Iowa State 4-H Council Podcast

Welcome to CloverCast: Sunburnt!

June 02, 2020 Iowa State 4-H Council Season 1 Episode 1
Iowa State 4-H Council Podcast
Welcome to CloverCast: Sunburnt!
Chapters
00:02:14
Why join State 4-H Council
00:04:19
Favorite State 4-H Council memory
00:06:31
Experience with ambassador counties
00:08:49
Tips for State 4-H Council interviews
00:17:38
Application for State 4-H Council
Iowa State 4-H Council Podcast
Welcome to CloverCast: Sunburnt!
Jun 02, 2020 Season 1 Episode 1
Iowa State 4-H Council

Bekah, Lily, and Theresa kick off the State Council’s CloverCast: Sunburnt podcast discussing their experiences with Iowa State 4-H Council. They share why they first applied for State Council and some of their favorite Council memories. Bekah, Lily, and Theresa talk about their work with their ambassador counties and how they reach out to them. They also give tips on applying for Iowa State 4-H Council, ranging from resources to use to how to prepare for interviews. Don't miss the first official episode of CloverCast: Sunburnt – Wednesday, June 17th all about Favorite 4-H Memories!

Goals of our podcast:

  1. To provide a safe opportunity for State 4-H Council members to engage with other 4-H'ers around the state in lieu of the Iowa 4-H Youth Conference. 
  2. To reach current 4-H'ers and potential 4-H'ers through thoughtful, informational, and personal discussion centered around 4-H learning opportunities and experiences.
  3. To provide State 4-H Council members the opportunity to grow themselves personally and professionally as they take part in and learn about each step of the podcast production process. 
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Bekah, Lily, and Theresa kick off the State Council’s CloverCast: Sunburnt podcast discussing their experiences with Iowa State 4-H Council. They share why they first applied for State Council and some of their favorite Council memories. Bekah, Lily, and Theresa talk about their work with their ambassador counties and how they reach out to them. They also give tips on applying for Iowa State 4-H Council, ranging from resources to use to how to prepare for interviews. Don't miss the first official episode of CloverCast: Sunburnt – Wednesday, June 17th all about Favorite 4-H Memories!

Goals of our podcast:

  1. To provide a safe opportunity for State 4-H Council members to engage with other 4-H'ers around the state in lieu of the Iowa 4-H Youth Conference. 
  2. To reach current 4-H'ers and potential 4-H'ers through thoughtful, informational, and personal discussion centered around 4-H learning opportunities and experiences.
  3. To provide State 4-H Council members the opportunity to grow themselves personally and professionally as they take part in and learn about each step of the podcast production process. 

Support the show (https://www.iowa4hfoundation.org/en/ways_to_give/donate_online/)

[“Hey” Theme Music by Bensound]

Haley Jones: Welcome to CloverCast: Sunburnt. In this podcast, council members discuss 4-H opportunities, insight, and stories relevant to current 4-H’ers. Each episode will be hosted by different state 4-H council members and you can toon in every other Wednesday throughout the summer on Apple Podcast, Spotify or wherever you like to listen. This podcast is made possible by the partnership between the Iowa 4-H Foundation and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach 4-H Youth Development. Now, here are today's hosts. 

Lillian Hill: Hi, I'm Liliana Hill. I'm a Hancock County 4-H’er. I am a senior at West Hancock and I’m a 9 year 4-H’er. 

Rebekah Craighton: Hi, my name is Rebekah Craighton. I am from Franklin County. I am a junior at Hampton-Dumont high school and I have been in 4-H for 5 years. 

Theresa Crawford: Hi, my name is Theresa Crawford. I'm from Poweshiek County. I'm a senior at Grinnell high school and this is my ninth year in 4-H. So, we’re all members of the State 4-H Council, which is a group of around forty high school juniors and seniors. On state council, we act as ambassadors to Iowa 4-H, so that means we all have ambassador counties where we go and reach out. We share 4-H programs and just state opportunities. And another one of our major responsibilities is planning the State 4-H Conference that happens every year in June up at Iowa State University. So, we made this podcast as you can probably tell it’s the first time the State Council has done a podcast. We made it when we realized that State 4-H conference was unfortunately going to be cancelled, but we still wanted as a state council to reach out to 4-H’ers across Iowa and find a way to still connect with them and just, yeah, really share with them and connect with them, like I said, so this I’m sure it's going to be a great opportunity for us and for listeners and were all super excited to put out more podcasts for you guys. 

