Athletic Recovery & Performance Podcast

Adam Bobo- IV Therapy and Stem Cells-Tools to Maximize Performance Episode 6

July 14, 2020 Season 1 Episode 7
Athletic Recovery & Performance Podcast
Adam Bobo- IV Therapy and Stem Cells-Tools to Maximize Performance Episode 6
Chapters
Athletic Recovery & Performance Podcast
Adam Bobo- IV Therapy and Stem Cells-Tools to Maximize Performance Episode 6
Jul 14, 2020 Season 1 Episode 7

ūüéß New podcast episode 6
Great Interview with Adam Bobo.  Adam started his career as a Nurse anesthetist and quickly realized his passion existed outside the OR as an entrepreneur.

With the help of Mentors Dr. Koniver(https://koniverwellness.com/) and Dr. Chad Prusmack @ Resilience Code(https://www.myresiliencecode.com/) Adam opened up his clinic Arete(https://aretenashville.com/) which is a IV and Wellness clinic In Nashville.

IV Clinics are making a push in the recovery world and similar to firefly's‚ĄĘ(www.recoveryfirefly.com) jump from medical device to recovery tool the science in the space of IV clinics can be limited and confusing.¬† Adam‚Äôs goal was to take his medical background and follow the science into this new venture to bring credibility to the space. 3 1/2 years ago he jumped into the space working predominately with the music industry and the rest is history. Adam Is now working with several musicians and PRO athletes like Eric Becker as he continues to hone his craft In the world of IV therapy and biologics.
 
In this Podcast we discuss the difference In his clinical approach to the IV therapies.  We also walk down the path of biologics and there are several links below to the products we discuss.  This podcast can get a bit deep in the weeds at times, but I really enjoyed pulling the curtains back and learning more about this side of high performance.  Heck I may even try an IV in the future!  Hopefully when Adam is in LA!

 Everything you need to know about NAD
https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/podcast/anti-aging-podcasts/what-is-nad/

The Role of NICOTINAMIDE ADENINE DINUCLEOTID in the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis
https://www.emjreviews.com/rheumatology/article/the-role-of-nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide-in-the-pathogenesis-of-rheumatoid-arthritis-potential-implications-for-treatment/

Stanford Study on sleep with basketball team

https://aasm.org/extended-sleep-improves-the-athletic-performance-of-collegiate-basketball-players/

Umbilical Cord Matrix

links https://www.steveyoonmd.com/biologics/umbilical-cord-matrix/

Ozone Gas
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5713831/

Adam Bobo
Instagram  @aretenashville  @adambobo
Website https://aretenashville.com/


Please find Anthony Kjenstad, Jake Wilks and Firefly‚ĄĘ
Email: [email protected]
Email:¬† [email protected]
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/athleticrecoveryandperformance/notifications/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/fireflyrecovery
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fireflyrecovery/
Website: https://recoveryfirefly.com/

Show Notes Transcript

ūüéß New podcast episode 6
Great Interview with Adam Bobo.  Adam started his career as a Nurse anesthetist and quickly realized his passion existed outside the OR as an entrepreneur.

With the help of Mentors Dr. Koniver(https://koniverwellness.com/) and Dr. Chad Prusmack @ Resilience Code(https://www.myresiliencecode.com/) Adam opened up his clinic Arete(https://aretenashville.com/) which is a IV and Wellness clinic In Nashville.

IV Clinics are making a push in the recovery world and similar to firefly's‚ĄĘ(www.recoveryfirefly.com) jump from medical device to recovery tool the science in the space of IV clinics can be limited and confusing.¬† Adam‚Äôs goal was to take his medical background and follow the science into this new venture to bring credibility to the space. 3 1/2 years ago he jumped into the space working predominately with the music industry and the rest is history. Adam Is now working with several musicians and PRO athletes like Eric Becker as he continues to hone his craft In the world of IV therapy and biologics.
 
In this Podcast we discuss the difference In his clinical approach to the IV therapies.  We also walk down the path of biologics and there are several links below to the products we discuss.  This podcast can get a bit deep in the weeds at times, but I really enjoyed pulling the curtains back and learning more about this side of high performance.  Heck I may even try an IV in the future!  Hopefully when Adam is in LA!

