Things Musicians Don't Talk About

Episode 20- Channa Malkin

May 04, 2021 Hattie Butterworth
Things Musicians Don't Talk About
Episode 20- Channa Malkin
Chapters
Things Musicians Don't Talk About
Episode 20- Channa Malkin
May 04, 2021
Hattie Butterworth

Today I am talking to the wonderful soprano Channa Malkin about her upcoming CD launch, inspired by the issues, stigmas and graces of motherhood. We talk about Channa’s journey to becoming a mother and the misconceptions many performers have about motherhood and working alongside it.

Channa's headshot is by photographer
Brendon Heinst

While growing up in a family of classical musicians, soprano Channa Malkin initially enjoyed other creative outlets such as painting and writing. Music was always present, as she went from playing the flute to songwriting and singing in choir and bands. But when she discovered opera as a teenager, there was no way back: she auditioned for the role of Barbarina in Le Nozze di Figaro at the Dutch National Opera, and made her debut at 16 years old. There, Channa found her true voice and embarked upon a path that has led her to become the artist and performer she is today.

Channa's new album, released on Friday 7th May,  This is not a lullaby . The album features the little-known song cycle Rocking the Child by Miecyslaw Weinberg, John Tavener’s Akhmatova Songs for soprano and cello, as well as various Russian songs composed by her father Josef Malkin. A key aspect of this programme is Channa’s desire to go against the typical trope of a mother rocking her child to sleep and instead present the lows as well as the highs, and a much more varied portrayal of how having a baby has impacted her identity as an artist and woman.

In her blog post on motherhood Channa writes,

Becoming a mother has taught me that I’m stronger than I thought. Compared to growing ahuman being in my body, giving birth and surviving the first year of motherhood, any professional challenge feels like a piece of cake. It has also taught me to trust my intuition, rather than worry about what other people might think. And every day, my son is teaching me to be more calm, more confident and more open to whatever life throws my way. And to laugh about it in the process.

Show Notes

Today I am talking to the wonderful soprano Channa Malkin about her upcoming CD launch, inspired by the issues, stigmas and graces of motherhood. We talk about Channa’s journey to becoming a mother and the misconceptions many performers have about motherhood and working alongside it.

Channa's headshot is by photographer
Brendon Heinst

While growing up in a family of classical musicians, soprano Channa Malkin initially enjoyed other creative outlets such as painting and writing. Music was always present, as she went from playing the flute to songwriting and singing in choir and bands. But when she discovered opera as a teenager, there was no way back: she auditioned for the role of Barbarina in Le Nozze di Figaro at the Dutch National Opera, and made her debut at 16 years old. There, Channa found her true voice and embarked upon a path that has led her to become the artist and performer she is today.

Channa's new album, released on Friday 7th May,  This is not a lullaby . The album features the little-known song cycle Rocking the Child by Miecyslaw Weinberg, John Tavener’s Akhmatova Songs for soprano and cello, as well as various Russian songs composed by her father Josef Malkin. A key aspect of this programme is Channa’s desire to go against the typical trope of a mother rocking her child to sleep and instead present the lows as well as the highs, and a much more varied portrayal of how having a baby has impacted her identity as an artist and woman.

In her blog post on motherhood Channa writes,

Becoming a mother has taught me that I’m stronger than I thought. Compared to growing ahuman being in my body, giving birth and surviving the first year of motherhood, any professional challenge feels like a piece of cake. It has also taught me to trust my intuition, rather than worry about what other people might think. And every day, my son is teaching me to be more calm, more confident and more open to whatever life throws my way. And to laugh about it in the process.