GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp

Day 1: Audre Lorde

June 01, 2020 Morgan Dixon + Vanessa Garrison Season 1 Episode 1
GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
Day 1: Audre Lorde
Chapters
GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
Day 1: Audre Lorde
Jun 01, 2020 Season 1 Episode 1
Morgan Dixon + Vanessa Garrison

Today's 30-minute walk is dedicated to the brave and brilliant Audre Lorde.  She argued that our very survival is political - that we were never meant to survive.  As you walk, meditate on her idea of "radical self-care."  What would it look like if you were radical about caring for yourself? How would it even feel?  What does it require? Today, you can walk in silent meditation, join our phone conversation, or cue up the playlist to let Audre Lorde's inspiring words guide you. This is your 21-day journey.  The only thing we ask is that you walk at least 30 minutes and reflect each day.  This habit will transform your life. We'll be cheering! #daughtersof #girltrek

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Show Notes Transcript

Today's 30-minute walk is dedicated to the brave and brilliant Audre Lorde.  She argued that our very survival is political - that we were never meant to survive.  As you walk, meditate on her idea of "radical self-care."  What would it look like if you were radical about caring for yourself? How would it even feel?  What does it require? Today, you can walk in silent meditation, join our phone conversation, or cue up the playlist to let Audre Lorde's inspiring words guide you. This is your 21-day journey.  The only thing we ask is that you walk at least 30 minutes and reflect each day.  This habit will transform your life. We'll be cheering! #daughtersof #girltrek

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Vanessa Garrison :

Good morning and Happy Friday. Are you there Morgan? Good morning.

Morgan :

I'm here. Good Mooooorning. It's Black History Bootcamp! It's Black History Bootcamp! So excited! Oh so excited!

Vanessa Garrison :

Someone just rolled by bumping some I think it was like pace and Jim Jones, and so that's the official start to Black History Bootcamp. While I'm out working someone just rolled in. I'm gonna kick it off.

Morgan :

No, no, no, no, I can, I can be blacker than that. I can be blacker than that. I'm walking in Africa and there's a chicken walking next to me. It's blacker than that. It's Black History Bootcamp. Welcome, everyone...

Vanessa Garrison :

It's Black History Bootcamp. Yes, welcome to Black History Bootcamp powered by GirlTrek. For those of you who do not know us, my name is Vanessa and I am calling in on this walk and talk all the way from Washington DC which is just all the way from my co founder, Morgan, who just like she told you is calling in from Accra, Ghana. And we are going to be your host, your guides, your sisters your walking buddies for the next 21 days. Morgan I am so excited about this.

Morgan :

Woooh! Call your friends, call your sisters! I was just on a call with my sister and my cousins and my cousin just prayed over this whole movement. So it is fun y'all. We about to stomp this...

Vanessa Garrison :

It's done, it's done! Amen. So I'm going to - right away I'll say that both Morgan and I are outside so there might be noise but that's okay. The the 21 days is meant to be actually a walking meditation that you can experience literally on your feet. If you can't experience it on your feet, and there might be days during the 21 days where you can't tune in live to these calls, don't worry, we got you. The daily emails have a playlist they have a reading list. These calls will be recorded and posted. I believe we've had more than 20,000 women who are signed up in online for today's, or coming on for today's call Morgan. But I think every one of those woman could call another sister and it won't be too late for her to join for tomorrow.

Morgan :

Nope, nope, nope, nope, nope. So if you are in a place where you can walk safely and the law says you can walk safely, we invite you to now lace up your sneakers, go outside of your front door, make sure you have a mask on. This is a solo journey. We don't need teams, we don't need groups. We want to keep everyone safe. And you just walk at your own pace, your own speed, walking 30 minutes a day, just five days a week will dramatically improve all risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, all sorts of things. And we need to be healthy for what is coming ahead. This is training for your body, your mind, your heart, the resistance. All right. So get out there and walk today and walk everyday with us for the next 21 days.

