Athletic Recovery & Performance Podcast

Balance and Movement with Dr. Ray Solano, DC, CCSP®

June 23, 2020 Anthony Kjenstad Season 1 Episode 6
Athletic Recovery & Performance Podcast
Balance and Movement with Dr. Ray Solano, DC, CCSP®
Chapters
Athletic Recovery & Performance Podcast
Balance and Movement with Dr. Ray Solano, DC, CCSP®
Jun 23, 2020 Season 1 Episode 6
Anthony Kjenstad

🎧 New podcast episode
Raymond S. Solano, DC, CCSP®
is a private practice DC, CCSP in Virgina for the last 17 years and is also one of the specialists working with the Washington Wizards and the GeorgeTown Hoyas.

In this episode we discuss the difference between a general chiropractor and how he has advanced his training to become a CCSP.  Please see links to his training. CCSP information https://acbsp.com/certification/ccsp/

Dr. Solano also has done extensive additional training in recovery techniques called the Graston Method and Dry Needling.  These are beneficial treatments for some athletes dealing with specific Injuries.  Please see Information below and link:

Graston Technique incorporates a patented form of instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization that enables clinicians to effectively detect and treat scar tissue and restrictions that affect normal function. Graston Technique has been effective in the treatment of: Carpal tunnel syndrome.
https://grastontechnique.com/Patients/

Dry needling is a technique physical therapists use (where allowed by state law) for the treatment of pain and movement impairments.   The technique uses a "dry" needle, one without medication or injection, inserted through the skin into areas of the muscle.

https://www.choosept.com/resources/detail/dry-needling-by-physical-therapist-what-you-should

I hope you enjoy the podcast.  To get more Information on Dr. Solano please look him up on these social networks:

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dr.raysolano/
Website: https://www.solanospine.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrRaySolano

Please find Anthony Kjenstad and Firefly™
Email:  [email protected]
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/athleticrecoveryandperformance/notifications/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/fireflyrecovery
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fireflyrecovery/
Website: https://recoveryfirefly.com/


Show Notes Transcript

🎧 New podcast episode
Raymond S. Solano, DC, CCSP®
is a private practice DC, CCSP in Virgina for the last 17 years and is also one of the specialists working with the Washington Wizards and the GeorgeTown Hoyas.

In this episode we discuss the difference between a general chiropractor and how he has advanced his training to become a CCSP.  Please see links to his training. CCSP information https://acbsp.com/certification/ccsp/

Dr. Solano also has done extensive additional training in recovery techniques called the Graston Method and Dry Needling.  These are beneficial treatments for some athletes dealing with specific Injuries.  Please see Information below and link:

Graston Technique incorporates a patented form of instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization that enables clinicians to effectively detect and treat scar tissue and restrictions that affect normal function. Graston Technique has been effective in the treatment of: Carpal tunnel syndrome.
https://grastontechnique.com/Patients/

Dry needling is a technique physical therapists use (where allowed by state law) for the treatment of pain and movement impairments.   The technique uses a "dry" needle, one without medication or injection, inserted through the skin into areas of the muscle.

https://www.choosept.com/resources/detail/dry-needling-by-physical-therapist-what-you-should

I hope you enjoy the podcast.  To get more Information on Dr. Solano please look him up on these social networks:

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dr.raysolano/
Website: https://www.solanospine.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrRaySolano

Please find Anthony Kjenstad and Firefly™
Email:  [email protected]
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/athleticrecoveryandperformance/notifications/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/fireflyrecovery
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fireflyrecovery/
Website: https://recoveryfirefly.com/


Anthony Kjenstad :

Hello, my name is Anthony, Jen said and welcome to the athletic recovery and performance podcast. In this podcast you'll follow my journey of understanding the science behind recovering performance and the technologies that help us get there. I will be interviewing athletes and the behind the scenes professionals that help these athletes reach optimal performance and recovery. And then this episode Jake and I sit down with Dr. Ray Solano. Dr. Solano is a sports medicine certified chiropractor based out of the Maryland area. He works with regular population but also works with the Washington Capitals, the Georgetown boys, as well as being part of USA boxing and figure skating. When I entered this journey into athletic recovery, I noticed many of my athletes were working with chiropractors and I was often confused. Dr. Solano does a great job shedding the light on his profession, and his journey to become a certified sports chiropractor, and how he complements many of the specialists involved with athletes trying to reach optimal performance. Towards the end we discussed his misunderstanding of the Firefly technology and how he now realizes its true potential as full body recover. Awesome, guys. Well hey, Dr. Solano thanks for jumping on, I'll kind of jump right into it if you don't mind if freestyle is, is kind of the best way for myself, so, um, why don't you go ahead and tell us a little background about yourself and how you got started as a chiropractor? Yeah, of course. So first of all, thank you guys for getting me on here. I started practicing for 17 years. I graduated from like College of Chiropractic, just outside Atlanta in Marietta, Georgia, back in 2001, worked for a doc for about a year and a half, almost two years before I realized it was time for me to do this on my own. So unless that practice I was employed at and I opened my practice up in 2003. And Fast Forward 17 years and here we are, and it's crazy how time flies I when I got into practice, when I started working

