Athletic Recovery & Performance Podcast

Brad Godbold- Director of S&C at NY University

August 10, 2020 Anthony Kjenstad Season 1 Episode 11
Athletic Recovery & Performance Podcast
Brad Godbold- Director of S&C at NY University
Chapters
Athletic Recovery & Performance Podcast
Brad Godbold- Director of S&C at NY University
Aug 10, 2020 Season 1 Episode 11
Anthony Kjenstad

🎧 Podcast episode #11
Brad is the Director of Strength and Conditions for all of NYU’s 22 sports teams.  

His journey from being in the military to being a head collegiate strength coach was an interesting fast track compared to most peoples journey.  

In this podcast we cover Brad’s  journey along with: 

  • Mentorship and how important this is early in your career 
  • Programming during Quarantine  
  • Balancing Performance Programming based off of what every other strength and conditioning coach is doing. 
  • Communication between athletic training staff and performance staff is Key = Enterprise information System  
  • The many roles of a strength and conditioning coach and how it has changed over the past 5 years 
  • “Don’t try to be anyone but yourself”  
  • S&C focus and the role they play in recovery and injury prevention. 
  • Technologies being used by NYU and what new technologies are being looked at.  
  • Who is responsible for implementing new technologies and recovery devices like the firefly™ 
  • Advice for anyone looking for a career in strength and conditioning.  You can find Brad on his instagram: 

Instagram: @_brad_godbold

You can follow NYU Strength and Conditioning:

Instagram  @nyu_strength


Email:

[email protected]


Show Notes Transcript

🎧 Podcast episode #11
Brad is the Director of Strength and Conditions for all of NYU’s 22 sports teams.  

His journey from being in the military to being a head collegiate strength coach was an interesting fast track compared to most peoples journey.  

In this podcast we cover Brad’s  journey along with: 

  • Mentorship and how important this is early in your career 
  • Programming during Quarantine  
  • Balancing Performance Programming based off of what every other strength and conditioning coach is doing. 
  • Communication between athletic training staff and performance staff is Key = Enterprise information System  
  • The many roles of a strength and conditioning coach and how it has changed over the past 5 years 
  • “Don’t try to be anyone but yourself”  
  • S&C focus and the role they play in recovery and injury prevention. 
  • Technologies being used by NYU and what new technologies are being looked at.  
  • Who is responsible for implementing new technologies and recovery devices like the firefly™ 
  • Advice for anyone looking for a career in strength and conditioning.  You can find Brad on his instagram: 

Instagram: @_brad_godbold

You can follow NYU Strength and Conditioning:

Instagram  @nyu_strength


Email:

[email protected]


Unknown Speaker :

