The RISE Canberra Podcast

Carmela Pavlic Searle and guests highlights - Podcast 9

September 22, 2020 Jen Seyderhelm
The RISE Canberra Podcast
Carmela Pavlic Searle and guests highlights - Podcast 9
Chapters
The RISE Canberra Podcast
Carmela Pavlic Searle and guests highlights - Podcast 9
Sep 22, 2020
Jen Seyderhelm

Welcome to the final RISE Canberra Podcast.

Produced by Events ACT, RISE Canberra is your home for experiencing local events, finding new ways to connect audiences with experiences made right here in the ACT by local makers, creators, artists and businesses. You can find out more at risecanberra.com

Jen Seyderhelm has been in conversation with Canberra creators, getting to know more about the approaches they're using to deliver events during these times. In this episode Jen speaks with Executive Producer for Events ACT Carmela Pavlic Searle who helped head up both RISE Canberra and the Where You Are Festival. You’ll also hear some previous episode highlights from Liz Lea, Dion Devow, Lexi Sekuless, Chris Ryan, Karen Champion, Keren Huggett, Nigel McRae, Marg Wade, Rauny Worm, Monica Penders and Fiona Harris.

Thank you for listening. These podcasts were created to show the depth of talent here in the Nation’s capital. They’ve also shown the resilience, collaboration and inclusivity that is present where we live.

The RISE Canberra Podcast are produced by Events ACT. The music is Three Times by Dawn by The Screaming Zucchinis.

Show Notes Transcript

Welcome to the final RISE Canberra Podcast.

Produced by Events ACT, RISE Canberra is your home for experiencing local events, finding new ways to connect audiences with experiences made right here in the ACT by local makers, creators, artists and businesses. You can find out more at risecanberra.com

Jen Seyderhelm has been in conversation with Canberra creators, getting to know more about the approaches they're using to deliver events during these times. In this episode Jen speaks with Executive Producer for Events ACT Carmela Pavlic Searle who helped head up both RISE Canberra and the Where You Are Festival. You’ll also hear some previous episode highlights from Liz Lea, Dion Devow, Lexi Sekuless, Chris Ryan, Karen Champion, Keren Huggett, Nigel McRae, Marg Wade, Rauny Worm, Monica Penders and Fiona Harris.

Thank you for listening. These podcasts were created to show the depth of talent here in the Nation’s capital. They’ve also shown the resilience, collaboration and inclusivity that is present where we live.

The RISE Canberra Podcast are produced by Events ACT. The music is Three Times by Dawn by The Screaming Zucchinis.

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the rise. Canberra podcast produced by events act rise. Canberra is your home for experiencing local events. Finding new ways to connect audiences with experiences made right here in the act by local makers, creators, artists, and businesses. You can find out more at rise, canberra.com. We've been in conversation with Canberra creators and getting to know more about the approaches they're using to deliver events during these times. I'm Jen SEDA home. And in this episode, I'm speaking with executive producer for events act Carmella , Pavlick , CEL , who has helped head up both rise Canberra, and the way you are festival the loss of here's. Some previous episode highlights from Lezlie, Deon Taobao , Lexie secularists , Chris Ryan, Karen champion, Karen Huggett, Nigel McCray , Mark Wade, Ronnie worm, Monica Penders and fear in a Harris. Hello, I'm Carmela , public sell , and I'm executive producer for events act County .

Speaker 2:

What did you want to be when you grew up?

Speaker 1:

I wanted to be an air force pilot,

Speaker 2:

And that's not the first time someone has responded like this while I've been doing this podcast project, which is really interesting. What stops ?

Speaker 1:

Well, I wanted to fly the FAA teens, and apparently my uterus stopped me.

Speaker 2:

Oh God, Dan uterus. And here I was, I actually thought at least every month, I thought you might've said it had something to do with height because Carmela public sale . I stood next to it. The other day, we were both wearing heels and I've got several inches on you and I'm not a particularly talk human being, but I know how few people who've tried to get into air force roles and it's literally been their height. That's restricted them.

Speaker 1:

Oh no, it was that. And probably the fact that I'm terrible at physics. Yeah. That is her about my obsession with Tom cruise

Speaker 2:

Instead of Ray-Bans instead for next. So instead you went down, well , you've gone down many different directions and I know you were like me. You're a radio enthusiast as well. Is that tied into the air force side of things? The radio enthusiasm?

