Iowa 4-H CloverCast

Pioneer Seed Grants

November 18, 2020 Season 2 Episode 2
Iowa 4-H CloverCast
Pioneer Seed Grants
Chapters
1:30
About the 4-H'ers
3:30
History of Pioneer Seed Grants
4:08
About the Florence Go-Getters project
7:03
Impact of the project
7:46
Where the idea came from
10:02
Two-Minute Tidbit: Statewide Food Drive
11:02
Applying for the grant
12:42
What was included in the donation packs
13:27
Most rewarding part
14:21
Past projects of the Florence Go-Getters
15:27
How they heard about the Pioneer Seed Grants
Iowa 4-H CloverCast
Pioneer Seed Grants
Nov 18, 2020 Season 2 Episode 2

State 4-H members Ella and Emily chat with Hannah Siek and Breck Coffland about the Pioneer Grant they received for their Florence Go-Getters 4-H Club. They talk about their 2020 project and how they utilized the grant money to help out people in their community. Listen in to learn more about the Pioneer Seed Grant program and how clubs utilize these funds. Tune back in on December 2nd for the next episode where we will talk about Collegiate 4-H. 

Resources:

Goals of our podcast:

1. To provide a safe opportunity for State 4-H Council members to engage with other 4-H’ers around the state.

2. To reach current 4-H’ers and potential 4-H’ers through thoughtful, informational, and personal discussion centered around 4-H learning opportunities and experiences.

3. To provide State 4-H Council members the opportunity to grow themselves personally and professionally as they take part in and learn about each step of the podcast production process.

 

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

State 4-H members Ella and Emily chat with Hannah Siek and Breck Coffland about the Pioneer Grant they received for their Florence Go-Getters 4-H Club. They talk about their 2020 project and how they utilized the grant money to help out people in their community. Listen in to learn more about the Pioneer Seed Grant program and how clubs utilize these funds. Tune back in on December 2nd for the next episode where we will talk about Collegiate 4-H. 

Resources:

Goals of our podcast:

1. To provide a safe opportunity for State 4-H Council members to engage with other 4-H’ers around the state.

2. To reach current 4-H’ers and potential 4-H’ers through thoughtful, informational, and personal discussion centered around 4-H learning opportunities and experiences.

3. To provide State 4-H Council members the opportunity to grow themselves personally and professionally as they take part in and learn about each step of the podcast production process.

 

Melanie: Welcome to CloverCast, a podcast for all things Iowa 4-H. We are excited to have the Iowa 4-H State Council members back again to host each episode. From sharing personal insights and stories, to talking with a variety of guests, members will provide relevant 4-H information to current 4-H’ers and beyond. Join them here every first and third Wednesday of the month on Apple podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you like to listen. CloverCast is made possible by the partnership between the Iowa 4-H Foundation and the Iowa State University Extension and Outreach 4-H program. Now let's get to the show.

Hello, everyone. Thanks for joining us for another episode of CloverCast. I'm excited for this episode, we actually get to hear from two 4-Hers from the Benton County Florence Go-Getters club and they received a Pioneer Seed grant, which they took, and made pillowcases and filled them with toiletries, for an organization in Cedar Rapids, so it's a really fun conversation. I learned a lot, as did our state four h council members, I want to invite you to listen in.

Ella: Hi everyone I'm Ella Hommel, and I'm Emily Plagman, and today we're joined with Hannah Siek and Breck Coffland. So can you guys each tell us a little bit about your 4-H background and like, how many years you guys have been in 4-H, and what has been your favorite project areas?

Breck: So my name is Breck Coffland, I've been in 4-H for about, as long as I can remember, I've always been around 4-H and involved in the community. And one of my favorite things to do in 4-H or my favorite project area would probably have to be showing livestock, or showing cattle, it’s what I've always been interested in and I've always followed my brother around doing it and I've had plenty of success in it. I won the county fair this year and I was really happy about that.

Hannah: So, my name is Hannah Siek and I've been in 4-H for, this will be my 5th year. So my favorite project area would probably be showing cattle as well. I also grew up around it. As long as I can remember I’ve always been in 4-H. Like, I guess, it's like, always been something I've always done. I’ve always been around those cattle, so like it’s always came natural to me. 

So yeah, that’s a little about myself.