 Everything you need to know about NAD
https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/podcast/anti-aging-podcasts/what-is-nad/

The Role of NICOTINAMIDE ADENINE DINUCLEOTID in the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis
https://www.emjreviews.com/rheumatology/article/the-role-of-nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide-in-the-pathogenesis-of-rheumatoid-arthritis-potential-implications-for-treatment/

Stanford Study on sleep with basketball team

https://aasm.org/extended-sleep-improves-the-athletic-performance-of-collegiate-basketball-players/

Umbilical Cord Matrix

links https://www.steveyoonmd.com/biologics/umbilical-cord-matrix/

Ozone Gas
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5713831/

Adam Bobo
Instagram  @aretenashville  @adambobo
Website https://aretenashville.com/


Please find Anthony Kjenstad, Jake Wilks and Firefly‚ĄĘ
Email: [email protected]
Email:¬† [email protected]
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/athleticrecoveryandperformance/notifications/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/fireflyrecovery
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fireflyrecovery/
Website: https://recoveryfirefly.com/

Anthony Kjenstad :

Hello, my name is Anthony Kjenstad and welcome to the Athletic recovery and performance podcast. In this podcast you'll follow my journey of understanding the science behind recovery, performance, and the technologies that help us get there. I will be interviewing athletes and the behind the scenes professionals that help these athletes reach optimal performance and recovery. Hello everyone, and welcome to Episode Six of my newly started podcast. I appreciate all those early support. In this episode, Jake and I get to spend time with Adam Bobo from IV therapy and wellness out of Nashville. Adam opens up my eyes and hopefully yours on the science of IV therapy and all of the unique products that can be delivered through this therapy, including things like magnesium, vitamin D, zinc, and even some biologic treatments. IV clinics are making a push in the recovery world and similar to firefly jump from medical device to recovery tool. The science in the space of IV clinics can be limited and confusing. Adams goal was to take this medical background and follow the science into this new venture to bring credibility into the space, three and a half years ago, he jumped into this space working predominantly with the music industry. And now Adam is working with several musicians and pro athletes like Eric Becker, as he continues to hone his craft in the world of IV therapy and biologics. Towards the end of the podcast, we move into the science of biologics and how these products are being used by not only athletes but people with conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, turf toe, and even post operative care to heal and recover faster. Hey, I did a little bit of research on you. Tell me a little bit about yourself. I know you're did you start off as an anesthesiologist, a nurse and ethicist. Okay. And, and and really in, in my backgrounds orthopedic. So, you're doing the same thing as an anesthesiologist. I mean, that's kind of the trend in in orthopedic care, right is rather than a, an anesthesiologist they're actually doing there's more people like yourself who are delivering anesthesia in that space.

Adam Bobo :

We can practice this solo practice pratitioners to so we can be in a surgery center with no anesthesiologist even on site on call anywhere we can work directly under with a surgeon. Same liabilities, same practices, same guidelines, like there's nothing that we can't do that any anesthesiologist can do truthfully.

Anthony Kjenstad :

So how do you jump from anesthesia, putting people to sleep to a, you know, a health health and wellness platform like Arete. is it Arete?

Adam Bobo :

It's Arete, it's Greek it means excellence of any kind. When I first started the company, it was called Revive, we just had to pick a name. And that was so cliche and we were getting into things that were so far beyond just IVs. And we have this big vision of things that we're going to get involved in in the future. So we we separated from that the moment we saw that this was becoming a real possibility and venture we started generating a lot of interest. We were like our We got to separate from that. And the word airtight just kind of fit with the brand because we're trying to promote excellence in all areas of life. And I think that having a foundation of health and wellness kind of exudes that from the core of what being healthy is. But yeah, I did anesthesia for open heart surgery for four years kind of did all kinds of cases but did primarily open heart surgery, anesthesia. And, you know, I've always kind of been the one who needed to be learning all the time, and needed to be doing more and finding and tapping into more knowledge. And after about a year and a half, it got redundant, monotonous, I felt like I you know, I was challenged, but I was only challenged 5% of the time, and even the challenges were relatively similar.

Anthony Kjenstad :

The challenges for you unfortunately, during that or somebody's coding or, or they're not breathing or you know, but that doesn't happen that often, right so a lot of times, you're just behind the cockpit and the doctor is doing their thing.

Adam Bobo :

