FTCO Travel Podcast

Ep. 51 | The Friends Talk Paris, France

July 27, 2020 Friends That Carry On - A Travel Podcast Episode 51
FTCO Travel Podcast
Ep. 51 | The Friends Talk Paris, France
Chapters
FTCO Travel Podcast
Ep. 51 | The Friends Talk Paris, France
Jul 27, 2020 Episode 51
Friends That Carry On - A Travel Podcast

In this 51st episode, the friends revisit Paris, France!  Tune in with Jim, Tony, and Brian to hear about some great food, cool spots you don't want to miss, and enjoy hearing about some of their favorite experiences.

Listeners, there is a lot of great information if you are in the travel industry or thinking about joining it, the future is bright and big things are on the horizon, so click play to listen to this episode.

Also, if you have not already done so, subscribe to the FTCO website, and get each episode and travel expert segments sent to you automatically.  Also, check out our new Friends with Benefits Fan Plan, be registered to win up to 4 to 5 trips a year, plus lots of other travel benefits.

Show Notes Transcript

In this 51st episode, the friends revisit Paris, France!  Tune in with Jim, Tony, and Brian to hear about some great food, cool spots you don't want to miss, and enjoy hearing about some of their favorite experiences.

Listeners, there is a lot of great information if you are in the travel industry or thinking about joining it, the future is bright and big things are on the horizon, so click play to listen to this episode.

Also, if you have not already done so, subscribe to the FTCO website, and get each episode and travel expert segments sent to you automatically.  Also, check out our new Friends with Benefits Fan Plan, be registered to win up to 4 to 5 trips a year, plus lots of other travel benefits.

Intro :

Welcome everyone, to the Friends That Carry On Podcast where we dive deeper into our trips, unpack tips, and everything in between. Now sit back, relax, and get ready to go on a trip with your favorite group of friends.

Jim Scott :

All right. Hello and welcome to Friends That Carry On Podcast. We're a group of friends who like to get together and travel the world, and share our experiences trying to create FOMO first in our friends to get them to come with us, but then hopefully inspiring others to travel after they've listened to some of our adventures. Today, we are going to be talking about Paris. We were actually asked to do a webinar by the team of the Travel Industry Marketing Association. So, part of this podcast today has already been recorded and we did it, but there was a lot in the beginning we didn't think you would be interested in. So, we wanted to clean that up, let you know what those references are when we talk about what you got on the screen, that type of stuff. You'll hear some of that during the podcast that we were actually doing a webinar. But anyhow, it's lots of good information. We thought we'd share why we love the places we like to go, areas we like to stay, wining and dining, and all that type of stuff.

Tony Price :

Yeah, and we'll be doing a few more. They've asked us to participate. I think one of them is a bucket list webinar probably next month that we're going to be doing.

Jim Scott :

I believe so, yeah.

Tony Price :

So, we'll probably share those as well as we go.

Jim Scott :

Absolutely, absolutely. But we want to give a little introduction so you understood the context of what we're talking about.

Tony Price :

Yeah. And then again, so we'll probably follow up after that part of the recording and touch back up on some of the other episodes and follow up on some of the information that's in there. So, I guess on that note, enjoy the webinar that was recorded for the team Elevate Webinars Series.

Jim Scott :

Yep. All about Paris, here we go.

Kulin Strimbu :

Good afternoon, everybody. Hello and welcome again to the Elevate Webinar Series. Nice to see you here this afternoon. Hope you all are having a wonderful week. I want to give everybody a chance to kind of hop on in here and get settled before we get started. Right now, I'd like to talk a little bit about what we have coming up. If you haven't registered for the upcoming webinars, as you all know, these are coming up every single day during the week, barring a few random things. So, we've got a trip on the wild side tomorrow with ecotourism and going into next week, we have going backstage in Western Europe, which features a lot of overviews on neat places to see individual countries, which is great. We've got a wellness webinar next week and a really interesting webinar on Japan outside the commonplaces. So, please check out the upcoming webinars at tima.travel and look for that Elevate Webinar Series. We're going to take just one more minute here and let everybody get logged in. Few features coming at the end. Please keep an eye out for our bucket list adventures. We got Tahiti in there. Our host today will be also coming back again to give us an update on the CARES Act, the PPP, and repayment options that's something that you're working on with your business at the end of the month. So, please get registered for those and check them out on the tima.travel website. We're going to give it one more minute here. Let people finish logging in. We'll get started today. I appreciate you guys taking time out of your day again to join in and participate in this Elevate Webinar Series. I'm recognizing some names of people who've been here before. We're going to be uploading. If you have not already seen it, the recordings of all the previous webinars as well as the social media packs and information, that's a marketing content that you guys get to use for free on the pages on the Elevate Webinar Series site. So, if you missed anything or want to revisit anything, please head out to that page as well and look for past webinars for that information. With that, I think we're probably going to get started here. Welcome everybody again and thanks so much for joining us today for the Travel Industry Marketing Association and travel show marketing group Elevate Webinar Series. I'm Kulin Strimbu and I'm the President of TIMA, and we welcome today the Friends That Carry On who will be speaking about Paris. The Elevate Webinar Series was created as a mutual investment with TSMG and TIMA to better support ongoing education information and communication experience with travel brands, destinations, travel agents, and influencers. It's also meant to help travel agents and sellers better market and promote the locations and the services that are being offered during the events. So, probably we'll be happy to know we provide these marketing materials for every webinar that you register for including social media posts, text, hashtags, all that good stuff, and a quick email promotion for the webinar topic to use for free. We'll also include contact information for the Friends That Carry On gentlemen and links to the video if you want to rewatch what we saw today. Like I said, all is free to use. Download, do what you like. It would help promote business. A bit about our host today, we're welcoming the Friends That Carry On, which is a group of friends who started traveling together, creating stories, createc an amazing podcast that we would love to tell you a bit more about and I'm sure Jim will do that once we get started. The voices of the Friends That Carry On are Jim Scott, Tony price, and Brian Roman. You probably know them. They've previously done hosting of the CARES Act and PPP programs earlier. Knowledgeable and smart guys who love to travel and we love that about them as well. So as always, it's great to have you guys back. Thank you so much for posting one of our Elevate topics today about Paris. And Jim, I will hand it on over to you.