Vanessa Garrison :

All right, thank you for that Morgan. I'm going to kick us off then we have 30 minutes to get through this amazing content. Today we are celebrating the life of black, lesbian, mother poet, the godmother of the radical self care movement. the architect of intersectional feminism, just a bad ass beautiful black woman, Audre Lorde. I am so excited to talk about her today. And I'm so excited for the next 21 days. As I was meditating on Audre Lorde, I was thinking her legacy and the legacy of all of the women who we are going to be talking about, that's our birthright, their wisdom, their strategies, the ways that they resisted the grace and style, their unapologetic fair -flair. Those are our birthrights. And today, there is not one thing that we have not experienced that they have not been through and have not prepared us for a time such as this. So I my prayer is that for every woman on this call, and I'm assuming some brothers folks allies have called in - this is a space for y'all too and this for the next 21 days. I hope that whether you're looking for a hope, encouragement or ideas that you get them. So we're going to kick this off Morgan by...

Morgan :

Shout out to.... Scott in San Francisco who asked if he could join...yes you can Scott.

Vanessa Garrison :

Yes, welcome to the brothers who have joined. This is a healing space Look, this is a healing space and it is centered around black women and it's centered around black love, and that love black love radiates out to every single person who we personally, um is in our circle in our community, as part of our village has held down this movement and who just come in looking for some inspiration. So welcome. And actually, Morgan, to get us started with that, I'm going to ask everyone to take 60 seconds. And on this walk-and-talk today as we're reflecting on Audre Lorde, I'm going to challenge everyone for the next 60 seconds to set an intention. Why did you come to this call today? What do you want to get out of it? The universe is asking you to name it, and it is ready to supply it for you. So I'm going to read a reflection from Audre Lorde, a poem and by the end of that poem, I want everyone to have their intentions for this walk and this conversation set. The poem is "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde. "My mother had two faces and a frying pot where she cooked up her daughters into girls. Before she fixed our dinner, my mother had two faces and a broken pot where she hid out a perfect daughter who was not me. I am the sun and moon and forever hungry for her eyes. I bear two women upon my back, one dark and rich and hidden in the ivory hungers of the other mother pale as a witch yet steady and familiar bringing me bread and terror in my sleep. Her breasts are huge, exciting anchors in the midnight storm. All this has been before in my mother's bed. Time has no sense. I have no brothers and my sisters are cruel. Mother I need, mother I need, mother I need your blackness now. As the August Earth needs rain. I am. The sun and the moon and forever hungry, the sharpened edge. Where day and night shall meet. And not one." That was just about 60 seconds. Morgan, I hope you set an intention. And I'm gonna ask you a little bit about your intention by asking you first -and everyone you as I asked Morgan, check in with yourself. Morgan in one word, tell me how do you feel?

Morgan :

Mmm. Relaxed.

Vanessa Garrison :

In one word, what do you want?

Morgan :

How do you feel, Vanessa?

Vanessa Garrison :

I feel uh. No it's ok you can wait. Look I feel um..I feel peaceful. What do you want Morgan?

Morgan :

Yes. And that that that poem was all relaxing and stuff. I couldn't even think of....and the last thing it was like my mama's boobs and the the black, and the...It was good. I need to go read it. I was like I hope my mama was listening.

Vanessa Garrison :

We're gonna post it after. It's called "From the House of Yemanja".

Morgan :

All right. What's the other question?

Vanessa Garrison :

How? What do you want?

Morgan :

Aaah, I want black people to be free. What do you want?

Vanessa Garrison :

I want time to rest. For all of us. What do you what do you need?

Morgan :

I need.... I need space. I need space to express myself. I need space. What do you need?

Vanessa Garrison :

That's funny. I was thinking, I was like, I was kind of thinking along those terms, but I think I need grace. Like understanding that you know I'm doing the best I can in every moment. Um, and the last one Morgan is what do you hope?

Morgan :

I hope that all 20,000 people who signed up for this are walking somewhere beautiful and they're feeling life coming back into their body after being so tense and tight over the weekend.

Vanessa Garrison :

Yes, that's a good hope I actually just said these 21 days - this walk this community, I hope it transformed every single woman who called in and person, man, whatever on this call. I hope it provides a transformation for them, that outlet. I hope this really really touches somebody for the next 21 days. So that's what I hope. Everyone out there.