Exactly. And a lot of times too, it's the same thing like it's a really good job and career path for anybody who wants tons of jobs stabilities tons of job security, good money, consistent work life, you don't bring work home. I mean, there's so much that's good about that. But those things are things that scared me. I saw myself 30 years from now making $25,000-$30,000 more dollars doing the exact same thing I was doing. So I was always fearful of that I've always wanted to start a company I just hadn't found anything that worked and fit and a lot of my friends in Nashville are in the music industry, or they're athletes or they're entrepreneurs so I don't really didn't really associate with a lot of medical people so a lot of my time was with them and I wanted to find a way that I could bring my world of medical background into their world in some in some aspect. Most of my social circle was was different, so it was like, Alright, if I can tie into their world, it gives me a chance to be involved in what they're doing. But also, I'm the unique one. Like I'm the one that that they that that's unique in this space. So how can I tap into that? The IV clinics were kind of coming up and places and I'd seen the stuff in Vegas they've been doing and I've been kind of diving into some research and finding, you know, where there was some small facilities and there was like, what the athletes will call like the guy you know, the guy in New York that does the stem cells, the guy like this is my chiropractor guy. And I was like, man, I could, you know, fall into that niche of being like the health and wellness guy at some point. So, I kind of took that concept of, of the hangover style clinic, traditional IV, like pop up shops that you see in places and took my medical background knowledge and try To make it a truly medically driven research based evidence base that even it being anecdotal evidence based practice, and we combine it with a lot of my music, music friends who on the road would have this thing called rock docks. And they're basically vent provided by the venue artists get sick or has strep throat or, you know, dehydration, whatever it is. They call in the rock rock comes on the on the bus, you know, writes in a script for a steroid dose pack gives them a z pack, maybe an IV, maybe not. And, you know, they play the show. So there's such a disconnect there. There's an invasion of privacy. So I was like, how can we bring all these things together into one unit of having this rock dock idea of like concierge medicine in a way these and then make it as medically driven as possible for the minimal minimal amounts of research and evidence based practices out there. So we kind of just molded them And so when I say we, my business partner kind of helps me with the financial side, and he's one of my best friends in town. And we basically just us to spend late nights trying to figure out how to create that entity. And he has no medical knowledge whatsoever. Now he does, but at the time, he was completely medical ignorant. And we just sort of formulated ideas. And I guess three little over three years ago, we did our first IV and did it for a country artist friend of mine and his wife for free and just said, let's see if this works. You know, there's not great data on dosing of vitamins and supplements, and especially in the IV space. And it's so frowned upon by probably 60 to 70% of the traditional medical community, mainly because it's tainted name and idea in the hangover space. So we tried to just get as much anecdotal stuff as we could while this small scale research was starting to trickle out amongst the medical community, any old stuff that's been out like high dose vitamin C and things like that and tried to combine all these ideas and get really solid anecdotal research amongst our friends and colleagues in town and it kind of grew from there. Be honest, it was a side hustle, I still was in the operating room, the first year and a half, I would go to the operating room at 6am get out by five or six if I wasn't on call. And then I would wash my face and go straight to see clients until 10pm. Get home eat dinner at 1015 1030 and then go to bed get back up at 5am and get back to the operating room and do the same thing and do that every day. And then on the weekends, I would see people as well and just organically grew it. And by word of mouth, people started feeling better, probably predominantly when we started just because they were hydrated a big piece of it because we always caution on the side of lower dosing with these vitamins and stuff because there wasn't much there wasn't a lot out there. So we Slowly integrated more and more stuff and saw more and more benefit in it. We haven't really I think our marketing budget thus far has probably been like 500 bucks, maybe we just haven't really spent any money on marketing people this space and the people we work with have just kind of word of mouth grown it and somehow we've gotten to this point.

Anthony Kjenstad :

So, three years later what have you figured out scientifically like what would a dosing be for IV? You know, we're with the Firefly(www.recoveryfirefly.com) we're dealing with a lot of elite marathoners, OCR athletes, we're dealing with PRO teams. When these okay these guys are getting ready to go back into the NFL, NBA as they are training harder what's a what's a dose that you recommend? I guess your system around recovery and delivering it through hydration therapy?

Adam Bobo :

