couldn't run. So I remember clearly I got to naught point four of a mile and I just stopped and and just cried and just found it so difficult. I just thought, Oh, this is horrible. This is not for me and it's not as easy as I remember I just, I had no fitness I had no base level of fitness I just put on an old pair of shoes and ran out the door. But of course that's not how you run when you don't run you you build up to it you walk run, but I didn't know anything about count to five k back then there was no such thing. So I just kind of muddled on but then I decided that I wanted to do half marathon for not being able to run at all not even be able to run one mile. I wanted to put my sights towards a half marathon so I gave myself six months. So from January to September, I built myself up probably in the wrong way looking back at it, but I did manage to do it and I did my first half marathon and I did it in one hour and 58 I wanted to go sub two hours. I did it. So I was really happy. And then I got pregnant with my second daughter and I completely stopped running again. And because for me exercise and pregnancy, it just didn't feel right. I was doing boot camps at the time. And I just remember thinking, why am I doing this because it just didn't feel right to me. So I stopped doing it. I got pregnant with Rosie I gained even more weight the second time, again, Boston. So again, for stone, and it was just again, I was back in the same position of Okay, well, I'm going to run again to lose the weight because it seemed to work last time. But the problem is, I had quite a I had a really good birth, I had a lot of birth with both of them, but unfortunately, my recovery for the second time I was 30. It just wasn't as quick so I couldn't run for 10 months, I had an pubic symphysis and I was getting adjusted every week, but I just couldn't run. So um, I was getting adjusted and when I could run after 10 months, that's when my life completely changed. In a very unexpected way. So I was just coming back into running and then I discovered Park run. And a photograph was taken as as you all know, with park for me sometimes get a photographer that takes a snap in a sneaky snap of you. I was so funny I had this flippin hydration backpack on my back to put my phone in because I had no idea what I was doing I this backpack on and like I was wearing an old shirt when I was actually running a five K and I just had my phone in my backpack that I put on and it's pictured me but actually it looked quite it made me feel quite fierce, you know, a mom of two I had this backpack on I just felt like yeah, like this is this is this is me. This is the new me. Anyway, that photograph you could submit it to this girl can so I submitted it because I wanted the writing over the top that said something like hot and not bothered or something just something like you know, cute like that. So I submitted this picture, and then they gave you the captions put over your own photo. And I thought that was all it was. But actually what it was, was they were looking for campaign ambassadors for women in sport. And they asked me if I wanted to be a Southwest ambassador. And I was like, Well, of course, but nothing really came of it. Until I had a phone call, saying, Jim, I know this is really short, negative, but can you get to lunch, and dinner tomorrow? bearing in mind, Rosalie would have been how old would racing event she would have been less than 18 months old. And I was still breastfeeding her at the time. So it was it wasn't as easy as me just getting away. Anyway, so can you get to London tomorrow, somebody pulled out and we need you for the campaign for Marks and Spencers because Marks and Spencers are doing a clothing line. I'm not a model. It's just like I don't know, if you really want me I've never heard moto before. They're like no, we want real girls on the campaign. We want real women Can you get to London tomorrow with your running buggy minus the baby? We're just going to use the blanket instead of your and I thought okay, so I rang my dad, he's a taxi driver. And I said, Dad, can you get me to London tomorrow? I wasn't working at the time I had no income. And they told me that they were going to pay me 300 pounds for the shoot. And I would have done it for free if I'm honest, but the thought of having 300 pounds for a day's work when I hadn't worked in years was something that I was very excited about. So I knew my dad said yeah, I'll clear my diary. I'll take you to London. So off we went to London with my running buggy, we did the shoot. They paid me the 300 pounds just before Christmas. And I was just coming back to running very very lightly. And me being me I'm very much an all or nothing person. I got this money from the shoot had a great day. It was awesome. And I guess I got to keep all of the kit as well which was just amazing. Because I didn't have any money saved. For me having brand new kit was a really big deal. I have Money. So I did the shoot and got the money. And then I thought, I need to do something I've changed with this money. I don't want to just spend it on Tesco future, I want to do something with this money. So I went online, and I didn't know what it was, but I just decided it'd be a really good idea to do an ultramarathon. And I haven't even run a marathon. I did a half marathon, what, three years previously or two