Dr. Ray Solano :

For someone right out of school, I was a DC I was a Doctor of Chiropractic and in quite frankly, at the time I questioned and wondered whether or not that's exactly what I wanted to do for their for my entire career. I knew there was there was more that I could do. I knew I knew that I wanted to work with the active population. I knew that I wanted to someday work with professional athletes. Being an avid sports fan, and just growing up in athletics and and right around the time, I had opened my doors, my private practice. I had gotten a mailer from a chiropractic program that was starting an accreditation a certification to become a certified sports chiropractor. And it intrigued me because at the time, I was like, wow, you know, I want to work with athletes. There's so much more than my profession can offer to the athletic population or just the active population for that matter and, and I just never had anything to kind of harness all my thoughts and all the things that were out there in the world to provide care for these athletes until I saw that flyer and I was like, wow, I really think this is something that will benefit me and help me grow as a practitioner and actually allow me to get closer and closer to my goal of one day working with with athletes and so I so I enrolled I enrolled in that program. I remember it was through Palmer College of Chiropractic in Palmer has a location down in Florida. So I remember I had to go to Florida, which is not necessarily a bad thing going to Florida but I had to go to Florida for one long weekend, every month for a year and we went through the gamut of everything from taping athletes, sideline care, to emergency protocols bracing, concussions, soft tissue work, you name it we talked about everything for a year tested on it and at the very end of the program we took a board exam, we took a board exam and I took mine past it and that designated me as a certified chiropractic sports physician, which in my world and the DC world Doctor of Chiropractic world, it's it's an accreditation, it's a certification, it's advanced training, working with athletes. Now, a lot of VCs may claim and say, Oh, yeah, I treat athletes and this and that and the other but in my profession unless you have that, that stamp after your DC credentials, it's a ccsp after your DC credentials, unless you have that. You really may be working with some athletes maybe understand some protocols but you weren't engulfed in it, you didn't go through the boot camp. You didn't invest your time and money because it could have it is an expensive certification. You didn't invest everything necessary to become a quote unquote sports chiropractor. And that's what I call myself when when people ask me, Hey, what do you do? Um, well, I'm a sports chiropractor. So I became ccsp. And then that also gave me enough confidence to start being just more comfortable with my skills, diagnosing more than just the neck and back conditions, you know, working with extremities, and then branching into some recovery protocols, branching into some exercise instructions And then over the years, over the past 10 years, I've attended a number of different soft tissue technique, seminars, gotten certified in variety of them. I've attended, attended concussion forums, I've attended some some different seminars that strictly were based on recovery protocols. And you know, I've taken all that stuff and I stuffed my tool bag with a number of different things that I can pull up at any given time and you fast forward to 2020 Here I am a sports chiropractor having worked with the Stanley Cup Washington Capitals for seven seasons. Georgetown boys basketball program, a number of NFL athletes work with USA boxing but figure skating and to be honest with you everybody far and few in between from a weekend warrior learning to run a five K to to an ultra marathoner. I mean, you name it, and I've seen it and they trusted my skills. As a sports crier, chiropractor, they understand and know my journey. And in here I am today honored to talk to you guys about it.

Anthony Kjenstad :

I am glad you shed light on that quite honestly because I have always been a little confused about the DC community, my backgrounds orthopedics and medical device and, and actually durable medical equipment and so I've I've sold into predominantly orthopedics but I would have that occasional dc in my area of prescribing ACL braces and you know, working with athletes with meniscal tears, and I never really sat down to understand I always thought it was odd. You know, why is the you know, what I would traditionally think somebody that's going to manipulate the back of the spine, why are they dealing with soft tissue injuries or, or ligament injuries and so kind of so so. I'm glad you shed some light on that. Definitely. So, so you hit a little on something. So from from your extensive training, I almost see your extensive training as almost like a fellowship program. You became a DC, you know, like an orthopedic surgeon, we become a general orthopedist. And then they go do a fellowship trained in sports medicine on yours almost seems to be a little again, from my background is you almost did the athletic training fellowship to some degree.

