Agent vs Lender

Capturing High End Listings

August 20, 2020 Ron Pippin
Agent vs Lender
Capturing High End Listings
Chapters
Agent vs Lender
Capturing High End Listings
Aug 20, 2020
Ron Pippin

This week we speak to real estate agent Bret Charlesworth with Summit Sotheby's Realty. He gives insight on how he knew he needed a team and how he moved to higher end realty. Bret also gives us insight as to how to self-motivate whether on a team or an individual agent and how to go after those high end listings. 

Like our podcast? Go to our Instagram and Facebook page @agentvslender for exclusive content and episode highlights!

Show Notes Transcript

This week we speak to real estate agent Bret Charlesworth with Summit Sotheby's Realty. He gives insight on how he knew he needed a team and how he moved to higher end realty. Bret also gives us insight as to how to self-motivate whether on a team or an individual agent and how to go after those high end listings. 

Like our podcast? Go to our Instagram and Facebook page @agentvslender for exclusive content and episode highlights!

Ron Pippin :

Thank you for joining us again for another episode of Agent Vs Lender. And today we have a local realtor, Bret Charlesworth. And, Bret, we're glad to have you on our on our podcast today.

Bret Charlesworth :

Good to be here, Ron, thank you for inviting me on.

Ron Pippin :

So, Bret's been in real estate, you know, I'm not going to tell his story. I'm going to let him tell us a little bit about him. And just where he started and a little about him and his team, and so I'm gonna let you take it away. So tell us a little about yourself, Bret.

Bret Charlesworth :

Okay, sounds good. So, I got into real estate about four years ago, I was a in business for most of my career, Vice President of Sales, that sort of thing. But my sister in law had one of the big Keller Williams teams in the state of Utah. And so she recruited me in to kind of break into the Salt Lake area for her. She's, she's more up north into the, the Davis county Weber County area. And so, I started back then on a team. And I get that question a lot I get the question, well, should I start on a team? Or should I start solo and, you know, my experience on the team starting out I thought was great. I think it's a good way to start out because, number one, it teaches you the business, it teaches you discipline. And, you know, we had coaches and things like that. So we had accountability. Sometimes it's hard to be accountable to yourself when you don't know what you're doing. And we have some leads that were provided to us as well which, when you were just starting new in the business and you don't have any leads, it's always nice to have some leads. So the trade off to that is obviously you get up you give up a lot of your commission. You know, when you when you're on a team, I looked at it was as what am I going to make at the end of the year? And what kind of experience am I going to get? And so I don't regret that at all. And I actually stayed on the team probably longer than I should have. I stayed on the team for three years, but for that initial year, I was the Rookie of the Year for our brokerage. I did 42 transactions. Yeah, it was a good really good year. And, you know, my sophomore year was not quite as good to be honest. I had a little bit of a setback. But then the third year, I was up to 52 transactions with a lot higher price points and I pretty much doubled what I made the first year.

Ron Pippin :

Yeah. When you say being on a team, there's you know, you don't make as much. You know that may be true, because sometimes you don't make as much per transaction. Yeah, I know a lot of people when they start out in real estate and they will just want to try and do it on their own. They say you know, I don't want to give up that that amount. But the problem is, you know, we have a coach and they say, you know, I'd rather have a, you know, a slice of the watermelon than a whole grape. And you know, it's the same. Same thing right there. It's just like, you know, when you are on a team, and you're getting the accountability, which is huge. I mean, accountability is so key to making it in this business. And some coaching. It's just like, it's so worth the amount that you're giving up, especially for the first 2-4 years that are critical years to learn this business.

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah, I absolutely. I would agree. I just feel like I thought that analogy you gave was great because, you know, I have friends that started in the business about the same time I did and tried to go it on their own. And yeah, they got a higher percentage per transaction but, they ended up with, 5 or 10 transactions at the end of their first year. And I had 42 well who made more money, you know?

Taylor Archibald :

Yeah, absolutely. So yeah, I mean and I, I think that that's a great takeaway is maybe go starting out with that team just gives you access to those resources that a big team typically has, like coaches, you have, you know, more accountability, you might have some more, you know, software or, you know, team members that you can help rely on. So maybe being able to do that to kind of learn the business is a good route. So since then, I think you've kind of transitioned to doing your own thing. So what made you make that transition?