Yeah, well, we've kind of built a it's not proprietary because we do disclose what In it, for the most part, but we've basically built a bag around athletes that is pretty tight on on pregame performance. We've also kind of got a slightly different one for post game recovery. But what we did with that is so Eric Decker, who played in the NFL with the Broncos, and then the Jets, and then the Titans, was here for one year with the Tennessee Titans and had gotten IV's out in in Denver, and basically is a good friend of mine and he was like, Hey, I really want to, you know, try to squeeze as much as I can out of this last year in my career. We got IV's out there, I felt like it helped me whether it was placebo, whether it was just, you know, a 2% change in recovery or a 3% added performance boost, whatever you want to say. I really feel like it helped me can we try some stuff? So during camp we just literally made I don't want to say we made stuff up but we we mess we played around with like, you know, is it 500 milligrams a day. Magnesium is it three grams, four grams of magnesium and tried to just find a niche that for the most part across the board, he consistently got the best benefit out of dosing wise. And we found that to be like a mid range like a two grams of magnesium pretty consistently always like he felt like his soreness was dissipating. And again, it's not just magnesium, there's a lot of other things that that we do from, you know, we found that combining zinc with magnesium and there's research that supports this to that combining those two in adequate doses expedites soft tissue recovery. So we saw a really good benefit in having both of those things in there, your traditional IV clinic so this is easy to discuss. Our athletes are getting 10 to 15 milligrams of IV zinc, usually twice a week and two to three grams of magnesium to two times a week in their hobbies. Your traditional IVF clinic because of costs They want to keep reduce their IV cost as much as possible. And this is what I have to explain to these guys. Anybody who's a new client that doesn't want to pay what our costs are, I send them with a pretty much a breakdown of what they need to get in their bags. They take it to the vital flows, these other shouldn't shout them out, but basically these other traditional hangover clinics that tout that they're good at performance recovery. So I get down there and they'll look at it and be like, we can't do this. This is not what we do. So those clinics are doing like two and a half milligrams of zinc at most. They're doing 500 milligrams of magnesium at most, maybe 1000. But those such low amounts. You know, most of the stuff is water soluble, so it's really hard to get too much of you're just pulling it out. So like even too much magnesium. Yes. Is it is it difficult? For the most part? Yes. So a lot of these places were sub therapeutic on doses and their goal is to To say that it's got zinc, it's got vitamin C, it's got calcium, it's got mag, it's got B complex, it's got these things in the bag, but if you put low enough doses you can claim to have all those things not release the dosing schedule on it and then come back charge a lower price but your profit margins larger whereas us we decided to cut into our profit margin charge more for our treatments, but maximize what is in those bags. And so like for example, like I said, we've got four times the zinc and four times the magnesium in our standard athlete back then 90% of you know, pop up shop IV clinics

Anthony Kjenstad :

Are you also focusing on one of the for my background in orthopedics? I remember a study that came out of Kerlan Jobe(https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28203589/) and they take care of a lot of athletes here in Los Angeles and there was a huge lack of vitamin D in athletes. Is that something that's perfect. Are you doing Oh, you didn't mention that Mindy. So it just popped in my head

Adam Bobo :

Huge lack of Vitaman D. Depending on how guys want to do it, some guys hate vitamin D shots because they're very thick, not as comfortable as a lot of things. So a lot of that schedule was what we'll do is either 50,000 to 100,000 units per, per week or every other week. You can do there's some research that shows 300,000 once a month, but again, if I have the option to break the dose down a little bit and weekly do it, these guys get great recovery. There's they sleep better. That's a big thing. A lot of these athletes don't sleep. They're so sympathetic, driven all the time, that they don't know how to turn that off at an electrical level, almost at a system level to go into a parasympathetic state and get good sleep. That's one of the biggest complaints these guys have. A lot of times I can't sleep I don't sleep that well. I wake up tired. And vitamin D have we've shown that it does help those guys a lot that magnesium. They really do Like they get a more optimal sleep a lot of these guys were whoop the like those bracelets and track their sleep and they do feel like their sleep quality goes up and their overall daytime energy levels are better but yeah, vitamin D is huge.

Anthony Kjenstad :

So okay, you're dealing with the the pro athletes that people that are investing in themselves but what Jake and I have found is that that there's a community out there of like I said, ultra runners that are running hundred mile races and stuff. How would somebody like them optimize utilization of this IV therapy? Do you just schedule it? Is it three times a week? Is it after your runs are kind of how do you optimally deliver this care in your mind for those type of athletes?

Adam Bobo :