Dr. Ray Solano :

An extension of would you kind of related to that? Yeah, I think I would, in fact, I always,when I when I explain what a sports chiropractor does to some of the lay people, my patients, some people I talked to on the street, I tried to try to kind of describe it in the sense where, you know, a sports chiropractor or a certified one is is is almost like a DC, physical therapist, and athletic trainer, and in some ways, because therapists all rolled into one, we encompass just a variety of different techniques and thought processes and just really just understanding the musculoskeletal system and that seems to kind of drive the message home for people they understand it because a lot of people at some point in another or another had seen a massage therapist, we understand what they do or PT, and they kind of understand what they do. Now I'll even I'll even be as bold as to throw in the fact that a sports chiropractor well trained, is even competent and skilled enough to understand orthopedics in a sense to where we can. We can detect and diagnose certain orthopedic issues. Now, chiropractors or sports chiropractors, they're not orthopedic surgeon. So, you know, in my practice, if I have a patient that presents with an ACL tear, I'm going to be able to diagnose it now treatment Probably not, but recovery, the recovery component of the the rehab or treatment. Absolutely. I could be on top of that but I have you know, esstablished colleagues and some of your quite frankly, are pretty good friends that are in the orthopedic world that our orthopedic doctors will seek surgeons that I'm able to reach out to for advice or help in regards to putting patients in the right direction. So, sport a good sport chiropractor can detect certain orthopedic issues that warrant the need for intervention in an orthopedic surgeons office. So that kind of sums it up. Yeah, it might my story and the story of many sports chiropractors, I think probably does resemble that of a fellowship. You know, when I was in chiropractic school just to become a DC, we didn't have the type of training that I out of my pocket paid for when I got out of school. Now, fast forward 20 years in today's chiropractic programs, I think they've gotten a lot better about making that part of the curriculum in most chiropractors now actually are specializing so you have those like myself that specialize in sports medicine, you have some that are going to pediatrics route that that are working with with children and conditions that a lot of times, children, children present with, some are working with with geriatric, so. So there's a lot of specialization but I really have to say that the sports medicine specialization, after the DC program or the DC schooling is becoming one of the more popular ones from what I've noticed. Now, I don't know if we know the same people but we may because I know you work with the capstan, you work with the lawyers talk about how you integrate with you know the orthopedic surgeon, the physical therapist, the athletic trainer when you when you involve yourself with the program like the the capital. Yeah, absolutely. So with the capital specifically, I'm there during the regular season. I'm typically there once a week to address any mechanical issues, whether it's the neck and the back extremities. I'm also there to address any soft tissue injuries areas that need maybe some spot work and I do that through a variety of different techniques that I practice and I'm also there to help assist before and after practice. If any injury stroke presents in my, my specialization or my my training is needed. So I work very closely with the athletic director or the athletic trainer there for the capitals, the head trainer, the two assistant athletic trainers, the massage therapists, they have a physical therapist that comes in from time to time for certain cases, but many times they'll refer the athlete out to that particular office if need be, but to be honest with you a lot of times right there in that training room between the athletic trainers, the massage therapist, myself in the orthopedic doctor are periodically checking in we all work very well together. And to be honest with you, we seem to have a better control the capitals for years now, maybe five or six have been the healthiest team and National Hockey League(NHL) Having guised guys the fewest or the least number of days on the shelf with injuries(injury free)resulting from an injury. So that speaks volumes in itself. Yeah.

Anthony Kjenstad :

So I, you talked about spot work, I think, you know, circling back to recovery. I think a lot of you know, with my background in orthopedics. When I fell into this recovery product called the Firefly, it really was around blood flow. And I started learning more about recovery and foundationally. I know it's nutrition. I know it's sleep and blood flow is a component of that. You talked a little bit about spot work. And do you consider the graston technique and dry needling? Is that part of recovery, in your opinion, and walk me through each of those techniques a little bit if you don't mind? Yeah, for sure.