Hello, my name is Anthony, Jen said and welcome to the athletic recovery and performance podcast. In this podcast, you'll follow my journey of understanding the science behind recovering performance and the technologies that help us get there. I will be interviewing athletes and the behind the scenes professionals that help these athletes reach optimal performance and recovery. Hey, podcasters hope you're all doing well. In this podcast I am strangely absent and Jake takes over the wheel to speak with Brad godbolt. Brad has a great story of coming out of the military as a combat veteran to becoming director of strength and conditioning at New York University all inside of five years. For anyone interested in becoming a strength and conditioning coach, this is the podcast for you. As Jake takes a peek behind the scenes with Brad's journey of mentorship and how that helped him become the coach he is today. Also, after the podcast is over, be sure to check out Brad's Instagram content which I will post a link to for anyone wanting programming at home. So man, give us an introduction of yourself. Obviously, I know you we connected through Instagram about what, two three months ago? Yeah, I think something like that probably. Yeah. Close to the beginning of this whole quarantine mess. Yeah, right when it happened. So yeah, we've, we've been in communication for the past couple months but for everyone listening, give a quick introduction of yourself and where you're at and, and all that jazz. Yeah. So my name is Brad Godbold. I'm the head strength conditioning coach at New York University. So I'm in New York, been in the city now for almost five years. I just moved here to go to school when I got out of the army and started this whole professional coaching gig. So straight from the army. You decided you didn't have a you didn't have enough working out in the army. So you wanted to make it a profession. Is that is that what it was? Yeah, man, basically, um, I so I've always had kind of a passion for health and fitness and being in the gym. Everything. So when I got out, I knew that I wanted to do something in the health and fitness arena. Um, but five years ago, I didn't know that like, like collegiate strength conditioning coach was an option. I didn't know that was a job. I just got out and I was like, getting into like social media and stuff like that. So I was like, Alright, cool. I'm gonna, I'm gonna go to school. I'm going to be a famous Instagram trainer for you, not well at all give me five years to get 4000 followers. So, so the next best thing was to be a college strength coach. Yeah, basically. Um, so I got out active duty in 2015 and moved up here to New York. I went to Long Island University and Brooklyn and got my undergrad and Sport Science, which is kind of what catapulted, get to where I am now. One of my professors, I think, actually the first college class I took like I signed up I got our I got accepted, I signed up classes showed up school first class I took was the head strength conditioning coach at Liu. And the class was on our functional sports training or functional athlete training, something like that was the name of the course. And so being a little bit older, coming in and class kind of had that obvious military Look, he kind of picked me out and was like, like, started inviting me to the gym and everything. Watch training sessions outside of class. So pretty much if I wasn't in class, I wasn't at home. I wasn't at the gym myself. I was in the varsity performance room just hanging out watching and learning. And so I really owe a lot of my career to Richard James, because I wouldn't be where I am now. had not met him. Yeah, and that's what's so what I love when I speak with strength conditioning staffs and coaches from across the NCAA. Everyone has a similar story of somebody taking them under their wing teaching him the ropes. That's one of the cool, the coolest things about the profession is how intertwined everyone is, and how you really feed off and learn from the guy in front of you until you just continue to grow, which is I'm sure how you got to NYU. How long have you been the head strength coach there at MIT. So I've been the head strength coach at NYU us actually just since November. It's again, another situation of where I am without a couple of key players. So I'm sure we'll get to it. But fast forward to being at NYU. I'm working in the private sector in New York working with athletes and offseason stuff like that working for business. The guy who owned the company was also an assistant strength coach at NYU at the time, I'm working. They they assistant coaches, their work about 12 to 15 hours a week. So it's a really, really minimal part time job. So he was doing that on his own private training thing on the side or I guess it was Full Time gig. So he ended up actually moving on from New York out to Ohio and took his business with him everything but with him leaving there was a assistant role at NYU that became open. And through knowing him, I basically just stepped right into his assistant role. because he'd been there long enough that our reputation, they knew he was leaving. He was like, hey, if you want to make the hiring process really easy, I've got this guy. So that happened, I got the job. And then just a few months into it, the head strength coach gets an offer from Dartmouth to go be the number two on the football program there. And they asked me at this point, I haven't had any head coaching gigs at all. I'm just running my private business and assistant coach jobs. They came to me and we're like, Hey, we think you know you've got enough skin in the game. We like what you've done. Are you interested in the tech For all and I'm like yeah, for sure. Awesome. So it's again I've been I tell people this when I have conversations with people who are just interested I have been my I guess rise to where I am is not traditional at all. I've been very, very fortunate very lucky in my career. I know that so I don't take any of that for granted that I've gone from where from not even knowing a strength coach was five