Alpha Connect Sisterhood Series

Special Edition: Past National President Lori White Scott, EE

April 09, 2021 Kelly McGinnis Beck Season 1 Episode 27
Alpha Connect Sisterhood Series
Special Edition: Past National President Lori White Scott, EE
Chapters
Alpha Connect Sisterhood Series
Special Edition: Past National President Lori White Scott, EE
Apr 09, 2021 Season 1 Episode 27
Kelly McGinnis Beck

On this next episode, Kelly speaks with Lori White Scott, EE, who served as national president from 2004-2008.

Show Notes Transcript

On this next episode, Kelly speaks with Lori White Scott, EE, who served as national president from 2004-2008.

Special Edition Podcast: Past National President, Lori White Scott, EE

Disclaimer: This transcript was developed with an automated transcription program, spelling and grammar errors may occur. 

Kelly  

Welcome to this special edition of the Apha Connect sisterhood series podcast, featuring stories from our living past national presidents. I'm Kelly McGinnis Beck, national president and your host. On today's episode, I chat with Lori White Scott and Epsilon Epsilon from Emporia State University in Kansas, who served as national president from 2004 to 2008. I hope you're ready to laugh because Lori's bubbly personality and hilarious stories are going to keep a smile on your face through this entire episode. So today, I am joined by past national president Lori White Scott, welcome, Laurie. 

 Lori 
Hi, Kelly. 

 Kelly 
Lori was national president from 2004 to 2008. But before we talk about that time, Lori, I want you to share with everybody your story of how you became an Alpha Sigma Alpha.

 Lori 
Oh, it's a good one. I went to Emporia State University, which is the home of Epsilon Epsilon chapter. And it was the fall of 1979. I had three roommates, we had our four person back then it was called a dorm room. And so we all went through rush. It was another term from 1979. Now recruitment, I had no intention of joining a sorority, I was very independent, and just wanted to meet people and see what it was all about. And we went through recruitment together. Well, I, the minute I walked into the Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority house, I was sucked in and they were so genuinely warm and friendly. And literally just swept you in and I was introduced, it was loud. It was boisterous. There was laughter, everyone, and the gal that met me at the door Stacy, Stacy McGee Banks, but Stacy McGee was my hostess that day. And it was just very informal. We were just walking through the house, it was house tours, and everywhere we stopped, somebody would say, Oh, I want you to meet our chapter president Stacy McGee and and I was just floored because she never once said that she was president to me, that's not how she introduced herself. She was just Stacy. And I loved that because of the other sorority chapters that I visited on campus. There was always an official greeting line and the chapter president was at the head of the line and, and it was obvious that the President was a bit elevated above all of the other chapter members. And I loved that Stacy was one of the gals. And no one really, you know, they did introduce her as the president, but she didn't see herself as any different than anyone else. And I love that everyone was on the equal playing field. And that was one of the things that really attracted me, but she was so warm and friendly and everyone was and that I knew instantly I was going to join, and I let my parents know about the decision. My parents both went to KU, University of Kansas in the early 50s. And neither one was part of a fraternity or sorority. In fact, my dad was invited by one of the fraternities to be on the base, their intramural, recreational, whatever baseball team because he was a really good baseball player, but they would never have asked him to be a member. And well, he was a townie, he was from Lawrence. And just, I guess they just didn't see him as someone. You know, it was very, it was very different. Very, I guess you'd use the word snooty or snobbish. And so they both had a very negative perception of fraternities and sororities. And so when I called them and I said, I'm going to join Alpha Sigma Alpha, my dad specifically and my mom to both said, absolutely not, you are not going to be part of a sorority. And so the next day I joined Alpha Sigma Alpha 

 Kelly 
Why does not surprise me whatsoever?

 Lori 
So a few weeks after I joined, it was dad's weekend. So I invited my dad to come and he did. After he met my chapter sisters, he knew why I had made that decision and did what I had done and absolutely became Mr. Alpha Sigma Alpha. I mean, he is like the number one fan and cheerleader for Alpha Sigma Alpha and has been the entire time I've been a member. So my chapter members when they see me, they always ask how my dad is doing. And he, he became a number one fan after he found out what it was all about after he experienced it himself. So I'm a big proponent of parents weekends, because I think it's important for members to bring their families into their chapters so they can actually meet their best friends and see what really the whole experience is all about.

