Strive Seek Find

Ten Questions with Phil Diplock: Coaching:

August 09, 2021 Chance Whitmore Season 2 Episode 7
Strive Seek Find
Ten Questions with Phil Diplock: Coaching:
Show Notes Transcript

This episode marks second   “ Ten questions” episode . The ten questions episodes are based around  a simple concept:  Allowing people to talk about the things  they are passionate about.  It can be a job, hobby, cause, or anything  in between.  Today  I’m joined by  Phil Diplock, head baseball coach at a local high school. 

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In life, we have two choices, to experience or to exist. Every week, each of us makes that choice to either seek a better way to live, or to get by. walk alongside me each week on the strive seek find podcast as we continue to seek our own brilliant future. Hey, welcome back. Once again, you're in for a treat. This is the second time that I'm doing a 10 questions episode. The 10 questions episodes are gonna be based around a simple concept, allowing people to talk about things they are passionate about. Because honestly, people talking about their passions is both interesting and cool. It can be a job, hobby, cause or anything in between. Today, I'm joined by my buddy, Bill deblock, Head baseball coach, and local high school. I've known Phil for many years at this point. And there's a lot of things we could be talking about today. But we're going to mostly I'm going to say mostly because we're going to wander a bit. focus in on coaching. So let's get started. Phil, welcome to board chats. I have been waiting for this moment. Finally, I don't know if I'm offended because I'm number two on your list. But I'll try. You gave me some whiskey. So that's, you know, that makes up for? No, honestly, I don't know if it'll be a treat. But I'm excited to seriously have a chance to sit down and like you said, Man, there's so many things we could go somebody areas we could go about different things about passion. Such a great word. Yeah, we are. Yeah. today. We are drinking a little bit of Irish Whiskey as we do this. I'm drinking the red breast and I've got the teeling Yeah, so we're having a little treat. As we're doing this. I had to bribe him to get him out of the house and get me to record this. I was an easy one. Yeah, it was easy. Yeah. So tell us a little bit about yourself. Yeah, you bet. Man. I was just saying today I am actually age wise I hate always given an I really don't care anymore. I'm gonna be officially a senior citizen and about a month 55 I grew up in Southern California born and X was born in Manchester, England parents came over when we were very young and then grew up in Southern California was baseball was my passion kind of back when I was growing up, loved all sports. After playing a little college baseball, and then going into the real world, worked a hard working job for a few years and then got into law enforcement. Spent 10 years with the LA County Sheriff's Department which looking back was was obviously life changing and and huge and learned about people and things and myself and and then as things played out and got an injury that stopped that profession, unfortunately, and then moved to Idaho, one of the best decisions again, ever made two daughters and at the time we moved up here 20 years ago, it's 20 years next month that we moved Idaho, then I got an education. And ever since I've kind of climbed the ranks, so to speak, or moved up to different positions from started a school safety without having a background in police work. And then with the encouragement of people I got to know became a dean of students did that for a Columbia High School and that school open did that for six years, I think. And in the midst of doing that I started actually law enforcement program was created the sorrows One of them was doing an awesome job of just teaching a basic class but as a as a program. They were thoughts around the state of making it official CTE career tech program was named the director by default I think I was the only ex cop at the time so anyways got into teaching which was very I just gained a whole new respect for teachers and realizing that Yeah, besides having the summers off and Christmas vacation all those things that when you work a different type of job you never had so but man did I find people that again, work their butts off and as I started teaching every Sunday night flipping a book open trying to think how am I going to keep my kids interested and I think I had an easy in terms of I wasn't teaching math or science we got to keep kids interested I was teaching something cool but even that was a challenge but did that and then somebody taught me to get into administration again I don't know if I would have done it anywhere else chance but I did at the school that I like I said opened it from day one and got to be a vice principal work with an amazing principal and you know some other people came and went and the other admin role but love that school and so anyways left there a year ago hardest thing I say I love it. And then I tell you I turned around and left get an opportunity to open a school. That is for career technical education based, but with all what are are called at risk and I'm not a big fan of the label but it's real but kids that are just struggling the traditional setting and something else needs to be there. I was one of them. Because I didn't feel like we did as a district there wasn't again, not because of people the nampa School District love the Napa school district I did 20 years almost and but this is a different kind of an opportunity. So in the