Speaker 1:

No, I think I've had very, very many different jobs throughout my career. And I keep thinking, how did I end up where I ended up and it all boils down to wanting to make a difference. So air force was wanting to make a difference to protect the country. Radio was trying to help support the Australian music industry of which I'm very passionate about as well. And then all the very weed and wonderful offshoots of jobs that I've had since then kind of have that connection as well. But I've also just music fuels my soul. Yeah, yeah. Me too simple as that.

Speaker 2:

And even in, I suppose, some of the more diverse, non directly music related roles, there's always little thread in it somewhere or another. Cause I know you worked in defense for a while as well. You're working media side of things, the federal police. Yeah. How did you find that?

Speaker 1:

Oh, that was one of the most satisfying jobs I've ever had in my life. We helped break a global pedophile ring. I really worked hard on the national missing persons campaign, which is just massive now. And there's lots of wonderful things that we did, especially. One of the areas I looked after was online child protection. So really terrifying, but also extraordinarily rewarding job to do. And I think possibly one of my favorite and also working to commissioner Mick Kelty , who is an astounding man. And of course at that time, Andrew Colvin was his chief of staff who is now heading up the bushfire recovery couldn't have been given to a better guy. I've had the great gift of working with some amazing people over my lifetime as well.

Speaker 2:

And then you were working in trade. We were working in Australia, working overseas, overseas, and whereabouts overseas,

Speaker 1:

Everywhere. I'm online at the moment. So when I go back to Austrade, I was head of global events. I think that there's probably going to be a bit of a restructure. Now post COVID essentially was running events in the U S China, India, Indonesia, and then lots of smaller ones too , like Japan and various other countries, Mexico. That was great too.

Speaker 2:

Say global events where you organizing actual events or was it within where you working at the time facilitating what they were doing,

Speaker 1:

Typically trade and promotion events. So business week . So the business side of Gooday USA, which is what most people would be familiar with and then using the badge of government. So going with the PM or the trade ministers, or a whole bunch of cabinet ministers with Australian businesses into a country where we were negotiating free trade agreements. And just saying, we're here, let's do business. Let's do a deal. So yeah, it's strategic, quite fun too . Where are you from originally Canberra? So you are again ,

Speaker 2:

Born and bred. Now, then this comes back to the conversation I've had with many of the people and people are always surprised with the arts community here. How many people are Canberra born and bred or have come back to Canberra? Because before I came to Canada five years ago, if I asked people who were from Canberra, who I met in Sydney or Brisbane or whatever, and said, Oh, what do you think of Canberra? Particularly when it looked like we were heading there, they'd be like, no, I think the word a hole was used frequently. And it seems like this was the place that people lived in so they could get out of it eventually. Like there was always that aim, but the mindset has changed. Did you deliberately come back here or was it just ,

Speaker 1:

Um , a bit of both as tends to be in my life. I left Canberra, went to Sydney and then this is part of the radio career. So I went to de femme Sydney and then went

Speaker 2:

To Melbourne for double teeth and in a couple of other stations. And then my father got sick and Melbourne was a very, very long way away, too far away. So I wanted to come back and be closer to him. As the older you get, the more you realize that time is precious and fortuitously, Mick Kelty , the AFP commissioner was looking for staff. And I literally met him in the airport, the chairman's lounge and all an airport. And he went, come back to Canberra. So that worked in Welland. Wait . Yeah, I think the time is right now. So back I came, dad passed away and I've been here ever since and raised a family now raising in my beautiful family. How, how do you find that? For me? When I came to Canberra, I came to Canberra thinking I would eventually hit back to Brisbane one day and now that I'm here and there's so much opportunity and my kids are so happy here. And I remember the first day I, one thing I had this child, teenager accost me on a walk with my dog. Now I've lived in many places and children just don't accost you and start conversations. Any other places I've moved except for Canberra. And then the first day I went to my children's primary school, I got to the door and there was a child who was ahead of me. And he took the door, held the door open for me and allowed me to go through. And I could not, again, I have never been somewhere where the man is and I thought, what is this place? And this wasn't a one off. I remember when my son went to high school also, we went to a fate and one of his new high school friends came up to me and he actually shook my hand. He said, hi, my name is Troy I'm. Jacob's new friend at high school. It's lovely to meet you mrs. CEDA home. And I was like,

Speaker 3:

But this is Cambra normalcy. And he was just lining up. My daughter's like, if this is the best,

Speaker 2:

Nice to raise a family. Yeah. The girls love it. I mean, they don't know any different, although we take them traveling quite regularly, but they love Canberra. I don't think I've had opportunity to move, especially back to Melbourne. And they were not came at all and it's okay. Like there's nothing, anywhere else that could offer me anymore. And Canberra is so close to everything. The opportunities there, I think hopefully, yes, the attitude about the Canberra bubble or whatever is hopefully changing, but I'm really happy to be here. Events act. Yes. So much. You had lots of things that were scheduled for the future for activities that were both normal ones like flurry out, for instance. And then some that were innovative, which is you had your hands in and then COVID stopped things in its track. And we are here because of rise Canberra. What, what happened for you? Well, everything kind of stopped. And we were faced with this new reality of nobody knew what was happening in the foreseeable future.

Speaker 1:

And I had been, we were just ready to launch a new winter festival for Canberra. And the fact that we didn't know what was happening to that almost became a secondary thing because we all just kind of sat back and went, Oh my gosh, what does this mean? What's happening? And then we got the official word that all major events were postponed indefinitely until we worked out what was happening with COVID. So then I guess along with the rest of Canberra and Australia and the rest of the world was sat there going, what happens now? Like what does it mean? What can we do? And that's pretty much where we stopped and took stock and started talking to the industry. Once we realized pretty quickly that arts and events were going to be significantly impacted by what was happening around us.

Speaker 2:

Mm well, there's no precedent for this. There's no prior model that you could base experience on. And traditionally the government everything's planned a year in advance, maybe even longer than that. And so this project in itself coming together so quickly has been, yeah .

Speaker 1:

Incredible. Thank you. I think so.

Speaker 2:

I think so too. I clearly, we weren't all of a sudden had lots of things in our diary to work towards, but the thing with your role is that you are both in control of it broadly, but you're also reliant on each of the components working individually. And in this, you have no template. How have you found this whole rise experience?

Speaker 1:

It's been joyous and terrifying. As I said, see, there's always that duplicitous nature of, of the work. It has been amazing to watch creativity being born out of this and collaborations happening that normally wouldn't happen. And what I've noticed particularly is people seem a lot more forgiving at the moment in government. It takes a long time to get things done. There's a lot of processes that you need to follow because you're responsible for public monies and a whole range of things. So the fact that we basically turn around firstly, the rise platform, the website, to give a voice to those Canberrans that could actually deliver events, then actually pulling together a festival in three weeks and serendipitously launching on the day that we should have been launching the winter festival was quite astounding. And I still sit back and go, wow, I can't believe we did that. But we kind of, we set the ball in motion. Canberra is makers and creators and artists did it really. And the reason why it's so amazing and beautiful is because of what they came up with.

Speaker 2:

Well, and it's like the , uh , field of dreams line too . You can build it, but will they come? But people have come in spades, everything sold out. I've had moments where an enterprise it or escape is a case in point where I went to go to the Saturday almost, I felt like the first day and it was already sold out. So that's amazing.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And even the online attendance for Rocksby, we'll take that as an example, they had a, I think it was about 700 in that first night online. And I said, well, how does that compare for when you're actually outside and at the Lake? And that Lexi said, well, normally around about a thousand, but it's free and it's outside. So she was thrilled with the fact that for their first time experiment that we got those kinds of numbers. Yeah. So there's definitely an appetite people in Canberra definitely still want to be involved in events and make those connections and follow a festival program. So that's great.

Speaker 2:

Well, from experience being here in terms of support for the arts, broadly speaking, the act is, has numbers off the charts. So we will, we're prepared to pay a ticket to go see concerts, classical music we have that base to start with, but how it looks now is different to how it looked beforehand. So I'm , I'm not surprised that people came, what I've loved though. And this actually came out from talking with Carrie Leeson from lifeline, is that in that situation where you have the choice to ring lifeline, or you can be on the phones, helping other people from lifeline, the act wants to help. Right. And so what I've loved with this project also is that all these arts practitioners have, rather than sitting there going, Oh , what can I do to help myself? They're looking to, what can I do to help as broad an audience as possible? And I see it in every single interview I've done.