Ella: So how did you guys get to know each other and then what club are you from?

Hannah: So we’re in the Florence Go-Getters 4-H group. So it’s like, between Norway and Blairstown, we kind of got to know each other like from showing cattle and being in the same 4-H group, that’s kinda how we met. And then we go to the fair together. 

Breck: I knew Hannah a bit from 4-H, like she was in the same Clover Buds as me, I’m older than her by a year I think. And, like, we got to know each other in Clover Buds. And then we just kind of started being friends, we could connect over showing cattle.

Hannah: Yeah and like we kind of could relate like because obviously not a lot of people show cattle at my school so, like, it's kind of nice to have somebody to relate to.

Emily: Ella, can you give us a little history about the Pioneer grant program?

Ella: Of course, Emily. For over 40 years, DuPont Pioneer has supported grassroots efforts by Iowa 4-Hers to improve their communities through the Pioneer Seed Grant. These small seed grants, provide the funding necessary for Iowa 4-Hers to perform a service project that has an impact locally, from planting community gardens, to painting buildings to creating care packages, funding from DuPont Pioneer has allowed Iowa 4-Hers across the state to experience the joy of service, while also learning how to plan a budget, meet with officials and organize an event.

Emily: Thanks Ella. So why don't you tell us a little bit about your project and how you came up with it. 

Hannah: We kind of thought of it because like every year we do a service project, community service. A few years back, we did the Pioneer grant, like and we did it to the Ronald McDonald House. So it was kind of based off that. We took it to a women’s shelter in Cedar Rapids. 

Breck: Branching off of a little bit of Hannah, the project a little bit more in-depth was that we hand-sewed pillowcases that they could use as their own pillowcases. And we bought the fabric and we made them ourselves. And then we went around with the Pioneer grant with it, which was $500,  we bought toiletries and food and necessities that they could use and that the women’s shelter requested, or Waypoint requested, and what was most used, so we put them in the pillowcases. And we spent around $800 on everything in total including fabric and toiletries. 

Ella: So how many did you end up making?

Hannah: Oh we made 30 pillowcases with all the stuff inside.  

Ella: That’s impressive 

Breck: There's a picture that we took, all of Stacy's rear suburban end was completely packed full of pillowcases. 

Hannah: Yeah that’s our club leader and it was packed.  

Breck: And what was nice was that there's only six people there helping to pack. 

Hannah: Like, it was like on a school day. So like the few people that don't go to our school, are still part of the club. So like they couldn't go. And then every now and then like, I guess like somehow like practices, stuff like that. So they have a lot of activities.  

Ella: How long did it take you guys? 

Hannah: I didn’t take us that long to pack it all. The thing that took us longest was like the sewing the pillowcases because like we had the whole day to sew because like we had to teach everyone how to sew so you had to practice first, so you didn’t let them fall apart because that'd be really, bad.

Breck: The one girl who actually knew how to sew like didn't show up for a couple hours though so we were just kind of guessing what we were doing, until like this really crafty mom showed up, like, “Oh, yeah, this is how you do it” and we've been doing it wrong the entire time. 

Hannah: Yeah, it was really sad because like we had six I think pillowcases that were already done that were sewed wrong.

Breck: Six pillowcases that we thought we sewed right

Hannah: We ended up having to tear them apart and my club leader resewed them, cause like we ran out of time because we don't have enough time to, like, finish em up that day. So that was interesting. 

Emily: What kind of impact does Waypoint make for Cedar Rapids? 

Breck: Waypoint is a women's shelter that services both women, like entire family units and children. And they have, like, a distinct educational center that the children can use. And like they can have multiple families come in and be using these things. And like they can stay there for as long as they need, and then they also have services that can help them get off on their feet, so they don't have to stay at Waypoint for their entire lives.

Hannah: And also for the like children that can't go to school, they have a daycare center for them. So, like, if the parents are at work or something like that, and like they can’t go to school, they will take care of them. 

Ella: Makes sense. Where did you guys get this idea?

Breck:  I think we got this idea from using, well, like what Hannah said, we did the Ronald McDonald House, a couple years back, with the Pioneer grant fund. And we, I think we got the idea of helping a homeless shelter last year with the 10 milk gallon challenge where we bought a bunch of milk and then we gave it to a homeless shelter and by the end of the day, all the milk that we bought was gone. So I think we just kind of got into helping shelters like that and then decided to help another one. 