middle of building, creating, getting started hiring, so get about a year out, you're out and we open the school, and I wish it was tomorrow for the sake of a lot of kids that, you know, just struggle. And then they disappear from our radar, right? Because it's a big system. And so, yeah, that's where I'm at. And I forgot the other part of my life, which is massive is coaching. Thing coaching at Columbia, this was year 15. So I've been the head coach there. And I've spent I think this is my 24th high school year total, in different fashions, assistance and back home. I started back at my, my alma mater in Southern California when I was first a police officer before the kids came along. So I was coaching and working full time and yeah, I think I think that's me up to date. That ratio state Yeah. Now this is your second stint as head coach at Columbia, right? Yeah, yep. I took two years, which I think when you talk about regrets in your life, I don't have many, I really don't. The biggest one was stepping away as a head coach. I did it because it was part of the if you're an administrator, you can't coach in our district. So I went through that path. And it was hard. It was super hard. I remember the day I told kids and told myself and my wife was really the one as usual, like you sure you want to do this. And I wasn't sure. And I knew afterwards, I wasn't. So I got lucky enough, the guy that I hired to replace me actually moved on. And so I was given a second opportunity, thankfully, from the superintendent at the time, worked it out. And as long as it didn't affect my job as an administrator, and I didn't think it would and I don't think it did get back into it. And that was six years ago. So yeah, so I had a two year hiatus, which was, honestly, again, I think, when we talk about passions, one of my biggest passion after playing is been as been a coach, and I've enjoyed being a coach. So this is a thing and I'm trying to make sure I remember it properly. Didn't you bring? It wasn't the first year of the building opened or the second building opened brought the first title to the building back? Yeah, nowadays, actually. Yeah, first year, very first year, the school, you know, brand new school with, I think we had a total of 50 seniors on campus. None that played baseball. I had none. I had this young group of kids. Luckily, I opened it with an awesome assistant coach and partner and friend, we've known each other since you're 18. And so we got a chance to coach this group of young aggressive baseball players a little talent. And you know, they believe they bought in a some chemistry there. And we went on to win a state championship against a big powerhouse school. Yeah, you're one it was it was incredible. So that was 2000. The spring of Oh, seven. Yes. I think that was the year that I met you actually. I think it was two. Yeah. So yeah. Now, it's hard to believe that was 14 years ago. No Kid. So what really led you to coaching Was that your path took you to that passion? Yeah, that's a good that's a, you know, when you reflect on your life, as all men like me starting to do more and more and getting softer and softer, I guess some of my players would tell me I think I always knew kind of deep down just because I always had a kind of a mind for like, back then it probably wasn't the best thing because I used to probably coach guys when I should keep my mouth shut. Just because I thought they should be doing something different. And not that I was perfect added or anything and but I kind of knew my first year in junior college, I dislocated my shoulder right after the season, the started before the second season. So I actually had some, I was down, I couldn't do anything, I end up having surgery, I went back to my alma mater and got a chance to be an assistant coach. And I loved that man that was like, wow, I can see myself doing this maybe down the road. I did it for two years. And then you know, went to work, I went to a job that just didn't allow it right. So difficult to do with nine to five most most normal hour jobs. So but then when I got into police work, I was put on graveyard shift like most guys are, and so I had a chance to come back. That's what I did. That's when it became a full kind of a full time gig. And I became a head coach of a JV team. So I was learning, you know, even at a young age, I was 25 starting to figure out that it's more to winning and losing. Right. And still that I mean, obviously that still there, but just building the relationships and then and then I you know with having kids, the girls came along and made it difficult to do all that stuff. So I I wasn't coaching, I was working full time and being a dad and doing all those things and trying to but my is things get harder, or you wonder why things happen. Then I came here and had a chance to coach and I've been doing it for 20 years here. Yeah. So that's kind of how it led into, you know, then I was an assistant at a high school here and then this opportunity at Columbia came over to be a head guy and I'm like, I think I'm ready. I think I want to no matter what anybody told you and all the headaches that sometimes come along with being the head guy and all the things that are not coaching so to speak, right like fundraising and And doing the uniforms and doing all the other stuff that can be not that I don't love that stuff. I don't like fundraising. Nobody does. But all the other things, all the other things I don't mind. So, yeah, fundraising is a curse. Yeah it is. Nobody likes it. No. So what about coaching after 24 years? Yeah, still feeds your creative energy. What about? Well, you