 Kelly 
Absolutely. So did you join as a first semester freshman, or? 

 Lori 
Yeah, at Emporia they had recruitment or rush before school even started. So before I went to my first class at Emporia, I already had, you know, 80 women friends, and was right at home. Three of my four roommates, we joined Alpha Sigma Alpha together, the fourth bucked the trend, and she became a tri sigma. And so, but ironically, she only state two years in her chapter, whereas the rest of us stayed. In fact, another friend of mine in high school, joined her junior year, she transferred from K state to come to Emporia with no housing, because she knew she was going to just immediately move into the Alpha Sigma Alpha house who of course loved her. So it was a natural fit. And so really, I have seven friends from high school, there's seven of in a group that are still close to this day. And four of them are Alpha Sigma Alphas. 

Lori 
Yeah. Really cool. No, 5 of us, no counting wrong four, there are four of us, I think. Yeah. So it's just it's really, really neat. And then my, my chapters sisters, we took the unique experience there, I still to this day, I they're my best friends. And I've been such a support structure, especially just through the last two years. It's it's been incredible. So if anyone wants to know, the true definition of what being in a sorority is all about? Or what's true sisterhood and friendship is, they just need to look at the women that I know.

 Kelly 
Oh that's neat

Lori
Well, that's what sisterhood is about, right? Being a being there to support each other through the good and the bad, and everything in between.

Kelly
So tell us a little bit about your path to becoming national president. What did that look like?

 Lori 
Well, I will I think first I should backtrack a little bit because I actually met Jack, my husband in the Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority, it was just this, I guess you'd call it a byproduct of being a member of the sorority, but he was boy, how we had guide from most of them were fraternity guys that would come over and we had a big kitchen and, and dining room in the basement of our sorority house. And so they would come and serve our meals every dinner. So they would come through the door with their baskets of food and plates and present them to us with our food. And then if we wanted seconds, we would ring a bell, they would come back out of the kitchen and you know, purchase more biscuits or whenever we wanted, they would bring it to us. And then after dinner, we brought him our plates and they wash our dishes. It was awesome. But senior year, we the seniors always did what they called a senior sneak and we would kidnap the house boys and go on a outing. Well, we all piled into each other's cars and went to about 45 minutes away went to a rib place was actually called Guy and May's Bear Butt Barbecue. And so we all went, so when he and I packed into the same car and we talked the whole evening and the next day he called and asked me to one of his fraternity parties that was coming up. So we went to a Tahiti in the sticks party at the Sigma Pi that they had put put together on April 23, 1983. And then that was it. So, So that's another thing about joining a sorority at a Emporia state you might need a house boy

 Kelly 
S
o you met him your senior year of college.

 Lori 
Yes, in fact he's a year younger than I was. So I graduated like three years, three weeks after we met. And also one of his, than I lived in Kansas City. He lived in way western Kansas. So he came and lived with one of his fraternity brothers that summer because I just had six weeks before I started my job in Oklahoma City. And so we dated that summer. And then I moved to Oklahoma City, and we just dated long distance for a year while he finished up school. And then he moved to Oklahoma City after he graduated. 

 Kelly 
Oh, that's fun. 

 Lori 
It was fun. 

Kelly 
So tell us once you graduated, moved to Oklahoma City, what next? How did you stay involved with Alpha Sigma Alpha. 

Lori 
So that's ironic, because night night, that was 1983. I was in Oklahoma City till 19, at the end of 1984. But that summer of 1984 was the national convention in Kansas City. I missed it. So I, the conventions been twice in my hometown, and I've missed both times. I don't know what the deal is. So we probably better steer clear of Kansas City. 

Kelly 
Well some day we'll be back there and hopefully, you'll be able to make it and we won't have to cancel it again.

