Iowa 4-H CloverCast

4-H Memories

June 17, 2020 Iowa State 4-H Council Season 1 Episode 2
Iowa 4-H CloverCast
4-H Memories
Chapters
1:40
Favorite club memories
4:00
Communications events memories
9:55
State Fair memories
11:05
4-H trip memories
17:21
State 4-H Council memories
Iowa 4-H CloverCast
4-H Memories
Jun 17, 2020 Season 1 Episode 2
Iowa State 4-H Council

Bekah, Abe, and Holly are back for the first official episode of CloverCast: Sunburnt. In this week's episode, they reminisce about some of their favorite 4-H memories. These range from simple moments created within their clubs or at the county fair to trips in Washington D.C.! While looking back, they discuss the hilarious as well as the heartwarming. Be sure to tune in on July 1st for the next episode all about State 4-H Opportunities.

Resources:

Goals of our podcast:

1. To provide a safe opportunity for State 4-H Council members to engage with other 4-H’ers around the state in lieu of the Iowa 4-H Youth Conference. 

2. To reach current 4-H’ers and potential 4-H’ers through thoughtful, informational, and personal discussion centered around 4-H learning opportunities and experiences.

3. To provide State 4-H Council members the opportunity to grow themselves personally and professionally as they take part in and learn about each step of the podcast production process.

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Bekah, Abe, and Holly are back for the first official episode of CloverCast: Sunburnt. In this week's episode, they reminisce about some of their favorite 4-H memories. These range from simple moments created within their clubs or at the county fair to trips in Washington D.C.! While looking back, they discuss the hilarious as well as the heartwarming. Be sure to tune in on July 1st for the next episode all about State 4-H Opportunities.

Resources:

Goals of our podcast:

1. To provide a safe opportunity for State 4-H Council members to engage with other 4-H’ers around the state in lieu of the Iowa 4-H Youth Conference. 

2. To reach current 4-H’ers and potential 4-H’ers through thoughtful, informational, and personal discussion centered around 4-H learning opportunities and experiences.

3. To provide State 4-H Council members the opportunity to grow themselves personally and professionally as they take part in and learn about each step of the podcast production process.

[“Hey” Theme Music by Bensound]

Haley Jones: Welcome to CloverCast: Sunburnt. In this podcast, council members discuss 4-H opportunities, insight, and stories relevant to current 4-H’ers. Each episode will be hosted by different state 4-H council members and you can toon in every other Wednesday throughout the summer on Apple Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you like to listen. This podcast is made possible by the partnership between the Iowa 4-H Foundation, and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach 4-H Youth Development. Now, here are today’s hosts. 

Rebekah Craighton: Hello. My name is Rebekah Craighton, and I am from Franklin County, and I have been in 4-H for five years. 

Abe Schmitt: Hi, I’m Abe Schmidt. I'm from Winneshiek County and I've been in 4-H for nine years.

Holly Kirchhoff: My name is Holly Kirchhoff. I am from Humboldt County and I have been in 4-H for nine years. 

Abe Schmitt: Thank you everyone for listening to our State 4-H council podcast, CloverCast: Sunburnt. Also, thank you to those who shared our pilot episode. In today's episode, Bekah, Holly, and I will be discussing our favorite 4-H memories.

Rebekah Craighton: We are super excited to be here today. Hey, Abe, what's a memory that jumps out for you? 

Abe Schmitt: Well Bekah. There's a lot of memories I have from 4-H, uh, it ranges from club memory to fair memories, to state council memories, to just going on 4-H trips. One of my original club memories though, is making wreaths for our local community members. Basically, what we would do is, we would get about fifty 4-H members into our leaders’ garage. We'd get a bunch of wreaths that we got from our local, uh, tree nursery. And we’d just spend about two or three hours on a December night making them. So, does anybody else do volunteer projects and their community? 

Rebekah Craighton: Actually yeah, that is one of the big things that my club is involved in. So, we actually have two main projects that we do from year to year. Uh, the first thing we do is actually on the County fairgrounds where we..there's this area where it's like, seating around it, and then there's like flower beds and mulch and different trees in the middle. And it's like a Memorial garden to someone who passed away. And we take care of that, you know, put different, put new mulch down, you know, put, make sure the flowers are weeded, all the kinds of stuff like that. And then, also, the second project we do is at our cemetery, which most people, when they think of volunteering, they really don't think of the cemetery. But a few years back, our cemetery society was asking for volunteers to help take care of it and adopt like a section. Each of the sections are named and they're like square, you know, around where the road is. And so, we're like, heck yeah, we'll help out. And so, we go in there, like after storms, especially, pick up branches, rake leaves, all those different kinds of things to help the cemetery out and then it actually inspired, um, my dad and I to adopt their own section and help take care of that.