Morgan :

Yeah, yup. If you're new to the GirlTrek community, yeah, if you're new to the GirlTrek community, I just wanted to officially welcome you. And I wanted to say you're in a safe place. That this community is for you. It doesn't matter where you come from. It doesn't matter what you've got in your pocketbook. It doesn't matter what size you are. It doesn't matter what religion you are. It doesn't matter what gender sexual orientation. You are welcome here, sister. You are welcome. And we love you and my name is Morgan. That's Vanessa and we are the co founders of GirlTrek. And you probably know by now, but just in case you got this on social media and you don't, our mission is to inspire a million black women to walk in their healthiest, most fulfilled life to walk in the direction of their healthiest, most fulfilled life. And so we are well on our way with that today and I get little bit emotional thinking about all of you walking with us right now because this is the mission-in hard times we can just blaze a path together. So welcome, welcome, welcome. You are official, you are officially a part of a movement and we just thank you for joining us today. So Vanessa..

Vanessa Garrison :

Alright Morgan, this is a bootcamp. This is a bootcamp. That's what I was about to say. This is the point where you're gonna need to remember that it was 12:10 so that you could go back and listen to the recording and get your pencils out. We are going to go through some fun and fast facts about this intellectual giant so that we can level set about who she is and then Morgan and I are going to get into, what I hope and know, is a juicy conversation - because she is my friend - about this woman. So here we go Morgan every fast and fun fact I know, and at the end if I missed anything drop some knowledge on the people. Audre Lorde was born in New York City to Caribbean immigrant parents who settled in Harlem. She was born Audrey Geraldine Lorde, but she chose to drop the Y from her first name, while she was still a child explaining in her book "Zami A New Spelling of My Name", that she was more interested in the artistic symmetry of the "e" endings in the two side by side name. That is power right there, folks, she changed her name because she herself wanted to be able to call herself what she wanted to call herself. Her mother was light... light enough to pass for white. And she has written extensively about her relationship with her parents, that it was difficult. And because of colorism in particular, and what she said was her mother's deep suspicion of black people with darker skin than hers, it really influenced her writing and her work. In 1954, she spent a year at the National University of Mexico where she came to confirm her identity as both a lesbian and a poet. "The Cancer Journals" and "A Burst of Light" were two works that she wrote that reflect her breast cancer diagnosis, her treatment and her recovery. She deals with Western notions of illness, treatment, physical beauty. It is a beautiful journey of life and death, mortality victimization, survival. In 1991, she became the New York State Poet Laureate and she remained the New York State Poet Laureate until she died at the age of 58 years old. In 1992. She died in St. Croix from liver cancer, and she had an African naming ceremony before her death. She took the name Gamba Adisa, which means warrior - she who makes her meaning known. Those are my fast and fun facts about Audre Lorde, Morgan - an activist, an artists, a writer a poet. What you got? Did I miss anything?

Morgan :

No, but why did you choose her? What does she mean to you?

Vanessa Garrison :

You know what? She means truth, and truth telling, and speaking truth to power. Audre Lord is a woman who has talked about swallowing rage, swallowing fear, living on the margins. When I was in college at UCLA, I devoured her poem, "A litany for survival". I read it over and over again. I saw myself when she talked about the women who love around corners, coming and going in darkness. And I felt that, I felt like I didn't have a place, and her words and her poetry, her activism, the way she called out white feminism, the way she actually called us to task around our individual leadership -she has a beautiful essay that she wrote around Malcolm X, and she talks about Malcolm and Martin and this enigmatic leadership and how we better check ourselves because we are the leaders. So I love so much about her, but mainly that she just speaks truth to power. What about you? What do you love about her?

Morgan :

Yeah, that's, that's it's the same. I love "A Litany for Survival". The concept that we were never meant to survive, but we did changed my whole orientation. I was like, these fools did not even want us to survive, and we did. And so now we better speak. We better speak now. We better speak now because your silence will not protect you. And so it just... Oh! It gives me shivers. It gives me shivers. I love Audre Lorde's....