Jim Scott :

All right. Thanks, Kulin and TIMA, and the Travel Show Marketing Group for inviting Friends That Carry On to participate in your Elevate Webinar Series. We're definitely honored to be part of it. As Kulin mentioned, my name is Jim Scott and I'm joined here by my fellow friends, Tony price and Brian Roman. And as she's mentioned, our voices may sound familiar, we've done a couple webinars through our sister company called Octave where we've done some stuff on the PPP and the COVID issues. For those of you who are not familiar with Friends That Carry On Podcast, we are a group of friends. The way we got started, we had planned trips and then put them out there amongst our circle of friends, and anyone who wanted to go and was able to go would join in maybe for the whole trip or pop in and pop out on certain legs of the trip. Everyone was welcome and still are and the theme was the more the merrier. Our goal was to always create FOMO amongst our friends because the fear of missing out on a great time always inspired everybody else to join in. So, we got a lot more participation that way. Over time, many of our adventures that we've done is like running with the bulls in Pamplona, seeing the northern lights in Norway above the Arctic Circle, riding with camels and spend the night and Sahara Desert in Morocco, going to Oktoberfest in Munich, spending New Year's Eve in Bangkok, and visiting the Angkor Wat Temples in Cambodia, on top of many more adventures. Because of that, our small group have decided to start sharing our stories. First, we did that in blogs and then we found was a lot easier and more efficient to sit around and just chat about them. Som we decided to record our stories and hence the Friends That Carry On Podcast was born. We just record our 50th episode and we have over 20,000 followers on social media. For a few guys from West Virginia, it has been a small success and we hope to continue to grow, and more importantly, continue to travel and talk about it. Whoops.

Tony Price :

It went away.

Jim Scott :

Yeah, double clicked that. I didn't mean to. Now, if you would, we've got our website there, friendsthatcarryon.com. If they will go to it and you'll see our episodes that we have listed like so. We just record our 50th episode and it'll be published here in the upcoming week. But you can see all the different places we've gone and different things we've talked to. If you subscribe to it, there's no cost to it, and you'll get sent by email our podcast every week, and I hope there's a lot of good information that you can use when working with your clients and so forth just to give a first-hand experience from the friends and what we saw and what we experienced. Now, when we're not talking about our own trips, the Friend That Carry On Podcast does interviews of people with a love of travel. We've interviewed the GlobalGaz, Ric Gazarian, who is on pace to visit every country in the world and document it. Last count, he was near 150 of the 195 countries. We've interviewed a fraternity brother of ours and a legendary relic [inaudible 09:15] who is a YouTube sensation with well over a million followers. Though he's traveled the world seeking great relics from the past using his metal detector. We also interviewed a friend we met in Pamplona, John Hemingway, who's not only an author, but he's the grandson to Ernest Hemingway and he shared stories of not only his books and travels but stories about his famous grandfather. And more recently, we've begun to interview travel industry experts, travel advisor Tom Karns from Lamacchia Travel and Matt Kundra from Matty K Travel have lent their expertise to our listeners. And on our 50th episode, Jen Lee from Travel Planners International gave us her insights on what is going on in the travel industry. And the reason I bring this up is we are always looking for travel experts to interview and provide our listeners with good information. So, if anyone listening they would have an interest, contact us on our website friendscarryon.com. And as a bonus for sign up for this webinar, everyone who registered will be entered into a draw and we'll pick one lucky winner to be interviewed on the Friends That Carry On Podcast. As content creators, we've been working with travel advisors and suppliers to help everyone create more travel sales opportunities. And we will be providing more details on ways to work with us at the end of the webinar. With all that being said, today's format is going to loosely follow our normal podcast format for how we talk about a city that we visited. We will do a brief intro into the city, which will be Paris today, and then talk about areas or places to stay. They go into day trips or things to do in and around the city, and then we go into our wine and dine segment discussing great food and drink experiences. At the end, we will open it up to Q&A. If some questions come in during so, we'll try to fill them. So, who is ready to talk about Paris?

Tony Price :

I am.

Brian Roman :

Same here.

Jim Scott :

Cool. Guys, let's tell them why we love Paris. All of us have been there a few times Tony's been there the most. So Tony, why don't you start off and tell us what you love about Paris?

Tony Price :

We only have an hour, right?

Jim Scott :

We only have an hour.

Tony Price :

What's my favorite city in the world? I will say that, and there's numerous reasons why that is. For me, it's a perfect combination of lifestyle as far as the cafe lifestyle, being able to sit, grab a drink, whether it's a coffee, cafe, glass of wine, pretty much on any street and any arrondissement around the entire city. Fabulous food, it doesn't matter how small of a hole in a wall place it looks, chances are it's good. The wine is spectacular. And the culture, the museums, the the churches, anything that you visually can see, it's there. I mean, there's so many reasons but it definitely is my favorite city in the world.

Jim Scott :

Brian, your thoughts?

Brian Roman :

Yeah, all of those reasons of course what Tony mentioned. The cafe lifestyle being, able to just walk pretty much everywhere. The transportation system within Paris I found really easy to use, very efficient. I love the feel of the city. I've been to New York and Chicago, great cities. Paris, there's something about it. The ancient buildings, the aesthetic of the city, just the feel walking around, it's relaxing to me. And I don't want to jump the gun but the food for sure is the main reason that I really enjoyed it. We were there most recently back in late 2018 and we had fantastic weather, and every meal, breakfast, lunch, dinner was outside. And as Tony mentioned, all of the food was wonderful. There's really not a lack of anything to do. I could go back 10 more times and I would still not be able to do all the things that I want to do.

Tony Price :

Absolutely.

Jim Scott :

Yeah. Oh, absolutely. Paris is fantastic city. I'm not ready to clear my favorite because I don't think I've been to my favorite city. I want to go 100 more places and decide what my favorite is. But what's not to like? You get there, and we were talking on another podcast about bucket list and how our bucket lists have changed over the years. Originally, Paris was was very high up on it. Obviously, we've gone numerous times for good reason. But all the iconic buildings, whether it's Notre Dome or the Eiffel Tower, the Arc de Triomphe, there's just so much stuff. So, when you get there, especially if it's your first time, you're kind of in all of it. But then as you get past that initial all of all these fantastic buildings and locations, and museums, the street cafe life, which we're going to talk about later, you just settle into that. Tony and Brian are both right, the food, doesn't matter where you go, you sit down, you're just in for a treat. And that's what makes it special.

Tony Price :

Absolutely. You're talking just real quickly about going and it was one of the first cities but it was at the highest on my list of some place I wanted to visit, I never thought I would possibly go back there when I first went. And then having done that and now I think it's been eight times but one of the most recent trips, we never left Montmartre. I mean, other than an afternoon to go grab a cocktail outside but [inaudible 14:53] It was, yeah. We'll get into it but it just kind of funny how it changes and how in certain area you could spend an entire week just hanging out and still see a bunch of stuff that's new. It has everything.

Jim Scott :

Absolutely. So, to stick with our format, we're going to go into areas to stay in Paris. And obviously, with all the different, I'll never say the word right, arrondissements ...