Speaker 1:

That's fantastic. Well , I have to say, now that it's done and the finale events really kind of brought this home when I saw all the creators talking together and I just started hearing about all these extra projects that have started popping up and I went, wow, we've created an ecosystem. It's got a life of its own now. So I thought we only had a small budget. We only had like a tiny little piece that we could help the events and art sector with, but it seems like they've taken that little bit and they're growing it into something that will continue on well beyond rise and the way you are festival, which is just thrilling. Yeah. Yeah. Do you think that

Speaker 2:

And other States and territories have looked to us for this model and gone and look what the act has done?

Speaker 1:

Well, I've had people and friends reach out to me from interstate and it's been in their music newsletters and they've picked up on it and had people going, can we talk to you about it? Can we understand what the thinking was and how you went about doing it? Because I think people were quite surprised, one at how quickly it developed, but also like it was a beautiful program. I make the joke that if you look at it, it's not pretty, but if you really look at it, it's beautiful because we had something for everyone. And like I said, we did it on a relatively small budget. So our head of programming, Adam did a sensational job of just making sure that the diversity was there and that everyone was represented. And we had some pretty clear, some pretty clear goals, get money into the industry, make sure we keep at risk members of the community in Canberra connected and deliver something of value. And , um, I think, I hope that's what we did

Speaker 2:

Stop. You did two sides to this one that you just mentioned yourself about in the past. I think that there was a tendency to be insular within your artistic industries . So the musos might stick with the musos that performance artists stuck with performance artists, et cetera, but you are absolutely right. That finale we had because we need to, there is that thread of networking across these industries with forgiveness and with acceptance of new ideas that I've never seen. Yep . And I, I was like you , I got goosebumps at the moment, but I felt this shift in the willingness to embrace each other rather than to poke the nose up at someone else's not directly connected

Speaker 1:

Artistic field. Fantastic. Cause I can see that that has happened in the past, which is always quite interesting in itself, but I really feel that through necessity, people are willing now to collaborate in a way that they haven't before. And how that's thrilling to me is as the exec producer for what will be an innovation festival, that's exactly the start that you need. You need all those diverse people in a room together, looking at a problem and saying, how do we move forward on this? So I was asked the question by the head of the directorate about how, how did I feel about the innovation festival, not going ahead. And I went, well, it kind of deed just in a smaller way. And to me, I really think of this as a first step. And hopefully we can bring all that collaboration, all that Goodwill, all that creativity and just keep giving people platforms like bigger and bigger platforms to be able to explore that and really showcase Canberra because that's the other thing that I think has been a really big win out of this whole COVID situation is the priding Canberra and what we can produce going into the winter festival, there was a really big desire about you need the big names and you need someone else, someone out to be able to really draw the crowds in, but you know , we don't. And I really think that that attitude has definitely shifted in the last few months. As people can see the talent that we've got here, it's kind of astounding. And I feel like I'm discovering it for the first time because I work overseas primarily. I never really paid attention to Canberra. He came back, did the washing hugged the kids well, that stuff, but I've never really worked, worked in the arts and events system and industries here. And so it's been really thrilling to see like we are awesome . We are awesome. And it's just, I think we're getting, because we're finding ways to hang on to those really amazing people. I think there's a less of a need for them to go elsewhere to do what they have to do. So if we can help contribute to that all the better, I say,

Speaker 2:

Because he is a case in point immediately in my mind and also Nigel from Smith's his big thing was that, why do we keep bringing in artists from outside when we have so much here that we can draw on in the first place? And again, I got that message loud and clear, cause he'd seen it for a long time before I suppose the community and beyond that embraced it as well. So I suppose you'd kind of just answered that, but what is your hope for post COVID arts in Canberra?

Speaker 1:

Oh gosh. Yes. Just that we continue on with all the positivity that's come out of it. So the creativity, the collaboration, the forgiveness, the willingness by audiences to kind of try something new. That includes me. I watched a whole bunch of stuff I probably normally never would have. And again, because we have more time because we can't go out, we are doing that. We're exploring. Well, I feel definitely I'm exploring beyond what I would know. And I really hope that that entrenches itself a little bit as we come out of covert and that people are still willing to kind of explore and see and do, and that our creators just keep finding those really amazing collaborations and keep going and that we give them a platform to do that.

Speaker 2:

Finally, there is a saying from one of the psychologists, I think it's Piaget, but I can't recall. And it's around how our children are a reflection as they grow up the unlived lives of their mother. And I was thinking about this the other day. I know it's a full on thing. And I was thinking about this from yours and my angle being mothers. And what do your children make of what you do? What do they know of what you do?

