Strive Seek Find

You can't Handle the Truth!

May 17, 2021 Chance Whitmore Season 1 Episode 49
Strive Seek Find
You can't Handle the Truth!
Show Notes Transcript

Welcome to the Strive Seek Find Podcast. I’m your host Chance Whitmore.  The old Proverb “timing is everything” has more  uses than any of us can count.   Oftentimes it ends up sounding as cliché  as  the related “Strike while the iron is hot”  Funny thing about clichés though ,  many of them end up being overused in great part because they have a elements of truth in them.   In the past week I had the opportunity to learn this again when I was put in a situation  where the right message  was not enough.  Having the right message at the right time was critical.  

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Before I get started today, I want to ask a favor. As you listen, like what you hear, please leave a review and share the episode I want to discuss anything from you so or any other episode. Reach out to the Strive Seek Find page on Facebook, or to @chancehitmore5 on Twitter. Thanks. We've all heard that movie quote. You can't handle the truth. You know, sometimes that's actually true. What Welcome to strive seek fame podcast, I'm your host, chance Whitmore. The old proverb, timing is everything has more uses than any of us can count. Oftentimes, it ends up sounding as a cliche, in the same vein as striking while the iron is hot, not putting your eggs all in one basket. Funny thing about cliches though, many of them end up being overused, in great part because they have an element of truth to them. In the past week, I have had the opportunity to learn this again, when I was put in a situation where the right message was not enough. Having the right message at the right time was critical. So let's get started. I'll add that this is a lesson that if I had internalized earlier in life, I might have presented some heartache for myself. And for those I was trying to help. Additional caveat, though not the COVID kind. This applies globally. But traditionally, I've been better at using this professionally, that I have personally honored honestly, because even knowing better, I fall into old habits. And I selected the story rather than a professional one because well, while the skill cross applies. I actively work not to talk about work here. My eldest, just finished her first track season, obviously, sixth grade track, wiped out by the visit. She chose to be a thrower because she likes the community that comes with it. From what I understand. This is not uncommon among throwers, she had a tremendously good time throughout the entire season. And I got a call from the coach letting me know that she had been a leader was doing all the right things. That was cool. I asked her how she felt about each meet, I congratulate her. I tried to take the opportunities to learn that come out of it. But still keep the stress low and fun. And then Then came the third meet. She'd begun to identify with the shot. It was going to be her event because she was doing pretty well at it and had placed Not today. Today, she threw two feet under what she normally threw on an irregular basis. And she was crushed. She was so crushed that she melted down. She didn't start crying. But the disc came up. She didn't warm up. She didn't really even throw the disc and cut her distance in half on that one. She was obviously upset, but she wasn't trying to focus and adjust. She was trying to shut down and get out of the situation. And as I'm watching this, I'm gonna be honest with you. I got angry. And it wasn't over how she performed at all. I just was glad she was participating. What angered me was her reaction. It's the old coach in me. Losing is acceptable. If you worked your ass off and did your best pouting or quitting. Those rank up there with my worst nightmares. I wanted to discuss it. Now let's be honest, I kind of wanted to chew on her a little bit. Then there, fix it. I wanted to coach her up wanted to coach her heart, get her move in the right direction make her better. But the look on her face. And the body language told me not now. At least not now for me. Maybe someone else could have the discussion. Maybe your coach could. What she needed was me to be dead. And my instincts were to be the coach so I wait And I waited. And I waited a little more. And I grabbed my teeth to enough along the way because I really needed to have this conversation. But she needed to be in a place that she could hear it. So four days later, she came home from practice, bouncing, excited back in a good place. And there the opening was, she was able to verbalize what she thought she had done. And then we were able to talk through the response, talk mindset, tough competition and performance. And she heard me. So it was an extremely positive conversation after the fact. Because while what I felt I needed, and what I felt she needed, was an immediate conversation about performance. She needed time and space to put it behind her to be able to have the conversation in a productive way. She was then able to discuss, reflect and learn. She's a lot smarter than I am. To take this back to the macro level. It applies to almost every time in place. There are times where you have to have the conversation. Whether or not you want to. Sometimes you really want to though. Select inappropriate when some conversations can't wait. They need to be had immediately. Others, make sure you give yourself time and space to be ready for them. In your own headspace. A mentor of mine likes to say, never have a conversation you're not ready for. He's a smart man. Make sure the conversation is held in such a way there's an opportunity for growth. There's no point in just cutting people down without trying to provide feedback on how to get better. And depersonalize the experience. No matter how gratifying it would be to go right out someone. It doesn't always work. But it will make big things better in the long term than blowing the doors off people will. And that's route to creating your own brilliant future. Shout outs. quick shout out to the sludge podcast, friends of the program. Phil, Greg. Possibly Dave, I think he's still there. I appreciate the shout out and you calling me out on my lack of whiskey sharing. All I have to say guys is bring it you want to sit down and have a drink Let's sit down and have a drink over microphone. worth mentioning today is worth mentioning comes to us courtesy of the BBC News Service. The article the myths that hint at past disasters, by Mark Paisner deals with the field of geo mythology, and how geologists are using the indigenous myths around the world, specifically those in coastal Europe and Australia to look at how the past cultures dealt with rising sea levels after the last ice age. It's a fascinating look at the intersection of science and myths and how it's been used, in part to figure out how to deal with the next impending crisis. And that makes it worth checking out. I posted the article on the strife seek fan page on Facebook. giveaway announcement. We are creeping up to our one year anniversary. It's coming middle of June in celebration. Over the next month, we're going to be doing a few giveaways. I have posted how to enter on my social media. Check it out. Enter and help me celebrate the first year of Strive Seek Find. That's it for this week's episode of Strive Seek Find Thanks for listening. enjoyed the episode. Please leave a review. It really helps. If you have feedback or ideas, please reach out to the Strive Seek Find page on Facebook or @chancewhitmore5 on Twitter. Until next time, keep seeking your own brillant future Have a great day.