Holly Kirchhoff: Bekah, that's really cool. I've noticed in 4-H that one of the fun things about it, is getting to do things with other people. One of my favorite 4-H or club memories is just working the food stand with my 4-H club. It might sound kind of lame when you first think about it, but it's actually super fun just being in that atmosphere with a bunch of your friends and one time, one of my club members, and I just walked around the fair and sold donuts. And it was so fun to like interact with people from the community, and just be with them. Do you guys have any other County fair stories? 

Rebekah Craighton: Actually, my favorite fair story was not with other people. It's about the first time I ever did an educational presentation. And that was actually just a few years ago. My county youth coordinator, my CYC kind of just told me, you know, you're doing this. And I was like, Oh, okay. Sounds good. And I did, um, a presentation on cupcakes, which is kind of like my passion. I have my own bakery, and the whole time up there, I honestly thought I did awful. I was scared. I was terrified. I was like, this is a spatula in my hand, like shaking and you know, and the judge was frowning at me the entire time and just like, angrily scribbling things on the paper and I'm like, oh my God, this is going to be bad. You know, I'm going to get last. And that does not look good when you're in high school. And I was so scared and then I somehow ended up getting first and I honestly don't know how it happened and I got to go to the state fair, but that is definitely one of my favorite memories, even though I was terrified and just wasn't having it that day, I still manage to make it through it. What about you Abe? Do you have any memories of the fair?

Abe Schmitt: Well, I have a lot of memories of our county fair and just going down the state fair with projects. One year when I was younger, I did the same thing. I did an educational presentation on football. So, mine was about eight-man, verse eleven-man football, and I was just a seventh grader. And I think there were only five people in the room, uh, listening to my presentation. And at the moment, like you, I was scared. I wasn't, it was the first one I'd ever done, but surprisingly enough, I went to state fair.

Rebekah Craighton: Before, before like I joined county council, I wouldn't even talk in front of people. Like I was so terrified. And like when we had like, you know, like our awards night. Umm, when I would like go up there. I wouldn't, I do like the small things, like handing out awards, cause I didn't want to talk in front of people. And then this last year was the one who hosted it. I literally don't know how it happened. I think it was my CYC that helped me get over my fear. 

Holly Kirchhoff: Communications day can be very effective. I also have some interesting experience with educational presentations. One time I did mine on how to show a cow and I barely knew how to show a cow, so that didn't go very well. I also tried, um, extemporaneous speaking last year. That was terrifying. I like having, I like knowing what I'm going to say. When I go up there. 

Rebekah Craighton: Okay. Could you explain what extemporaneous speaking is? That's something I'm really interested in, but I don't know much about. 

Holly Kirchhoff: Oh yeah. Extemporaneous speaking is when you go in thirty minutes before you actually give your speech and you draw a topic and they can be anything from like, how has 4-H impacted you? Or just really anything, and then you get this book full of information that you get to use to like pick out what you want to say. And you basically just write a speech in thirty minutes and then you go give it. 

Rebekah Craighton: So, what did you learn from that new experience? 

Holly Kirchhoff: I learned..how to improvise pretty much because I had a rough outline of what I wanted to say, but I didn't have anything written down word for word, and for me, I really like to plan things ahead of time and know what's going to happen. So it was, it was different, but I'm glad that I did it. 

Abe Schmitt: Well one of my favorite county fair memories is, uh, Share-The-Fun my, um, some members of my group did when I was a younger member. So, in my group, when I was younger, there were a lot of older girls and they were all in the same grade as my sister. Now, she's long gone out of 4-H, but they decided that they would do a song called Alice the Camel. And they all had, you know, like poofy hats and stuff, and they needed a camel. And I was like eight years old. So, they decided they would dress me up as a camel. So, they got a camel mask and they got this big, long trench coat, which I was like, four feet tall. So, you know, it was like dangling at my ankle, you know, like a wedding dress. And then what they did was for part of the song, what they did was the humps on the camel disappeared after every refrain, a very basic song. So, they put balloons on my back, and they popped them every single time. And then at the very end, I took my mask off and I revealed to everybody that it was just me being the camel. And I think that's one of my favorite memories, because it was like the first time I got up on stage and it kind of like, I don't want to say it kickstarted my 4-H career because I had already done some things before that, but it was one of the funnest memories because I really got to see other people enjoy the things that I was performing for them.