Speaker 1:

That's a really interesting question. I'm not sure what they think. I tend to be very low key at home. It's kind of like my safe space and I downplay a lot of what I do at home because my focus, like my focus when I'm working is I'm promoting Australia, I'm promoting Canberra, I'm helping businesses. I'm helping people when I'm at home with them, I'm helping them. And I'm trying to help them be the best little humans that they can be. And I hope that what they make of what I do is that they can do anything. And that's the point of having a really varied career as well. It's like, if I want to give that a go, I'm going to give that a go. And if I don't succeed, that's okay because it might lead to something else. And that's really, I just think if they can take away from me that just give it a go just to have a go .

Speaker 4:

Well, I'm going to say two things out of this. Having worked in radio and you'll understand this, the producer behind the scenes is the one that makes things work and they're the unsung hero. And even in this conversation here, you've talked about all the different threads, but really you held them all together. And I am very, very aware of that. And I had a conversation with my own child the other day and he said, let's do this exercise where we describe each other in three words. And we described everyone and his first word to describe me was cool. And I thought to myself, going forward, if I'm calling my child's eyes, then I'm going okay . I that's exactly my feeling as well. And so I hope when you listen back to this, if your children listen back to it too, they are aware of the fact that you are the conductor here of a mighty orchestra. And we all played in tune. Thank you so much. And luckily I have a Greg [inaudible] and on that note, I will wrap up this podcast with Carmella Pavlik . So who headed up this incredible opportunity for all of us. And I'm going to lean over and give Jen a very non socially distant hug.

Speaker 5:

Well , we'll do all the cleaning,

Speaker 4:

Carmela Pavlik . So , and now for some highlights from the rise Canberra podcast guests, hi, my name is Liz Lee. I'm a dance artist, producer and mentor, I think as well. There's been a lot of people who have been three or four times as busy during COVID to kind of handle the crisis. And there may be the people who need to have more of an understanding of how powerful the arts are. I mean, if you shut down all the radio programs played no music for a week, no dance. It didn't look at any art didn't read any books, nothing would happen. Nothing would happen. Even driving a car, they're an art form of engineering to a certain degree. Do you know what I mean? And the aesthetic line of a car or the color, it's all there. Yes. You could be doing a lot of walking in nature, but even then you're going to be listening for the bird song and that's that's music, eighties all around us, but we kind of forget, and then it gets put into a box. And so we're not going to come out of this within the next six months. And even if we came out of it within the next six months, we're not going to be fixed because I think what this is revealed is certainly within the arts, there were a lot of things that are really fragile and a bit broken. Those of us who are working freelance and you go from job to job, we bust our guts to make sure we've got as much work lined up for the next 18 months and so on and so forth. And you do the best job you can so that you can hopefully keep employed and so on. And this is revealed that there is a fragility within that. Like if something in the system stops, we come to a grinding halt and we work incredibly hard. And I think we need to look at the system that we have to see what we can do to ensure that if something like this happens again, it's not a grinding halt, but there is a way through it. I mean, I've got a lot of different colleagues who were starting to look at different career avenues, not necessarily stopping being an artist anymore, but doing a business management degree, do I really want to be an administrator anymore? What else should I be doing? Obviously, I don't know all the answers, but I, I think one of the issues with answering that question is we genuinely don't know when we're going to come out of it. And we don't know what we're walking back into. One of the things that has been causing me panic to a certain degree is hearing about all these incredibly well-funded like the Royal opera house is apparently in trouble. Western venues are in trouble. Yeah . Wow. And I'm not saying, Oh my goodness, that stressful. I mean, it is dreadful, but those are the kind of venues that are really well supported that have a strong, I would say business model, if they're in trouble, how does the average Joe blow on the street make it work? And where does everybody go to make a living to live? So there's these different undulations of uncertainty within our industry overlaid with what's happening with covered overlaid with government decisions. And it's quite easy to feel quite powerless.

Speaker 6:

Hello. My name is Dion devel . I'm the creator and owner of donkeys designs that had so many positive comments about giving non-indigenous kids and people, the opportunity to where Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art on their clothing and their school apparel really proudly. And I think that sometimes nonindigenous Australians can feel a little bit hesitant about wearing Aboriginal art and language and symbols on their clients because they feel like they can't because they're not Aboriginal one. That's not the case. We need to embrace an Aboriginal and enters a culture as part of being Australian that can be worn and used respectfully by anybody, whether they're Australian, whether they're indigenous or non indigenous or anywhere in the world.