Dr. Ray Solano :

So my my soft tissue technique of choice and I practice different ones but with with spot work my my technique of choice is graston technique. I'm what you would call a drastic grasping technique specialist, which is a credential after my last name that indicates that I've gone through all levels training, the highest level of training to become a specialist for the brass and techniques. So I use graston technique for that spot work what I like to call it could be an athlete, that that needs an increase in blood flow, a reduction in adhesions in maybe a hamstring or a calf. Or maybe I'm working on the quads, maybe it's something in the shoulder that needs to be released or addressed. But the graston technique, you know, a lot of people call it scraping a lot of people call it you know, using an instrument or tool, but graston technique does involve using an instrument to release patients and to dilate blood vessels and by dilating the blood vessels, as you all know, increases blood flow. And with more blood flow, you also have more nutrients and oxygen coming into that area that's receiving the spot work. Therefore providing additional recovery, additional nutrition additional healing to take place. And in my practice, in when I'm working with with the calves, for example, if I need to get a little deeper, maybe maybe I found or palpated something that's really really deep in in in the hamstring or in the Quad that I can't access traditionally with with breast and technique or my thumbs. For that matter. I'll resort to dry needling, dry needling, you know is using a solid filament needle similar to acupuncture needles, oftentimes a little bit longer to target those top bands of muscle to break up or release the state that that tendon or muscle is in. And when that takes place, muscle twitches are most of their twitch response, which in actuality is the muscle breaking off or freeing itself from the state of dysfunction it's in. And when a muscle does that, it goes through the same physiologic process as a muscle that's releasing permanent Asian, or a muscle responding from a massage, go through a dilates, increases blood flow, and you know, so on and so forth. It's oxygen and all that good stuff. So spot work for me is graston technique. And it's also dry needling when when I'm using it.

Anthony Kjenstad :

I know dry needling has somewhat of a controversy to it, right? I mean, there you have to be certified to do it. But there's certain states that allow it or don't allow it or is it the person delivering it has to be a certain training love, like I know like, I've watched that community grow a little bit and I know like an athletic trainer in California can't do dry needling what's what's, what's your thoughts on on the controversy around dry needling?

Dr. Ray Solano :

Yeah. So dry needling, it's, first of all, it's a shame that there is such controversy. And almost like us in today's day and age, right, we're in an election year. And certain things start to happen in society, whether it's through protests, whether it's through a pandemic, whether it's through whatever might be taking place. In today's day and age, we also start to remember Okay, this is also an election year. A lot of politics involved here. What's really true, what's really not true? Well, what a dry needling, it's interesting because with a dry needling, the acupuncturist and by the way, Bri needling is not acupuncture, it's completely different philosophy. It's a completely different approach. So as soon as the acupuncture just realized that other people were putting needles into the body without injecting anything into the body, then that that created an uproar. And I really think that with acupuncturist and also physical therapists, physical therapist and acupuncturist, I think, kind of played a tug of war game for a while and they still are as to who could utilize dry needling, and then you have sport chiropractors like myself jumping into the circle. So now that just creates a lot of animosity amongst different professions. And the sad part about all of that is the fact that dry needling is very effective. Dry needling really, truly helps. I've seen it with my own eyes, not just in my practice, with a with a with a patient that sits in front of a computer all day and has suffered terrible migraines for months because the suboccipital area has been so rigid and tight. You needle them and two days later, they're like oh my this is like the first day I've not had a headache in weeks. So I've seen that happen. I've seen athletes perform better after dry needling but then you have a lot of people playing that tug of war to say, No, I should do this. No, you shouldn't do this. So the technique itself, I've seen it work. I know it's effective. I don't think the actual procedure or the process is controversial, rather than the actual higher hands or higher minds making it controversial because they feel that other people shouldn't be doing it, because maybe they're not as trained or as skilled. I know here in Virginia, if I remember correctly, athletic trainers can perform dry needling. But however you don't want to Maryland that might be a different story. So so the controversy, I think behind dry needling comes more so from the political powers that be trying to fight as to who can do it, who can't do it rather than the actual procedure that's very effective. I know I've read

Anthony Kjenstad :

Thanks for shedding light on that. So one of the things you talked about this extra education, this in essence, fellowship training that you did sub getting your your doctor of chiropractic, you talk about additional education in recovery and getting into recovery. I think my journey, our journey of the podcast is to learn more about recovery because we feel like we have an effective tool or tools in the space, but there seems to be not a lot of education around recovery. Talk to me about the additional education that you've done. Is it been focused by companies educating you or is there an actual additional education place that you can go to learn about recovery?