years previously, and I just thought I like to set my sights really, really high. So that's what I did. I entered race to the stones. And on the 10th of January, I created an Instagram account because I just thought I really want to remember this and I want to take pictures and it really understand Instagram, I didn't understand hashtags or how it worked. But I just knew that I was becoming a bit boring on Facebook, and no one actually cared about my training, which is fine. So I created this account. I wanted to call myself this girl can run because I just said this girl can campaign and I can run button for And at this scale kathlyn run was taken. So I had to call myself this girl Cameron fall hoping that I could actually run fall but I didn't know. So I caught myself this girl Cameron fall. And then I put it on Facebook. Remember it clear as day is the 10th of January, I did my first post, and I put it on Facebook and I said, I'm training for an ultra marathon if anybody wants to follow my journey, here's my Instagram name. And 14 people out or I don't know how about 400 friends followed me. So my 14 followers, I was set and I was gonna do this. I spent the next six months training for it. I found Instagram really helpful. I kind of connected with other runners because I found out how Instagram works. I connected with people that have done the distance before. A particular person that I connected with was a guy called an ultra runner Justin who done hundred milers. He was very helpful. He sent me loads of emails with loads of tips. I really didn't know what I was doing. And it was really helpful things like, you know, not tying your shoes too tight because your feet swell things that I wouldn't even thought about. And it was just a community really. And then I suppose because my journey was so authentic and so raw people started to get interested in it and started to follow me. And before I knew I had 100 people that wanted to know about my journey, and it was, it was people from all over the world. And it was, it was amazing. So So yeah, then I then I trained for the ultra and then I did it and then my girls waiting at the finish line. And it was definitely one of my proudest moments, just going from nothing to 100 K and in six months. So So yeah, that's pretty amazing. And I met you last year when we were doing the Loch Ness 10 k bed, which was absolutely lovely. And how did you find that and what what other races have you been doing kind of in the build up to that The Loch Ness Tang k was an amazing race because I actually got a PB that day, I actually ran a 40 to 59 which was an absolute dream time. And before the lockmaster 10 k, I was actually in the midst of marathon training, so after so after Loch Ness I then went to material and did my marathon prep race, which was went really badly because it's a heat wave. But I actually was in the midst of marathon training when I did a lot less 10 K so that was like a chin up race. And then I did my my a race which was Abington marathon in October. So how you got there? It went really well. I've got a 323 I seem to run three hours. 23 marathons. I've done it twice now in two different years. 2018 2019. I've run three to three at the same course. So yeah, it went really well. But of course, after the marathon, that's when And then I started to PB again. I started to peak again, but then I got injured. Again, not in a hole. But yeah 2019 was a really good year. And this year well, I wasn't ever going to do my outcome this year. I knew I wanted to give my body a year off from marathon trainings. It's quite intense. And ultra marathons, I think, in my opinion are much more doable than racing a road marathon because racing a road marathon is extremely difficult and very hard on your body. ultra marathons you can stop at an aid station, it kitkats and Chris chats your friends Instagram story, you know it's fun, but marathon racing a road marathon is not fun and it's really hard going on your body so the marathon for me Abington is always my a race of the year, but next year, I'm going to be targeting Newport, which is a nice flat fast marathon but I don't like them really busy. So I did London and I didn't really enjoy it because it was a bit busy. For me, I prefer the quieter races, which was which was why Loch Ness was such a pool for me. It's a nice quiet race, like their support, but it's not overwhelming London I found quite overwhelming. So I like quieter races. I've been to Mars and no one even knows about it. It's a quiet race that no one cares about losing the races that I enjoy the most the ones that no one really knows about. So what has been your favourite race that you've done? My favourite race ever was the Montreal marathon that I did in 2018 without the heatwave, it was it was the first time I've been accused which is the Boston qualifying time I did it by accident. And I was running a strategy of running for miles on former off so I run for miles easy four miles marathon pace four miles easy for miles miles, and I did that for 26 miles. But me being me being a bit stupid. I didn't realise that. a marathon is 42 k because it's in Canada. They don't work in miles. They work in K So when I got to 140 K, I don't know why, but I just thought I had a lot longer to go then TK. So I crossed the finish line in 330. And it didn't even feel difficult for me to run that