Speaker 4:

My name is Lexi secularists , all of a sudden all these artists and not only from Canberra, but they're proud to be from Canberra. And I'm loving this shift in the paradigm, even in what I'm seeing in this covert situation that we're like where Canberrans with fantastic artists, there's so much talent here. There is. I think it's a well resource town. It's a beautiful town. As I was saying before, it's where I used to come for ideas, inspiration, rest , charge , open and off I go. But the off I go can be happening here. It's also a city that's growing. You know, I did a summer season in , in Sydney and speaking to people yeah. Out us from other areas. When they talk about the leg of the tour, the Cambra leg, when they talk about when they got to come to the Playhouse, they talk about how Cambra audiences seem to really be listening . It's a very, very unique place which often can be people can poopoo it a little bit. And there has been, I think up until now or up until had about the last five years, people would reach a point and leave Canberra and people are just beginning to see with the resources that are here. This is obviously things . So we'll have to see what's going on with COVID and there's some things for clothes and stuff, but you know, the venues and the capacity and what I suppose I would like Lake spear to be as well. I'm keen to bring in those, those artists who did leave so that it was my brother who told me this, that Australia pinched Russell Crowe from New Zealand, because he was able to establish himself as an artist here. And I think Canberra previously in our past, we've lost some artists because they were unable to establish themselves outside of Canberra. And I think that's just beginning to change. And I certainly like to be a part of that changing permanently.

Speaker 1:

Hello, I'm Chris Ryan. I'm a comedian in Canberra. I think there's a lot to be said for that in arts organizations in leadership is to actually just tap people on the shoulder and say, we're ready for you to do this. I think you should just do it because that gave me the strength to believe that I could do it. And I believe, and I know I can, but to have someone else like an organization say, come and do it. And then for it to sell out, it feels good. And I think that's pretty much why I wanted to teach the course as well as because I run comedy in Canberra. You know, that's part of what I do with my life. And I want to have more diverse voices on stage, as simple as that, I want more voices on stage and more diverse voices. So I want to hear from people we haven't heard from traditionally and look it's obvious. I mean, it might be hackneyed, but it's traditionally been sort of heterosexual. Anglosaxon men of a certain age group that have been very comfortable to start comedy. And I'm really grateful for all those men that I know that are dear friends and allies of mine and others. But now it's really about me helping those that come after me. I'm just this old white lady. And if I'm not intimidating or good, that's what I want in this circumstance. In other circumstances, I wish for people to be intimidated by me. I'm Karen champ .

Speaker 4:

I've worked in the disability sector for a number of years. In October, 2018, energy was launched. It's a disco for people with a disability in want to see in the very beginning, we just wanted to make a difference for people with a disability. And we didn't realize the impact that that would have. We've also found with carers that they come and they have a great time their individual, and they could be sitting on a chair, but because the carers are come on, we need to get up and dance. That encouragement is there. And you find that the individual has a dance partner. And so you have more confidence to be on the dance floor, surrounded with other people dancing. And yeah, it's really difficult to explain, but they just come alive and it doesn't seem like a big deal type of thing, but it actually is because some of these people do not talk they're nonverbal. And when you actually see their movement, you've sort of opened up something in them. And we've had carers that have said, Oh my God, I didn't know that she could do that. You see? And we've had some people that have come for the very first time and they've sat on a chair. They've sort of looked around and they're interested in the lights and stuff like that, but they really haven't gone on the dance floor. But the following week when they come, they're a completely different person and they're excited and they're happy. And they're like, see you next week. Yeah, it's really endearing for me. It really is. Cause I can see that this small little thing is actually, let's say only an hourly event weekly on every Tuesday night , seven to 8:00 PM, but they look forward to it and some are getting ready at four or five in the afternoon, just so they can come to this.

Speaker 7:

I am Nigel McCray and I'm one of the owners of Smith's alternative. The community's changed to see a lot more people who are proud to be Canberrans has a lot more ownership of the local art scene and things like the government when they put on a , a show or something in the Hyde park or whatever, they'll just book a whole lot of local artists, which just didn't use to happen. Or it used to drive us mad that the government would spend thousands of dollars getting in musical artists from Sydney and elsewhere. And we knew how much talent there was here, but Cambridge didn't, that's the sort of thing that really is a big change and going on, I think that'll just grow and grow and people will start to know and love the local culture.