 Lori 
I hope so. I sure hope so. So, so anyway, then, by end of 1984, Jack and I had moved back to Kansas City, I transferred with my accounting firm and worked in Kansas City, and he got off immediately upon coming to Kansas City. And oh, in 1985 Cindy Fundus, who my chapter sister Cindy Fundus Smith had, she was a chapter consultant her senior year, and was the only one that traveled that year.

Kelly 
Oh that's a fascinating story I'm sure. 

Lori 
And so, so then, I guess a year after she had finished traveling then for she graduate 84 or 85. So right after she quit traveling, they asked her to be a province director in the Kansas Missouri area, and they needed another one. And so she called me up and said, Hey, we need another province director, do you want to do it with me? And I said, Sure. And that was I think that's one of the things. I always, anytime there was a volunteer opportunity, whether it was in college, or afterwards, I always said yes.

Kelly 
And it doesn't surprise me, Lori.

 Lori 
I could, I could picture sitting in a chapter meeting and someone saying, hey, we need someone to make name tags for dads weekend. And was like, okay, I'll do it. You know, raise your hand. And when we need someone to help submit our awards application for Greek week. Okay, I'll do it. Well, so same thing when Cindy called, it's like, okay, and so I had no idea what I was doing, but being a province director with her and and it was, you know, an off year, so it might take you five. So 1986 was the first year I went to a convention as a volunteer. I did get to go to Chicago in 1982. I was our collegiate delegate. So I fell in love with the National Alpha Sigma Alpha at that point, and I actually really wanted to be chapter consultant because Sue Zorchik had visited our chapter.

 Kelly 
Okay.

 Lori 
Yeah, she she was in my room. And so she and one of my chapter sisters Judy Biggs became was served as, it was back then it was a field representative. So they served together. And so they were in 1982 in Chicago, and they paired, like Sue was Beta Beta Judy's, Epsilon Epsilon. So they paired me with Beth Colwell, who was the Beta Beta rep. And they told us okay, here's the plan. You guys are going to be the two consultants when you graduate, we're gonna do that. Well, Beth went ahead and did it. She traveled. And I then submitted my application but I had to withdraw it because I got an offer I couldn't refuse in my field of accounting and I, I just felt like it was something I had to, had to do. And of course, I've regretted that ever since so I'm a an official leadership consultant wanna be

 Kelly 
I'm sorry you missed that opportunity

Lori 
But I that that 82 convention, I like National Council did a skit. And Retta Robinson was the president and she, they were sitting around a card table pretending like they were playing cards and just retelling embarrassing stories about each other. Rhetta had told this story and here she is with her Southern accent. She was tall, elegant blonde, and she was telling the story about the first time she met her husband's boss and she was shaking hands and our formal gown and her fake fingernail fell off in her boss's hand. Everybody started laughing and I just thought, okay, I really liked her. I want to be just like her. So she was President when I applied. And I remember when I became chapter President, I thought, well, that means I'm best friends with the national president. I would call her up, that poor woman, I call her all the time, just, Hey, how's it going? I'm a president too. We have so much in common. But it was always so kind to me. It never bothered her that some little collegian from Kansas was just calling her out of the blue. But so I that was one of my big regrets. But once Cindy and I started volunteering together, it just just became one of these things where you just every other opportunity that came along, after I was a province director, I was housing Chairman. I can remember as, gosh, I went to a back then it was state day, but I remember go into a state day nine, nine months pregnant, sleeping in a bunk bed. 

 Kelly 
Oh, my goodness. 

 Lori 
So it was just so much fun. Every experience, I think, when 1992 Rosemary Goss asked me to serve as chairman of colonies, and that was actually my, I just loved it. I got to meet these collegiate women that I call trailblazers, because they were on their college campuses with other sororities, or maybe no sororities at all. And they had guts, they had a determination and they said, I want to start my own group, kind of like our founders. And I've just always admired their courage and their hard work, their enthusiasm. That just energized me working with those kinds of women. And then also Guess who I got to work with, leadership consultants. My favorite people that I can remember always being on the phone with the women that were at our colonies, and one time Myrna Ward. Well, she and I would work together a lot. This was actually after, when she worked at headquarters, but she was on the phone. We were talking about an upcoming visit we were making. And I remember looking out my back window, and my dog was out there digging up my old dog and came into the house with a dog bone, a literal dog bone in her mouth, and I remember telling Myrna, Myrna, I've got to go. My new dog is digging up my old dog. Trying to picture what her face must have looked like.