Tony Price :

[inaudible 15:17]

Jim Scott :

Yeah. Close enough. But you and everyone else knew what I was talking about. There's obviously lots of places to stay, lots of great places, so it's hard to go wrong. But we're going to start off with probably our favorite area, and that's Montmartre. Tony, do you want to go into what makes Montmartre special?

Tony Price :

Well, it's definitely small. It's the 17th arrondissement, so it's kind of towards the north. It's a far outlying one, but it's the Basilica of Sacré-Cœur, which is on the picture there, and then just that whole area, the Butte. You'd want to wear some walking shoes if you're going to be hanging around in that area for the day.

Jim Scott :

Yes.

Tony Price :

But it is. It's one of those places that's really crowded during the day. In the evenings if you stay there, it then it becomes more of a truly a locals' place. You just don't have a huge crowd because people kind of come in for the day and then head out. If you're going to Paris for your first couple times, most people are not going to stay in that area. You'd want to go more down towards where the Notre Dame, center of the city, so you don't see a whole lot of people staying in that area. It's just a crazy eclectic area. When you say bohemian lifestyle, it really is. A lot of the artists from the '20s, in the '40s and stuff back then were hanging out in that general area, too. There's a lot of cool stuff up there.

Jim Scott :

Yeah, Sacré-Cœur is sort of being the center point and the highest point in Paris. When you climb to the top of there, the views are incredible.

Tony Price :

Absolutely. So, the so the pictures you can get of the Eiffel Tower and the city in general are incredible, especially at night, but Sacré-Cœur itself is pretty impressive. Even when it's lit up at night, it's kind of an all struct type feeling as well. And then just slightly down the hill to the side of it, you got a lot of cool little restaurants and all. And depending on which way you go up and down the hill, depends on a lot of things. You definitely want to be on the side of the hill that is in front of Sacré-Cœur. I stayed on the back side and got a lot of steps going up and down the hill. My friends were on the front side and that's where more of the action is. We were kind of on the dead side, so if you're looking for a quiet stay, that was great. We were close but it was straight up the hill and straight up to step. So, be on the front side of Sacré-Cœurif you're in that area, but as you go down the hill or the Butte or whatever you want to call it, there's just a ton of have different places to go. Moulin Rouge is down in that area. I can't think the names of others but there's a lot of great places over there. Yeah. I know we'll get into it a little bit later on things to do, but one of the areas I love up there, it's the Place du Tertre. That's where all the artists hang out and get your pictures drawn up. They can get a little bit pushy, but it's still awesome. Just place to hang out and grab wines. That's the first place we sat down when we got their, very first trip. It was just one of those kind of cool corners. Now, I pretty much go every time I was there and at least have a seat so. And also one of my favorite little museums is ... I love Salvador Dali, and his little museum is right there. It's really cool.

Jim Scott :

I didn't make that so I need to get that on the list. But yeah, there's obviously lots of cool little markets. Our one friends are big into cemeteries, which might sound weird, but we've gotten in the habit of going to them because there's some incredible monuments, you learn a lot of history. Even in the Montmartre area, there's a couple saram cemeteries we visit there as well. So, it's pretty cool. Did Jim actually write a book on the cemeteries or just at subway stop?

Tony Price :

I think he did. Yeah, he's on the famous cemeteries of Paris.

Jim Scott :

Yeah. So, one of our friends who is a contributor from time to time, Jim Reed, and he's also an English professor in a college in California, has written a couple books on Paris, one on the subway stops and one the famous cemeteries there. So, shout out to Jim.

Brian Roman :

And also a participant on Jeopardy.

Jim Scott :

That's true. And he's also been on Jeopardy. So, he knows Alex Trebek personally. So, little insider information with our friends there.

Tony Price :

That's also the only vineyard too in Paris.Oh, okay. I did not know that. They're still small little vineyard right there.

Brian Roman :

We walked right past it when we stayed there.

Tony Price :

Yeah. Pretty cool.

Jim Scott :

We're going to definitely talk about harvest festival but do they grow grapes that make wine that entered into the festival?

Tony Price :

The actual vineyard is at the festival and they have a little tent area and they do serve it. It's just extremely small. They do something there but I don't know if all their grapes are grown there.

Jim Scott :

Yeah, I got you. Okay. All right. Well, that hopefully gives you a decent bit of information on Montmatre. Obviously, there's a lot of other areas in Paris to go to. Latin Quarters someplace I've stayed and St. Germain. Guys, do you have any info on some of these other areas?

Tony Price :

One of my favorite when you get close to that is number four, which is the Marais, also known as the Jewish Quarter. So actually, which is on the screen right now, Notre Dame is technically in the fourth arrondissement and Île de la Cité, which is right behind Notre Dame or I guess east of it I should say. But it is one of the heartbeats. So, you get the Latin Quarter, which you're just talking about, which is on the left bank of the [inaudible 21:23], the Marais is on the right bank and on the other side of it, and the shopping, the food, and there's just so many things in the fourth. It's just a great place to hang out. There certain streets in there that are a little bit more quiet. So, it's one of the things. I remember when we went one time, we rented apartments since we were going to be there for an extended period of time. Two different groups of us and we end up walking to our spots. We were right across the street from each other. Can literally yell at each other across the window. It was pretty funny. But it's a great area. That's one of my favorite spots other than the two that you mentioned, right? What about you, Brian?

Brian Roman :

Yeah. Well, we stayed in Montmatre when we were there. I've only been once and I fell in love with the city. It was just a wonderful week. Our experience was really hitting the museums and the churches, and taking a day trip out of the city, the restaurants. So, we didn't spend much time in the Latin Quarter. We went to visit Notre Dame when we were there. I think we were there about a year before it unfortunately burned down. And how did you pronounce it, Tony? Île de la Cité? We found a wonderful ... and this is just one of the beautiful things about just wandering around in Paris even if you don't know where you are. You're not going to have any trouble finding really cool places. We ended up it was on Île de la Cité, get back in some sort of a cul de sac type of area where it just kind of wrapped around a circle. We found a little restaurant that was in between a few row homes, sat down outside, had dinner, there were people playing bocce ball, and kind of a little park setting out in front. Not many people around but just right in the heart of the city. And it was just a great experience. We must have stayed there for three hours just hanging out.

Tony Price :

It's easier to do it when you're drinking to your wine.

Brian Roman :

We'll talk about that. But I don't remember the name of the restaurant and that's the case with many of the places that I went to. I can remember a few of them. I'll mention those a little bit later, but that was what I remembered about the fourth arrondissement.

Tony Price :

Well, Latin Quarters is fifth.

Brian Roman :

Gotcha. Gotcha.