I tell people leading up to the race getting so there's enough in my mind, there's enough small studies out there that have shown that peaking your magnesium levels alone, really because most of us are have low magnesium levels or low normal. For the most part, we're cooking it out of our most of our vegetables, the moment we toss it on the skillet, it's out of the spinach factory out of a lot of stuff pretty fast. So, in general, we're pretty sub therapeutic on that. And you can push those to high normal or just above normal, and you're completely safe. But what we've seen is a lot of people we have like, we have like a Semi Pro CrossFit athlete, we have some guys that compete like that, that even they're just like semi competitive marathon runners. Yeah, I've seen by just elevating their magnesium levels. They're performing better timewise their their cramping is going down. Magnesium has been shown to reduce and expedite lactic acid out of the tissues at a faster rate. So if you can keep that at a higher level, your recovery time in race is going to be better, because that's what a lot of those people are doing that are competing. ultra marathons or high, high, high distance or CrossFit competitions where your recovery time is limited. You have to find ways to recover in the event. Slow, you're slow your your, your breakdown. And how can you recover while you're competing in a way and elevating your magnesium levels been great. So a lot of those people we say is, you know, leading up to a race because a lot of these people don't want to spend the money throughout the year. I have athletes that want to do it twice a week in season out of season, it doesn't matter in season, they'll go to three times a week. But say you're that ultra marathoner and you train a lot, but your pocket, you don't want to spend the money to get IVs all the time. I tell people that getting one like a week before or 10 days before, and then the day before and then three days before so you basically get three pigeonholed IVs the hydration alone is beneficial because it's not like you're hydrated for the race, a lot of this fluid you can get a lot of your height. through oral consumption, I still believe that I don't think that IV hydration is is the end all be all. But I do think your vitamin supplement nutrition absorption because it's 100% bioavailable is greater when you do it IV versus oral and we're just not getting the oil in the duck at the levels we needed. So even just magnesium and zinc alone pre race and then I do like carnitine. So carnitine is amino acid that basically functions in your body as a carrier of long chain fatty acids from outside the cell to inside the cell for utilization energy. So by elevating your carnitine levels in said athlete, your ability to utilize fat, especially once you deplete your glycogen stores or your carbohydrate stores in your body. Now your fat utilization for energy is better because that transporter is more available so you're carrying this broken down fat or fatty acids into the cell for energy. So I like the simple things I like are zinc carnitine and magnesium if you're trying to like be very simple, very cost effective but yet still see benefits in race. If when you get more into in depth stuff like na D which is dirt I don't know if you don't know much about this, but an idea is a derivative of vitamin d3. It stands for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide single most beneficial thing for longevity, anti aging, cellular rejuvenation, for lack of a better word nerve regeneration, endurance promoting,cognitive benefit enhancing. You get one NAD treatment prior to a race dosing over 500 milligrams 500 to 1000 milligrams of energy the day before race, your endurance will increase in that race period.

Anthony Kjenstad :

And that's delivered through IV?

Adam Bobo :

you have other dozens ways you can do it. So I'm trying A SUBQ(subcutaneous administration) therapy now on myself see how it works because I have athletes all over the country and we can't do IVs for everybody. I do have some nurses that are throughout the country. So we're trying to figure that out but SUBQ delivery you do yourself but you've got to find a way that access is at its most bioavailable form which is IV so there's supplements like TRU NIAGEN(https://www.truniagen.com/) and on the market that you know Adam Viniteri, I think, and Shannon Sharpe are both like big promoters of or face brand of face for them but it's not directly an NAD it's actually in NR which is Nicotinamide Riboside, a precursor, and a lot of the theories and modern supplementation is that by increasing precursors you increase end product or you increase the end product of an NAD. I think these things help, but they're not as marked of a difference as IV NAD one treatment and I've done this with guys that don't run marathons that have a goal of 3:45 and not and break 3:30 you know that aren't ultra competitive marathoners. If you're a healthy person, ish, and you're competing and you want to increase endurance, and you're like, what's the one like, I have to break this time for my personal thing? What's the one thing I can do to help me get that? And it's literally not training harder is NAD. Period I've seen in athletes. I have guys that'll say, the fourth quarter felt like the second quarter.

Anthony Kjenstad :

Yeah, no country vacation, any of that stuff?

Adam Bobo :

No, not at all. Um, NAD was first used in in schizophrenia patients back in like the 1950s I guess schizophrenics have a lot of concomitant coexisting dependencies, abusive stuff, and that's where they found that NAD actually benefited Alcohol, opioid abuse so its biggest place of use now in the United States is addiction. High End addiction centers that are cash paid type addiction centers are using NAD to eradicate chemical level dependency in 20 days. And then there's just a psychosocial psychological component of addiction but the actual chemical dependency without using the the volumes or the Xanax or the other drugs to manage withdrawal symptoms, you it's, it's unreal, the the therapeutic applications for an NAD the biggest hindrance to people getting an NAD is cost, you're looking at per treatment cost anywhere from $500 to $1500 dollars, depending on the dose and what you're doing with it.

Jake Wilks :

Basically just a one like a one time one time treatment.

Adam Bobo :

Yeah, and it's just it's kind of dose dependent or facility dependent or is it concierge. Usually, you're looking at NAD as a standalone $500 to $1500 dollars, depending on, you know, LA is going to be more expensive than Nashville, for example.

Jake Wilks :

And do you see, you know, we're talking a lot about recovery. Do you see people using this for injury or injury prevention as well, outside of just hydration and recovery?