 Kelly 
So I know the story of some of your dogs. I'm guessing that was not Weasley.

Lori 
No, that was Zoey, dug up Shelby. And actually came into my house with Shelby's femur.

 Kelly 
Oh, goodness.

 Lori 
Yeah, so anyway. Yeah. So when we, well Rosemary was VP of extension while I was doing colonies, and so she came to Kansas City to do an extension visit at Rockhurst.

 Kelly 
Okay

 Lori 
So that was my first extension visit, she invited me. She came and stayed at my house. And I, again, got sucked in. It was such a phenomenal experience. And I knew that that was what I really, really wanted to do in the future. And that visit was also memorable because Rosemary came to my house and we went shopping on the plaza one morning and the girls came with us. They were maybe, gosh, three and five. Rosemary was trying on this outfit. And the girls both said Rosemary, can we go in there with you? And I was like, No, no, no. And so of course they go in with Rosemary into the dressing this enclosed space. And I was standing outside and I heard the biggest fart. Of course, Amanda goes was that you Rosemary. And of course Kayla's like no, it wasn't.  And I was just dying outside, dying. My kids were farting in front of the past national president. So we went, we went to the house and we were getting ready for the actual presentation and Rosemary within the guest room and Amanda was tearing through the house. And Jack was trying to catch her and she busted into Rosemary's bedroom. Here she was in her underwear. Jack's like just like, uhh hi Rosemary. Grabs Amanda and ran out.

 Kelly 
My God, what a great story.

 Lori 
I know. Why anyone wants to ever visit at my house I do not know. But it was it was wonderful. And Rosemary and Diane, both are my mentors have role models to these this day. So it was the start of something wonderful. But I do I did crack up because when Rosemary and I, when I first met her, we met at the 1982 convention in Chicago in an elevator and we have a picture from that.

 Kelly 
Oh, neat.

 Lori 
We were at the top of the john Hancock building in Chicago. So it was really cool. But Rosemary when she was president came to Kansas City to go to a state day. And so I was driving. And I had my husband's car. And she sat in the front seat. It used to just irritate the heck out of me, because she would always call me Rachel. And I was like, my name is not Rachel. But anyway, so I was kind of intimidated by her. So she got the car, and I didn't realize my husband had his no farting in the car key chain, right there on is. Rosemary just started busting out laughing. And I was just like, well, what if she pointed to that. And I was again, dying. Why is this always happened to me? And so anyway, she started telling me all have her fart stories. And so we instantly on did and after that became like BFFs. Yeah, I kind of have a lot of those kinds of stories.

 Kelly 
So how did you go from genercolies (sp.)? And then you found your way onto National Council?

 Lori 
Yes, yes. So they, Leslie Ziringer had served as vice president of extension and had adopted a little girl and then she got pregnant. So she went off of council and they appointed me as the new VP of extension. And I absolutely again, I loved it. I got to represent Alpha Sigma Alpha visiting college campuses, I probably, I don't, I lost count, but at least 50 campuses that I visited,

 Kelly 
And you're the queen of extension, Lori.