Dr. Ray Solano :

Sure, yeah. So some of the recovery methods that I learned about, were taught to me through my ccsp program, the fellowship, the post chiropractic like we talked about, but I have found because recovery I think is on the cutting edge. And on the forefront here, I have found that most companies that are truly standing behind their product and most companies that really truly want to get that message out. They're the ones that themselves are holding different webinars or seminars or events to introduce their product to practitioners like myself. And that most recently in the last few years is how I've learned a lot about some of the markets I was talking to one of my colleagues who was at our at a recent Florida convention for chiropractors and and there are a lot of recovery type companies there to promote their products. So for people like myself, it's definitely exposed more so I think through conventions or through direct webinars and conferences and things like that. And companies. Maybe the company comes out and does a demonstration in my practice that's how I learned about these things. How I am able to apply them in my practice is through a direct demo that's given to me, or through visualization, and actually having some hands on use through my affiliations in the work that I do in some of these training rooms, like a Georgetown basketball or, or with the Washington Capitals, because we use a lot of recovery methods with the Washington Capitals. And, and that's how I'm able to actually get my hands on and go, Oh, yeah, I remember seeing this at a seminar. I remember seeing that at the convention. Let me actually see how this works. And let me talk to our athletic trainer in regards to what his thought process is on this. And so I'm able to visualize it and see it and maybe touch it even better if I get the demo in my office, but I'm actually actually able to use it through the demo in my office, or in the training room because I have access to it

Anthony Kjenstad :

Any any difference between how the Georgetown Hoya's look at recovery versus the Washington Capitol's, do you think? Anything that you see things done at a collegiate level faster than you see it done in the pro level? Or do you think it's vice versa?

Dr. Ray Solano :

Yeah, I think in general, that would be the case. In general, that would be the case you see it done a little differently at the professional level, at the collegiate level, you know, for, for a variety of reasons, probably more so budget reasons, you may not see as done as frequently, even though college athletes are probably more accessible. And you're more likely to have a college athlete consider trying something versus a professional athlete. I think for financial reasons. It's not going to be as prevalent at the collegiate level. But I will say this referring to your question specifically with the Georgetown basketball program and the capitals. I think Georgetown is done a fantastic job. Our our athletic trainer Mike Leonard. He has always been about recovery. And his thoughts and his ideas are backed by our head coach, who if you didn't know is Patrick Ewing, right and be a Hall of Famer Patrick Ewing played in the league for a long time. And Patrick, when he took the job there at Georgetown, he wanted to bring that NBA level of training, recovery. rehab, he wanted to bring that to his basketball program at Georgetown, him having been a Georgetown graduate, it was important for him to make sure that he was utilizing all of his resources and his prior experiences in the NBA NBA to make the Georgetown basketball program operate at a different level. So I've been fortunate enough to experience that. But I've also worked with some college programs that that haven't been that lucky and banette fortunate to implement those recovery methods.

Anthony Kjenstad :

So talk about the Pro's and recovery its all the rave everybody's talking about. It's bleeding down into NCAA sports, these athletes arrive at Georgetown, they've never probably heard recovery before and all of a sudden, you know, they're invincible right? They're a 19 year old athlete and and you talk to them about you know, recovery is probably as important as working out and, and loading the body. Do you see a trend in your youth community because I see on Instagram you work with a lot of youth athletes, etc. are you seeing those trends kind of go to the youth population because I really feel like that's where it's needed most. I mean, I have two youth athletes and I feel like you know, these athletes at a high level get you know, their nutrition is on point their sleeps on point their recoveries on point. But then when you look at these youth athletes that are probably working out, sometimes more than a professional athlete, it feels like that is the biggest opportunity for us to educate

Dr. Ray Solano :

Absolutely and you got to start at the grassroot level. Listen, I didn't start. I didn't get to where I am. Right out of the gates working with pro athletes, I started working with the youth, the young athletes, the ones that were more impressionable, the one that actually took time to listen to you, and, and the parents were there to educate them as well. It's 100%. Gotta start at the grocery level. I myself has a Division Two football player as a son, he's 19. And you know, I'm constantly driving the message home about recovery, and about how that's just as important as training for him to have a recovery day and for him to understand his body and learn what recovery methods are going to work best for him. So I really do think that the youth is worth that. And I think in today's day and age, having social media like on my Instagram page at Dr. dot race, on my Instagram page, you know, I'm posting, you know, treatments with some of the professional athletes that I see as well as the college. Some stars, like Anthony McFarland and chase young and then some of these guys that are going into the NFL. And guess who's looking at that? And guess who's learning from that? And guess who's inquiring about that and maybe clicking to find out what it is that that Dr. Solano is using on this guy. It's a young kids, the kids in middle school sometimes are in elementary school. They want to know what's this all about? You know, kids in high school, are constantly reaching out to me asking me, you know, what they can do to be a patient because they think that that technique, although they really don't know what it is, but they feel like that technique could help their legs, or maybe my shoulder would benefit from that, that video that I saw on your Instagram page.