Tony Price :

That's the only areas that we've stayed. We've obviously visited most of the arrondissement but that's the only three that I've actually stayed in.

Jim Scott :

I stayed in the Latin Quarter the very first time I went, which was 2007, stayed there and I guess Notre Dame is not in the Latin Quarter. Technically it's close enough today to get there and lots of cool little restaurants. Our buddy, Terry Hall, who led me on that trip and he's also a contributor to the Friends Podcast, he has a little Greek place that he loves right there at the Latin Quarter, just lots of good little restaurants. And I had a similar experiences to Brian. Our first night there, we were heading back to our hotel and me and one friend, Gareth Gank, weren't quite ready to go in and just wandered up the block.

Brian Roman :

Seems that happens quite often.

Jim Scott :

We didn't know if anything was up there. It was dark and just it's kind of an alley like situation. We didn't feel unsafe or anything. And we found we got to the top of a little hill and there was several little cafes, and we're able to get to an adult beverage and end up sitting there probably a couple hours also just because it's laid back, nobody's pressuring you, and just just really enjoy the evening. It's really quiet and nice. That's one of the little beauties of pears.

Brian Roman :

And the 'no pressure', that was the exact experience that we had when we were there. The people were so nice to us. We didn't have one bad experience. It was really incredible.

Jim Scott :

And as Americans, just by nature, not necessarily negative thing, but we're always assuming just because of our dining experiences and so forth, it's get in get out, get the next seat going. Whereas over there, and this is more or less for all Europe, Paris included, this is really you take your time there as long as you want. The service comes slower, but that's just because of the way they do things. So, it's not a bad thing. That's not an indictment of the service. It's just a different pace but it's nice. It's welcome. All right. Well, that gives us a little flavor on places to stay in Paris. Let's talk about daytrip in Paris. There's tons of stuff to do. We've kind of touched on that already. But let's just talk about things to do within the city. Brian, what are some of the things that you did and liked, and stood out when when you made your trip to Paris?

Brian Roman :

Well, everything you see on the screen, we did everything but two of those. This was in our first, we were there for eight days. The Eiffel Tower, of course, you have to do that. We went right at dusk and we got we got some wonderful pictures, and we went up in the Eiffel Tower right as it was turning dark and we were probably up there for about an hour. The different photographs that we have, I was looking through some of those befor this podcast today and the transition from sunny to dusk to nighttime and the lights start to come on and I have this whole series. Probably I took way too many pictures, probably 100 or so pictures. But that, I would definitely recommend going at that time. Sainte Chapelle, the chapel, that was really impressive. The photos, I've printed several of those off. I don't know if I can really describe it. Just colorful, soothing. The stained glass is just really incredible. And of course Notre Dame, we we spent probably three hours in Notre Dame just walking through and looking through the history, and looking at the architecture, and all of the different sculptures.

Tony Price :

Did you go to the top?

Brian Roman :

We did not make it to the top in Notre Dame and we spent three hours in there. That'll give you some sense of what that's like. And we haven't been back since the fire, but I don't even know at this point. Are they allowing anyone in? Not at this point.

Jim Scott :

I don't think so.

Tony Price :

I've been to the top of Notre Dame twice, all 387 steps.

Jim Scott :

But who's counting?

Tony Price :

No. But it was one of those surreal moments and I will say this. Hopefully, we'll get the chance to do that again, when they redo it. But it was truly surreal when we came out of like one of the spiral old stone staircases going up the tower. And as soon as we got out or started to walk across the little walkway there, the bells went off. That was like one of those things you just kind of got chills. I'm literally standing on top of Notre Dame when the bells are going off.

Jim Scott :

Did [inaudible 28:56] show himself?

Tony Price :

Yeah, he took a selfie with me. But yeah, one of my favorite pictures I have is from the top of there looking out over the city. It's pretty cool.

Jim Scott :

Nice. Well, I've got an interesting Eiffel Tower story. The first time we were there in 2007, the elevators weren't working. So, you couldn't really go up at that time. But they did serve beer underneath there. So, we're with a few of the friends I've already described. And so we were enjoying it watching people walk by. We're obviously underneath looking up and couldn't get up to the top or anything to get the great views. So, we're having a good time doing that. And then there's a Chinese camera crew that comes through, the big like TV camera type thing, and they were filming a Chinese documentary so they pulled me to the side and started interviewing me on politics in the US and globally, and all this stuff, and I don't know what exactly I said. I started spouting stuff off and they're probably call me and we asked the wrong person. And I just rambled on probably for 10, 15, 20 minutes, and my buddies are over there looking at me like, "What the heck is he doing?" Somewhere on Chinese TV, I'm some kind of small celebrity.

Brian Roman :

We didn't have a copy of that interview. Wow, we should try to find that.

Jim Scott :

They didn't take my name so you won't be able to Google me. So, I think I'm safe.

Brian Roman :

I will say one thing just looking at the list there that you have up there, the Louvre was wonderful, but definitely don't underestimate the other museums in Paris. The d'Orsay was an incredible museum. It's just a totally different feel. I do them all, of course, the Louvre was wonderful, but the architecture in the d'Orsay and the feel that you get in there, again, it goes back to that. That's the old train station museum. Just a really incredible place to go. So, the Louvre, you hear quite a bit about, but many of the others you don't. So, it's important to get out and see those.

Tony Price :

The timing, too, because you go into the Louvre ... and then that's the case with some of these big ones. It's one of those things if you're only going to go to Paris once, of course you want to see the iconic things and it's like standing in line for the best roller coaster, right? Sometimes you're going to have to suck it up and do it. But it's not for the faint of heart. The Louvre is typically packed to the gills. The small museums are just spectacular, and many of them are free, too. The Petit Palais museum is fantastic. The [inaudible 31:41], that's at the end of the Tuileries near the [inaudible 31:45]. That's a spectacular little museum, too. So, there's some great ones out there. And I would say again, we're talking about chirping through Paris and talk about the iconic things but people will go for a while to two reasons. And I think if you want to get off the beaten path a little bit, there's a lot of cool little things like that that you can see, that you can probably see a lot more of because you don't have near the crowds. But there's some great, great museums. I was talking about the Dali Museum. We had no lines, there's probably 25 people in the whole thing the entire time we were in there. So, there's some great ones.

Jim Scott :

Yeah, no doubt. And even walking from to-and-fro places, it was good to have Jim Reed who has been to Paris I don't know how many times and knows it like the back of his hand. So, we're heading over to the Eiffel Tower but we got off a few metro stops early just to get a flavor for the city, which ended up being a nice little on our own walking tour and there was a couple chapels that we were able to walk in and get a flavor for them, stopped in place that makes macaroons. It's famous for their French macaroons. Another place, they've been serving mustard jars on there, especially as jars of mustard, been serving it since the 1700s, and it was incredible. So, those kind of little things that certainly don't make the most list make it really enjoyable to get around Paris and so forth.