 Lori 
It was an amazing experience I absolutely loved, loved every minute of it. And I you know, I've kind of loved every different volunteer opportunity. But back then the VP of extension also served on the NPC delegation. And so here I was VP of extension, I was newly on council, newly on the NPC delegation. And it was, it was just I loved all of it. It was it was really interesting and fun. And after that, I just became close with everyone I served on council with and and when Marianne became president, I kind of was basically her right hand anytime she needed anything. We spent hours on the phone talking. In fact, I do have another story about my kids. One day, we're playing with some neighbor girls, and I walked in and they had Barbies. And I just remember one daughter, I think it was Kayla was saying, Hi, I'm an Alpha Sigma Alpha Barbie, I talked on the phone all the time. Back then, you know, before cellphones, again, we were to start the telephone all the time. But then I worked closely with Marianne so when she served her, after she served her four years, then I became the president. And it was just a kind of a natural flow. She had prepared me so well, that it was a very smooth transition. And then she continued, she went out she was the first president and then immediately went off as council after serving as president, because it was always kind of tradition that the President would serve another couple of years just to help the new president with everything. And Marianne was the first one to say, No, I'm done. And it's time for the new president to assume that role without, you know, anyone else in the room that anyone might be looking to for the leadership. So it was it was really great. I think that started a whole new tradition.

 Kelly 
Yes, definitely. And she was always in the background as the person you could call.

 Lori 
Absolutely. Absolutely. And to this day, in fact, this Thursday, I'm headed to Dallas and Marianne Bullock and Angela Baldry, Barb Williamson, I who all served on council together are just going to spend the weekend together. So, 

 Kelly 
Oh, that'll be fun. Tell them all I said, hi.

 Lori 
It's cool. I will. 

Kelly 
So tell us about you know, the the I keep, I want to say eight years because we're in a presidential election period, but four years as national president, what were some of the things that happened during that time period in Alpha Sigma Alpha, or that happened kind of in the world that had an impact on Alpha Sigma Alpha? 

 Lori 
Oh, gosh, we I really had it. It was an interesting four years and ironic, because after serving so long as vice president extension, and installing maybe four chapters a year for, you know, year after year, while I was president in all four years, we only installed two chapters. So that was, you know, really interesting, but it was, we were just coming off of a significant economic downturn. So we had really, just had to make a lot of changes based on financial decisions. And probably one of the first things that we did was hire Krystal Slivinkski as our executive director, and which is really the start of something incredible. She's done some fabulous things for our organization. But that was probably the first thing and then in what year was it 2005 I think, the Longwood rotunda was rededicated it had burned the word Bruckner Hall. It is it been on Longwood's campus since 1830 something and so it burned to the ground in 2001. And they rebuilt a building in that beautiful rotunda that was rededicated in 2005. So I got to travel to Longwood, and the Farmville Four presidents were all there.

 Kelly 
So I didn't realize they had done a rededication with all the presidents. That's cool. 

 Lori 
Yeah. Oh, we have pictures around the clock and, and on campus and on the different signs with all the other presidents and they were they were lovely, delightful women. So we had a great, great visit. And of course, I got to have lunch with , you know, Francis, Francis, Deedee Francis, and Lynn drove me from, Lynn Chambers drove me from Richmond to Farmville, and, and it was just a really, Julie Wiley was there. It was just a fabulous experience. Probably my favorite visit as President.

Kelly 
I can imagine. 

Lori 
Yeah, it was, it was really cool. And then, you know, our first convention was 2006 was going to be in New Orleans. And in you know, in August of what was that 2005, Hurricane Katrina just wiped out New Orleans just devastated the city and the people and but our our Hyatt property where council had visited and everything was all said, but initially said, Hey, we're going to still have a convention here in 2006. And, and which is really interesting, as I look back at the photos, I mean, every single window was completely blown out. So it was, you know, as you look at the photos, you're like, I just don't see how that's possible. But they were very optimistic. And but they they held on till, you know, it was probably, I'm guessing, January before they said, Oh, sorry, we can't do it. So our headquarter staff had to scramble to, you know, have a whole new convention site. So it was like, Can you imagine planning and including the site selection in less than six months, and so Boston was selected. And so we ended up in Boston, but the property that we were in, in Boston was just not prepared for our group. And so we had and I know it was always one of my favorite things was to be assigned to have three women that I'd never met before to live in a room for a week. And this time, there were like, four women in one room with one king bed. And I don't know if you, but there were, I mean, room, after room, after room of that type of situation. So it was complete, just crazy situation. And luckily, I think everyone has such good sports and, and they the hotel did try to accommodate and move people around. But cots and different things just so that everyone had space, but it was craziness. But that was a memorable convention. There was a lot a lot that actually occurred there. That was where we had our historic bylaw amendment that included sexual orientation toward human dignity and a discriminatory policy. So that was, that was very memorable. And but it was, it was a fun convention, despite the interesting room arrangements,

 Kelly 
I imagine. That is the one convention I missed.