time. And I just remember feeling so elated that I've achieved a lifetime goal. But without the it didn't really feel like a lot of effort because the year before I I didn't I run 346 at London and the heatwave, sorry, no, not that no, that it was that year so that that year I run 346 and miss my good phrase by 77 seconds. And then I went around the 336 months later, without it didn't feel like it was that hard work, but it's probably because of the heat. There was no heat it was 10 degrees. And it was a lovely flat colour. And it was in a Montreal is a French speaking place. So a lot of the signs were in French. And it just it just was a different feel. And it was just yeah, getting that time. Didn't expect it was just yeah, feeling I can't really put. Yeah, it was definitely my best grace ever. Why did you choose Montreal? what's the what's the draw? I just not true again was a bit of a funny one I chose a place that I didn't know anyone. So I was kind of in the thick of the mum life. And again, I've made Instagram connections across the whole world. But after London Marathon I just, I had a stress fracture before I got to London and my training was all just, I didn't do anything that year it was 2017 and it goes trust fracture. I didn't end up doing London. And I just wanted to when I got better, I wanted to do a marathon that year but just wanted to go somewhere that nobody knew me. And I wanted to kind of have a break from my family. I suppose I was just I was so consumed in my own life. I just felt like I didn't really know who I was anymore. So I picked Montreal because I picked them out and that was the trail math and it was up the mountain. I didn't know anybody there apart from a few people that I've met on Instagram. And I just got on a plane and went somewhere that I didn't know, I just wanted to do something brave. So I I picked a country that I didn't know. Yeah, it was because I didn't know anybody So, but only people that I knew online and then met in real life, but I didn't actually know one person over. So that was a door of material. And I've gone back every year since because I've now made a complete running community over there. And I love it. So um, so yeah, I'd make that my I want to share my goals to what see young girls and I want them to know that they can follow their dreams and aspirations just because they're a mom. You know, it's different because when I'm in school gate, and they're like, they get peed. The moms get really confused, like, Oh, so you're going away on your own. It's like, Yeah, I am. And it's one week a year. I'm with my family, for the, you know, for the other 51 weeks of the year, I'm with them. So I don't see a problem in Going away, doing something for myself. For one week year, I think it's really important. If my husband went on a golfing holiday, no one would say a thing. But it's because it's a woman going on her own for her own reasons, they women don't seem to understand that. And I want to break that stigma. So I do it every year. And I give my husband instructions on how to use a washing machine and like, get on with it. So um, so yeah, I wanted to show my daughters that they can, you know, you can you can travel, you can do something for yourself. And for me, my joy is running. So I put running in my holiday. And that's, that's what I do. So do you find have they been inspired by your running? massively they have, I don't push them into it, and I don't, but sometimes I'll come home from a run and they'll say, can you run with us, especially my eldest is going to be nine this month. And also things like parkruns been massive for them. But I just I just feel so strongly about women in sport feel so strongly about it and how women I've got so much confidence from my running and actually ended up finding myself in running when I felt like I really lost myself when I lost my you know my full time job and ended up in this kind of mum life as I like to call it I felt like I really lost myself for a long time but running has given me a voice again, it's given me a reason to to inspire others to find what I found in it and I just that's what I want to share on my journey is I want people to get out of it. Why have to see what to see the capability that you've got in you. If you put the work in. It's not easy. It's not easy at all. But everyone's got that capability if they put their mind to it. What gives you that sort of strength of mind then what is it is it Instagram is it you know, definitely not Instagram, Instagram close tomorrow, nothing would change for me at all. I will be able to do an Instagram Stories anymore. I it for me it's self improvement is my internal driver. It's it's self improvement. It's knowing that I haven't reached my potential yet. I'm 38 this month, no sorry 3736 37 this month and I just feel like I'm really happy that I know how to run my best marathon time yet. I know I've got a better time in me. I know that I'm gonna be running into my 40s and I know that I'm going to still be pbn, because I'm just getting stronger. But running just takes so much dedication. But it's just great to know that it's you against you. And your times mean nothing to other people, but they mean everything to you. Doesn't matter if you have it run. If you want to run a sub 35 K, that's just as important as somebody who wants to run a sub 25 K. For me, there's no