know, I think what's what's kept me going as long as I obviously love the game of baseball, right? You have to what what keeps me rolling? is the fact that I get to see seriously get to see young men, right? Become men, I get to watch them right I get to watch senior I'm senior night, when they walk down the runway, with their families and go on to what's next. I like to think that I had a little bit of influence and how they're, they're going to turn out or they're going to develop a passion for something whether it's baseball or not, I honestly don't really, right. I mean, I don't care. But I've got to spend time and I think that's one of the I love all sports. But for baseball, we have what's a lot of downtime, I'll have a batting practice where if I'm not throwing, I can walk around and get to know the kids, right, I can literally talk to them and relate. And so building those relationships where it's, you know, a dad relationship for a while, right. And then as a progressive age and maturity, that becomes a friend relationship, you know, that keeps my creative at 55. I still think and they will tell you that my kids will tell you that like man coaches like 19, at least in the way I act and whether it's immaturity, or just because I don't want to get hold, right? And then the creativeness of just trying to figure out how to compete with what you have as a coach, right? It's something like, I've had an opportunity to go to a couple other places and you know, call I've been honored enough to be asked to help that a college. But I've loved where I'm at, but I've loved the fact that I get what I get, right? We don't recruit, we can't recruit. Those are the kids that you know, come to my school to play baseball, or come to school and then they're going to play baseball. And then figure out how to compete and show them how to compete no matter what you have. I'm I think I'm a very optimistic guy when it comes to I think I can win in anything might not always be realistic. But whatever I do, I think I'm going to win. And then if I don't then we figure out we go from there how to keep trying to you know, how do we how do we deal with what we have in terms of skill and talent and then putting that together so and I use the word compete because I know people say oh, you're all about winning Of course we are but it's more about competing. So that when you're competing in this I just hope my boys notice that you compete in your life when you go get a job right or you go be the best dad You can be your there's all those things that you as you get older you know this you start figuring out that if you can figure out how to compete against your yourself and figure out strategies to deal with all of your issues. I hate to say issues but we all have your anxieties your you know your just all those things your dreams when you can figure out how to deal with your yourself. Yeah, probably going off chance in terms of but yeah, creative. Yeah, I just love it. Man. I love coaching. So what's the biggest lesson you want a kid to walk away from your program? You know what I say this every year when it's that last speech you got to give when you lose that last game of the season, whether it's in the state title game or right or how are you every didn't make it to the district play out whatever. But I think the biggest let this is what I say to my guys, I want you to leave here I tell parents is that apparently because I this is what I tell her boys I said I want you to leave here being a good dude. And I the term dude, like that guy is a dude for me, doesn't just refer he's a dude athletically, it means he's a good he's just a dude. He's just a good dude. And what that and I tell the kids what it means to me, which is they're gonna go out and be the best person they can. The best dad someday the best son, they are right. And the best brother, whatever it means they're just going to be a good person, not perfection, but just try to be a decent person, you know, got very kind of an email when i know i and i a long time out of coaching at this point. But I still run into those guys who are now the youngest of those guys, I believe would be about 35 right now read running into them and catching up those relationships and seeing how they turned out and how that what how they've grown is just incredible. Oh, it's like you sit well, and I share this I do it every I've been lucky enough to do this the past while since I came back, I think six years ago is that I turned it in I have them there at the parent meeting and say all of these guys played for me. They all played for me right? And I watched them grow some of them since seventh grade at the middle school. And now like you said, Now they're it's hard to believe they're 30 something and both of my assistants who played for me they have their their own kids. And then the emotional part right you start realizing why you do it when they text you right after their baby's born like coach, you know, she was born last night I you know, it just you know it gets me honestly I am getting older I'm getting softer and choked up and I just it's Yeah, it's but it's still why you do it and at the end of the day like getting the invites to the weddings and going to the I guess said is nothing better now. So, as far as after 24 years, how do you continue to improve as a coach? Yeah, and I think you you can I mean, that's the key right? We've talked about this in different realms of life but I think having an open seriously gotta have whether whether people would say this about me and some people listen, and you know, you got to fix mindset or and I am stuck in