 Lori 
Oh, you did? Oh, my goodness.

 Kelly 
My son was born June 11. And I was all set to come to convention with baby. But born with a heart defect. And so we couldn't leave Philly because we needed to be close to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. And he's fine now. But I remember, I like it was like literally like one of the very last minute decisions where I finally called Christy Adams at headquarters and was like, I'm not gonna make it. I'm really sorry. And she was so gracious and understood that I was so sad to have missed that convention, because I can only imagine, you know, the experience of you know, it was in New Orleans, we had to move it to Boston. And I knew kind of that that bylaw amendment was coming and all of that. So that was the one I missed. And I love hearing the stories about all of it. And hopefully someday we'll be back to Boston and I can go.

 Lori 
I know well, in I, I think we had some of the best speakers we've ever had in Boston, actually. Marianne Kelly did a beautiful presentation. Yes, it was, it was fabulous. And we had another speaker that told a story that I still remember to this day she talked about blind man that climbed Mount Everest and had his kind of a helper right behind him, yelling in his ear to tell him, you know, you can do it. And so her whole message was who's yelling in your ear? Who's prepared, propelling you forward? And I it's stuck with me ever since that convention, so so we It was really memorable, and a very outstanding convention and but sucks that you missed it, but I'm so glad that Drew is doing great.

 Kelly 
So you also got to experience that that decision of we need to cancel convention, or at least in your case, you had to relocate convention, whereas this past summer of 2020, we had to cancel due to the pandemic. So that was an interesting experience as well.

 Lori 
That's true. I never thought about that. 

 Kelly 
I can imagine what your, your national council went through and making those decisions. They're difficult decisions to make.

 Lori 
Yeah. And our headquarter staff, I mean, they really the lion's share of the work fell on them to get prepared and make that change. 

Kelly 
So you were paving the way years before and how we could quickly pivot to something else. 

Lori 
Right. We're a very Alpha Sigma Alpha, very adaptable, flexible, fluid. Yep, we can roll with the punches, for sure. But another thing that happened, I know, a tragedy, but was the Virginia Tech shooting occurred. And I remember just how shocked everyone was and and while we didn't have a campus there, we obviously like people like Rosemary Goss was a professor there. And we have so many members in Virginia, but just I can remember having to write a letter just to the membership, talking about, you know, that shooting and just how devastating it was and, and how it was more important than ever for us to, you know, stay together as sisters and support one another and support that Virginia Tech Community. So I do remember that experience, particularly, is just being one that was, you know, just tragic. But, we also had some some interesting, we partnered with the Department of Labor, and with the Wise Up, 

Kelly 
I remember that program, yeah.

 Lori 
Yeah and so we actually traveled to D.C. and we're at that Department of Labor and got to make a presentation and talk to all the women there. And I remember standing, oh, gosh, six feet from Elaine Chao, who was the secretary of labor while she gave a speech and it was just, incredible experience to be there for that. And it was, I think Naydia Mills was was the one that really got us hooked up with the Department of Labor and the Wise Up program, which is a fascinating program for women to prepare women for financial matters, budgeting and investing and all the different things that with this purely geared for women, so it's really natural for us to partner with them. 

 Kelly 
Yeah, I do remember that program. That was pretty cool. 

 Lori 
Yeah, it was cool. And then I also got to meet Helen Lortz, who was one of our recognition of eminence, recipients. She had an apartment in Washington, D.C., and so I was able to meet her in her home just the loveliest of women. And she passed away just a couple of years later. So it was, and so it's just wonderful to have been able to meet her and talk with her. She's fascinating. 

 Kelly 
Oh, I can imagine. 

 Lori 
Yeah. And then I guess my last convention was an Albuquerque and we announced the ladybug as our official Alpha Sigma Alpha mascot, which was so much fun. And I think everyone enjoyed that whole. That was one of our first red tie dinner was that convention and just that's a neat tradition that's been started to seeing everyone in there read.