Tony Price :

Another really good one in small museum is ... I should say small but it's not as famous as some of them, [inaudible 33:25] museum, the garden, which is where most of the big statues are, that's really awesome. And you can actually get some food and go to the back and just hang out, and it's kind of cool to sit back there and relax on some chairs and food, look around the the museum. It's kind of wild.

Brian Roman :

We did that. It was it was a wonderful midday, kind of a rest of feet.

Tony Price :

Yeah, there's also a great little cafe just right outside of that that has some good wine, too.

Jim Scott :

Sounds like wine might be part of your daily diet.

Brian Roman :

I'm counting. That's the fourth time Tony's mentioned wine.

Tony Price :

I can mention it five times.

Brian Roman :

I'm sure you will.

Jim Scott :

All right, well, and obviously strolling the sun, there's just so many things to do within the city and we haven't even touched on a lot of them and we could take up the whole thing there. Obviously, we mentioned the Louvre and in the picture there as the iconic pyramid by [inaudible 34:30]. How do say his last name? Which caused a lot of controversy. And if you're strolling through there, obviously a big glass pyramid amongst these 1,700 structures of marble and so forth. It's really a stark difference but it's become an icon on itself, too. So, it's just cool. It's one of those things that you need to see.

Tony Price :

Yeah. I will say something and I probably shouldn't share too many secrets, right? Because then they become not secrets. But what really cool is catching the Arc de Triomphe if you want to go to the top towards when they close at night. So, around 9:00 range and then you get to see the sparkle, sparkle, the Eiffel Tower from on top. That's pretty cool. So, just from a timing standpoint, it's a good time to visit and it's typically not super crowded at that time.

Jim Scott :

Cool. All right. Well, that should give everybody a flavor of some day tripping in Paris. So now, what are some day trips you can do going outside of Paris? The one we got up on the screen is going to Normandy, which was for me was really important, something I really look forward to and it's probably one of the most powerful day trips or anything that I've ever done. I know Tony's been. It's a fairly easy trip. You can catch the train right in downtown Paris and head out on a two or 3-hour train ride out there.

Tony Price :

It's like 3 hours.

Jim Scott :

Three hours, that's what I was thinking. And then from there, depending on the tour you get set up, you get picked up and drove about another half hour from that train station out to the beaches and can have half day or full day tours depending on what you signed up for. But going to Omaha Beach and Utah Beach, and the the American Cemetery, just lots of good stuff.

Brian Roman :

Yeah. This is one after hearing you all talk about your trip to Normandy that I suppose I have a bit of FOMO about. I've not been there and the experiences that you all had talked about, for certain that's very high on the list, if not the top of the list, the next time that we go to Paris is to make that trip. Who was it? Was it Walter that had the funny story about his experience and getting there, and getting stuck?

Tony Price :

Oh, that was me.

Jim Scott :

That was Tony.

Brian Roman :

That was you.

Tony Price :

On the first time there.

Brian Roman :

Maybe a what not to do? Well, it turned out great.

Tony Price :

It turned out fantastic and that is probably worth just a quick share. Again, this was one of the things that say when we talk about my travels, you just can't fret things because you just don't know what's going to happen. And we had that plan. I think I forget which train I'm supposed to be on. Whatever train station we were heading out of, we got lost and missed our train. And we were meeting our tour guides up in Bayview. And so, "What do we do?" So, we were like, "Okay, well, let's just kind of go. Maybe we'll catch up to him."

Brian Roman :

Really?

Tony Price :

So, we did. We just grabbed a cab, had him just drop us off. And if you've never been there, the beaches are pretty big.

Jim Scott :

Well, yeah. I mean, just to describe it. One, it's a half hour drive from the train. station itself, but then this is all back country tied up and the distance between Omaha Beach and Utah Beach is 7 miles between the two beaches.

Tony Price :

So, we just said, "hey, drop us off." So, he dropped us off near the where the little museum and Visitor Center is. So we just walked, we just start walking around, had no idea where we were going, and kind of snuck in on the tail end of some tours and just kind of just wandered around. And that's all we wandered around and it got to the cemetery, and everything. Then we realized it was closing time and again, because it's not like in town there's no cap stands, there's no place to ... I'm like, "How the hell can we get out? How we could get back to the train station?" So, I walked into the visitors center and my not so good French, got a hold of somebody, and then just tell him the story. I was like, "What can I do?" And the one guy stood up and said, "Are you just going back to the train station.?" I'm like, "Yeah. Do you have bags?" No, just our camera and stuff. He goes, "I live on the other side of the beach, but I'll give you a ride." We're like, "Seriously?" like awesome. So, he's like, "Sit outside and wait, and I'll be buying a golf cart to pick you up." So, I got until Eric and Shelly with, my wife and friend that was with us. They're just looking at me like, "What? You're going to count on this guy to come by and pick us?" Well, the next thing you know, the people that we're talking to comes down and they're like, "Oh, you're Tony." and they're like, "How long are you in there?" I was like, "I don't know." Anyway, the guy comes by picked us up on the golf cart. Of course, he takes us through the backs sections of the grounds. It was just awesome to see. And then we get in his little car, which is I can see why he didn't want us to have bags because we wouldn't fit. But he takes us on one of the best tours through the countryside and shown us all these things of history, because he's a tour guide, that's what he does. And it was just fantastic. He actually took us through [inaudible 39:52] places to mention again, where to get wine for the training right back with good cheese and everything. But yeah, it's just kind of one of those things that it started off terrible because I felt guilty, sent into McDonald's try to figure out right by the train station how we're going to get back up there and catch it to get that kind of a toward the end. It was one of those things, again, don't fret it. Just keep going. Good things happen.

Jim Scott :

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, that's a lesson for any traveler no matter where you're at. Absolutely. Just keep going with the flow. But normally, I don't think we can recommend it more. Going through that cemetery and on those beaches and knowing the history, it really sinks in your soul. So, I can't tell you how good a trip that would be if you're inclined to do it. Another day trip outside of Paris, about a half hour trip outside of Paris is the Palace of Versailles. Brian, I know you all did a fairly extensive tour there. What were some of your thoughts?