certain things again, if I think they're right, but I think having an open mindset and listening, right that's one thing I love my coaches and they'll laugh and brag and say it doesn't matter what we decide you're going to overrule you're the president, you know, the United States type of a Medallia so now I just think keeping that and then I, I'm always watching videos, I still look at stuff, I am a big believer, and that within the game of baseball, that it's the foundation is the same as it was an 1800, right, you've got all these things coming out these days, and all this analytics, and I'm all for data rights certain amount, but you can go crazy, like they've started doing and it just, it takes away from what the game is that it's rude, you know, you're not coming up with a bunch of different plays, it's not you know, you're running this play and you're running that play. There are certain things if you do foundationally you're gonna you're gonna have some success. But, you know, when it comes to drills, I'm all about finding something different that might convey what I'm trying to teach where I can show to it, you know, I'm sent to one of my players via via text message is shown that video and it's just talking to guys no matter what i doing this for as long as I have and winning and winning the state title losing the state title game, I still I love the game. I love talking it no matter how young and I really have a big passion for someone somebody as a young coach, because I think I have something to to give there to like, and that Not that I've been perfect, right. But I think the guys that do it, right? You always have something there's a there's a common ground that you can share with with with the youth or younger guys that get into this game. Yeah. Let's flip side from mentorship to who, who mentored you Who do you idolize? Yeah, yeah. My biggest mentor. And it's this is a great question in time in terms of timing. He just retired from teaching after 36 years of teaching down in Southern California, but he was my, and he had his retirement party. And fortunately, I had my knee surgery at the same time. So I couldn't go down. But he was my first High School. He was he was the head JV coach. And he was on his own. And it was one of those deals, right, no stipends. But this guy came in, and I think he's seven years older than me. So at the time, I was 16. So he's like 2425, maybe doing a student teaching all that stuff. But the way he coached and he had one of the biggest mouse in the world, he gave me my nickname Dipper, which most people call me these days. But he was what I learned from him. And I feel it all the time. When I'm in the third base coaching box, when I'm giving a postgame talk or pregame talk or getting off the bus ready to play in the state title game is what he said to my team back in the day, we had a chance at a big game. Because the thing I remember most was no matter. He got him telling us directly. I'll get on your ass. When you're lazy. And your minds if you make mental mistakes, that was it. He said, I will never be on you when you drop a ball when you make a defensive error when you start. That's part of the game. And I and I remember that because I've said that over and over for last 24 years. He was that guy that if he lit you up for being lazy or whatever it was. And then you did something, right. Whether it was the smallest things in this game today, which is you know, you're doing, you're doing what's called the sacrifice button, right? You're basically getting out on purpose to get a runner to the next base. He found you like he would turn from the third base box. Again, I do that now. And that's because what he did, and I would find that guy and call his name out and be like, Oh, just like my guys are like, oh god coaches calling me right I did to like I was crapping my pants like what? He's like Dipper, it's your run right there. That's your ramen. He scores that your it just was such a might seem simple, but it was big, right? Because you felt valued. And you knew this dude cared. And that was just so many other things. man he took the time when we stretch to walk around and ask you about school and ask you about your grades and just rag on you about the way you know your haircut looked. And it was all in it was just all in like this guy love this man. When he when he stopped doing that guys, you you realize oh, he's he's done with this guy. So something you know, so that Chris Pascale and I hope you know like I said biggest, biggest mentor he left our high school after my senior year. So I had him for two thank God and I graduate and then he became a head coach for 3032 years and develop the powerhouse program because again, because his expectations were you were a good person believed in the team chemistry aspect of coaching. Like I again, I I don't know if I got that from him. But I'm a big believer in so that's my biggest baseball mentor. Because it got me really started into what ended up becoming a huge part of my life. And then my junior college coach Nick fiskardo was a same type. In terms of relationships, man, he he he built him even in a day in and age when every coach most coaches just, you know, there wasn't time for it, especially at the college level. I wasn't him. He knew You he knew what, you know what buttons to push. He knew what buttons not to push. Yeah, he was he was he was another big baseball mentor. Yeah. Awesome. Yeah. And, and you and I have talked about this a couple of times. And that was the, that whole piece that seems to be lacking today. And coaching is a lot of those, those mentorship, guys, because