Adam Bobo :

Reduction of inflammation is massive. So my guys talk about the difference of getting on a plane and flying cross country to play the Rams for example, or the Seahawks is pretty hard. That's why these caught like West Coast to East Coast games are so hard to win on the road is not just the teams home field advantage. The flight creates so much innate inflammation in your body that recovering from that flight in less than 24 hours to play a game is really, really difficult. These guys have noticed that they'll wake up the next day, because a lot of times they'll land on Saturday we'll do treatments as soon as they land the next day they wake up and they're overall sense of well being, as described by them is heightened. They feel more rested, they feel less achy, they feel like injured like bumps or bruises they had on a Thursday, Friday, they said that traditionally would have had more residual effect on Sunday or less. So yeah, and in that inflammation, injury prevention space, like I've actually used it to treat rheumatoid arthritis in a lady. We adapted as a study from Harvard University that they did and in the New England Journal of Medicine, and that they've done in mice basically gave them gave them rheumatoid arthritis, which is an autoimmune disease that there's no treatment for you're taking like harsh drugs like biologics and stuff to manage symptoms and slow the progression of the disease or the autoimmune disease. We've seen that I told this lady, she reached out and said Do you have anything that can work? And I said, Well, I've read these three studies that have been published that showed a lot of promise, but I have no idea. And you're looking at a protocol that's 10 days long, it's probably going to cost you $8,000 and I don't know if it's gonna work.

Jake Wilks :

And this was in NAD?

Adam Bobo :

This is NAD and I told her that, like, there's there's no real published research in NAD in rheumatoid arthritis in humans that is really solid. There's anecdotal reports of people saying, Yeah, it's great. It's awesome, but I don't know that it's going to work. If it works, so well. rheumatologists will be prescribing, but it might work. So we tried it. We did 10 days, five days in or chronic knee pain had gone that she had no no source of. And five days after the 10 days, she had joint swelling and pain and redness and warmth and both her basically her thumb and her index finger and five days after completion of the 10 days, complete resolution of pain, discomfort, joint stiffness, heat, redness, everything gone. This was last June, she takes oral supplement and does, you know, every few months it's the treatment but complete resolution. No, no, no more room and like her markers have decreased somewhat. They're still present, but no actual clinical presentation of rheumatoid arthritis whatsoever. Which is, that's a while when you think about that's what we've seen the biggest benefit in pain and recovery an injury is joint actual joint inflammation. So like turf toe, we've seen great results. Chronic on on, on undiagnosed or no diagnoseable reason or cause of like knee pain. We've seen great results. I mean, the joint inflammation stuff is is unbelievable. Unbelievably Wow. When you think about treating things,

Anthony Kjenstad :

I was looking at some of your posts on Instagram and I noticed, so my backgrounds delivering durable medical equipment into orthopedic surgery surgery. And I think you had mentioned that for post surgical patients. You know, I know I've always thought it interesting that jumping from orthopedics to this sports performance world we're in now that nutrition is such a big thing, but they're not talking about nutrition. postoperatively. Right. Um, and how would you add IV hydration therapy into a pre operative post operative? Like a total joint ACL reconstruction? Do you have a an algorithm where you think that fits?

Adam Bobo :

I don't have anything specific. You know, I think the biggest issue now is that we're so concerned with this intra op fluid. We're so focused on intra op fluid restriction on operating. They think that there's fat track, anesthesia recovery benefits, limit intra op fluids, well you already restrict fluid the fluid window prior to surgery. And now you're restricting it more. And now you're what you're starting to see a lot of people have is more post op, nausea, vomiting and more post up GI upset or discomfort with constipation, and then you slam them with with Percocet or oxycodone or some other form of opioid. And I think that there's a place for you know, whether it be NAD or whether it be just more optimal IV hydration, you know, I think intra op I do see that the science behind reducing fluid intake because moving there is some fluid loss, but it's usually not that much. You're not constantly drinking fluid all day anyway. But more optimally getting people hydrated before surgery, whether it's with an IV or just saying, Hey, we need you over this week to you know, consume more vegetables that are usually like green leafy vegetables, broccoli, spinach, things that contain more hydrating properties, water, chia seeds, things that are hydrating naturally. But people don't do that, you know, traditionally and medicine now people that are having surgery 70% of people in our country are very unhealthy anyway. 30% aren't probably, but we're a pretty unhealthy country as it is, but we don't. We don't teach nutrition either. No, I think that's a huge disparity. It's not it's kind of missed. When I think that and even sleep, that's the other thing like I harp sleep to my guys, I think that sleep is the single most beneficial thing and optimizing your sleep is the single most beneficial thing you can do to aid your recovery period. I think that there's nothing better that will prolong your life. That is that is more beneficial to your day to day health and sleep. It's when all your growth factors come to come to light you get more growth hormone release like your your body is recovering during that time. You have different processes going on yet we get we as a society are so focused on the grind. How much can I outwork the other guy? Oh, I don't need that much sleep I function fine on five hours. I think that's all crap. I think people can do that. I'm one of those people that does that at times. But truly if we could even educate people on like, like Stanford did a research study on their basketball team. And they showed that by increasing their sleep from six and a half hours to eight and a half hours over a three month period. They increased three point percentage free by by I don't want to miss quoted nine to 11% three point percentage by nine to 11%. And overall speed on agility tests, just that was the only variable across the whole team. Now granted, could they have eaten healthier? Could they have done other things? Sure, there's there's variables they couldn't account for. But the only thing the team actually increased was increasing their sleep by two hours. And all those things so you can say mental acuity and actual physical performance increase. So you you could deduce that by increasing sleep in the business world, you're now more what's the word efficient with your with your time, you know, you're able to actually get the same work done in less time and you're benefiting your health on the back end. Yeah, nutrition is super beneficial. I just think that it's it's gonna be hard to actually institute that.

