Strive Seek Find

HIstory is Watching

September 20, 2021 Chance Whitmore Season 2 Episode 14
Strive Seek Find
HIstory is Watching
Show Notes Transcript

Welcome to the Strive Seek Find Podcast I’m your host, Chance Whitmore.  Life is easy when everything is hitting on all cylinders…  These days it often is not.   This week, as we  return to school I’m reminded of this very fact.    How  we deal with parts of our life being spinning (nearly) out of control will whether we  control the insanity… or  collapse under the strain of a life stretched completely out of shape.  And it  that makes you think. 

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In life we have two choices, to experience or to exist. Every week, each of us makes that choice to either seek a better way to live or to get by. walk alongside me each week on the strive seek find podcast. As we continue to seek our own brilliant future. We tend to throw the word resiliency around a lot these days as we sit in air conditioned spaces. Welcome to the strive seek fame podcast. I'm your host chance Whitmore. Life is easy when everything is hitting on all cylinders. These days, it often is not. This week, as I returned to school, I'm reminded of this very fact. How we deal with the parts of our life being spun nearly out of control will determine whether we control the insanity or collapse under the strain of life as it stretches completely out of shape. And that should make you think, now let's get started. Now, under no circumstances should we assume that any of us are truly experts on any of this, the ebb and flow of life has a way of knocking us right off kilter without warning. Even if it's simply something like daylight savings, our asses tend to be handed to us for a week. Now that we've had a very special few years, where the entire world has been knocked off kilter, it's even more apparent. Even with all of that the nature of life still is going to provide us with opportunities for much more personal punches in the mouth on a fairly consistent basis. While everyone has our problems, and we can't claim to know them. But each of us has to learn how to overcome our own set of challenges. The last two years has left most of us feeling stressed and angry, or angry and stressed, I'll grant you that some of us are going undergoing almost unimaginable adversity. Our health care workers, for instance, have been pushed well beyond the red line. And all of you who are still showing up to work every day. In that situation. I do salute you. That being said, I was reminded this week by a member of my family that I needed to put things in perspective. While the last two years have been challenging, and the next several will quite possibly be even more. So. It's important to look back and realize that as a whole. As a culture. We haven't been tested like previous generations. We haven't faced the Great Depression, the dustbowl, multiple world wars, the societal upheaval of the 1960s. This is not to devalue it. We have dealt with the housing crash 911 and our current pandemic fund, for instance. But the tests overall, aren't even close. During the Second World War, as you probably know, there was rationing on many civilian needs for meat to rubber, from nylon to gasoline. cookbooks, the time had suggestions for substitutions due to missing ingredients due to rationing. Most of us would have at least heard of this when studying the Second World War in high school. But the facts and the figures had the fact that happened doesn't put truly in perspective. One of the stories I got from my father growing up, grew up after that era was the impact you could see even decades later in his parents. In this case, we're going to go to Christmas trees, the American tradition, something to stack presence under something to have lights on, something to commune with and be around. It should provide examples going back to the war. And yet it does. I can't remember the story of icicles. Now, many trees today don't use these things. icicles are those little little strips of silvery plastic that you draped over the tree. It's not all attached like Garland, so you can spread it out as individual streamers, and make a heck of a mess out of your tree. But some people like it. For reasons that will become obvious later on, I won't have it on our family tree. The nice thing about the plastic version of this is like many things in our society. It's not meant to be saved, it's meant to be thrown out with your tree. But back in the 50s, when my father was growing up, he talks still about having to pick each individual strip off the tree and bag them up and save them. Because his mother remembered the year during the war, when there were sores shortages on war material. And they couldn't get icicles because of a shortage of aluminum. So for years afterwards, before the tree came down, each and every strip had to be recaptured, just in case they couldn't get more next year. And admittedly, that's a small example. But it's always one that stuck with me because of the time and tedium that went with it. My father grew up on a working farm, and there wasn't a lot of time to waste. And it speaks to the situation if you're going to spend 30 minutes plus picking every single, solitary small strip off your tree and set it aside, just in case. onto another example. Amy's great grandmother, who lived until almost 101 was born in the 1910 and generously left Amy and enormous button collection meticulously colors sorted into plastic film containers. A lifetime supply of needles in the form of needle envelopes, snipped from pages of magazines, a rainbow of thread spools that actually came in handy during our current pandemic. As she was sewing masks, and boxes of fabric scraps, patterns and notions that have been scavenged from outgrown clothes. To put it in perspective notions in