a lot of the guys, coaching is tough at the best of times, but in this day and age, it seems to be even harder. So we're losing a lot of those older guys, because they just agree, and they just kind of walk away. But what why would Why take a three $4,000 job and put your real paycheck at risk? Because people are coming after you. Yeah, yeah, I totally agree. And why? You know, it has changed, you know, and I don't want to say things can't change. I'm a big believer and things will change but the things that are right said earlier should those you shouldn't get away from being a good person and being a competitor of getting after it. But when people and you know it's it's hard, right? You watch professional sports and guys are running their mouse or really just, they're doing things it's all about me, right? It's it's the mee mee mee they can never have enough money they can so our kids see that. And so it becomes a an eye guy type mentality. That's what I said. So I tell my guys, this is an AI guy. So did you become an AI guy, you can go do something else. I'm still a big believer and whether I have to continue to beat that into them into their minds. I will because I like I said, I think it's it's another life skill, right? When you leave. If you get into any most professions, you're gonna have to work with somebody else, right. And if you want to build a competitive team in your profession, or whatever it is, you're gonna do, it's a big thing, but we're living in a generation of you know, we're we're kids and all sports or, or they have to choose a sport. And I hate that I freakin hate it. I do even as a head coach, man, I don't want my guys playing baseball 12 months a year, like none of us did that whether you play organized, even if you're playing football in the backyard, take a break compete in something else. Because there's so many things you can learn from each different activity. And then when the break comes, and it becomes when you're when you're 12 years old, and it starts becoming a job No matter how much passion you love it. That's That's not right. For any, you lose kids. Yeah, you lose kids. And then again, parents start having this added stakes too, because I think parents feel the pressure of if I don't play in this club or play all year round, my student is not going to get a chance to, or my child's not gonna get a chance to play at the collegiate level. Well, here's the secret. If your son or daughter has enough talent, they'll get a chance. And if they have, they have some talent and if you have a coach who who's worth half his salt and he's going to put his name out there for him. There's there's places to go to school all over the country to play in any sport, right? Then you know, it even if it means you get two more years to play, and you get your education out of at the same time, great. But we are we are living in and people can say what they want, you know, but we're living in a generation of selfishness. It's about me and Gosh, man, it's it's sometimes it's hard to do. And I and I get it. I've lost some good comrades who have resigned from coaching, because of the parent attitude and the law. And then the lack of this is about us and not just about your son. Right? It's a collective, which again, I try to tell my guys the more success we have, the more we do as a group, and that's going to help you instead of you worrying about your stats and everything. Yeah, so sorry. I can go on with that for two days. Yeah, yeah. So let's go to the place where it can be a little bit high for a second Okay. What do you think your biggest accomplishment has been in the field? And so and what are you most proud of? Vegas accomplishment like well, what are you trying to do? Chances are I'm gonna brag about myself I don't know what I mean. I you know, I accomplishments I've I've accomplished a lot in terms of those sell things I've got coach of the year I've won a state championship but I'm on my wall of fame from a junior college and I think I'm on there partly because I just like I said I showed up every day and played hard I'm I'm proud of all those things right i mean i am i think it made me who I am and maybe the competitor and sometimes it may be too much of a competitor but I think my biggest accomplishments are are when guys call me or they still I have a list of all my x players whether that was whether that student played or that athlete play one any or was you know the superstar baseball player and got a chance to play college i i think i pride it on that it's kind of a because I don't like cutting kids from playing I don't like watching my guys on the bench five straight games but the reality is right it's a varsity level and we're I it hurts me whether the kids know that I think they do later on down the road because I try to include them in postgame conversation or whatever but I think my my it's it's my biggest accomplishments are that they still are in contact Are they still stopped by the field after you know like I said like at Columbia 14 years I still in contact. They still see these guys. They, whether they're coaching for me or just in town for the weekend because they live out of town and I think that's my that's my I would say is my biggest accomplishment is those friendships that are built man, whether I'm 55 and they're only 30. And we still go out and have a drink or just can laugh. Yeah, there was the second part. Was that part of it? Yeah, I yeah, all the all the other stuff is common. You know, I just shared this with my boys like about that stuff about getting. I told them I was lucky enough, I got I got voted by my peers for