Brian Roman :

Yeah. Way bigger than it had been described to me. Just approaching the palace was, for me, incredible. I've never seen a structure so large. Long lines, so get your tickets ahead of time. You can buy them online and just have them ready. We bypassed probably a 2-hour wait by having our tickets ahead of time. We did not use a tour guide at all. We just we just kind of meandered through ourselves but we were hungry when we got there. The first thing we did, we went to the restaurant Angelina, which is within the palace on the first floor of the Palace of Versailles. It's just kind of like a kind of a tea room type of restaurant where they offer sweet, savory types of dishes. It was wonderful. We had a great view overlooking the gardens and the food, the service, the people were great. It was it was a really good way to start that. Then we just we just meandered through all of the different rooms taking pictures, got to see all that major parts, the Hall of Mayors. But my favorite part was once we got outside, out into the gardens, it's like 30,000 acres. It's small, very small.

Jim Scott :

Typical backyard.

Brian Roman :

Yeah. It took us about 15 minutes to cover at all. You can get lost for sure. We had lunch and Champagne sitting on the ... you can see it in the picture there on the top right. What do they call those? It's not a canal. It's just the lakes, kind of the manmade lakes and there's places to get food, champagne, sit out of blankets, hang out. And then from there, we wandered over to the Hamlet area, and that may have been my favorite part. Wandering back through the farmet that Marie Antoinette hadn't built and all of the little farmhouses. The way they were all put together, it was really beautiful, really well-maintained. You couldn't go inside but the pictures, we got to go through a few small caves. It's just the paths that you kind of go through to get over there. It didn't hurt that it was a 70 degree day and sunny, it was a little bit of a breeze. So, we spent probably 8 to 10 hours on the entire day. It was wonderful.

Tony Price :

Did you guys go to the [inaudible 43:33]?

Brian Roman :

Well, the grand was closed. We were able to go into the Petit, so we never got to do that one. But yeah, we were over that direction as well.

Jim Scott :

That sounds fantastic. I strolled the grounds and loved it but I've never got over to the Hamlets, and you have a large picture posted here and I never realized that little Hamlet was part of our size. So, next time, I need to get back to that area.

Tony Price :

Yeah. Well, speaking of which we talked about the next time I go over, we're probably going to spend two or three days in that general area and just kind of really explore, and also just explore that little area with the town, the city.

Brian Roman :

They named the whole town now. The whole thing is Versailles now.

Tony Price :

It's definitely worth it. Another good place that I haven't been to that's on the list, though, is [inaudible 44:22]. So, if you want to get out there, that's a good, solid day. I can't obviously speak to it, but it's one of those things that I hear a lot of good things about.

Jim Scott :

And I know our buddies, Terry Hall and Lee Lucas, went to Leone and did sort of the ... Who's the famous chef there that they went [inaudible 44:39] Yeah.

Tony Price :

That's not a day trip.

Jim Scott :

Well, something I've done outside of Paris. Anyhow, so that sort of gives you a flavor of some things you can do outside of Paris. We're now going to transition into wining and dining. We've already mentioned numerous times about wine itself, the great food, and so forth, but I think probably are without any specific restaurant in mind, our favorite thing and y'all can correct me if y'all don't agree with this but it's the street cafe life. There's tons of them everywhere and wherever you sit down, whatever you're looking for, whether it's a meal or a coffee or an adult beverage, sit back, people watch, and just really soak in the vibes of Paris. Any thoughts on that, guys?

Tony Price :

Again, it's one of my favorite things. There's a couple of really cool places. It's kind of getting off the beaten path. There's a lot of Michelin stars floating around, but we tend to not go to the super expensive other than maybe once or twice. But one of our favorite places is Roberto Louis Steakhouse, but it's not like a traditional American steakhouse, right? They have the open pit and there's community style seating right there if you want. You can sit right at the picnic table, which I think is where we've sat every time, and literally can watch them cook it on the wonderful seasoned grill that's right there. And then as far as grabbing a drink, is Lebaron Rouge, that's the locals kind of wine hang out. Not very big, but you can bring in your own bottle and fill it up.

Brian Roman :

It's kind of wild.

Tony Price :

Yeah. The whole overall lifestyle is just spectacular.

Jim Scott :

Now, one place I know Terry always likes to take people especially on their first trip is Leon's muscles.

Tony Price :

Leon's muscles, which is kind of funny because it's not really Parisian.

Jim Scott :

No, but it is there and I know the one I went to is on the [inaudible 46:47] and there's good food.

Tony Price :

Yeah, they do. They have several of them throughout there. Yeah, it's one of his favorite little things to do.

Jim Scott :

Yeah. So to me, it has struck as Parisian just because that's where my first experienced it. Any other restaurants and so forth that you want to share with our fellas today?

Brian Roman :

One of my favorites was Le Precope. That one is supposedly the oldest cafe in Paris. It was maybe the first cafe that actually served coffee out of a ceramic mug.

Jim Scott :

No.

Brian Roman :

And we had heard about it. And as we were walking around, I think it's in the sixth arrondissement, and we were just walking down an alley and we came upon it and we had planned to go there. So, we decided, "Well, it was about 4:00, so it might get busy. So, let's just go ahead and sit down." They had some seating outside in the alley, which was just the perfect setting. The cobblestone streets and the stone buildings, and probably four or five tables outside. We got one of them, there was nobody else there. Within about 15 minutes, they were all full. We stayed there for probably 3 and a half hours. And what I didn't realize is until about two hours in, I went inside to the restroom and it's incredibly big. I had no idea we were just in this little tiny alley, I thought that you just walk in and it was just this little room but we didn't even come in the front door so I had no idea about that either. But the food was wonderful. The setting was great. Lots of really good choices and that was a great experience. That was my favorite dining experience on our first trip to Paris.

Jim Scott :

I think what you said about not realizing how big the restaurant is inside, on the picture there on the right where you see several of our friends sitting there, same thing until we went to the restroom, we just saw a little bit inside. When you go inside, you got all this ornate gold and stuff all over the place and just really fine dining restaurant. We were just at the little tables outside and don't realize what you're actually sitting at. That happens a lot, it's kind of neat.

Tony Price :

Another thing, again, it's not even a restaurant, but one of my favorite things is combining food and drink, I guess, [inaudible 49:24] It's sitting on the steps of Sacré-Cœur. He really go down to one of the little markets, get a bottle of wine. How many times I mentioned that?

Brian Roman :

You're at nine.

Tony Price :

But yeah, you can get your €2 or €3 bottle of wine, grab a little bit of food, some cheese, and go sit on the steps, and view the city and hang out. It's kind of a crowd thing to do.

Brian Roman :

Yeah, again, great views from here. It's really incredible.