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah, so I just felt like it was time time to go out on my own. I was starting to, you know, that first year, most of the leads that were generated were generated by the team and not me. And, you know, and as time passed, I started generating most of my own leads. And so, at that point, I felt like, well, I now should be getting a bigger percentage of these transactions. I also eventually became the director of sales for that team. And I was training new agents and recruiting new agents and stuff like that. And to be honest with you, I really wasn't enjoying it. I mean, that's what I did. My whole career was management and I really just am enjoying just kind of doing my own thing and not being responsible for a bunch of other people. So I broke away. And that transition was, you know, I mean, it's always a little scary, right to do that. It's always the fear of the unknown, right?

Ron Pippin :

Yeah, I've done that too. I've started obviously on working for other people and, you know it's a big leap when you jump even if you're not like starting your own brokerage, even just jumping away from a team. It's a big leap, a leap of faith, but it sounds like you've done really well. It sounds like spending been a good move for you.

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah, it's been a really good move. I think one of my motivations as well was, I wanted to really increase my price point, even though my price point had gone up throughout the years. So I chose, you know, more of a luxury brokerage. What I've done this year is focused on that higher price point, and it's really paid off, you know, what you focus on expands as we we've all heard and that was definitely true. In that case, in some of my transactions, I don't think I'll end up the end of this year, with as many transactions as I did last year. I'll probably be I would guess, maybe about 10 off from last year, but the price point of those transactions, is a couple hundred thousand more on average. So it's quite a bit different in terms of income for sure.

Taylor Archibald :

Yeah. So what are some of the things you know, talking about focusing on kind of that luxury side of it? What are some of the things that you do differently focusing on that is there you know, something that you do to attract that business or you know, without giving away your trade secrets?

Bret Charlesworth :

well, yeah, so I think first of all, just the brokerage I chose is known for luxury, so that helps for sure. And then you know, if for example, I don't do like a ton of expired listing fizbo type stuff, but I do a little bit of that. And if I'm going to do it, I just choose higher priced homes to go after I don't I don't go after you know, $250,000 homes or $300,000 homes, so I choose that higher price home to go after. But then, you know, in terms of marketing to a farm you know, I started doing that when I broke out on my own. So marketing to a farm my SOI, etc, you know, I'm going after that higher price point and then the services that I offer, I'll do a really nice video all that stuff in house at the company I'm with. I don't know if I'm supposed to mention companies so I'm not doing it but if it's okay, I don't care. Yeah, I'm with Sotheby's. So I went from Keller Williams to Sotheby's. And the reason why I chose them is because they, number one, just the reputation but number two, they have everything in house. So going from a team rather than me having to hire a photographer, a videographer, you know, all those different things, marketing departments, somebody to create. For me, that's all done in house. And so I just felt like I could focus on real estate instead of trying to focus on all that stuff. And it's, you know, it's really been beneficial. You know, I paid I'm sure a higher split than others pay and things like that, but I feel like it's worth it because it's you know, it's taking a lot off of my plate so to speak. And the quality is phenomenal. So if I go into a listing presentation, I'm you know, and I have to pay for it, but I'll, I'll create a nice, you 90 second video forum of the house. If it's a higher end house, I'll do twilight pictures, drone shots, you know, and just the quality of what we do is just really high and so that's what I offer.

Ron Pippin :