Hannah: Yeah we ended up, we gave it to a few other shelters and like the one we got a tour around the food pantry area. By the time, it was like a pickup day, and like by the time we were done, like all the milk was gone. It was kind of cool. We bought more than the 10 gallons.

Breck: It felt like 30 gallons of milk and I was surprised to see how many people needed that and how quickly they received it.

Hannah: And then this year we also did it but we dropped it off this time. They asked for quarts instead of gallons because it was like easier to give away. So we did about the same amount but it was in quarts. So we did it again. 

Ella: Did you get to see, like, when you delivered the pillowcases kind of like what the reaction was?

Breck: Due to COVID, we weren't allowed to actually, I wasn't there when we dropped off but we weren't allowed to actually go inside. So, we got a virtual tour so we were on a zoom call with the, I don't think it was the CEO, but one of the managers of Waypoint was there and she gave us a walkthrough of what Waypoint is, what they can do, what they're doing now, and how they can help their community. 

Hannah: And then also because of the derecho they're under construction so like, we couldn’t visit even if there was no COVID, that was like the main reason for it. But, yeah, so we couldn’t exactly see, it would have been nice to see but like it’s alright, we still helped out.  

Melanie: Hey listeners, just interrupting this episode really quick. So the State Council members can share about something else that they think you should know, during our two minute tidbit. 

Emily: Speaking of service, the State 4-H Council is actually putting on a statewide food drive. This food drive has a goal to reach 10,000 non perishable food items to give back to families, this holidays. 

Ella: That's right, Emily. At the end of November, all the food will be given to families in need and we are really excited to help those who might not have enough food for Christmas. So 4-H members and anyone interested can donate their non perishable food items to their local county extension office. And from there, it'll go to a local food bank, we'll be sharing the result on the Iowa 4-H Facebook page so make sure to check in and see how your county and state are doing.

Melanie : So that is your two minute tidbit, be sure to check out the Iowa 4-H social media so you can see more about the food drive and make a donation at your local extension office. Now back to the episode.

Emily: So can we talk a little bit about the applying process to the Pioneer grant, like what all did that entail? Was it a super long process or like, give us little information about that.

Hannah: So it wasn't like a super long process, we had to write like why we needed the grant. That was, like, probably one of the hardest parts of it.

Breck: I mean the application process was pretty simple if you've ever written out a, like a writing for an award for a 4-H ceremony, you basically just put on your goals, what you did to achieve this, like what you had to do to get to that goal. And it was actually a really simple process, you just didn't, you just kind of wrote down what you thought and felt. 

Hannah: And then you turn it in to the county extension office, and then, one of the things that they said we had to do was like after the project to write a little report about it, like what we did, like what we achieved, like those kind of things. Like how much money, like, what we all spent on it and stuff like that. 

Ella: So like speaking of money, so your grant was about $500 right?

Hannah: Yes. 

Ella: And then, you said your cost was 800, so did your club just pay for the rest?

Hannah: Yeah, like the club just paid for the rest like whatever the remaining amount was. 

Breck: I think it was about $300, $200 dollars. 

Hannah: Yeah, that we ended up having to pay for. It wasn’t too bad, if we hadn’t had the grant, it would have been a lot harder to provide. 

Breck: Yeah we wouldn’t have had the most sufficient of funds after that. 

Hannah: Yeah. Yeah, cause like the pillowcases, like the fabric was like $258 

Ella: What was all in like the packs inside the pillowcases?

Hannah: So we had a shampoo, conditioner and we had like a hand soap, laundry detergent, toothpaste, some toothbrushes, dental floss, deodorant, like baby wipes, ramen noodles, mac and cheese, oatmeal packages, granola bars, tissues. 

Ella: Oh my goodness.

Hannah: Spaghettios

Breck: We had like Baby Wipes in there too. 

Ella: Your guys sewing must have been insane to hold all of that. 

Hannah: It was crazy walking through the store with all that.

Breck: Our sewing and that thread was stressed. 

Emily: What was the most rewarding thing about this project? 

Hannah: Seeing the final result of it. It started off with just like a pillowcase. That was probably the most rewarding was hearing like what we’re donating it to, like the most important and like seeing the final result. 