Anthony Kjenstad :

Plus it's not covered by insurance, you know, speaking to like what you said postoperatively if something's not covered by insurance, you know, patients that want it? Right? So if you tell them, hey, there's a I've got a nutrition, sleep algorithm preoperatively that's going to make your outcome better. If it's not covered by insurance, if an IV makes sense postoperatively in the OR, or in the recovery room, but it costs them $400. They're not going to do it unless it's covered by insurance, and I'm assuming none of the things in your therapy at that part are, are covered by insurance, correct?

Adam Bobo :

That's the big pieces because nothing's FDA regulated or FDA approved. In a way, the drugs are FDA approved, but the therapies aren't. Because the FDA is run by Big Pharma and Big Pharma. The last thing they want to do is have things that actually can heal you or benefit you because that cuts into their drug profits, and they want to sell you the drug. I mean, if I was running if I was the CEO of any big pharmaceutical company, I would want to shut down everything that could potentially step on my profits, if that's what I did, but that's not good. So I feel a little differently about it. But you know, I don't know that insurance will ever cover this stuff. I think it you could get into eventually a covering ad because I think clinical research is only going to come around even more it's starting to nav starting to catch waves and pop culture. I know Justin Bieber talked about it and his addiction issues that he's had he talks about it on his therapy sessions that he did on Netflix. He talks about getting an ad weekly or regularly to help with his like, overall mental status and his issue past issues with addiction and he feels like it helps him a lot. So I think the more you see it in like popular, places or culture, like I've had a few articles written about me and my work with the athletes doing a lot of this stuff. I think the more awareness we get of it, you're gonna see more clinical, like really good clinical research come out in humans because the safety's there. Yeah,

Anthony Kjenstad :

Unfortunately that world is trending to cash pay anyways. Right? So I mean, you know, one of the other things I noticed and we've already hit in 30 minutes I appreciate your time is you're doing more than just straight IV bags. I mean, you're, you're into stem cells exosomes, I have a background in selling biologics and amniotic fluid. I saw exosomes, give me a little. Give me a little peek into what else you're doing outside of IV therapy. What what are you doing on the on the on the stem cell slash, you know, regenerative medicine side.

Adam Bobo :

So we have a great stem cell protocol that we use where we're using umbilical cord matrix. So people don't know a lot about stem cells. So everybody thinks themselves come from yourself or come from dead babies. Stem cells in the US The only way you can get them if you're not sourcing them from yourself or from yourself basically are coming from donated Usually placenta cord, placenta products, amniotic product, most of what we use regularly is from the cord matrix, which is basically Imagine all the vessels that are inside of the umbilical cord being surrounded and cushioned by this gelatinous matrix. It's really high in mesenchymal stem cells or stem cells. So we have a protocol where we use both IV stem cells and injections stem cells, whether it be in the joint, soft tissue. We only do because we don't use fluoro or X ray to position needles. So we don't do spine we don't do. We do very easily accessible landmark based ones and we've seen great results in addition to the stem cells, so stem cells basically a man like I tried to keep this so simple. And this is like the explanation I give my guys imagine a stem cell being you know, a cell that can become any cell, for lack of a better way to put in or repair any tissue so it goes in your body. It has a homing device that can find dead injured inflamed cells or tissue and replace those repair those become those cells and thereby basically repair or heal those sites. Well, exosomes are so cool in what their role is. They're more like carrier vesicles of messages, message messages or proteins or genetic coding, RNA coding. So the way I explain it exosomes, imagine I give somebody stem cells and they this how explain it to my most of my clients. Imagine that you're going to the bar, and the damage you can do at the bar. Drinking alcohol is equivalent to what goodness the stem cell can do in your body. What's a one it's one mile to the bar, and I said you can leave at eight and you've got to be home by two. So you're gonna walk there for the stem cell, and you get there and you've got three hours. to party it up or whatever you want to do, and how much damage you do to your you know how drunk you get or whatever is is equivalent to what the stem cell was able to do good in your body. But you got to be homebound too. So you all now, all of a sudden I give you an extra zone, and it's like the Uber, so you're able to get there faster, get back faster. So now you've got five hours of time there to party or whatever you want to say. So now basically, exosomes are carrier vesicles for the stem cells and genetic information which makes the stem cell penetrate deeper last longer become more therapeutic. And we've seen tremendous results that that still shocked me with these without a lot of our clients.