You know, there's something to be said for doing what you do best. So I'm gonna I'm gonna jump back over to the lending side. I know that there are some brokers that I know that try to do it all, they will do the marketing, they will originate they will put everything into the system and they will try and process it. You know, they are a one man or one girl show, whatever it is, and they do a lot to try to get their several deals done. So when you are getting to the next level and you start getting busier, there's just no way you find you find that if you're a restaurant, and you find that restaurants have hosts, and they have they have cooks, and they have waitresses, and they have you know, they have all these different things and they have people to clean up after them. So if you're trying to do at all, you just can't do anything really well. And so the way we've set up here too is just like, you know, Taylor has his specific area in which he runs the business actually, Taylor runs most of the business. And I go out and I, I'm trying to bring in the leads, and we have, we have some assistance, and we have a processor, and we have people that specialize in their area. So we're, you know, where we're closing, I don't know, seven, 8 million this month. And your price point that's probably not as big of a deal. But you know, our price points 275. So we're closing, you know, close to 30 loans this month. There's no way we can do that without a team behind this. But we do that without without sacrificing the service and stuff that you are mentioning, so good for you for recognizing that there are certain things that's just worth paying for, so that you can go out and getting business. So anybody listening to this right now. Take a take a page from Bret's business model and pay for those services, because you know you can it's my coach calls it you know you have $10 activities you have $50 activities you have hundred dollar activities and and so forth and you don't want to spend your time doing $10 and $20 activities you need to tire that stuff out.

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah, absolutely. So that was part of why I chose this brokerage is because you know, they have a lot of employees that the do all that creative for you and so on and so forth, transaction coordinators, etc. So it's all just kind of it's a little bit like being on a team but not quite like being on a team. If that makes sense.

Taylor Archibald :

You're still able to focus, you know, because before when when you're on the team being like the Director of Sales and you end up having to kind of fill some other roles besides being a real estate agent. You can be a real estate agent and you have maybe some people that help make it easier to be a real estate agent. So you're still focusing on on that.

Ron Pippin :

So question, you said that you had you had some accountability and coaching when you're on that team, but you're not on that team now. So how are self accountable when you made that shift? And you made that jump from a team to basically being the guy? How do you do that? How do you keep yourself accountable?

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah, and that's, that's always a good question. You know, should I have a coach, so on and so forth. I'm kind of a rare breed, in that I'm very self motivated and self discipline. And not that like I believe in coaching for sure. Like, I'm sure I'll have coaches throughout my time in the future as well. But right now, I don't have a coach and I'm just the type of person that wakes up at 5:30am, every morning and works out. I have a morning routine. I'm in the office by 8, I'm on the phones. And so it's just, I have that self discipline. I would say 90% of the people don't have that self discipline. And believe me, I'm not perfect for sure. I mean, it's easy to get off track. And it's easy to fall, you know, away from your plan and your schedule. And I do it all the time. Because I'm human, right. So anybody that tells you they stick 100% to it. I mean, that's great in theory, but, but if you can make a huge attempt to stick to a discipline schedule, you know, it'll make all the difference in the world.

Taylor Archibald :

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And, you know, something that kind of came up to me while you're saying that because I think that Ron and I are pretty self motivated people too, but I know that we've both kind of hit some times where we plateau a little bit and it's like, you know, you're done, you're gone and then you know, something happens, maybe even in your personal life that kind of makes it so you've plateaued a little bit. And so, for the people that are listening yeah, we we always kind of recommend having a coach or having even doing something listening to you know, Bret and what he's saying, to help keep that motivation going and help prevent from that plateauing. So hopefully people out there listening or, you know, they're trying to do that self improvement and like Ron said, a page from your book to to see if they can incorporate something to be a little more motivated and generate that business.

Ron Pippin :

Yeah, I loved what you said about the about being the routine in your schedule. And having that schedule, I think is just vital. Because if you know what you're going to do for the next day, it makes it so much easier to move forward. Otherwise, you're just reacting to whatever comes up. And you're not being intentional in your business, you're just being reactive instead. And it makes a huge difference in being able to grow.

Taylor Archibald :

And you have to be reactive, you're probably a lot more prepared for that when you're sticking to that schedule, as well.

Bret Charlesworth :

And I think if you get into the office at 10, or 11, or something like that, and start your workday. I mean, I'm pretty much done with the disciplines part of my schedule by by 11 o'clock. And so then now it is time to go out and do showings, and you know, things of that nature, right? Work on contracts. And so not that it never gets interrupted. I mean, sometimes it does, let's just be real but, but for the most part, you know, other people aren't really demanding stuff before 11 o'clock, if that makes sense. So if you can get your stuff out of the way, why 11 o'clock then then you know, then you can move on to that stuff later in the day.