Coach of the Year this this past season. And I told the kid you know why that happens? For two reasons, obviously, you and your success, but moreso the way you act. And then the other part is, like I've said, I've just been, I've gotten to know my fellow coaches. And I think they actually like me, and I could be wrong. But I think they liked me. And I think that's what it's about getting along with people, right. And just them seeing is pretty good person. I mean, you still might want to kick my ass, we play each other, but the end of the day, like I thought it used to be, you know, you just shook hands and said a good work. Even if somebody thumped you. I think it's it's that it's not you, all these things have to come into line, because I've been around long enough to know that, you know, when you're voted by your peers for anything, if somebody doesn't like you, you could go 15 and oh, or whatever, and conference and you're gonna get awarded that even though maybe you deserved it. In terms of that part of it. But yeah, so the, the the individual stuff comes always at the hands of it's not just you, right? It's a combination of, like I said, surround myself with great young assistant coaches, and then what your kids are doing ultimately, yeah. So if somebody wants to start coaching, what would you tell them? Yeah. How do you get into? Yeah, oh, first of all, I would encourage it, because I think we, we continue to need great mentors, because that's what coaching is, ultimately, if you're going into it, you realize that's what you're there for. And it's hard when you're young, you know, this, you started young man, and we are competitive as hell, and you want to win. And it's so funny to go through all my years and look back at the conversations I had with my young coaches who are coaching a younger level team, and you're trying to explain to them, okay, here's philosophy, here's the, you know, the philosophy of our program, as I'm sharing with parents, like, you know, at the lowest of the levels, in terms of age, it's a developmental stage, and you've got to tell your young coaches, these guys need to play, okay, it's not going to be any good to have nine guys as freshmen, and then the other seven, I don't want to do this anymore, right, we're not going to get better as a program, they're not going to get better as a player and as a person. So I think sharing with them, like if I could just write like we all do, like the wisdom of, here's what the big picture is, right? Here's what it is. Because the reality of how many of these kids are getting a chance to play collegiately or I mean, and then that shrinks to play professionally. Right. But if, if they can figure that out early on, and I don't know if I did, I, my wife, I think thinks I did. And I think I did because I was lucky enough had a good coach, right? That's the key. So if you can get a coach who is a big picture guy even early on, and realizes that at the end of the day, it's relationship building, and teaching these life skills, which sports tests allow for that I'm not just sports, right? Any any type of team or whatever it is that goes on at a high school and you have a chance to be around people. And your common goal is competing at something and then those friendships that are just built over because you go through all the ups and downs like is is huge. So I would encourage that I would and I think communication I think that's a big thing when you're young it's hard to do it's very hard remember have had that talk where guys after a game are like okay, Coach, what are you gonna say here? What do you say here? You know, after you've been beat real bad, or you've got to learn even when you win you have to say so it almost has to be those conversations don't change right? In terms of the way you are you always have to have something to bring and teach. Sometimes they're a little shorter sometimes a little longer, but yeah. Well, if you if tomorrow you can't you couldn't coach baseball again. Yeah. How would you fill that hole in your life? You know, that's a tough one. I don't know if I could fill that hole because I walked away for two years and that hole was not filled. I'd like to think what I'm doing with my life in terms of education and taking this this different for this lead from leaving where I think I had an impact on on kids who became young people I think same thing I mean, my my whole I'm gonna dive into this new school right I just am excited that it's a smaller environment of 400 500 Kids maximum where I think I think this is my own right optimistic just I I've done it out of 1500 person score I think I knew every face didn't know every name. The thought of knowing every name and knowing a little bit about each of those students and being able to be there just something I always think we all wanted in high school where you just wanted to go to person again you have your family that's great, but they're doing their thing and you also need something else so I think that would be where the whole would be or I mean honestly next step I've been talking about this is even even coaching at the high school is in the summertime is taking a getting a little guy team. You know what I mean? little guy I'm talking nine or 10 year olds, right and bringing those guys to start. teaching them the game and just teach them about the important things even then like are they these are the guys who can be a lifelong friends because I think out of out of what's been a long time in the game of baseball, I think when I look back, he said, What's the number one thing that's come out of it? It is relationships. But my