Vanessa Garrison :

Look, I got a quote for you Morgan, I got a quote for you. Yeah, I got a quote for you, though, because this is why you have shivers. And I'm teeing you up for this quote, because really what you're saying is what is happening even right now, is why this is important. So let me put this out there so that we could get into a little bit of a conversation. She said, "those of us who stand outside of the circle of this society's definition of acceptable women, those of us who have been forged in the crucibles of difference, those of us who are poor, who are lesbians who are black, who are older know that survival is not an academic skill. It is learning how to take our differences and make them strengths for the Master's tools will never dismantle the Master's house. They may allow us temporarily to beat him at his own game, but they will never enable us to bring about genuine change. And this fact is only threatening to those women who still define the Master's house as their only source of support." I had to put that out there, Morgan for this conversation and I need to reread the last sentence as we talk about this. "And this is the fact that is only threatening to those women who still define the Master's house as their only source of support". Now, what were you saying? We just needed to get that good word out there.

Morgan :

No, I can't say nothing cuz I only got a couple of degrees, I ain't got no PhD, whatever you just said was over my head. Like, I say. Listen, Audre Lorde. Listen, here's a list. I got so much to say about this woman. First of all, right now, in this moment, she was the one who defined radical self care. And we know from Angela Davis, that radical means pulling stuff up from the roots, like pulling all of your assumptions about how you spend your time, how you love, how you live, how you eat, pulling it up by the roots and being radical about how you care about yourself. It was so I was, if you didn't catch the daughters-of conversations last week or last month, we were able, we had the great honor to talk to both Nikki Giovanni and Angela Davis. And Angela Davis gave Audre Lorde such a shoutout, she was like, "I'm so glad that GirlTrek is paying tribute to Audre Lord, for defining for us what it looked like to practice radical self care". So what I think about actually, when you talk about the Master's tools is even how we care for ourselves is is a form of oppression, right? So like...

Vanessa Garrison :

Yes that's the truth!

Morgan :

..money that goes to a spa, how we you know, like, all these sorts of things that we have been taught, that we have to do in order to care for ourselves is all... for the take down. That's first of all. So what I, what I want to encourage people to do is to really start to think about how are you radical about your own self care? What are the things that that requires with you? What does it even look like? What does it feel like to be radical about caring for you now?...

Vanessa Garrison :

I was reading about Audre Lorde... Sorry, go ahead, Morgan.

Morgan :

No, it's okay. I was saying, for me, it looks like quitting my job. When I was a teacher, I was underpaid and underappreciated. And I was filling the gap for a system that had failed black children. And it was killing me too. That's what it looked like for me. Self-care looked like falling back on all of my academic pursuits in order to do what I needed to do. It looked like getting out of a marriage that no longer served me. It looked like buying myself a plane ticket and moving myself to Ghana so I could get sunshine because I was vitamin D-deficient. It looks like bold moves. It looks like sticks and jabs to this system that was trying to take me down. So I am telling you guys, yes, there's all sorts of awful things happening in our community. And perhaps the most awful is the way we treat ourselves because we don't know that we are worthy of greatness. So I am grateful for sister Audre Lorde for coining this whole canon of radical self-care that we can be a part of today. And I just implore any woman listening to this, to evaluate on your walk home: How are you taking care of yourself? What are the decisions that you have to make? How can you be radical right now in making decisions to better care for yourself because you were worth it? So that's what I got.

Vanessa Garrison :