Ron Pippin :

So I'm I'm curious. You had moved once you moved from the team to another brokerage that focused on luxury. That's another leap. How did you do that? I think you know, I'm sure I would like to know and I'm sure other people are the same way they would like to know how do you make that leap from? You know, that $200,000-300,000 houses to more of a luxury home?

Bret Charlesworth :

Well, and I don't want to give the wrong impression either because I'll still sell $100,000 condo if somebody wants to list it with me, right. So in fact, I've sold two of those this year. Literally two different you know, $110,000 condos in Ogden. So you know, I will take anything for sure. And I'll do a great job for you, I'll do the same job for you, if it's $100,000 or if it's a million dollars, and I'm still breaking into there. So I think just kind of going back to number one, the choice. So, I lived in a neighborhood in Draper, Utah. That was a pretty exclusive neighborhood. So you know, in my previous life, you know, I did okay for myself and so I lived in a pretty exclusive neighborhood. And when I was on the team, I actually had an assistant, and I was driving around that neighborhood with this assistant last year, and I'm just like, what the heck, I have no listings in this neighborhood. I've never had a listing here. And I've still never had a listing they're but that's okay. So anyway, but that's point I just made this vote this conscious decision that I need to focus more on that on that higher price point. And so although I haven't had necessarily listing in that neighborhood, I've been able to gain a lot of listings and a lot of other neighborhoods that are in that higher price point. And so again, I just think it's a conscious decision. I aligned myself with a brokers that I thought could really help me accomplish that just by the name and what they offer. And, and then I focused on it. And so maybe that's not very detailed, but, you know, that's what I did. And so, I was intentional about calling people that had higher priced homes instead of calling people with, you know, necessarily lower priced home. So as an example when I was on the team You know, a lot of they did a lot of advertising for leads in places like Zillow and places like that. And I found that the majority of the leads that I got from the team, were first time homebuyers. And those first time homebuyers typically aren't buying a $700,000 home. Right, so I remember it seems like it was like four or five days in a row, I would go down to Orem and meet, because when you get a Zillow lead, they want you to meet the client, you know, they don't want you to really prequalify them, they want you to just meet them. And so I'd go meet a client and there was it was usually a student who was not pre qualified, who wanted to see a condo. And you know, as I'm driving from, you, Draper to Orem, which isn't a bad drive, but, you know, just time after time I found that, you know, that wasn't really what I wanted to be doing. And so even though I'm happy to do it, I'm happy to help, like I say any price point. But it's interesting. I got a call from an agent on my former team a couple days ago. And they were calling on a listing that I had cancelled. You know, the owner had changed their mind, the seller changed their mind and decided not to sell. And they were wondering, because this market is so competitive. They were wondering if I was if I could talk to that seller and get them to sell a $200,000 townhouse. And I asked her how, how business was going and she said, she has, you know, six or seven buyers that are all in that price range. And of course, in this market, she's just pulling her hair out, right, because it's so competitive. And she's going through, I mean, I'm proud of her to go through that kind of effort to go through cancelled listings to try to get her buyer a house is extraordinary. You know, most agents aren't going to do that for their buyers. But that's a lot of effort. And that's just not where I want to put my focus right now.

Taylor Archibald :

So just in just to be clear, I know Bret said this a couple of times, but anybody listening that's, you know, thinking about using him. Don't don't feel like oh, you know, I'm in the 200 price range, I can't use him. Just know that you're gonna get, you know, that luxury service with Bret, regardless of that, you know, price range that you're in.

Ron Pippin :

I do find it interesting, though. That what you said you were intentional about making phone calls, and doing your marketing to just a different subset of the market and it's not that you didn't fall into that you were intentional with that. So I just found very interesting that you know and actually eye opening, so people that, you know, if you are advertising grants and no down payment programs, you're gonna be getting the first time buyers. And that's probably not what you're advertising.