Rebekah Craighton: So, have you done Share the Fun since, or was that your last time? 

Abe Schmitt: Well, it would have been a good way to go out, but I have done it a few more times. I've played the piano for some, we'd did a group or another club one a few years later after that, where we sang a song about the fair, but, uh, this year, I don't know if I'm going to be doing it just because if we have it. But I've been, I've really enjoyed doing them and watching other people's. Our county always has a lot, almost 20 show, almost 20 skits every single year. So, they're really fun to watch. 

Rebekah Craighton: So, Abe did you ever make it to the state fair? 

Abe Schmitt: Well, Bekah, I did make it to state fair for some other projects, but for Share-The-Fun I never did, sadly. Do any of you guys have any fun memories from the state fair? 

Holly Kirchhoff: One of my favorite state fair memories is actually when we worked there through state council. I ran the educational presentation room and it was really cool to see every kids’ presentation that they brought from their County fairs. Then I learned about a bunch of different things. Including bees. 

Rebekah Craighton: Did you stay at the fair?

Holly Kirchhoff: Yes. While we were working at the state fair, we actually stayed at the Youth Inn.

Abe Schmitt: Speaking of the Youth Inn, I've had a bunch of great memories in regards to working at the fair and going there. One night when we were out, um, going to rides and just enjoying the entertainment, we realized it was five minutes to curfew for us state council members. So, me and a few others had to run all the way across the fairgrounds through crowds of a bunch of people, and we arrived there one minute late, but they said it was all right. 

Holly Kirchhoff: When I went to Washington, D.C. we got told if you're early, you're on time. If you're on time, you're late. And if you are late, you're left behind. Um, that was just a fun little phrase they told us to try to get us to be punctual. And this is actually when I went on the Citizenship Washington Focus trip to Washington D.C. or the CWF trip. This is probably my favorite trip that I've gone on through 4-H. It was such a cool experience to see all the monuments and the white house and Gettysburg, and go to all of these historical landmarks, and at the same time, learn about the bill writing process. And my favorite part about it, was we were sitting in the auditorium with people from Oklahoma and Alabama and Nebraska and 4-Her’s from all across the country really. And it's so cool to see that 4-H isn't just something that happens in your County or Iowa. It's like a worldwide thing. And it's so cool to see everyone come together. Have any of you guys been on 4-H trips? 

Rebekah Craighton: Yeah. One of my favorite 4-H trips was actually not a national trip, but it was just like a state trip. And it was the legislative day trip when I was in like seventh grade. And I actually met one of my best friends through that. Um, our group was the last group to be picked up. So, as you know, like there's no seats left, you kind of get what you get, and you don't throw a fit. And so, I got on there and I'm like, oh my God, where am I going to sit? Cause I had already planned who I'm going to sit by. And then there was no like double seats left, so we couldn't. And so, I just sat randomly by this girl and I thought she was asleep. Like she had a hoodie up. She was like, by the window, all scrunched down. Yeah, come to find out she was not asleep. She's trying to ignore me. So, she didn’t have to talk to anybody. Me being me. I like to talk to everybody. So, I just started talking to this girl who I thought was asleep. And then she like started talking back. And then, by the end of the day, we're doing everything together, going like on every place we got off, we'd be like together taking pictures and we ate at spaghetti works beside each other. And to this day, she is still one of my best friends and yeah, 4-H you can definitely meet friends and new people in very interesting ways. What about you, Abe? Have you ever been on any 4-H trips? 

Abe Schmitt: Well, Bekah I have been on a 4-H trip. It's kind of the same as Holly went on, although it was just called our citizenship group in our area. So, it was our County and a few surrounding counties hopped on a bus. We went to D.C. However, on the way to D.C., our bus broke down. So, we were trapped for the entire day. We were supposed to be in Gettysburg in the middle of Indiana. We spent the entire day at a Walmart parking lot. We did miss the Gettysburg night tour and driving through the Appalachian Mountains during the day. But we did get eat at Steak and Shake and go to Gander Mountain Outdoors. And you know, it, might've not been the best part of the trip considering we did get to go to everything eventually, once we got a bus that wasn't broken. But it was really fun to actually bond with some of the people that were on the trip as well, because I might not have met them or talked to them, had we not been stuck in a parking lot all day, but we did. And I made some good friends from that trip. 