difference. It's just you versus you. And seeing the improvements I've made is just thousands and thousands of miles of hard work. I'm not naturally gifted I'm not naturally talented, but I am consistent and I show up and that's the difference. So that's to me. My, that's my drive is trying to be the best me that I can be. Do you run on your own? Yes. I'm such a lone wolf. I really am. I like running on my own. I like listening to music on my ID run with a friend once a week. And that's it once a week. I do enjoy being on my own, especially when I do my long runs. And I'm training for a marathon, I've got to go out and run 20 to 24 miles. When you're racing you're on you're effectively on your own. So I find to train with others. It's like a security blanket that you really shouldn't be getting used to. Because when you're racing, you are on your own, and especially in races that I do like the quieter races, you're quite often on your own like Loch Ness. I wasn't exactly with other people. And you have to get used to being alone when you're racing, especially when you're not doing the big races. So I think Like to run on my own. So we've talked about your favourite race. What was your least favourite? my least favourite race. I would say, Oh, my least favourite race. This is probably a little local race that's called the ironwoods 10 k and it's, I remember getting some Maya one and you had to like climb up for Rick to get up this steep and I thought, oh my god, what have I done and it was so hard. It was a trail race, but it was 10 k of how I remember thinking I want to quit off tomorrow. I've never felt like that after a race before thinking I want to give up after one mile. I thought how am I gonna get through the next five because it was just so tough. So yeah, it's probably that one. It wasn't great. Hasn't sound fun. So like you've been explaining your your training has completely changed it while you've been on lockdown. Can you tell me what the difference is in like a week's worth of training now, as opposed to a week's worth of training a year ago? Definitely. So a year ago, there would have been no strength training in my running, I'd gone up run six days a week, and that would have been it. Now, kind of minute were you doing? Um, probably about a year ago, I would have probably been doing, you know, around hovering around the 14 mile mark, which is, again, where I am now hovering around like the 4045 mile mark. That's where I kind of sit on I'm not training for anything that's in my base mileage is 40s 45 miles. But now the differences I'm also incorporating other stuff. My strength training is now five times a week on top of the running and also found this really weird love for skipping in lockdown. I just, I picked up a skipping rope from eBay and I just thought I really want to skip. I thought my kids keep skipping and I think it looks really easy. I skip them like 10 seconds. And when it's die, I wanted to challenge myself to get for five minutes, which doesn't sound like a lot, but actually, it's a lot. So I also do skipping as well, five days a week as well. So and what kind of strength training are you doing? It's really bodyweight exercises also incorporating weight so i'm doing i'm doing Jay wicks his 90 day body challenge. And so I paid for it and lockdown it was half price. And it's you've got cycle one, cycle two and cycle three and cycle two incorporates a lot of weights. And again, not some that's five times a week but I've just really found the difference in doing that just is completely changed my body shape but also when I came out of my injury, I did have quite I did put on not loads of weight, but it was too much for me to run comfortably and that's now gone. So I've kind of shed it quite a lot of body weight as well. So that's been good. And where do you like to run? Are you a Road Runner? Are you a trail runner? Road Runner. I do love the trails but for me I love a nice flat country road that it's got blind corners and just nobody really goes there. My favourite loop is a place called Kingston Seymour which is just so boring but I just like it because it's just quiet and it's just country lanes and it's flat. But yeah, I do like the road some definitely a road runner. I do enjoy trail but rates were I really do enjoy it the most. Did you have? Did you have any races in the diary that were cancelled? No, because I was injured. So I haven't I didn't actually put any races for this year because I was just coming out as rehabilitating myself from my injury. So I didn't actually have any races but this year, so I haven't. It's not been a disappointing year for me this year was always for me about not racing. It was about building a stronger base so I'm not getting injured. I've had the same injury for twice in two years. So that was come that came from my weak core. So this year, I was really going to knuckle down and target that before I built myself up to race. So no races have been cancelled for me to share because I didn't actually have any in the diary. For me, my focus has been on getting stronger. And I think that's where you're noticing a lot now where people are struggling. A lot of runners need that carrot that that that that reason to go out. I don't need that. So for me locked on his change nothing because I don't need that race to validate my hard work, which some runners need