Anthony Kjenstad :

So So thanks for shedding light on the chiropractic community. It's actually really opened up my eyes and really jumping from orthopedics to sports performance, I really noticed that your community is heavily involved in in that space. I noticed a lot of athletes are training with the team throughout the you know, throughout the season, but when they're in the offseason, in many instances, they're working with your community to stay fit throughout the season. And how does how does somebody find you, somebody like you in their community, I live in Southern California, if I'm trying to integrate chiropractic care into my you know, whether I'm a I don't even call it weekend warrior anymore because I think, you know, especially with this pandemic, we've all become way more active and I and I hope that trend continues. But, you know, friends in my community are peloton three times a day or three times a week and they're going to orangetheory Fitness. I don't think they're integrating. First of all, my messaging is around recovery in the Firefly, but I don't think they're integrating somebody like yourself into their regimen and I think it's very important. How would you number one find you, you know, if you're in a community where you're not at. And number two, how would they integrate somebody like you into their life? Would it be is is there a lot of heavy lifting at the front end to, for you to get to know my body? And then is it become more of a maintenance thing kind of describe how I find you and then how I integrate you into my lifestyle? Yeah, that's a great question. I really think it's about understanding. First of all I use I'll use a CrossFit athlete as an example. That CrossFit athlete naturally is gonna have some bumps and bruises along the way. And it's about that particular athlete talking to his or her network of colleagues and asking a lot of times the that right individual, or maybe right under their nose, they may be in their workout class. So you know, if you're in a health club, asking your trainer or asking some of the people you work out with who, who they have used for certain injuries. It's also about if you're an athlete in a high school program or in a college, it's about asking your own athletic trainer. If you're professional athlete, then a lot of times those professional athletes already know where they need to go based on what their athletic trainer or some of the other athletes in that locker room the results that they have had. So really truly like anything else, it's about asking within your own community because you want to go somewhere that's going to have the right doctor there to provide care for you that's like minded and understand, you know, maybe hip injuries because you're an ice skater or a hockey athlete, or maybe you want to work with a doctor or, or sports chiropractor that understands throwing because he sees all the baseball players in town and maybe he played baseball himself and he understands the process. So it truly is going to be about asking and and once you do get to that office of that individual you know in my in my office practice I really wish truly wish that my phone would be ringing off the hook with people that just wanted to come in for maintenance. But in actuality, it's not like that, in my practice is people calling here that want to get treatment because they're in pain, or because they feel like a restriction of the sword could take them to the next level. Rarely do I have someone ever call my office and say, Hey, listen, I feel great, just want to come in for maintenance. So we get into our office, even if it's for pain, we get them into the office, and it's about seeing where they are, and meeting them there. From a from a mental aspect or physical aspect, understanding where their injury is going through the treatment protocols, the treatment plan, and then as the as the individual gets better, then you taper your visits then you taper your treatments. And then you shift gears a little bit and say, Hey, listen, you know, I know you're coming in or doing some great work, great work for you. Your hips to establish some range of motion some mobility in your in your results are showing great, you know, your your reassessment is excellent. we're shifting from a pain phase, slash rehab phase to now more of a wellness and maintenance phase. And by the way, remember that product that I told you about way back when called Firefly, I really think that that's something you really should be implementing, into your routine, from here on out as an athlete or as a competitive runner or whatever it is that you're doing you enjoy doing as a cyclist, whatever it is, and making that part of your wellness part of your recovery part of your maintenance. And that's how I utilize some of those things in my practice. You know, they come in in acute pain, you get into that phase, they shift to the rehab part of the phase where they're, they're coming into the office, probably sometimes more often than not giving them things to work on at home and then the end, maybe they only need to come see me once a month, to maintain to check in for me to get in their ear a little bit about their exercises and whatnot. So that's how people can find me. They can ask about someone like myself through the arena that they're in. They get in my office, it truly is about myself, or the individual that's providing the care. educating them. Education is so important, very much like you and I had a conversation a little while ago about the sports chiropractic designation. There are a lot of people out there that that have no idea I exist. And you don't know how many times people have gotten into my office, and they look in there like after one treatment. They're like, wow, I think this is where I needed to be a while ago. And that makes me feel good because I did my job educating them and making them feel better and they're on the path to to peak performance. I've been in the medical community for 20 years, and I I learned something new every day. I mean, I there's a place for everybody. And I think as I've the journey as I dive down deeper and understand each specialty a little bit more I see value where maybe I didn't see value before or I saw your profession as a very niche profession. And I saw these outliers and I didn't really understand why they were outliers or why they were moving into that space. But no, I appreciate you shedding some light on on your care. Um, I think you know, Jake, I end up taking over all these conversations. I apologize. You got anything to ask?