Lilliana Hill: Theresa, do you have a specific reason of why you decided to join State 4-H Council? 

Theresa Crawford: My sister was on Council the year before me. My family has always been just like a big 4-H family. It was kind of just like a thing I would do, was apply to be on State 4-H Council. Once I joined Council, it really motivated me to reapply because it was such an awesome experience the first year, but yeah, it was just an opportunity I heard about and I just did it I guess - no particular reason. 

Lilliana Hill: What about you Bekah? 

Rebekah Craighton: Okay, so I joined State Council because in 2018, I went to youth conference for like the first time ever and I was like, oh my gosh this is a blast and I really wanted to be like more a part of it, and like planning it, and so that's why I applied. Through State Council I've made you know, countless friends, and friendships that’ll last a lifetime, and like this group of people truly pushes me to be a better person and encourages me to always put my best foot forward. So, I'm really glad I took the opportunity. 

Theresa Crawford:  Awesome. What about you Lily? Why did you join State 4-H Council or apply?

Lilliana Hill: So, mine kinda wasn’t as beautiful as your guy’s. My CYC pretty much harassed me for a couple of months and told me to do it. She goes “you’ll enjoy it, I know. I’ll push you. It’ll be fine.” And I was like well “I’m not really sure about it Victoria, I'm already really really busy and then the State Council Ambassador we had that year, we talked her into coming down and speaking to our council, and so then I ran and I really liked it. It was a lot of fun, I got to meet a lot of cool friends, and so I did it a second year, and now I’m on it again with you guys, so it was a great experience, I’m happy I was voluntold. 

Lilliana Hill: Do you guys have a favorite memory of being with State Council, or just 4-H period?

Theresa Crawford: I would say, probably the first memory that comes to mind of State Council was at our first retreat in 2018 at The Ambassador Retreat. We went on a night hike and it was just supposed to be a really short night hike. Like to a pond and back, but we ended up walking I think for a couple hours because we got lost in the woods at Clover Woods. It took us a while to realize we were lost. But yeah, we got lost and there was like people whipping out their phones with like compasses and maps,  trying to figure out how to get us back. The adults back at camp were calling, they were like “Are you guys ever coming back, like what's going on?” But yeah, it was, it was a little scary in the moment, but looking back, its honestly, it was so funny and so much fun, and a great bonding experience. Like we all had a great time getting lost. 

Lilliana Hill: I think it’s so funny that you guys got lost because another state council member and I decided to hang back, because we were like “Exercising, not our thing.” And so, we stayed back, and we were in our pajamas like getting ready for bed. And we heard you guys are lost, and we thought it was so funny because we got like showers to ourselves, and got peace and quiet before you all came back.

Rebekah Craighton: Mine is not as funny as Theresa’s, but my favorite memory was definitely this last year during like I think it was in October. We had a retreat at Clover Woods when you’re all around like the campfire, even though it wasn't even on, and telling ghost stories and then when we were done, the boys tried to scare us once we went back to our cabins. So that is definitely my favorite memory. 

Theresa Crawford: Oh! I forgot about that, that was also so much fun. I remember the girls in my cabin screamed a lot, which really just encouraged the scaring. 

Rebekah Craighton: So, Hey Teresa, you mentioned Ambassador Counties. What's yours? 

Theresa Crawford: Yes, so it’s kind of crazy on the east side of the state. Unfortunately, there's not quite as many council members on that side. So, we have to each take quite a few so I have Poweshiek, my own, and then also Mahaska, Keokuk, Washington, Louisa, Muscatine and Scott. Yeah. I got a got a whole handful 

Theresa Crawford: What about you Lily, what is your Ambassador County?