and I don't. So I've actually been quite lucky in that respect, but I don't really feel that I need that to make me go out and make me run. And so can we because you've mentioned your injuries a couple of times. Can we talk about that a little bit because you would want your back but also, I saw an Instagram post where you were talking about your socks you are known for running in yourself. And I know that that was also a bit of a help because you were concerned about injury there. So what sort of injuries have you have you suffered? My back injuries have been the worst ones because when they hit you, you can't walk, let alone run. It's an L five injury. So it's at the bottom, it's like a bulging disc. So when I've had that twice, and that my serious ones, but I always get niggles in the bottom of my legs in my cough, so I quite often used to wear compression socks, because it used to make running on these niggles manageable but the problem is, you need to address these nickels not just cover them up with socks. So I took the socks off, I made the decision this year to take I still wear them on my long runs and sometimes on my speedwork but I wanted to stop running, not wearing them all the time. So and what happened what happened with you back then so is that is that a slip day? Yeah, it's a bulging disc. And it's just come. I think it's from having children and your back isn't as strong. But yeah, it's just an area that is seems to be my weak point. But it doesn't help when you've got a very weak core, you've got neck stability, if you imagine your, your core is like a steering wheel for your body. So if your steering wheel isn't tight, your legs and hips will just go wherever they lie. So you're not strong in your trunk. So that then leads to problems when your hips, your hips meet, you know, your legs are going everywhere, your body's not straight and strong, which is that's part of the problem, but I wasn't addressing it. I just kept coming out with these injuries and then going into the next so it was time for me to stop. Which is great because lockdown came along and actually look at me and think, okay, I was weak and everything was weak. So that's why I've been dressing it in lockdown to stop this, you know, happening again. All the time. So have you do you feel like you're like Queen of the plank now, I do feel like and Queen of the play. But I think what I'm most happy about is actually being able to backwards lunge and getting my knee on the floor, which I couldn't do before lockdown. I was that stiff, I had no range of movement, and also do my personal training, which I've also been doing lockdown lock study for my personal training course that I've been doing. And it's kind of understanding enough to me, and really understanding the body and how it works. And I just had no idea really, so it's been really helpful. So yeah, I'm more happy that I can get my knee on the floor doing a reverse lunge, but my plank games pretty strong too. But yeah, it's my lunch. I'm really happy. That sounds stupid, but it's just the little things, just the little things that make me happy. Just seeing the improvements. And you're so you're training to be a personal trainer, is that your ambition and Absolutely um, and also I'm running coach as well, which I was just about to qualify before locked down. And I had my day fall with the athletics because actually, as much as I love doing, you know, doing my coffee and doing my barista and job, even though it's gone. actually helping people run is something that I'm extremely passionate about. And I want to do it the right way just because I have a large Instagram following doesn't make me a run coach. And I see a lot of people just decide one day I'm going to coach. I didn't want to do it like that I actually wants to do it properly, and qualify. I've actually been helping a few people during lockdown. And just just as a fun project really, and they've been getting amazing results and really improving their running and just getting that feedback has been so rewarding because I believe in life you have to do what you're absolutely you passionate about. And I'm very passionate about what I do and running and I just I just want other women to To get out of it, what I have is not even necessarily about the times. It's about how you feel about yourself and that self confidence. So I think, going forward, that's going to be my road. But I want to do it properly. Not just I have a large Instagram following. I'm not all of a sudden a running coach, I want to really do it properly. So what advice would you give women that wants to run, but we're kind of maybe, maybe they've had kids too, and they're worried about strength, they're worried about being seen. They're worried about whether they can get in the first place? What would you tell them? I definitely have been in that position myself when I put on lots and lots of weight. And I was very worried about being seen in public running. And I think you just have to know that every single driver or person that walks past you, is cheering you on because actually you're out there doing it. And I think that's really powerful thing to remember that. every runner that you come across will smile because we're all runners doesn't matter. how quick they run past you, they know you're out there giving it your best. And I think that start small, don't