Jake Wilks :

No, you're good. Anthony. You're a US most of the questions. I would just say in the past, when I played at Stanford, we we didn't have a chiropractic in house but we actually were able to get a little bit of education around it and actually saw a chiropractic doctor when I was playing to get adjustments each week, and to really take care of some of my I actually have a hip it's out of place a lot of times because I have one leg a little bit shorter than the other, but just speaking on you know from what Dr. Solano does it even the gen pop, you know, we talk a lot about athletes professionally collegially all the above but one of the questions we get is how important is it for the general population to to get adjustments and to take care of, you know, even if they're not injured or suffer from, you know, something like I have you How important is it for athletes, maybe like Anthony to get on the peloton, or you know, general population people just to come in and get regular checkups in take care of their spine and their back and to get adjustment.

Dr. Ray Solano :

Yeah, that's a great question. I think that that the answer to that really does lie on the individual and what their needs are coming. I have some some patients that come in once a month for your traditional chiropractic treatment, maybe some neck and back care, once a month, religiously whether they had a symptom or not, they come in because what brought them in here to my office to begin with was a neck injury and they remember being debilitating pain and I remember being on the shelf for six weeks not being being able to swim or ride bike as a result of that. So they want to maintain proper not just alignment, but mobility through their neck and back. So for a traditional high refractive patient, if I had to give an answer to that, I would say once a month is a good good amount of time for that particular patient to come in to receive adjustments. And when you're working or talking about a patient that may be receiving non traditional chiropractic care when I say non traditional chiropractic care, I'm usually referring to soft tissue work like in the hips or maybe the hamstrings or even work on their feet. It really does depend on what's going on at the moment. And it really does depend for for the athletes specifically does depend on what they have going on. At that moment in time with the ice skaters that I work with, in my practice, I work with Olympians, national competitors, international competitors, they have a heavy training period in that training and training period is typically in the summertime, because in the fall and early part of the winter, during competition mode, and they're not going to need to train or learn anything last minute because they've already done that through the summer. So typically, in the summertime, is where I say to my ice skating athletes, like Hey, listen, you know, I'm going to need to see you weekly, because we want to establish a little bit more mobility into your hips because your range of motion is not where it needs to be. That's going to involve some graston some, we're going to definitely do some chiropractic to your lumbar spine, but that's going to also involve some, some tissue laser to kind of take care of that nagging knee you're dealing with because now you're on the ice twice a day six days a week, and let's do a little bit of laser to keep that inflammation down into your nag knee. Let's use some rock paid to stabilize that kneecap. Let's do some graston in your hips. And by the way, don't forget for recovery, you know, this is a great time for you to be using your Firefly if you're in my office's which is Norma tech foods, and so on and so forth. So the long answer to your question, Jake, I think once a month for your traditional chiropractic patients, it cranks up a bit during competition mode for the athletes.

Anthony Kjenstad :

All right. So I read this article and doing a little research before we we talked last question, but I thought this discussion in this medical paper was interesting. It says where chiropractic truly excels in in its ability to actually improve performance, since it is through the full use of the nervous system that peak performance can be achieved chiropractic is the only form of care available to deliver subluxation free 100% nerve flow, and that peak performance is possibly only with chiropractic care. What's your thoughts on that statement?