Yeah. Yeah, I was reading - thank you for that, Morgan. I and I challenge everyone out there to just start to even ask themselves, you know, how do they define radical self care for themselves? And we can get into it about we were talking earlier, and I was saying, if you don't even know who your self the self is, then you can't really actually define care for yourself. But even before that, when you were talking Morgan, I was thinking one of the things that has always stood out to me about Audre Lorde's work, and this is where the self-care movement has really gotten it twisted and has taken it to this kind of bubble bath route that it is not the route of black woman comments, quite frankly in our survival. But her her invitation around self-care was an invitation to collective survival, not individualism. So I invite folks to go back and read, you can read through, we put a couple of essays in the email, she was talking about self-care from a group dynamic, Morgan, and my self care is having you as a friend, is having somebody I can talk to, is having the GirlTrek sisters in team. It's, I was talking, you know, people who have to rely on. It's it's safe space to say I'm hurt, I'm angry, I'm scared, I don't feel celebrated. That's actually what GirlTrek has been for the last 10 years for so many black women, where we do not see ourselves we can see ourselves, looking at yourself in the mirror and seeing yourself is self care. And to start Morgan with how do we start to say take so take care of ourselves, we better start to spend time with ourselves. We better start to spend time with ourselves. And then we better start to ask ourselves, where do we fit in? Not just individually with my care, but how does my care fit in with this collective and how do we advance it together? That is, I believe how we honor Audre Lourde's, kind of radical self-care moment, I'm going to take care of myself so that I can also get in the fight. Like it's a it's a it's not an either-or situation. And sometimes, which has been, as I have watched over the last three days, and I've been, I've been in a particular like sad and kind of a place I'm also going through personal things. I'm all I'm getting a divorce, Lord Morgan, but, and moving. But as I've been watching the news for the last three days, I've been grateful for the people who've taken to the streets on my behalf. I've been grateful they when I'm down they're up. I'm grateful that when I'm weak, they're strong. I'm grateful for people's voice when I don't, and we better all be grateful for that. You know, that's what I think about when I think of collective survival. And I think of self-care. Let me rest while you get in the game and just imma tag you out so I could get in the game later. That's what I think about when I think about Audre Lorde and self-care.

Morgan :

I love that, but more I want to ask... yeah, resource. Yeah, I want to give a resource to anybody listening. GirlTrek - we identified women who just had the sweetest spirit and training in Mental Health First Aid - clinical psychologists, all sorts of women. And then some women who just prayed up and we train them to be a part of our our Care Cavalry. And so if you need somebody to listen to you right now, I don't know what you're going through. I don't know if you are on the brink, I don't know if you're with a man who who does not treasure honor you or respect you. I don't know what you're going through right now. But if you need help, you can call 855 GirlTrek. Sorry, it's loud out here... Eight five, five GirlTrek. And there's no "i" in GirlTrek because there's no "i" in team. So GirlTrek t r l t r e k, t r e k, and it's eight five five GirlTrek. And there are women who are just waiting there to just be a Sister's Keeper. And listen, I just wanted to say that. And then the second thing I was just tickled when you're talking. Do you remember, you probably don't remember this. We were in college, all them years ago I remember we were walking down the street in LA and you kept looking at yourself in the mirror. And every every time we passed a window.

Vanessa Garrison :

This is sad that I remember this.

Morgan :

....Why did she keep looking at herself?

Vanessa Garrison :

We were going to Tony Romo's to get some ribs, shout out the Tony Romos..I kind of remember...

Morgan :

No, it was a moment. It was a moment because I realized I didn't look at myself. And I don't know why. I don't know why I didn't look at myself, and I was shocked that you were staring at yourself, the way that you were staring at yourself. I was confused by it. Because I just I felt like feeling in that moment, you know, and she gave her, put her in front of the mirror. She was covering up her smile. That's how I felt when I was walking down the street with you. And so I just want to publicly thank you because you see yourself so clearly I'm able to better see myself. So thank you for that.

Vanessa Garrison :

Thank you for sharing that. And I will say that lately, as I've been in transition I am re greasing - redefining myself, greasing myself, and one of the practices I have actually been doing with my meditation is when I'm doing it - is look in the mirror. Because one of the things, and you and I both know this Morgan, we love to do self-care and meditation to be in service or whatever in service of other people, right? It's like, I'm gonna get strong, I'm gonna do these things. And so I feel like sometimes for me when I'm trying to get go in, I need to actually look at myself and remind myself: You are worthy of this moment, you are worthy of this time, you are worthy of this consideration. You are worthy of you know, how many-look how many hours have we looked on the zoom? How many zoom meetings have you had in the last week, Morgan? I want to know how many zoom meetings and then...

Morgan :

Too many, too many... at least at least 14, at least 14. Like too, like too many.

Vanessa Garrison :

Yeah, 14.