do what I did and think, Okay, I'm going to run, put on a pair of shoes and try and run as far as you can for as long as you can. That's not how you do it. There's great apps like couch to five K, now, walk and run, start small, be sensible. And with strength training, again, you could just implement it and you don't have to do five times a week, start small do it. You know, start with twice a week, three times a week and then fit in, you know, in your training and just be sensible, and listen to your body. And don't be too hard on yourself. And also know that the people that you're looking at social media, they put thousands of hours into their running, and we've all got to start somewhere. I started somewhere and I wasn't a runner, but now I've run countless thousands of miles but that's just keep showing up that's be consistent and you will see results but you've got to be consistent because stick with it and it's hard. It's tough. You just got to stick in there. So who are you? You inspire a lot of people, obviously. But who inspires you? Oh my gosh, that's such a great question. Who inspires me? I've got a particular friend called Kate Reed. I went to school with her. We went, we went all through school together. And Kate Reed is one of these people that she from a very young age knew what she wanted. She was. She said to me, Gemma, I've even got it. I have to shave. I've got like a when we left school, she signed her leavers, but Kate Reed, international athlete, she knew she was going places. And she went to the Olympics. And she ran the 10 k in them. Yeah, she loves the Olympics and just her mindset. She's overcome a lot of injuries, a lot of surgeries. She actually won barfleur But she just her mindset her work ethic has always stuck with me as one of my friends from school. She was the one eating brown bread sandwiches and bananas whilst we were eating daryle dunkers and all the other crap that you have in your lunch box. But she knew she just knew she was going to go to the top. And she did. She just knew. And I think that kind of mindset. I don't know there's something about it. That's powerful to be around. So yeah, I'd say Kate, my childhood friend from Clevedon, you have the same education as me the same start as I did, but she made it always the top. Because of a mindset. That's amazing. Okay, so what do you think that you've learned, as a runner that you wouldn't have learned otherwise? was running taught you that I'm capable of far more than I ever thought possible? I would never have done this personal training. I've always believed myself to be stupid to not be good enough. You know, just to be, I've never believed in myself, really. And I think running has taught me that. Yes, you can. Yes, you might have to work harder than everyone else, you're not going to be as smart as others. But you've got something inside you that others don't possess. There's people that are way smarter than me. You're way more talented than me, but they don't work as hard as I do. And I think that running is showing me that you are capable of so much more than you think you are. With the work you've got to put that work and, and roll your sleeves up everyday and get in get involved in it and do it. Yeah, running I suppose is show me my tree capabilities as a person, which I never would have seen before. And talk to me about food because I like to talk to others about food. things. What do you like to eat? what's the what's the best thing for you to eat before you run and after you go nachi if you want to know, um, I don't tend I don't tend to have, I'm not one of these people that eat certain food. I just know what foods I can't eat before I run like I can't eat a banana before I run. I upset my stomach. I just know what foods to stay away from. But I'm not one of these people that's really regimented in their diet. I like the nice things in life. I enjoy them. I don't think food is to be restricted. I don't believe that. Food should be. I think people hang themselves up on food a lot. And it's not something I really think about, which is why I'm a bit like, I don't really know what I eat, because I don't take it that seriously. I eat for enjoyment. I eat whatever I like. And yeah, I don't really have a diet I suppose that I follow. I just enjoy food like a normal person. Good, that's exactly what I want to hear. Now, I just don't think people should get hung up on food and what people eat what other people eat, stay in your lane. And don't I don't look at what other people eat. I don't care. I don't care what other people eat. And I don't care what other people say about food because you've got a lot of unsolicited advice. Again, I'm doing my nutrition with my personal training. And dietitians and nutritionists are the only people that can actually give advice. And I see people all over Instagram, spouting off about stuff they don't understand or things that they're not qualified to talk about. And it's dangerous. It's like speak to people in that field who are qualified. If you want to talk about nutrition, do that. Don't follow what Joe Bloggs is eating it's everyone's individual. We're all different humans are different, you know, we all have different nutritional needs. So yeah, I nutrition is an area that I think should stay with the experts and not people that don't know what they're talking about, especially me.