years ago to being a head strength coach doesn't happen without like several people. For sure, traditionally, when I speak with a lot of strength coaches, I mean that the history and the journey to get to where they're at now is pretty tremendous when it comes to internships. Different when it comes to assistant roles, like you continually have to do that until you get a head roll. So for you to go from like you said nothing to to the head strength coach in less than, you know, about five years is pretty, pretty unique for sure. Yeah, when you're the head coach role at NYU? How many sports does that cover? And then how many assistants Do you have under you that you'd have to manage now? Yeah, so we have 22 a sport or 22 teams across 15 sports. Some of them are co Ed sports. Some of them are Sarah reports. We don't have I mean, we have all the big players except for football, basically. So we don't mean basketballs, baseball, soccer, volleyball, swimming, wrestling, tennis golf. Guys, I'm only they shot if I left somebody out. Cross Country track throwing, diving. I hope I didn't miss anybody. So all those teams and I had direct oversight over everything. And I have two assistant coaches, like I said mentioned earlier that work in 12 to 15 hours a week. And generally those are specialists. So like one Want to split the assistant coaches, he's a baseball guy. So he works with baseball, softball. That's like his team. He does the programming on, he's been very successful with him. So I'll leave him alone, I trust them. And he does his thing. And then the hire that I brought in to replace me as an assistant is like a field sport person. So she's over the soccers. And then work depending on the schedule works with wrestling a little bit as well, but I do the programming for wrestling. So during this quarantine, obviously, things have looked a lot different. We're, you know, you're managing 22 sports, what does that look like from your side when it comes to programming for your athletes? And how do you delegate some of that over the past couple months, and obviously, New York has been, you know, a tough spot for that. So I'm sure it's, it probably looks a little bit different than some of your other schools but go into a little bit of that and kind of describe what you've been doing the past three, four months. Yeah, so the last three or four months, I'm sure a lot more With just about every other college in the country or even High School and professional teams has been something nobody's ever seen before. So for NCAA, it's definitely been a little bit more difficult because we, early on, we started off with being able to do some zoom training with teams and stuff like that. But I think maybe two to three weeks into it, NCAA was like, No, we can't do that. They essentially deemed that it was a liability issue. If we're conducting training sessions live and somebody gets hurt, okay, well, they're across the country in California. There's no athletic trainer there to like, help them out. So they shut that down pretty quick. So basically, what I've been able to do was give programming, and I cut back from doing sports specific programs for this phase into doing just a three tier general effect. athletic performance program being from some people who I think some states had access to gyms through the whole thing. So there was like one like full weight room style lift that was going on the whole time that some athletes were able to get. There was one for like kids who were more fortunate to have like garage gyms or have some equipment in their house and able in the last year, or really, the first year was just like you're at home, you don't have any equipment, you got a backpack, you got some laundry detergent. here's here's a workout you can do at home. So that's really been kind of how that's been going last almost five months now. So you basically had to simplify things down to basically three tiers. Now, when you were obviously during this time in the strength conditioning world, were people reaching out and helping each other as far as getting feedback off of what they were doing or just something you kind of had to create, or was there like a protocol to follow? Shed definitely no, there's no protocol, no blueprint. We've been there. Luckily, like we said earlier, this is a very like small field, a very close knit field. And the coaches that are really successful understand that you don't get where you are without a network. So that has been a big part of this. And even moving forward, like I started a focus group on Instagram. It's not much but I added, like 20 coaches from division one to Division Three, private sector, everything like that. And basically, all we're discussing now is like, Okay, what are some things we can do to open gyms back up in our areas in our spaces, based on the guidelines that states are putting out so that was a big part of going into programming as well was, I started I had an idea of what I wanted to do to just make it as simple as possible. But yeah, reaching out to coaches at Oklahoma, South Carolina, wherever I had connections out and saying, Hey, what are you doing with Guys, like what are what are you doing this time based on, like the guidelines that NCAA put out? And so I think having those conversations really helped to shape and get me at least to where we are now. Going back into the fall. Sure, just kind of collaborative. Yeah, that world and I and obviously when you're adapting to something completely new, it's you know, you don't want to be naive and think that you know, how to do everything. So, so obviously, I'm sure it was a lot of collaboration. Another question I have is, let's just talk about during the regular season, like when, when things are normal So today, when you talk about programming and coming up with strength, conditioning and performance for 22 different teams, you know, obviously every strength conditioning coach has kind of their you know, their niche and what they're, they're good at, in in come up with different programming, how much does who you trained under who you learned under affect