Jim Scott :

This is on a different note. But if you've listened to our podcast, you know that we're from West Virginia. And one thing about Sacré-Cœur, you get a lot of people to play music and that type of stuff in crowds. They're there throughout the day. And it's very common no matter where we are in the world that somebody starts singing Country Roads or Almost Heaven, West Virginia. So, even though it's not in this presentation, we do have a video of one of our buddies, Eric Fargo, going down and joining the guy that was singing and playing the guitar, and leading everybody in a verse of that. That seems to happen everywhere. Well, speaking of Montmarte, and we've mentioned the grape harvest festival earlier, but this goes along with great food and wine, and the atmosphere, Tony's just talking about Sacré-Cœur on the steps but the Grape Harvest Festival, and Tony, you've been at least once maybe a couple times.

Tony Price :

Yeah, we were supposed to go again last year.

Jim Scott :

We're supposed to go this year.

Tony Price :

That's not happening.

Jim Scott :

But if I would describe the festival, apparently, it's an incredible thing up there with all kinds of tents of food and wines, and cheeses, and whatever you can think of there, and everybody going to the steps enjoying it.

Tony Price :

Yeah. So, the steps wind in front of Sacré-Cœur where, the streets wind there. And right where the vernacular that takes you up drops off is where they start and the whole streets just kind of lined with little tents, little stalls of various foods, and various wines and champagnes, and it's throughout the whole area up there. So, you just meander around. I think it starts on a Wednesday. Usually it goes Wednesday to Sunday. Obviously, Saturday and Sunday is extremely crowded,

Brian Roman :

October 7th through 11th this year hopefully if they have it.

Tony Price :

Yeah, I don't think that's going to happened. Well, they may have it. I'm hoping we're going to be allowed to go.

Brian Roman :

You specifically.

Tony Price :

Yeah. But the food is just ridiculous. Again, you can walk around and do what you do at any kind of festival, right? Eatingg, drinking, watch things, and be married.

Jim Scott :

Yeah. So, if you're ever able to be in Paris in the early October timeframe, this is a great festival to go to or maybe even plan a trip around or plan a trip for your clients to take this in as well because it gives you a really good feel of the local food and a good feel for Montmartre.

Tony Price :

Yeah. Another unique thing that they've done is there's usually kind of a guest country and they'll have an area, like a little tent area, towards the top, where they'll show the wines from that particular guest. I think they had Brazil the one tim. They're not a big thing, but there's typically somebody that sticks out. It's just kind of a unique thing that they do.

Jim Scott :

Well, I know Terry's gone numerous times and always brings new people back to it and I think it's pretty much a regular trip for him every year, so we can't recommend it more. And you're able to go and take that in, it's a real fun day. Well, obviously, we could talk a lot more on Paris. We're getting close to the end of our time so we're going to wrap up on talking about Paris. I don't know if there's any questions out there that we can answer, but we're happy to do so. We didn't really have too many come in during the thing. Looks like we do have a question. Oh, here's a good question. Would you recommend Montmartre for families or just adults?

Brian Roman :

Oh, absolutely for both.

Tony Price :

Both. Yeah. I would say the holiday weekends, I was also there with two older kids over Easter weekend, which you can imagine traveling to Europe on any Easter weekend is out of control, but it gets really, really crowded. So, depending on the age of the kids, that would make it a little bit more difficult because of just the overall crowds. But yeah, absolutely. That's for everybody.

Jim Scott :

Definitely family-friendly. Just keep in mind it is hilly. So, if you got young kids, you either going to want to strollers or just keep that in mind. Just from wearing out standpoint, doesn't mean kids aren't welcome. Yeah, it's definitely very family-friendly. Okay, well, obviously we'll take any other questions that come in here for another minute or two. While we're doing that, who wants to be interviewed by Friends That Carry On? who wants to come on and talk about their travel experiences? If you are a travel advisor, want to talk about your special deals or stuff you got going on there, we are happy to do that and we are going to be as especial today. All the people that signed up for the webinar, we're going to be choosing somebody to be interviewed. So hopefully, if you get picked, you've got your talking voice on and ready to go for about 45 minutes to an hour. Don't want to scare anybody.

Brian Roman :

No pressure there. We can keep people going.

Jim Scott :

That's right. We can ramble just fine for everybody. But we've had a lot of success with a couple other travel advisors and obviously you can take it and share it to your social media and that type of stuff, and we've got a pretty good audience as well. So, that's a good way to get your message out there.

Kulin Strimbu :

One of the things that came in on the chat was, "What about going to [inaudible 55:21] for day trips?

Tony Price :

Yes, St. Michel was the one that I mentioned. I haven't actually gotten to go yet. It's on the list. We speak to it, but it's definitely one of the top things I know that a lot of people do as far as a day trip outside the city.

Kulin Strimbu :

Right. Someone popped in there. That's great. That's great. Well, I think you want to leave this open just for a bit more for questions here, Jim. What do you think?

Jim Scott :

Another question just came in. Or maybe it's already come in. Nevermind.

Tony Price :

You want to answer it again?

Jim Scott :

Nope. I think we got it. Maybe for a second or two as we do that, let me ... I got too many things going on here, one's trying to push all the controls. But Friends That Carry On, we're obviously in the travel industry not only as a podcast and content creator, but we also have our Octave, which does some consulting. But from the Friends That Carry On standpoint, we are collaborating with travel advisors like you all. Ways to partner can be itineraries that we can help with product review, blog post, video and live event hosting, social media campaigns, you can advertise on our website or the podcast itself. So, lots of ways that we can help you get the word out or help craft your message to your clients by using our own personal first-hand experiences at the different locations. We've been to certainly not everywhere, we want to go to a lot more places, but we've got a fairly extensive background around the world so. So, there's definitely ways to work with us there, you can go to our website, friendsthatcarryon.com or email us at [email protected] So, I don't see any more questions, Kulin.

Kulin Strimbu :

That's all great. I do want to point out, you guys can tell from listening to the guys here that they're very entertaining, very informative, please follow them and check out the podcast, Friends That Carry On on Spotify, iTunes, it's everywhere, and it's really entertaining. So, we invite you to do that. There's going to be some fun things going on with that going into the fall. So, keep an eye out on that. Thanks as always, gentlemen, it's always so great to have you on and very entertaining and enjoyable to listen to. So, I appreciate that. I want to thank everybody else who joined us today for the webinar and know that you'll be able to rewatch this on tima.travel and you're going to be receiving an email to the link as well as social media packs on Paris. So for the marketing email, as I mentioned at the beginning, the elevate series is a daily event. So, we've got more destinations, more riders, more brands from around the world. So, check out next week sign up and I will look forward to seeing some of you for the ecotourism adventure tomorrow, but get registered as soon as you can so we can keep you up-to-date on those emails. Thanks, Jim. Thanks, Brian. Thanks, Tony, as always, for your time today and thank you everyone for joining us. Have a wonderful rest of your day and a great weekend.

Tony Price :

Thank you, Kulin.