Bret Charlesworth :

No, yeah, exactly. Yeah I'm definitely like you said, I'm intentional about focusing my marketing on a higher end home. So, and again, those aren't, you know, it's funny because agents are probably like, yeah, you don't have to sell very many of those. And believe me, a lot of our agents are up in Park City and they don't have to sell a lot of those, you know, $4 million, or $5 million homes, which is not my price point. But, but they're selling a lot of them right now. By the way. Park city's going crazy. For agents out there, the higher price points. You know, they're actually more difficult the customers are more demanding. They don't sell as quickly. I mean, it's not all, you've got to be in that price point because some people won't be comfortable there. I was comfortable there because, I lived in a neighborhood like that I still do. I mean, I've moved from that neighborhood into another neighborhood, but I'm not uncomfortable with people that live in million dollar houses. That's just people that I associate with anyway. And so some people are intimidated and uncomfortable. And if that's the case, then that's probably not what you want to do.

Taylor Archibald :

Yeah. And even, I think for a lot of agents who are just starting out, it's good to say, you know, I'd like to kind of focus on that, but I think for most agents starting out, it's like, you Just take whatever comes to you and you're, you know, hungry for those leads. And to be honest, there's a lot more leads at that first time homebuyer phase than there is later on. Because most of the time when people are buying those those types of houses they're using, you know, the same agent they've used the past three times, they're using the same lender or banker or whoever it is, and so they get a little bit more set. So it's kind of hard to break into that. I think that you've given us some good advice on being proactive, and that's a good way to gain some of that market share.

Ron Pippin :

And there's nothing wrong with first time homebuyers, quite honest. We do a lot of those. So nothing wrong with that market. Just to be clear.

Taylor Archibald :

So I mean, how are you seeing that as far as you know, ongoing referrals? Where's your business coming from? Is a lot of it referral based for you?

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah, so, you know, it's funny because my whole career, after I was the Rookie of the year, new agents would always want to find out what are you doing? Where's your business coming from? And you know, I like to have 10 to 12 weed sources I really do. And, you know, I'm not above knocking on doors. I'm not above doing open houses. I'm not because that's what gets you business. You know what I'm saying? And so I'm not above driving like some agents will only work in a specific area. And believe me, that would be great if I could just stick in one city and make a lot of money but, I've had to go all along the Wasatch Front. I grew up in Ogden, so I have a lot of business up there. And I live in Sandy. So I have a lot of business down here and I've done a lot of business in Utah County. So I'm not above doing that. For example, this year, I've closed 5 transactions from open houses.

Ron Pippin :

Wow, good for you. That's great.

Bret Charlesworth :

And if you think about the open houses were pretty much shut down for two months this year. Yeah, that makes it even more remarkable, right?

Ron Pippin :

Yeah totally.

Bret Charlesworth :

And so, I'm not like some agents might get to a point where they, you know, oh, I'm only going to take referrals or whatever. And that is the biggest part of my business this year. As I as I broke it down. You know, I have received more leads from referrals than any other source. But, you know, five closings from from open houses, you know, that's a great source. And, you know, new agents can do that they can ask to do, even if they have no listings, they can ask to do open houses, for other people in their office, things of that nature, but I just really feel like the key to my success in real estate has been listings has been listing focused. Because when you're listing focused, the buyers come from that, whether it be open houses, door knocks, sign calls, whatever it may be, everything's generated because you have listings. If you don't have any listings, if your average, you know, maybe your SOI will call you in terms of a buyer, but other than that, it's pretty hard to get buyers. If you don't have any listings. If you have listings, the buyers come to you.

Taylor Archibald :

So being really proactive at those open houses. You're not there to show the house you're there to gain clients really is what it is.

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah, I mean, of course, you know, I'd love to sell the listing. And I have sold listings at open houses. A lot of agents will tell you open houses are a waste of time. You know, people just do that to get leads. And yeah, I mean, that's the main focus, but I'm also focused on selling my listing, which does happen from time to time at open houses. But yeah, you're exactly right. Open houses, that's a storefront that's a good place to meet people. It's kind of weird with face masks on now, you know, to get to know, people but it's a great way to meet people and gain their trust. And then of course, it requires follow up, you're not, you're not probably going to sign them on as a client right there at the open house. Your going to follow up with them and you're going to have discipline to continue to follow up with those people. Until they do gain your trust and want to use you as their agent. And so it's just a system and It's perseverance, discipline, and not being too, I guess too good to do certain things in the business. I don't believe I'm too good to do anything. You know, I'll knock on doors, I'll do open houses. I'll make phone calls, whatever it is that that you need to do to be successful. That's what you need to do.