Lilliana Hill:  So, my home county is Hancock, and our next-door neighbor is Kossuth county and I’ve done a lot over there. So, I've been an interviewer for their county council for two years. I've helped out at their County Fair, I help with some of their county council meetings, 4-H meetings, spoken at their awards night. So, they've seen a lot of me, and they actually encouraged me to apply for their summer intern program. So I'm Kossuth county’s intern as well this summer, so state council like it was this really cool opportunity for the state level and then it helps me do something kind of more at my local level closer to home too, it expanded, and so many opportunities have come out of it. 

Lilliana Hill: What about you Bekah? What have you done? 

Rebekah Craighton: So, my ambassador county is Floyd County. And the first thing I did was go to their county fair, and actually funny story about that is I know some of you might know the Floyd County Fair kind of had a tornado like a year-and-a-half ago and it got like destroyed, so it just they had one building that was actual building and while I was there we were in a tornado warning, and so everything was blowing around and everybody was inside that building. There was probably like 400 of us and we were just packed inside waiting to get out. And everybody’s  like “It’s a curse, It’s a curse.” People are like “I’m  never coming back.” And I’m like “Oh my gosh people.” But it all turned out okay, there was not a tornado, things did blow away though, so yeah. We also, I helped host their awards night and spoke at that, you know gave different Awards to people, and then also helped out with their fall festival and worked a carnival booth. 

Theresa Crawford: That’s awesome. What was the ah, so for state council we have to fill out an application, and then interview. What for you guys was something that really helped you through that process of getting the application done, going to the interview. What what was that like for you guys, what helped you through that? 

Lilliana Hill: For me, I have a lot of friends who were very very supportive. They’re like you have been in 4-H since you were in kindergarten. Like this is all you know, like you might as well just go for it and my CYC texting me like walking me through it, she goes “I'll proofread like your application and everything and you'll be alright.”  and then like I sent it in by February 1st, which is when its due,  and then you hear back a little later if you made it to the interview process, and I was just like terrified and like the incoming week, you're just like every day you get more and more nervous and anxious cuz you're like, oh my gosh, this is like so cool and you're like terrified and then that week of 2018 when we had State Recognition Day, there was a snowstorm. It looked like it was coming, and it was going to be pretty bad and I remember two nights before that Saturday of the interview. I was like talking to my mom, and I go “Mom I can’t miss this,  this is like going to be the end of my life if I missed this.” Like we were we were like called and we got a hotel for the night before so I made it on time and everything was okay and then we made it. 

Rebekah Craighton: When I applied, I wasn't very nervous for like the actual application part because to be honest, I never thought I was going to make it past that. I kind of just like, oh, I've done this, I didn't proofread it at all, and I just submitted. I’m like, I probably won’t get an interview, you know. Oh, well, I can do it next year - be serious about it. And then I get the email and they're like, yeah, you got an interview. I was like, oh and then it kind of started. It was like, this is actually happening. I can actually be like a state council member, and then we went up to my CYC’s office to talk to her and I was so scared. We practiced like three times a week until I had my interview, just so I knew I'd be able to answer the questions and be able to like hold myself together. Thank God for my amazing CYC because I don't think without her that I would have made State Council. 

Theresa Crawford: I do know for the application process, I waited till like two days before to start the application and like 15 minutes before midnight to hit submit, which was very stressful for me. And also, my mom who was like, had to deal with me being stressed out. So, if I could offer like a big tip, don't do that. Be on top of your applications. The next year I was, and it was a much better process. It was so much more easy-going, and I was a lot less stressed out about it. And I also had more time to think about my answers. I do remember for my second interview, I was super nervous about them. It’s like I was so nervous that I wouldn't get back on Council, and it was so scary because I…first year council was such an awesome experience and I wanted to experience that again. And I do remember when I came out of my interview, I did not think it went well, like I won't be on Council again, but then I was, which was great. So also, don't like judge how your interview went cuz it probably went better than you think. For me, it was just taking a deep breath and being myself and just giving very candid answers. If you want to laugh and joke in your interview, like crack a few jokes, like not too many cuz that might be a little weird, it’s still professional, but make it natural and casual and for anyone who is going to be interviewing for council in the future just be yourself. It’s fine. How about you Lily? What was your interview process, like? What would you say? 