how you program in the future, and is it hard to kind of balance between The right way to do everything and the next big thing or, you know, say you're reading Cody's book and you're like, Oh, I need to do you know, I need to do that or you hear some other thing that comes out. How do you balance between trying to be on the cutting edge but also doing what you know? Yeah, that's a great question. And I definitely struggle with that because having my different mentors, I'm doing my first internship at University of South Carolina with football and only football, to now working with Olympic sports. That in and of itself is just completely different. And it's hard because like, I really try to prescribe to the idea of doing things exceedingly well. Squat bench or not even squat, bend the knee hinge, press pull, carry those, the just the movements, but then at the same time, it's like, you know, Cal Dietz has come up with all this amazing stuff, and it's not just like, he's doing it for the Instagram he has the science The research and the data to back it up. So trying to understand try phasic training and where it fits in with, with my training methodologies. Um, I mean, yeah, it's a battle, but it's it's all about growing as a coach and learning, learning new things, learning how to implement new things, and still keeping it within your own methodology and philosophy. Gotcha. So, kind of shift gears a little bit, you know, we're athletic recovery and performance podcasts. We want to talk about the recovery side as well. Over quarantine, was there any type of communication between your athletic training staff or, or the rehab recovery side for your athletes that are training from home? Was there any implementation or will go back to protocols that were being taken? I know you know, everyone has different things when it comes to that protocol. But what what does that Like for your athletes over quarantine, if that was anything that you could implement over zoom or with your workouts, or what did that look like? Yeah, so I mean, I'm very fortunate in the fact that myself and my athletic training staff are very close. And we are very much so aligned on methodologies and philosophies. So that makes working together really, really easy. Um, and with that, we kind of share responsibility of recovery, there's things that they allow me as a strength coach to do to kind of fall within my scope, as well as in taking care of their recovery methods as well. And again, during during this weird time, it's really been about providing resources, since we don't have the ability to hold virtual sessions and go through even stretching. So it's been really, really relying heavily on social media and providing different resources that are available to them as well as this information and I try to post about hydration I tried to post about nutrition, sleep, mental health, everything that goes all into the all encompassing pie of the health of your body. But it's definitely been difficult with the restrictions of the NCAA and not being able to hold sessions. It's just just been all about providing resources and maintaining contact as much as possible. I mean, obviously, when you're dealing with 500 athletes, some are going to want to have more contact than others. Some want to be like, Alright, well, I'm done. cut ties, I'll see you in the fall. Right. So so you get a broad spectrum of that and like everything in between zero contact and contact every day. So sure, it's really at this point with, with the the hands being tied and everything, it's really up to the individual athlete. Right. And, you know, it's hard enough to hold athletes accountable during the season for recovery and, and to take care of the nutrition and sleep so I can't imagine What it's like not being able to kind of have that hands on accountability approach. I'm sure it's been a lot different was interesting. I was listening to Gordon Williams on the P fats, Instagram Live last night and he was basically talking about the relationship between street coaches and the athletic training staff and how it's kind of like a, I think he used the word like enterprise Information System, talking about how you can't really have a rehab program apart from the strength and conditioning program. He basically was saying they go hand in hand is that in the year that you find it? Obviously you mentioned at your, at your university, but is that something that is a kind of shifting to towards all of your your major college and professional teams now? I believe so. Yeah. Yeah. So when I was at South Carolina, they had a very, very close relationship, the head strength coach and the head athletic trainer. They would come to athletic training stuff in the actual performance on gym. Back and forth, I was very close relationship. And again here, there are places that have been where the relationship between athletic training staff and strength staff have not been cohesive. And you can definitely see like stepping back taking a look how that kind of plays out with the athletes. I'm there. I mean, I've I've seen it, where the athletic training staff don't want the shrink coach to do anything except for lifting weights like no stretching or foam rolling nothing like they're like, that's recovery, we do recovery. And, I mean, it takes a toll on the athletes that like it's almost like they don't want that. Like they don't want to give up any territory or like they feel like you're stepping on their toes or trying to do their job or something. So I have seen that. Luckily, it's been on a very, very small scale, I would say more so that it is definitely a more cohesive unit. And as well we're at NYU. We are. We are sports performance. And that sports medicine and strength conditioning. So we're we are one department, I guess, if you will. Sure. So, I think it was done that way by design. Very cool. So, so, you know, the role of strength conditioning coach, obviously, over the past five years and probably what you imagined when you first got into strength conditioning is probably changed a little bit, or might be different than what you