Taylor Archibald :

And so for those, I guess, listening to this, you know, and Bret, correct me if I'm wrong here, but I think that the difference is that you're willing to do anything, but when you're doing those activities, you're analyzing, okay, is this is this actually bringing in, you know, money is this gonna be productive for me to do? And so it's not just, you know, don't, don't be busy, be, you know, proactive and be, you know, ready to do that stuff. On that same note, I do have a question. And you might not have the answer here. But on average, Average, how many phone calls are you making a day to? You know, prospective clients or past clients?

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah. So I make about my goal is to make 100 calls a week. 20 calls a day. I usually don't call on Saturdays.

Taylor Archibald :

So, then you feel like you're pretty consistent at that.

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah. So I track it.

Taylor Archibald :

Yeah. Well, now, how do you normally track that just on a piece of paper doing checkmarks or?

Bret Charlesworth :

Well, today that's a system. And if somebody does have a system, it's just like, get a piece of paper out and write it down. That's like, that's just a great system, at least to start with. Yeah, so currently I do that on a daily basis. I just make a tick mark, and then I'll, and then I'll enter it into a spreadsheet. I use, I need to give my brother's company a plug. So he used to use a, I used to use a, an app called Sisu, and it's pretty expensive for just an individual agent like myself, but for a team, it's really awesome because you can track all those calls and track all your teammates and all that sort of thing. So anyway, that's his app. It's called si su and that's what that's what I use for a couple years and I really miss it because it's a lot better than that spreadsheet, but I could justify the cost with just me as a solo agent.

Taylor Archibald :

Yes, for a family discount.

Bret Charlesworth :

He didn't give me anything so you know.

Taylor Archibald :

Cool, so yeah, maybe people maybe brokers or something that are looking for a good system like that. That might be a good place to look.

Ron Pippin :

Yeah, I actually wrote it down. I want to take a look at we're gonna go take a look at it.

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah, it's it's actually really awesome when I was the director of sales for a team I mean, you could just at any time, look at the stats of your, of your team, just right there at your fingertips. Very, useful tool tool. And of course, you know, if you are, I mean, you just need to keep, you need to keep track of whatever you're doing, you need to keep track of your calls, your active clients, your hot leads, you're under contracts, everything needs to be be followed. And I do have a spreadsheet, but I also currently, so I used to use Boomtown as my CRM when I was on a team. And again, it's pretty cost prohibitive for an individual agent to use that. But currently, I use a software pack or an app called Cloz. And it's spelled co CL o z instead of se. And it's actually got this cool feature where it just gives you the snapshot. So if you remember the old say whiteboards, you know, if you were keeping track of you know, okay, these are my hot leads, and these are my under contracts and these are my closed and whatever, it actually gives you a one screen view of that whole thing you know, at any time, and so you can kind of just just look at that, you know, the beginning your day. And of course, you can put set to dues and have callbacks and all that sort of thing as well so that you know, what you're doing every day. But, but it also gives you kind of that that big view, which Boomtown didn't give me I really like that about close, but it's pretty inexpensive. I think it's like 35 bucks a month.

Taylor Archibald :

Yeah, that's cool. Yeah. And I know that there's, you know, one that we've used too is like Trello, which is kind of that, you know, whiteboard type thing. Yep. cards, you can move them to different places. And I think you start that one for free. So if you know it's a system that you're looking for, first off, don't wait for the perfect system to start tracking your stuff. Because there's no perfect system out there, each one has its pros and cons. So just start tracking, even if it's on paper. But then the next is you can, I mean, nowadays you can find almost anything that you're looking for for free. But then, you know, it's gonna probably have maybe more cons than if you're paying for it.

Ron Pippin :

So I guess using that technology to help is, I mean, it can really be a game changer for people. So the game changer isn't necessarily using an app. A game changer is tracking. Yeah, that's danger. And don't track you can't grow, because you don't if you don't know where you've been, you don't know how to get better.