Morgan :

Let's make that the assignment for tonight, Vanessa. Let's, I want to encourage and invite everyone out there who is listening to this call to spend three full minutes in the mirror, just grateful for everything you see, everything you have, all the beauty that is coming out, and just start to find the light in your eyes again. So that is my challenge each person.

Vanessa Garrison :

And if you need a mantra Morgan, if they need a mantra, just I'm going to encourage people, if you need a mantra, it's simple: I am worthy of my time. I am worthy of my care. You have to start there. You have to start there. We are in the streets right now fighting for justice for George Floyd, we would be in the streets fighting for you and don't want to wait till you're dead to do it. So you are worthy of your time and your care right now and we are worthy enough to fight for ourselves right now in this moment.

Morgan :

That is so wonderful. That is so wonderful. And so we also invite you to take this conversation from the streets online to encourage other women if you have any breakthroughs over the next 21 days. You want to share any pictures. You can - we can see it if you tag it with hashtag daughters-of that's daughters with an "s"- of, or hashtag girl trek g i r l t r e k girl trek or daughters-of. Those hashtags we follow personally and we love, love, love to see your story.

Vanessa Garrison :

Thank you for sharing that, Morgan, and I personally have been getting a ton of inspiration just reading women's daughters-of stories over the last couple of weeks. So please share the inspiration. I love y'all as mamas in their fly lil outfits with their curls and their little afros. I mean we are fly black women, we are fly and our mamas are fly. When Beyonce said, "I got shit from Tina", like all our mama's are fly. It's like even my mama shout.. I was telling Morgan. Actually, this is a really good transition, Morgan because I'm sure you know, I struggle with this. Audre Lorde was so open about her personal struggles, about cancer, about being a lesbian, and she literally embodied the term the personal is political. In some ways wrote that she deeply politicized every aspect of herself, including her fight with cancer. And I was thinking that about even when I sent on this call earlier, I was like I'm getting into work. I was like, I don't want to know if I want to share it out on this call with these 18,000 people. But I also feel like we have to heal publicly. We, the one thing that I will say about my family and the women in my family that I - and this is why I love Audre Lorde some more - I was literally taught to do every single thing in silence. I, we didn't hug each other. We didn't kiss each other. We didn't say I love you. And if you were hurting, we were we were told to literally suck it up. Like, buck up! Get out there and and it's and that's who I am, and it's really hard shell, but I in GirlTrek I have learned to talk, to say my pain, shout out to Veronica Berry who's a part of our community with Wonder of Woman - she talks about truth telling all the time. Just saying, I'm "I don't even know the answer" some days is self-care. But when do we say that publicly and when can we just fall back and be like the movement don't gotta know all the this information. No. Especially with social media because...

Morgan :

... Yeah...So in the spirit of telling a truth..go ahead

Vanessa Garrison :