Anthony Kjenstad :

And you're doing those as an injection. So like somebody comes in with a meniscal tear, you're gonna inject right in the in the joint versus deliver this through IV therapies that Correct?

Adam Bobo :

We do both.

Anthony Kjenstad :

Oh, you do both. Okay. Yeah. So I hadn't heard of it being delivered through through IV.

Adam Bobo :

Yeah, the guy that trained me to do it. like eight to 10 years. So I've just been lucky enough to meet two individuals who are ones a functional performance medicine doc and the other one's a neurosurgeon that owns a big clinic in Denver. And they're both they both practice a little differently, but they're both for whatever reason, found it in them to want to share everything with me and educate me. And I can definitely tell shout out to Dr. Conover at Konover Wellness(Delivering Biologics through IV Mentors Dr. Koniver https://koniverwellness.com/) in Charleston and then Dr Chad Prusmack @ Reslience Code( https://www.myresiliencecode.com/ ) at resilience code in Denver both those guys are brilliant, and share so much with me that I that's how I've been able to learn all this. You know, so much of this space is hidden. People don't want to tell you how to do stuff, you know, from the nursing background and anesthesia. You know, nothing about stem cells from like what you're doing. But these guys have taken me under their wing and educated me and taught me and taught me how to do a lot of this. But yeah, like so for example, I have a torn medial meniscus. And so I injected today actually, stem cells which would have been like three like three million stem cells, which is a lot. I mean, it's a good amount. So 3 million stem cells. And then there's two other products that we use. Doesn't really matter what their names are, but one comes from umbilical cord product.

Anthony Kjenstad :

is that the Wharton jelly mix(https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/wharton-jelly)?

Adam Bobo :

Well Wharton's jelly is the is we use that that's what our stem cells come from. Yeah. But okay, I have another one called poly site that actually comes from the umbilical cord tissue. And we have another one that comes from amniotic tissue. So, but those two products don't contain stem cells. They're one of those is really high and collagen, and one of those was really high and how ironic acid. So basically, we combine all these products and inject it into the joint and you you couldn't have a more potent combo of regenerative products. The other issue with joints and it's the same reason like, you know, you tear your hamstring, you strain your calf. You pull something in your back. A lot of times that stuff can heal. It's because you have blood flow. And this is a big thing with that is applicable to Firefly is that increased blood flow is increased recovery period. It's the same reason that I'm very big proponent in heat versus eyes. You know, I think that it's like Infrared Sauna versus cryo, do I think cryo is great in some instances and in some places, hundred percent, but I'm a bigger fan of regular use of infrared sauna or heat. Because I think that blood flow is king can restrict blood flow, you restrict the healing properties of getting there and actually healing that injury. Whether that's just fatigue and slow muscle breakdown or lactic acid buildup, you've got to get blood flow and blood flow out. Joint capsules, traditionally across the board have really really poor blood flow. So yeah, poor blood flow means poor products there, which means poor removal of waste, which means poor oxygenation. You need those things to heal the joints. So in addition to what I injected in my knee, also injected a thing called ozone ozone gas. So just a syringe of gas. So ozone gases, oh three. I was Oh, it's three oxygen molecules. oxygen that we breathe is two oxygen molecules. So we run an oxygen tank gas through an ozone generator splits the two oxygen molecules in half recombine them into oh three and then we take that out three and we can inject it we can bind it to blood, we can use it multiple ways. But basically what it does is it cleans things. If you get a really high end car detail that may say do you want ozone gas and they'll basically run that through your seat to remove smells that actually cleans things you can make a cleaner out of ozone gas to clean the counter surfaces in your home. So when you put it into a neat capsule, the first thing you do is you clean, you clean it out so bacteria that or you know dead tissue, things that really shouldn't be there that just remain in a capsule from like a muscle tear or like a meniscus meniscal tear you also increase the number of oxygen molecules in that joint capsule and immediately expedite recovery because you now have more oxygen flow there. So, by combining all these things, you increase the available oxygen you increase the cell the the stem cells that can Repair and Replace that so you increase the growth factors you increase the college and you increase the the ability of the knee to heal itself or the joint to heal itself with a body to basically heal itself whatever your your focuses for that treatment.