Dr. Ray Solano :

Yeah, so my thoughts. First of all, I never really have discussions regarding subluxation and nerve flow with patients, but chiropractic Indeed, I think from a traditional hands on discipline, I do think it does assist with proper nerve flow. Now, I don't really have that discussion with patients because the lay person will get completely lost with what you just read and all of a sudden, if a patient gets lost, they're going to oftentimes come to the conclusion or say, Okay, this guy doesn't know what he's talking about. But here's what I think chiropractic care, really, truly is capable of doing. And quite frankly, I think the best app is keeping people balanced and keeping them moving. Two simple things, okay, balance and movement without proper balance, especially for an athlete, that's gonna that's going to impact it's going to it's going to strip performance without proper movement. How do you expect to go through those normal movement patterns that athletes especially rely on, in order to run as fast as they can or jump as high as they can? It's impossible. So chiropractic is hands on therapy. It's physical medicine. chiropractic involves moving joints moving bones. Yes, alignment is important. Absolutely, it is. But for me in my practice, movement, I think far supersedes anything out there. And the chiropractors are trained to do that we're trained to manipulate move, fine tune for lack of better words, people. So that they can do what they're were blessed to do and what their bodies has been trained to do and that's perform on the basketball court or on the football field, on the ice. Chiropractic is huge, so whoever wrote that article hundred percent I stand behind that and I agree.

Anthony Kjenstad :

It's interesting you were talking about not confusing the patient. I think, where Jake and I are challenged with the Firefly is such a simple technology, manipulating the nervous system to increase blood flow. It's not an easy, easy, easy conversation and our products not intuitive. You know, you look at the Firefly, and it really is more in the Normatec world of blood flow for recovery than it is in the neuro muscular stimulation pool of muscle reeducation and muscle firing for blood flow. What are what are the two things you thought we were when you first saw us that has now pivoted and changed for you speaking to, you know, to our technology where there are misconceptions about our technology initially that after further discussion, you've understood us in a different manner.

Dr. Ray Solano :

Absolutely. And I think it's one thing and it's one thing on so many levels, the biggest misconception I had when I started looking into the product and seeing some posts on social media, and then the other is in Jake and I had an extensive conversation regarding this is, is I thought it was to treat knee pain or I thought it was to treat a local pain presentation I did not in any way expect and understand until our comp my conversation with Jake and doing a little bit more research about the Firefly, that this is this is for whole body recovery. This is really truly stimulating the body's nervous system to achieve those recovery goals. That's what this is about. So my initial misconception was that for localized pain or discomfort or edema, whatever the case might be, maybe some patellar bursitis, I was just very zoned in to what the app was where the application right where it's placed over the peroneal nerve. I figured that that is what he was going to treat that area of the body, but in actuality, and I've come to experience myself, my son has also experienced it and some of the athletes, boxers and football players that I've that I work with, since, you know, discovering Firefly and talking with Jake, they've experienced it. And this, this is about whole body recovery. And that's what I now understand.

Anthony Kjenstad :

Awesome, thanks for shedding light on that. Well, I appreciate your time. Where can everybody find you? I know you you shouted out your Instagram, but I want you to do that again. And I know you're super involved in your community. So please let us know and let our community know where they can find you and learn more about what you're doing. Absolutely.

Dr. Ray Solano :

So I'm on the East Coast as you guys know, I'm in the Washington DC metropolitan area I serve Northern Virginia, DC parts of Maryland. My website www.solanospinesport.com, has a plethora of information regarding treatment and some of the services I offer my bio Twitter @DrRaySolano and Instagram is @Dr.raysolano. Very active on social media. If anyone has a question, certainly send me a message. I'll reply to you right away. If I can't help you, one of the things I strive to do is put people in the right direction and that's always kind of been my motto. And yeah, I'd be happy to hear from anybody who's listening to us right now.

Anthony Kjenstad :

Well, awesome. I'll put all those links in the notes to the show as wellSuch line I really appreciate your time. I like

Dr. Ray Solano :

Appreciate you shedding the light on your profession and how you got where you're at now and we'll look forward to staying connected and following you in the future. Absolutely. Great to spend some time with you guys. Appreciate it. Thanks. Thanks again. Have a great day. Thanks. Appreciate it, man. Take care. Oh, yeah, that was a great podcast for me personally. So I hope you enjoyed it as well. Big thanks to Dr. Serrano for taking the time and thanks for my co host Jake for his efforts getting Dr. Silvano on. I know the audio was a little bit choppy there occasionally, I do apologize that we had to kind of last minute veer on doing it over the phone. As always, we appreciate any comments you have on the podcast so please keep sending in those messages. We also appreciate you taking the time to subscribe to the podcast subscribes and comments are the juice that keep us flowing. For more information on Dr. Solano. I will put his links in the show notes as well as information on the Firefly. Thanks again.