 Kelly 
Yes, the because the Foundation isgreat.

 Lori 
Yeah, yeah. Did I think that last that last biennium I served I, Marianne Bullock and Kim Benson, Krystal and I were project, the headquarters facility project teams. And we had land in Indy for quite some time and decided to finally break ground. And so we had the groundbreaking while I was president and had our cute little I am Alpha Sigma Alpha, We Are Alpha Sigma Alpha Ladybug shirts on and little hard hat that Krystal had designed. And it was a lot of fun. But just being part of that team and helping to make the decisions about design and layout and working with the builders. It was a design build. So they they designed and built at the same time, which was a big money saver, and really neat to see how that whole experience and see a project like that come together. And then of course, the actual ribbon cutting was right after my presidency, that Fall right after with Cindy Kelly. So it was just quite something to see that happen.

 Kelly 
Well, especially and when you think about the path that we took to get there, right, left Springfield in what 1998 because I was the first leadership consulting group to travel based out of Indy. 

 Lori 
Wow.

 Kelly 
So what almost 10 years later then we finally built our home. And we just added on to that home.

 Lori 
It's incredible. 

Kelly 
Yes. It's just great to have that facility.

 Lori 
Yeah, it really is. It really is. So and it was it was fun. We sent out like a survey to find out with different questions to see you know, what type of facade you want? Do what brick? Do you want stone you want? You know, what, what, what type of do you want two story do you want one story? Just all sorts of just design element type questions. And it was really fun to get the answers back and see what people wanted. And I had always had this picture of the Coe College Alumni building my ideal. That was interesting to see that that building become our building. We couldn't afford at the time the two stories. So we did a one level but it was is pretty similar when you look at the two buildings. And so that's really neat to see that.

 Kelly 
That is cool. That's a fun piece of history.

 Lori 
It is, all of it is. The story goes on. I mean, so much has happened since then. It's fun for me anyway to just watch as each group of volunteers has taken the helm and done such awesome things.

 Kelly 
And so what are you doing now?

Lori 
You know, right this minute, I don't think I'm on any, this is the first time since 1985, on any committee, but I talking to Ally Kowal and I think I may latch on to her alumnae  committee or task force that she's chairing. She is just so much fun to work with and is just like a lightning rod. She's always and is just a little Dynamo. So anytime you can work with her whatever the subject or task happens to be, it's fun.

 Kelly 
Well, it's good why now we will, we ping you from time to time to also provide board support and education, especially given your financial background, which is always helpful. 

Lori 
Yes, I did that is one of the most recent things like I actually put together a big PowerPoint presentation on how to read financial statements. And my favorite slides were when I I had my husband take a picture of me in my pajamas in bed, reading financial statements 

 Kelly 
I saw that.

 Lori 
I said this is what you should not do. Do not do this at bed and the next slide I think I'm sound asleep. 

Kelly 
That is true.

 Lori 
But yeah, I appreciate it when you guys call

Kelly 
Always. Before we kind of wrap up any other fun memories that you wanted to make sure we didn't miss the opportunity to share here?

 Lori 
Gosh, I, I can't think of any I'm sure if we were to sit for a while I would, I could rattle some off. Name a person I can probably tell a story.

Kelly 
Well, I would imagine yes, if we had an infinite amount of time, the listeners would love to hear all of those stories. So we'll just tell them that they have to come to convention. And find you and they can get to hear more stories.

Lori 
I would love that. Thank you for doing this, this is a lot of fun. You are just making things fun.

 Kelly 
Well, thank you for that. I appreciate it. This has been fun. I love the opportunity to just connect our members with other members and get to hear their stories. And I'm especially excited to launch this new this podcast special series around our past national presidents and let everybody get to hear their stories and what things were like during that time period because you can read it a little bit in the history book, but I think to hear it come to life through each of the past national presidents is really kind of cool.

 Lori 
It is very cool. 

Kelly  
Well, Lori, thank you for sharing your story with