No, I, in the spirit of telling my truth, my mama was wearing a leather suit in jail in this picture and she's fly. And as I stare into the picture, it's literally a leather skirt with a leather blazer that has shoulder pads, pink lipstick, hair lay, black pumps, black tie, she looks like she's going to, she looks like she's going to a meeting in the ladies room. But she is going to jail. And I was like, my mother, who's, who survived by the way, and literally, like, my mother survived over 15 years of incarceration. She survived that, but I, and she mastered the jail photo while inside I mean, gold chain down. She's dope. I was just like, what is this flyness and this is me. So, and then that's that's the story, Morgan. I'd missed that flyness that I'm going to put on a blue leather suit even in jail, you're not going to crush my spirit, system man nothing I have that in me that that no you are not going to crush me. Even right now I'm sitting here and I have on some gold hoops and I put on my lipstick and I put my mascara and I put on my "We are Harriet" shirt because I was like I gotta bring my full self to a call where people can't even see me, but it builds me up... it builds me up... it really does, so and, that is also self-care for me, by the way taking like you know putting on some mascara is self-care for me. It really is. It really is. So Morgan, you there? Uh oh y'all, Morgan might have got janky and, oh, oh she does not like when I say call her Africa internet janky or her phone. Look, God bless the diaspora. And all of the folks who have called in from the diaspora. This is a global movement. And actually right now uplifting that we have organizers in Uganda, Rwanda, Mali all over the place who are also organizing and calling in. This is what it looks like to heal. So, even though it does make Morgan's internet and phone service janky sometimes. But I'm going to read a quote from Audre Lorde, that I actually think, in this moment for me right now, as we are in protest, as we are no longer willing to sit on the sidelines. There is something around us having to grapple with the allies, the white women, our community, our neighbors, and how do we show up and self care when we are feeling enraged? So Audre Lorde has this quote that says "if white American feminist theory need not deal with the differences between us and the resulting differences in our oppressions, then how do you deal with the fact that women who clean your houses and tend your children, while you attend conferences on feminist theory, are for the most part poor women and women of color." And Morgan during this pandemic when people have the privilege of staying inside and having a black woman deliver their groceries on instacart, I am telling you that we need to have a conversation around what that means for us and and for black women. What I'm... it starts with you saying no more to the things that no longer serve you, which was a takeaway that I have gotten from reading Audre Lorde all day today- is we need to start by saying no more to the things that no longer serve us. Morgan, are you there? I want to know what you're going to say no to, in the name of this walk and talk in this call. And if she's not there, I got a whole list prepared y'all because I am seriously seriously on a list on a rampage to absolutely, absolutely start to say no to things. So I'm going to start my list. And here's the challenge to everyone. Start your lists. So Morgan gave you your first assignment and we're almost at our 30 minutes. Your first assignment: three minutes in the mirror meditation. If you need guided prompts: "I am worthy, I am worthy of my care". And then you're going to say, just quickly, you could put it in the notes of your phone, you can just say it in your head. "What are you saying no to?" So that you can say yes to yourself and yes to the things that you care about, so that you can start to define your life instead of your life being defined by your Outlook calendar, by the people who are calling and demanding your time, by the the ongoing cycle of the news and what it is requiring of us. You need to say "no", so I am personally saying "no", to... look that noise that truck just went by. But no, I am saying "no" to more than one hour of news for this entire week. As the helicopters go over my head. I'm saying "no" to one more than one hour news a day. It is too much. I cannot handle it. And I'm going to shut that off. So I hope everyone out there creates your "no list", takes time and looks in the mirror. Self-care says that you are worthy. In the words of Audre Lorde, "if I didn't define myself for myself, I will be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive." So don't allow that to happen. Let this 30 minute walk, be the foundation, let this next 20 days, 21 days- today was day one. Let that be the momentum that gets you to defining yourself for yourself so that you won't be crunched into other people's, especially people -as Nikki Giovanni told us just a couple of weeks ago- they ain't your audience anyway. They, as Audre Lorde said, want to see you eaten alive and never meant for you to survive. So you need to then look at yourself and say, "who I am?" "Who am I outside of this oppression, outside of this struggle, outside of this fight, outside of being a mother, outside of being a worker?" Who are you, and show up for yourself for the next 21 days. That is my prayer for every single woman who has called in today. Morgan, do you have any final words that you want to share with folks? Before we say goodbye if you're on, otherwise...Look, I hear her out there y'all in Africa. I'm so proud of Morgan. I am going to say that to close this call, actually, I am proud of my sister friend for the way in which she has practiced radical self-care and the bold moves in which she has made. Audre Lorde herself actually did travel to the Caribbean and Africa many times throughout her life. And she returned each time she said with a deeper and stronger persona of embodying the Mother Warrior within her. I have seen Morgan herself become a Mother Warrior she has been there. It is my recommendation to every woman if you haven't - certainly post-Corona when we have this chance -and you can do it with GirlTrek - that you take your own trip and pilgrimage to learn about the continent and the beautiful people there across many different countries, and to find a little bit of your Mother Warrior there....as Morgan did...as I did a couple of years ago. And in the meantime, I hope you find some of that in these calls. Be well sisters, this was day one. We will be back tomorrow with day two. We love you. Please walk safe. Please practice social distancing. Please wear your mask. Please protest smartly and safely if you're planning to do that as well. We want to see you on the other side of this. Be well.