Liliana Hill: umm…I know my first year I was very stressed out, snowstorm and all, but, like, I wasn’t the one driving, I printed off my application and my resume and I was just studying them like crazy. And cuz I’ve only done interviews, like, in my county, so like I’ve known the people. So, I’m like a lot more comfortable. Umm…so it was just stressful but you go in there and you shake your hands, shake the hands of the interviewers and I just..I kind of relaxed cuz then once you like shake the hands of someone, you’re like, you know, they’re people like me their like warm-blooded, breathing people. You’re fine. Not a big deal. So, you relax more, and you just...you give you your answers the way you are. If you’re stressed, your judges can tell that. And if you're really being yourself, like truly yourself and your relaxed and you’re just giving it your all, they see that, they noticed that, and they write that down and they remember that. So interviews still scare me, but when it’s an opportunity that you desperately want you...you really power through and I think that kinda shows, so all state council members, you kinda realize that when you’re interviewing if you truly want this, it will be and you will do your best. So, I’m pretty good. 

Theresa Crawford: And Lily, you mentioned reading through your resume and reading just reading materials. Bekah, you talked about practicing and being prepared, and these are all things like people do. Before my first interviews, I met with a lady and I went through some practice questions. She read over my application. We, like, made up the whole scenario. I walked into the room, shook her hand, even though I knew her very well. And that’s totally okay to do; it's not required. And for some people it's not necessary and it's not necessarily, you don't have to do it. You're not worse off if you don’t but being prepared is also good. Especially reading through your application. You submit the applications a month or so before you actually interview. So, it's totally legitimate that you would forget what was on that. So, for me, always on the car ride up, I’m reading through the application. I'm reading through, also the...they put out the forms that the judges will be filling out while you're doing the interview. I read through that. So, I can think of  ‘okay, how do I want to phrase this so that way it hits these points?’ There is, like, there can be a little bit of strategizing and planning going into it; not necessarily to get any sort of upper hand, but to just make yourself feel prepared and calm.

Rebekah Craighton: I feel like preparing really did help me out because my CYC was throwing random questions at me that I was never going to get asked in my actual interview. By the time when I got down to my interview, it felt like a breeze because it was...it was like those questions, but they weren't as difficult. So definitely preparing did help me. What about you Lily?

Liliana Hill: I was very very stressed and when I study, it it relaxes me, which is a weird thing to say but it does. Yeah, so when you... you don't have to practice. If that's not your style, you totally do not have to. But if it is something that you feel will help you, totally go for it. Totally read through your materials, practice with someone. Your CYC is almost always, like, willing to help you. They love helping for 4-Hers better themselves, you know our quote is to make the best better. So that's their job. And there is always like sometimes state council members will help you out. Anybody is willing to help you. So, Theresa, what do you think about that? 

Theresa Crawford: Yeah, and I know for people in my ambassador county that were at the beginning of the year, they mentioned, ‘yeah, I'm interested in applying for state council.’ I was like, ‘okay, talk to me’. I, like, have been through this process before I'll help you through it. There were people in my own county that were interested in helping and I was like, I was offering them assistance and I was able to read through their application. Reach out to your ambassador, they are there to help you and they want people to come on to come onto state council the next year, as much as anyone else. So yeah really reach out and use your resources. To find the application for State 4-H Council go to extension.iastate.edu/4h/statecouncil. You’ll...ahh, a page will pop up with pictures and information about State Council and also the application process on the side and tips for the application process. We’ll also put the link in the show notes. And I just want to say Bekah and Lily, it’s been great talking with you guys. I feel like we haven't been able to connect that all this past year. But yeah, it’s been really great talking to you guys. And thanks for being here with me. 

Liliana Hill: I agree, it’s been fun seeing you guys and getting to chat with ya. 

Rebekah Craighton: Yeah, it was definitely a fun opportunity. CloverCast: Sunburn officially launches Wednesday, June 17th, and don't miss our first episode where we will be sharing our favorite 4-H memories. 

[“Hey” Theme Music]

All: Bye!

Why join State 4-H Council
Favorite State 4-H Council memory
Experience with ambassador counties
Tips for State 4-H Council interviews
Application for State 4-H Council