this case refers to as zipper snaps or any of the many things that you might need to put together a piece of clothing. All of this was set aside just in case. When she died, she left behind a very tidy home, whose drawers revealed folded and saved and baggies, twist ties, disposable straws, napkins. This lady was a survivor. She lived over 100 years and survived everything that the world could throw at her and consequently, was cautious. One last example comes from my other set of grandparents and their tight focus on their garden. My grandfather had this habit of sitting in the back porch, and assassinating the small animals that got into the garden. He had a slingshot. He wasn't afraid to use it, he was going to protect that garden. They ate out of their garden whenever they could. They can they had refrigerator pickles, they were strong believers of waste not want not. And that made going to visit them. Interesting. Because where I grew up on the ranch, you would have the standard staple meal was hamburger fried potatoes, you go to visit the grandparents, and you might get served vegetarian fare, or which this next one I enjoyed chicken salad sandwiches. Now, that was fine for a day or two. But by day three, day four of the visit, he would eat dinner and pray that mom would sneak out of the house and over to grab a cheeseburger at McDonald's just to get some protein in your system. They were healthy, independent people till near the time of their deaths. And they were 99 and 98 when they passed on. So they've lived through a lot before they died about a decade ago. They're tough old birds. They grew up in a world without federal unemployment insurance, or social security. I grew up in a world that changed and then changed again and again and again in ways that couldn't have even been imagined at the time of their birth. In early 1900s, now I can hear someone out here saying, but 911 changed things. It did no denial, it made huge sweeping changes in our culture. The world changed in a moment. And it led to 20 years of war. And yet, for most of us, life went on almost unchanged other than the security measures that were put in place, such as the Patriot Act, and possibly us being a little more public with our CIA run prisons. Now, though, with even two plus years of COVID, and the admitted struggles it has brought to us as bad as it's been, we've had it fairly easy compared to what's come before we've had locked down. But for many of us, it was spent on the couch watching TV, we're still going to work. We weren't sitting there. Most of us worried about where our next meal was coming from. We may have had and definitely had self created toilet paper and flower shortages. But ultimately, the majority of us did not suffer from what? Well, at least until recently, when we moved into crisis health care. What we have faced is fatigue, and anger. We want a normal life. We want this in the rear view. And hopefully that will happen eventually. But if this is our test, if this is as bad as it gets, it's time to step up, get up and work through it. It's time to help shoulder the load to keep the country afloat. It's definitely time to move from the arguments that come from me, me, me, and it's what I want to we because we want a world worth having when this is all over. And I'll remind you that history is watching. Shout out. Thanks to Brian if the searching for political identity podcast for the wonderful review. Much appreciated his podcast, I'm going to say it again. Searching for political identity is a newer podcast that I've greatly enjoyed this week. Check it out. I haven't done one of these in a while, a not paying attention. But when I found today's article it it hit me. I know that it comes to almost no one's surprise that social media companies are not operated in the public interest. But the Wall Street Journal's latest treasure trove of leaked documents make it more clear than ever. These leaks of internal documents, including reports from Facebook's own researchers regarding the negative impact the platform's has on the people that use it. And the fact that Facebook has ignored these reports, even when this report showed that the platform was being co opted by human traffickers, and that the rules didn't apply to high profile account holders. The company was slow to react if it reacted with the power that Facebook and its related platforms like Instagram have on public discourse. Currently, this is more than a little worrisome. And it's something that we should all be paying attention to. worth mentioning. Today's worth mentioning comes from CNN. And it looks at the situation this is quite a national park. Last year due to fire approximately 14% of the world's population of sequoia trees was destroyed. The article takes a look at the measures to be taken to save some of the largest trees in existence. For instance, the General Sherman tree, the largest tree by volume in the world, is being protected by fireproof cloth as the fire rages around it. It's the idea of losing any of these ancient giants, some of them getting close to 3000 years old, and learning the efforts to save them. Make this worth checking out. I placed a link to the article on the strive seek find page on Facebook. And that concludes this edition of strive seek find. Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed the episode, or would just like to support the podcast. Here are a few ways you can do it. You can leave a review on Apple podcasts or Podchaser. It will help bring more listeners to the podcast. If that isn't your style, you can buy me a coffee or purchase some mirch links are in the podcast description. Finally, if you have ideas or feedback, please reach out to the strive seek find page on Facebook or to @chancewhitmore5 on Twitter. Until next time, keep seeking your own brilliant future. Have a great day.