best friends, the guys that I've been at their weddings and been in there in the waiting room for the babies started because we had this like minded interest of baseball. And we've that, you know, like I said, I, too, I always wanted my own girls to like, you know, I don't care about talent, are they going to get a scholarship, I just like, I just knew what that camaraderie brought to me. And I found these, these these four or five guys that I feel like they raised me. And I mean, your parents are there, right? But you're not with them all the time. You're with your friends. And we were all the same, so to speak, and, and they just raised me they're still raising me while I'm raising them, mainly because I'm more of a who I am. But yeah. So question number 10. So is there anything else that you want our audience to know about? You about bass, coaching about baseball? Anybody want to give a little crap to there's plenty of people I can give crap to? It would be I just, I think about the word passion, you know, what you're what you're doing, which I think is awesome, because it is interesting to hear people's passions, you know, I'm not one minded. That's like, not all I do. I don't you know, even though I wear a baseball hat, and I love all that stuff. I just think all the guys I know that are coaches, and I know a lot right, in different sports. And again, the guys that I get along with the best, I think we all have that in common at the end of the day, we all want to win. And we'll joke with each other and brag about who's got a state ring and who's got all this, but I watched those guys. And same thing. I see who's coaching for them. I see how they're keeping in contact with them, whether it's social media or in person or text and knowing that I just talked to so and so whether those are the it's a big deal. Being a coach is a right i think the the the the biggest compliment is my guys, I have none of them call me by my first name. They call me coach just like I do. The guy I talked about as my still the top two mentors in baseball, I don't I can't come to and they've told me call me you know, Chris, and I'm like, can't do that. It's and they know, it's just total respect that I call that guy coach. He meant so much to me. Yeah, I don't know. I think passionate, whatever it is, like my own advice is whatever you're passionate about frickin stay with it, man. We've gotten to the point where, you know, like, how can you only drink those two beers? or How can you only like that music you need to have that I just don't believe in that horseshit, I'm sorry. I just if you love something, right and you're passionate that's such a great word like passion. I you know, we put it on my T shirt man. I know other people do. But it's such a you know that you can say I it's super intense. I like the word passion. It means you just have a you have a love for it. Something that just drives you every day, right? It's like you obviously do in your profession. You're not in there. You know, it's never been about the money, man. It's been about just making an impact. Man, I think we all the end of the day, there's nothing better than then than that stuff of knowing or hoping you did. Even if it's just hoping that God I hope I made some kind of an impact and not all my life. I still don't believe everything I believe in is the perfect way or the correct way. But other some other people would say I do. Yeah. But hope I answered that one. Do you notice what the better? Give yourself a little shout out here. But you knows what's on the bottom of the whiskey glasses here? Oh, a little slideshow? Yeah, I don't know if we talked about that. I don't know if I should share that. Oh, and maybe I will, because you're going to end up coming on my podcast. And that's been another thing like passionate like, took too long to do that you started doing it. You were a big inspiration for me telling me how easy it was to do and how much you enjoyed it. And I was like, No, even though I had a daughter at home My youngest like dad, you got to get on and do a podcast because somebody will listen and I thought nobody will listen. And it's okay if they don't, right. I mean, nobody wants to listen then don't but because I think there's a lot more people like everything else that they just wish they would have. I guess that's some advice to to share, right? we impart on our own kids because there's too many things you look back as you get older. Like, I wish I would have done that. I wish I would have tried that. I wish. You know, it's and it's okay to say that because a lot of people won't say it. They'll just be like, why are you still doing this at this age and age shouldn't be a limitation man shouldn't be you shouldn't stop wanting to do things or at least try it because I still think to the day I'm done. I'm going to run into something else I'd love to do or passionate about our like, but yeah, I just doing a podcast so yeah, so I can't wait to have you on ours. Because we're gonna you know, we're a little more roasty on there. You've been you've been you know, we were like roasting each other and have a good time. And we've only had Oh, we had two guests on our so this is cool. I mean, it's fun. I'm glad you asked me to do a chance I love it. Appreciate you being here course. And thank you for sharing. Thanks for sharing passion with us. Yeah. So you guys really out there listening. What are you passionate about? Would you like to share it? Let me know Yes, tell him thanks, Jess. And that concludes this edition of Strive Seek Find. Thank you for listening. 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