thought. Tell me about how how the position is now compared to what you what you thought it would be when you first got in? Yeah, um, a lot of that has actually been, I would say, more self growth than anything I'm getting into it. I obviously start off my internship with a football program. I thought that you know, being a strength coach was, you know, being high and yelling and loud and like really, really high energy. And I do think that has a place um, but I also have been learning like me as a coach and like, that's not me. I've never really I've never been allowed person even when I played sports for the military I've always been more of a I guess a quiet presence. So trying to figure out how to do that has been like my biggest challenge I guess in the last five years is like okay I don't have to be the coach that yells and like Hi everybody. Oh, I do get excited especially on like max days obviously like I mean, you got to get excited on max day. A lot of work on max days but I'm not that coach that's gonna that's like yelling every set every rep of every single day. honestly don't think my voicebox can handle it. We're working with athletes like I just go on mute. Right last thing I'll say in five years is learning who I am as a coach and not trying to be Benny Wiley or cow beach trying to be myself while while obviously respecting those those guys for every all the years they've got in and demos coach but like, I'm not them. Like, I shouldn't try to be them. Right. And I think you know, from the general population to sometimes it can seem like, Hey, what are the strength coaches for other than just yelling and and hyping their athletes up when in reality, you know the street coaches are typically the ones that know their athletes the best spend the most time with their athletes. I know. For me, I played at Samford University and I had an incredible strength coach and Ryan Davis, who's now at Maryland. But even coming into college, not realizing how important the strength coach role was in not only athletic performance, but also in injury prevention. People forget there's two sides, there's, you know, two sides to mainly three when it comes to strength conditioning, athletic performance, athletic injury prevention and recovery and then teaching athletes how to lift and, and move properly. You know, those are three major components that a lot of people kind of, don't always realize from the outside looking in. Can you tell me a little bit how when you first got into And where you're at now how you had to adapt and learn more of that recovery part of it and the injury prevention part of it. What steps do you guys take at NYU? To kind of adapt that as well? Yeah. So I, for whatever reasons, I was very, very interested in injury prevention at an early start, and this, um, I don't know, obviously, there was some kind of influence, but I can't pinpoint what that influence was, but I was very, very much interested in. Okay, why should I be trying to make an athlete squat 500 pounds if they can't do a bodyweight reverse lunge or Bulgarian split squat? There's obviously some kind of imbalance there or something like one leg stronger than Okay, sure maybe bilaterally, they can squat 500 but if they can't do a bodyweight, full area, and then there's something going on, and so I became very interested in learning those patterns and making people better with their own bodies first. And then I've had a lot of a lot more success with the actual strength gains on the barbell when I know that they can handle their body in different planes of motion on different stable and unstable surfaces and stuff like that. So that has, for me at least has been kind of from the beginning with injury prevention and prehab. And it still remains my philosophy today. When I when I first take over a team, or start working with a private client, the first thing I do is look at how they move on, which should be I believe, by and large is how most strength coaches work. Um, but really just looking at how people move. And if you know the human body and no planes of motion, then you can kind of watch somebody play lacrosse and like this team as a whole has weak hamstrings. They're all quad dominant runners. And then you start just doing a whole bunch of hamstring work Nordic curls and things like that. And then they go from having two to three season ending injuries a year to zero and work like that just kind of speaks for itself. Right? So, you know, we're seeing more and more at universities and get getting your, you know, Director of sports performance science and, and kind of getting more and more niched when it comes to those, you know, your strength conditioning coach, a sports science coach, specific performance coach, can you explain kind of why you know why universities are going more that way? And do you feel like as a as a strength conditioning that you have to continually to wear more and more hats? Yeah, I think that as the field evolves, more and more institutions are starting to see the value of what strength conditioning is. I mean, it's been around what I mean, since the 80s. And it's just growing up to a point where now it's being valued as much as athletic training. I think with those new titles and certification, everything you're seeing is starting to go that route. And I will, I personally believe that in a very short amount of time, we will also as a strength conditioning field have a national board just like the athletic trainers have, and more be more stringent on the continuing education, everything like that. I think that's where it's going on. And probably even to the point where instead of a Bachelor's as a minimum requirement, you'll probably a Master's a minimum requirement. And you'll see a lot more strength coaches like Pat Ivy who had their doctorates up, I think that that's where the field is going as more and more value gets put on it and we start to see sports programs are doing I mean, just just if you look at sport, if you look at football today versus football 10 years ago, you're seeing things done on the field that you've never seen