Breck: When we did a Zoom call with the Waypoint, like I thought it was most rewarding when we got to like hear how many people this would affect, like how many people this would like give chances to or what this can reward them with and like give them, like the necessities that they deserve and need.

Ella : So for next year, are you thinking of like another service project kind of like that?

Hannah : We haven’t completely decided what our next project will be, probably be something a little different because like you don't want to like do the same thing every single year like just like hang it up a little bit. So, probably something pretty similar. 

Breck: Like, donations over time and like cleanup efforts to the Humane Society in Maringo and then we've done the Ronald McDonald house, like we've done tie blankets. 

Hannah: And we've done, like the tie blankets were for the firehouse, like, like the ambulance and stuff like that like for the children like cause every time you go on an ambulance and if you're a small child you usually get a small tie blanket so we did that one time. At one time, we made a little free library. So that was like kind of fun to make a little free library. 

Breck: A lot of painting. Yeah, it was. 

Ella : Were those all with Pioneer grants then?  

Hannah: Uh, no. 

Breck: Most of it came out of our club’s own money, but it was very nice to have a Pioneer grant this year to cover most of the majority of the costs. 

Hannah: The only one that we got the Pioneer grant for was the Ronald McDonald House. 

Emily: How’d you guys first coming out like hearing about the Pioneer grant, like you guys mentioned that you guys used it for the McDonald House also but like, how did you guys first, like hear about it?

Breck: I think we first heard about it, probably from the extension office in Vinton, or I think Stacy was told about it. 

Hannah: Yeah. The club leader kind of researched it like she kind of  researched like what kind of grants, you could have or what were available to clubs on the 4-H Online. So that's how we kind of heard about it. 

Emily: Would you recommend the grant process and applying to other clubs?

Hannah: Yes, we do. $500 is the most but it doesn't matter how much you get, like, it's like still something that you can achieve, like you're doing something good. So like kind of nice to have, so you don't have to pay for it. Yeah I advise it for all other clubs to try to get the Pioneer grant. 

Breck: It was a really good help, like $500 is quite a bit of money just for this project. And I would advise like applying for this grant to any other club. 

Ella: Cool. So like individually, how has the project, like helped you guys with, like, learning about service and like making a difference?

Hannah: I really didn't realize like how much like actually happened, like, yeah, I understand like homeless shelters and stuff, but it was like it was really nice to like, understand like what actually went into it. And like how the process actually worked. That was probably like the most, eye opening to me. That was probably like the best part about it, like learning about how everything worked. 

Breck: The biggest part for me was just the fact like how much these people need and like, what they're not receiving and like how, like how little of a difference we made, but that difference was quite large in the eyes of those people that were given it. And I, I really thought that like was kind of cool to be able to be a part of their people's lives like they're thankful for what we gave them.

Hannah: Like even though they don't know exactly like that we gave it to them. I guess it does have our name on it. But yeah, so like they do know it came from our club but like it was nice to know that like someone is gonna be happy from it. 

Breck: Give and not get back. Yeah, for sure.

Emily: So is there anything else you guys would like to share with us. 

Hannah: Do you have anything Breck?

Breck: No, I think we all covered it tonight and this was really nice to talk about it. 

Ella: We just want to thank you guys, Hannah and Breck for coming on and talking with us today on the podcast. I know I learned a lot and I'm sure that it will be great for other 4-Hers to hear about this opportunity so thank you for joining us and thank you for listening to our podcast this week. 

Hannah & Breck: Thank you

Melanie: We love hearing from 4-Hers about how they're making a difference in their communities. And special thanks to Pioneer for supporting these seed grants for over 40 years. If you'd like to learn more information, and possibly have your club apply, be sure to check out the show notes, where you can find that web link. I want to thank our State Council hosts Ella and Emily, our next episode is going to be December 2, where we are going to be chatting with a collegiate 4-Her and kind of sharing more about the next step after 4-H. Thank you everyone for tuning into CloverCast, now go out and make the best better.

About the 4-H'ers
History of Pioneer Seed Grants
About the Florence Go-Getters project
Impact of the project
Where the idea came from
Two-Minute Tidbit: Statewide Food Drive
Applying for the grant
What was included in the donation packs
Most rewarding part
Past projects of the Florence Go-Getters
How they heard about the Pioneer Seed Grants