Brian Roman :

Thanks, everybody.

Kulin Strimbu :

Thanks, guys. Take care. Bye-bye.

Eric Frago :

Wow, that was amazing.

Jim Scott :

What do you think about that, Eric?

Eric Frago :

I thought that was great.

Tony Price :

That was. That was spectacular.

Jim Scott :

That was a lot of good information, guys.

Eric Frago :

It was. You guys are brilliant.

Tony Price :

But on a serious note, that was actually pretty good. We could talk about Paris for hours and we only had 45 minutes or so.

Jim Scott :

Yeah. We were limited 45 minutes and a Q&A period. So, we do what we could, but we'd still got a lot of great information in.

Tony Price :

Yeah. So, real quick, though, if you go to the website.

Jim Scott :

Website: friendsthatcarryon.com.

Tony Price :

Yeah. And then if you go to the episodes tab, you can go down on the side, it lists pretty much every place that we've been and it references the webinars that we talked about. So, if you go and check it out. The first time we actually talked about parents, believe it or not, was April 15th last year when Notre Dame caught fire. That was actually the first time. It was our 7th episode. We followed up on that. Then in Episode 20 was when we really talked about things to do about Paris. If you liked what you heard today, you can hear a little bit more and probably some similar stuff, but I doubt we had the same things because there were so many things to talk about. But that's Episode 20. Then it was [inaudible 01:00:00] several times Episode 27 when we talked about the top cities to grab a drink in the world. Episode 31 was unique places to stay. We talked about Paris. Episode 38 was when we interviewed Beau, the Aquashaker in his adventures when he was over there. Episode 42 was the top five places to visit when we get to travel again after this crazy chaos. And then there's also a written blog on there about Paris. So, there's a lot information if you guys when they go check it out.

Jim Scott :

Yeah, check it out. And if there's other cities you want, we do now. We've updated our website and there's a nice search feature that you just type in either the country or the city. It'll show you even if it's the whole episode is not on, just like you mentioned a couple things with Paris, it'll bring up wherever it's been mentioned.

Tony Price :

Or even events like Oktoberfest or Northern Lights, anything like that, if you do a search, you'll find some of the episodes where we talk about it.

Jim Scott :

Absolutely. A lot of good stuff there.

Tony Price :

Well, cool. So, on that note about Paris, though, real quick, wrap it up. I know it's tops on my list to get back to as soon as it frees up and we can travel again. So, you guys.

Jim Scott :

Yeah, I'm looking forward to it. Walt's shaking his head that he wants to go. Eric, your thoughts?

Eric Frago :

Yeah, I want to go back and find that place where I had probably one of my best meals ever.

Tony Price :

Ooh, which one was that?

Eric Frago :

I always tried to perfect pasta carbonara.

Tony Price :

Oh, I know exactly where you're talking about. They're at the bottom.

Eric Frago :

I know. See. You're the one that knows where it it. I don't remember where it is. So, my objective is to get there with you sometimes so you can take me there because I won't remember.

Tony Price :

That sounds like I have to go then. By the way, that's up in Montmartre. It's at the bottom of the steps and then about three or four blocks.

Eric Frago :

I actually tried to find it when I was there in the grape harvest festival a year ago and I just couldn't find it. I'm like, "Damn, I need Tony with me." Excuse my French.

Tony Price :

There you go. That means you can't go to Paris without me.

Jim Scott :

That's a rule now.

Eric Frago :

Y'all heard it. But just to give you an idea, so I had no idea it would be that good. It just looked good. I've always tried to find that dish in a good eating town, because when it's done properly, it's really good. And it came out with a raw egg on top of it, and I thought this is going to be spectacular and it did not disappoint.

Tony Price :

Yeah, it was good. I remember that was good meal. That was a long time ago.

Eric Frago :

That was. I'll never see, I'll never forget it.

Tony Price :

Have we not been back to Paris together since?

Eric Frago :

Probably not?

Tony Price :

Well, if you had to think about that long ...

Eric Frago :

It's been too long. I agree.

Tony Price :

So, there we go. We all had trips canceled so far for Paris. We were supposed to be there for grape harvest festival here in October and that looks like it's not happening.

Jim Scott :

I was looking forward to that because I haven't done that yet. So, I was excited, now disappointed. And part of that trip, we hadn't confirmed it but I was looking forward to, we talked about spending a day in Versaille before we got into Paris. Actually the village of Versailles and then just spend in seven, eight hours on the grounds, which I've been there but I didn't do that detailed and long of day there, and then I'm realizing now how much I've missed and I would like to go again.

Tony Price :

We'll get to do it again.

Eric Frago :

I like Brian's idea. I'd like to go there and maybe stay out at Versailles for like 3 days. That would be cool.

Tony Price :

Actually. Go and stay stay that evening and then spend the whole day in Versailles, and then hang out in the village of that town, whenever you want to refer to it as now, and then ....

Eric Frago :

I'd feel a little royal.

Tony Price :

Well, that's French, sorry.

Jim Scott :

We'll waltzz on that today.

Tony Price :

Once again. He did another build in a hotel on the Versaille ground.

Eric Frago :

I'm surprised it's taken this long.

Tony Price :

And it's going to be decorated in period furnutire. Crazy. I have no idea how much it's going to cost.

Eric Frago :

Can you imagine the grand opening for that? Wow. Right. I think somehow we need to try to get there. Hint, hint, people.

Tony Price :

All right, let's do it. Absolutely. All right. Well, on that note, we'll wrap up. Again, check it out on friendsthatcarryon.com. And then, of course, any place you go to listen to your podcast, please subscribe.

Jim Scott :

Yep. Now absolutely, you can go there and subscribe. We were on so many different podcast channels now whether it's Spotify, apple, forgetting all the different channels, but but one there, so you can definitely get us there. And so you can subscribe for free or we will be coming out and maybe by the time you hear this, it'll be up a new fan page that has a lot of extra benefits. That'll be explained. So So look for the for the friends fan page.

Tony Price :

Yeah. So, it's the Friends That Carry On website and Friends With Benefit.

Jim Scott :

Friends With Benefits. Double entendre there. So, don't take it the wrong way.

Tony Price :

Hey, you get benefits. That's what it is.

Jim Scott :

Yeah. So anyhow, hope you enjoyed our talk about Paris and check us out on the website, and till next time.

Tony Price :

Yep, thanks, guys.

Jim Scott :

Thank you.

Eric Frago :

Later.

Outro :

Be sure to join the friends next week for another great discussion. Don't forget to subscribe if you haven't already. You can also find the friends and other content at www.friendsthatcarryon.com or check us out on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook by searching Friends That Carry On. Thanks again for joining us and don't forget to carry on, friends.