before. Okay, that's, you see seeing you're seeing football players run track and field times on They're on their sprints you're seeing, you're seeing guys hit to 25 for 40 reps on credits. Like if you're sort, we're starting to see that we weren't even close to touching what the human body is capable of, I still don't think we're even close to that I don't think we've reached the natural max of what the human body is capable of. But as we get closer and closer to that threshold, more and more value gets put on what we do as human performance specialist, and that is going to drive us up to the level that we're going to have a board and everything like that. That's good. It's very interesting. How much do you see, you know, I hear a lot of athletic trainers and performance coaches speaking on analytics and really getting down into the data of their athletes when it comes to both injury and both performance. Is there something that you do you guys keep up with different type of statistics and analytics and measurements? And you guys communicate with both athletic training and performance on those are What are your thoughts on that? So we only have just strengthen conditioning and, and athletic trainers as that department. So and we were starting to get more and more into the technologies and I think with our new gym that we're building this going to open. Hopefully at the end of next year, we will have a lot more about technology in the space. So now as far as testing, it's all kind of the old school analog, vertical squat bench press or a bench deadlift, all those things and I keep track of it. And I do quarterly test and I've got a huge spreadsheet that I created. That's probably way more in depth than it needs to be. Actually I didn't even create it. I had one of my student workers computer degree, created it for me on once it's there, it's easy to use, but I never could have created it on my own. This is a huge spreadsheet where I track stuff and I can see where Okay, athletes Got a lot stronger on their deadlift and their vertical went up, but something happened on their squat. And I can kind of look back at the numbers and track that and see like, Okay, well, I need to readjust training on whether it's an individual that happens or as a team that like result happens across the board. All right. So that's pretty much where my tracking is now. I love technology. And I think we're gonna get a lot more into that there's several programs that are bidding for getting that and then we've got, we've got rack performance bridge, all those companies like that. So we'll for sure have something like that in the future and give us the ability to track. Um, yeah, I don't know, it's kind of good. I mean, me and Anthony are, you know, in the space of technology and recovery and, and we're seeing so many new and really cool technologies every day and even you know, talk speaking with strength coaches and performance staffs and athletic training staffs. We're hearing all kinds of New technology coming up that is helping athletes, you know, know where their potential injuries are, where their limitations are tracking. You can basically track anything now when it comes to technology. So I'll just say like my first kind of dive into technology was actually the Nord board. And up first started learning about how you can track asymmetries and balances and stuff like that. So you put a guy on there and having to in order to curl and his left hamstrings pulling out 25 pounds, right hamstrings pulling five pounds. Okay, well, there's something going on with that right hamstring, he might pull that thing that five weeks down the road. Yeah, my first, I guess, glance into technology and how to use it and how to apply it as a strength coach. Um, so I definitely see the space there. And that's one of the places where I think that you can't necessarily do the simple things exceedingly well, you've got to take that technology and you've got to use it because you're human is not always going to be able to detect asymmetries and stuff like that. I mean, a squat, it's pretty easy to see at least a significant asymmetry. But like, You're, you're not gonna be that lucky all the time and be able to just like, look at somebody like, oh, you're weak, you're on that side. exactly it. I recently ran across a technology. It's basically a tomography scan. And one of our clinics were using it and I was lucky enough to go in and get scanned to see where I was either a potential injury or where I was overtraining at and basically it takes a scan and kind of shows you different spots, it'll have kind of color coordinated and be more red or kind of like he, you know, he was where you're overtraining and I've been running a lot recently, I had a little Achilles issue, and I went and got my scan. And of course, they had, you know, they didn't know anything. And of course, it came up to my Achilles and my calf was on my right side was potentially overtraining. Or more susceptible to injury? And I would say wow, you know, this is technology that that not only your athletic trainers can use, but your strength coaches can use on on Okay, maybe we shouldn't program so much for that, you know, for that calf to strain or whatever it might be. But just another cool technology that I saw that I've never seen before. And there's only a couple professional teams using it right now. But anyways, we just continue to see more of that technology coming out for both the performance and the in the street side. And I think we're approaching 30 minutes I'm going to wrap it up pretty soon I could talk forever, but selfishly one of the questions I had was for me and Anthony for what we do with firefighters is is work with a lot of your collegiate and professional teams. And I was actually speaking with an SEC performance coach the other day, and he was loving the firefighter with his with his athletes and he asked me, Well, hey, how do we implement this? And do we do you guys usually work with the athletic trainers or You guys work with the performance coaches when it comes to purchasing and implementing for their athletes? It