Bret Charlesworth :

So then along with that tracking, you've got to have goals. So if you want to have 10 appointments a month. You got to have that as a goal and you got to track that. Yeah. So, I have just in my little spreadsheet, I just have a weekly, you know, whatever, to two appointments a month or a week, sort of thing, you know, and, and then where am I tracking on that? And how many are listings? And how many are buyers? And and how many agreements have I signed? And what's my goal on agreements? And what's my goal on closings? And what's my goal? And so if you don't, if you don't have like, kind of a game plan going into each month, and so every month, I just set up a new game plan. This is what I want to accomplish this month. And, and then I track it, and at the end of the month, I can see did I accomplish it? Or did I not? Now the one thing is obviously closings unless you're going to get a cash buyer under contract you weren't expecting that's pretty much going to be determined the month before.

Taylor Archibald :

Right? So yeah, I mean, you've even broken it down. It sounds like to even what are the phone calls that need to be made to be able to get these appointments to be able to you know, and you can adjust that so if you know a few hundred to increase your salary, then you know, well maybe I should, you know, make 150 calls a week and, try and get three appointments. In this industry you can really kind of help to, I mean, do that balance of alright, I know that it's going to be more work but maybe I'm willing to do a little bit more work for this or whatever. So yeah, I think that but if you if you don't track anything, you're gonna be busy, especially right now you're going to be really busy, but you might be busy putting a lot of miles on your car and not getting the closing table. Right. So yeah. aisles don't necessarily equal dollars.

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah, I do. I do a lot of those for sure.

Ron Pippin :

Yeah, busy is good. productive is better. Yeah. So yeah, man, I'll tell you that we can we can turn this into multiple episodes. Yeah. Yeah, this is this is awesome. We are getting pretty close to our time. So we are gonna wrap this up. Is there any word of wisdom? Is there any like something that if you had to start over that maybe you would do differently?

Bret Charlesworth :

So I'm gonna, I'm going to answer your question but not answer it. So kind of my word of wisdom is, in this business, it's very easy to get discouraged. Even if you're doing 40 or 50 transactions a year, it's easy to get discouraged because what will happen is, those will come in cycles. They won't be consistent, you know, five a month or whatever, right? 10 a month, you know, it's not going to happen that way. It's going to come in cycles and, and I just think, you know, easier said than done because I think we all can get discouraged, but just keep your head up and just keep working and working smartly and doing those things you're supposed to be doing and it will happen. So when you're going through one of those cycles just just keep working, and you know, it's eventually going to happen don't give up on it because a lot of a lot of realtors just give up. You know, it's easy to give up.

Taylor Archibald :

Yeah, I think to add to that, you know, if you're, if you have the same mentality is Bret and you're trying to be you know, really motivated proactive, and you know, you might have a slow month but that probably means that you're spending more time on on the phones and that's gonna, you know, buckle up because the wave is coming sort of thing and so yeah, I think that i think that you know, if you're looking for someone to try it, try and find someone like like Brett, you know, if you're getting into the business and just Take him to lunch and kind of pick his brain a little bit, do something like that, you know, assuming he's got time or whoever else has time, but I think finding that mentor. Yeah, it's a big move when you're starting out and it'll help with some of that discouragement that that could come so. So thank you so much, Bret, for being on with us. How do people get in touch with you? What's the best way?

Bret Charlesworth :

Yeah, really? Just call me at 801-557-7406. Or you can email me at Brett. That's just with one t b. e t is a really long email address. But it's Brett at Charles worth realestate.com. So first name at Charles work my last name real estate.com.

Taylor Archibald :

Awesome. All right. So yeah, thanks for thanks for being on with us. And thanks so much. And, man. Yeah, we might Have to do this again. I think we just barely scratched the surface on, you know, of knowledge that you have and advice that you can give. So I appreciate that.

Bret Charlesworth :

Thanks for having me.

Ron Pippin :

Awesome. Yeah, so you can get hold of us at Taylor I had 801-628-7667 and that will wrap up another episode of agent versus lender, and we'll see you next week.