Holly Kirchhoff: I agree with that. I think that the bus rides to and from the trips are honestly one of the best parts of them. Cause you're just get to, like you said, bond with the people on the trip with you, like on my trip to Washington D.C., for some reason, one of the kids on the bus would always just start singing “I Want it That Way” by the Backstreet Boys and then the rest of the bus, would just join in.

Rebekah Craighton:  I also went to D.C. for the Healthy Living Ambassador trip this last February, and we didn't drive, we flew. And so, we had to stay in Des Moines the night before and get up at like three in the morning, that sucked. And, um, we're at the airport and I had never flew before. So, I was terrified, so I didn't eat anything. Cause I'm like, if I eat something, I’m going to throw it up, and I was like, they're gonna throw me out of the plane if I throw up. That was my biggest fear. I don't I don't know why, but, um, that was actually really fun. Everybody was like super supportive, like, Oh, you'll be okay. Come to find out, I really do like flying. And it was kind of interesting to see, you know, like all the cities when it's like, the sun's coming up. And then when we got to DC, we definitely like toured that day. And it was super fun, cause we got to like experience different things, you know, with our healthy living ambassadors before our conference. And that was definitely one of my favorite memories. 

Holly Kirchhoff: So, on that trip, what did, like, did you do something for like the healthy living ambassadors’ group, or was it just kind of like touring. 

Rebekah Craighton Yeah. So, we had like, um, a Healthy Living Conference in Maryland at like the National 4-H Center. And I think it was a three-day conference and we got to bring back different ideas to Iowa, and form…formulate our project. So, we had different ideas. We got to go to different workshops from these people that were from all over the country. And like, we narrowed it down to like, Juuling, and vaping, and mental health awareness. And then we each had our own like, individual projects. For the state project, we actually chose Juuling and vaping, because we feel like it's a big problem within youth today. And then we each got to focus on our own individual project. And my individual project is actually mental health because I feel like, especially in my community, it's something that we still don’t talk about a lot and I feel like it needs to be talked about, and we're trying to change that, And that's why I picked the project that I did. Sorry, that was a really long explanation.

Abe Schmitt: Wow guys. That's a lot of great memories we have talked about today. It's crazy to think that over all the years they've helped us culminate into the state council members we are today. Do any of you guys have some great state council memories to summarize this episode?

Holly Kirchhoff: My favorite state council memory is definitely when we were onstage in CY Steven's getting inducted at youth conference last year, because I think it was just so cool to see everyone out in the audience, like watching us and cause in their eyes, like we were the new leaders. And I think that's just so cool to be given that opportunity. What about you, Bekah? 

Rebekah Craighton: Yeah. So, my favorite state council memory is actually when we went on a hike, it was like a morning hike and I almost fell off a cliff. Like I slipped, and I was like, Oh crap. And somebody grabbed my hand and pulled me up. And it was definitely very scary. It was at Clover woods. And I just, I don't want to experience again, but it was a very good bonding experience.

Abe Schmitt: That's a great story, Bekah, you know, sometimes people make mistakes and almost fall off cliffs, but it's good and fun to bond with others, especially leaders like the members on state council. I think my favorite memory from state council was our first state council retreat, last June. The..the first night we had a..a line, what was it? What did we do that first night? Remember like swing dancing?

Holly Kirchhoff: Swing Dancing! 

Abe Schmitt: Yeah! Although we'd only met each other that day. We didn't know a lot about each other. It was so awesome to see everybody bond and really come together. It really showed me that, wow, this is really going to be a fun year for being on state council.

Holly Kirchhoff: Well, it's been a lot of fun looking back on our 4-H careers and thinking of all the great memories we've had. And I think the overall theme here, is that, it's not about what place you get or the trophy or the ribbons or anything, but it's more about just the memories that you have and the people that you make them with.

Abe Schmitt: Yeah. This has been a lot of fun, Holly. And for the viewers listening, we did mention a lot of different 4-H activities in this episode. So, we'll be sure to link all of those in the show notes. Check out those links if you want more information about what we talked about. 

Rebekah Craighton: And remember CloverCast: Sunburnt is coming out every other Wednesday this summer, don't miss our next episode where we're sharing all about state 4-H opportunities.

All: Bye!

[“Hey” Theme Music by Bensound]

Favorite club memories
Communications events memories
State Fair memories
4-H trip memories
State 4-H Council memories