was a great question for us because we kind of balanced between speaking to the strength conditioning coaches, and the athletic trainers and who's implementing with their athletes. For you guys, if, you know, obviously, you used to Firefly before, and I've had in love it, thank you throw that in there. But you know, who is the one implementing these recovery modalities? For your athletes? Is it mainly going to be on that strength conditioning side? Or typically on the athletic training side? I think yeah, I think mainly the the focus would be with the athletic training side, they're going to take care of most of the recovery modalities. I mean, that's, that's their job. That's their specialty. There. I mean, I have some training and just the trust I have with my department, they understand my understanding of the human body. So they're all a lot of things that I do but With one head strength coach and 500 athletes majority of my time is spent coaching programming. But I mean I use things like body tampering on my athletes that I do in the gym, I use custom massage devices stuff like that. This the Firefly I do you think would be something that would find its way into the athletic training room more on just because of the the stimulation, everything they they're the ones that are using, you know, the context, everything like that the Russians down south, I feel like it would probably find its way in there. Um, but I definitely through just doing my own research having conversations with you and my understanding of Firefly would be able to help implement fireflies in with with our recovery protocols. Right. So, for the most part, what we're hearing in that was, you know, an answer that we've, you know, heard for the most part across the board is the athletic training department is usually the one implementing and then the strength conditioning side is The one that's creating buy in with their athletes. So we hear that a lot of what we go through the athletic training department, but then our strength conditioning, our performance staff is really creating that buy in and making sure that their athletes understand the importance of recovery and sleep and nutrition, just as much as the athletic training department. And so that's kind of the role we're seeing when they come together as a team. Is that kind of what you would experience as well? Oh, yeah, I would definitely say this. I mean, this is not like, necessarily a reflection on me, but like they, a lot of my athletes didn't weren't into foam rolling even but body tampering and percussion before I got there. And because I use those things, and they see me in the gym, I'm doing the same programs that they do. I do my athletes lifts with them sometimes. And they say that something's bothering them. I'm like, Okay, well, this is what I use. I've got it right over here. Do you want to try it out? And I think just having Having the knowledge that their strength coach who does the same lifting that they do is using a certain modality for recovery they're going to be a little bit more I guess willing to buy in and try it out at least once. And then for at least with like the temporary and percussion once they try it, they're like look, I've got athletes that everyday they're coming in Hey, can I get the hyper ice like and they're like they're taking their time and they're doing it themselves now or they'll get a teammate roll them out with a with a steel roller. Like that by is definitely something that it's implemented in one area but then bought in, um, in another. Love it. Well, we are getting close to that mark. Brad, is there anything that you would like to add to anyone listening or a place where people can find you? I know you have an Instagram page, which you're pretty active on I follow it. you post a lot of good things on there. People can find you on Instagram. Where else can people contact you for Even potential people that are interested in the strength conditioning world and wanting to get kind of involved what what are some things that you have as far as advice or any last words before we end? Yeah, um, so you can contact me on social media. I'll do a shameless plug. My personal handle is underscore, Brad underscore Godbold underscore, it's just my name three underscores. You can DM me there, you can click the email link, comment, whatever. And then if you can also go to NYU underscore strength, that's our strength conditioning page. Also that has my NYU email you can click the link there and send that yeah, I mean, if you're if you're interested in the field, I just network, network, meet people be open. Doesn't matter if you've been coaching for a year or 20 years. somebody out there can teach you something. Um, and yeah, just the One of the biggest thing I will leave is like don't be dogmatic. Meaning don't pick like one single methodology and just like ride that line all the way off. Like you got to be willing to pull things from across all different types of training methodologies and add it in and figure out who you are as a coach. That's the biggest thing is like, Don't try to be a famous coach from somewhere else. Just be. I love it. That's great word, Brad. That's really cool, man. Well, hey, I appreciate your time today, my friend. I'm wishing you guys all the best. You said September is when your athletes will start reporting hopefully, hopefully. Yeah, hopefully. Well, man, thanks for your time again. You guys go give Brad a follow and watch out for NYU this year. Is the conquer all right. conquer something we just conquered. Getting back to school will conquer that. Special thanks to Brad for walking us through his journey. And definitely Special thanks to Jake for taking over the wheel. On that podcast, I hope you guys are all been enjoying the content so far. This is podcast number 11. And we hope to continue to push forward with several guests on the docket. Again, if you could take a moment to subscribe, we'd certainly appreciate it or leave a message on how we're doing that certainly keeps us motivated again. Thanks for jumping in guys and we'll talk to you on the next podcast.