Speaker 4:

Hi, my name is Karen Huggett. I'm an early childhood educator, a early childhood consultant and an energy healer. And for me, I learned how to be very present because I love the earth and I love being out in the Bush. And I have mates, I'm mates with trees and I'm the crazy person when you're driving past Hindmarsh at sunset. That's snuggled up against a big gum. I know that this is going to be Bush. Play connections is going to be wonderful for the communities in Canberra, because we are going to have a chance to be together. It's going to be quite a conscious space to be able to come and be welcomed. And no matter how many times his mum , you know, I'm a mother too. How many times have we gone? Oh , I just can't get my stuff together today. I'm just not going to get out of the house. Like Bush plays about rocking up being there. It takes a community to raise a child wing , know this, you've seen it in every indigenous culture that's ever existed on the planet. It is been weaved out of our existence so much, and it's really time for community to come back together in a really conscious way and to go as you are right here today, I see you. I support you. You want a cup of tea? I'm Mark Wade. I'm the author of Canberra secrets. And I'm also the owner operator of canvas secrets, personalized tours. That's the lovely thing about Canberra. And I really like the fact that we're not a huge city. And when people compare Canberra with Sydney or Melbourne, well, how can you be compared with a city that's four or 5 million and we're not half a million yet. And that was one of the triggers for writing the book. I was fed up with people, bagging Canberra, and I went to a reunion and somebody said to me, where are you living? And what are you doing? And I said, Oh , I was teaching in Canberra. And she said, Oh, well, you can't help bad luck. And I thought, how insulting, how insulting? I would never say that to somebody else about where they live, but people seem to think they have license to do that about people who live in Canberra. And I'd like to think that's getting better. And the old concept of canvas boring. Well, if somebody says that they haven't been here for 30 years or they haven't been here at all,

Speaker 8:

Hi, I'm brownie brownie worm. I'm currently the CEO of the Tuggeranong arts center. It really didn't take me long to fall in love with Canberra and then having the opportunity to work on Canberra during the centenary or those two years prior as well was like a real introduction. I'd already lived here 10 years, but all of a sudden I was understanding so much more about Canberra because I went to all these places and I sat my desk was next to a great historian, dr. David Haden , and just going to work was a pleasure because the stories he could tell the background stories were phenomenal. And I became this real King or Mallee fan .

Speaker 4:

Hi, I'm Monica Penders. And I'm the CEO of screen Canberra. This isn't about a nice to have. There are more jobs in the screen industry than there are in colon gas in Australia. So we are looking at a lot of jobs. And of course with the federal government support during this pandemic, the job keeper, majority of people in the screen industry did not qualify because they don't have their own company or B you don't work for a company you freelance and therefore they fell through the cracks. So no only was there no work, there was no or very little support for them to, to survive. And that's really hard. And like creativity, arts, all of those with some people may look as fluffy, other things that make us human things that make us intelligent. I think it was Churchill who said during the second world war, when somebody who suggested cutting money from arts to go towards defense and his comment was, or what are we fighting for? My name is Fiona Harris. I was born in Canberra at Canberra hospital. I'm an early childhood educator in Canberra. And I'm also the facilitator of an intergenerational learning program at my workplace. When this COVID thing stops changes, we go back to some sort of normal. What would you like to see? I want to keep going with these aged care connections, because I think the aged care industry is there's a lot of wonderful people who work in it, but there's this, there's this barrier for a lot of people there. Why are you doing Dora ? They're a bit scared about making that step and walking into a center, just to connect with the residents or to say hello, or like some of these people don't get any visits ever that just focus my mind in the future. I want to be, I want to be singing to these people. I want to be dancing with these people. I want to be bringing the children in to visit these people. I'm currently doing it when it starts up again. I've already got that going as part of my workplace, but I just want to take it further. Like I want to start doing it across Canberra, start doing art and start bringing art in the children, into these residents and just creating together, spending some time together. Thank you for listening to the rise Canberra podcasts. They were created to show the depth of talent here in the nation's capital , as well as events created for the way you are festival. They've also shown the resilience, collaboration, and inclusivity that is present, where we live, where I live. The rise Canberra podcast was produced by events, act with support from talking Canberra TWC.