Agent vs Lender

Counter Intuitive Marketing To Set You Apart

November 05, 2020 Ron Pippin
Agent vs Lender
Counter Intuitive Marketing To Set You Apart
Chapters
Agent vs Lender
Counter Intuitive Marketing To Set You Apart
Nov 05, 2020
Ron Pippin

This week we speak to Rod Moser who is a real estate agent and a real estate agent coach even reaching agents in Canada. We discuss with him how he has leveraged his own unique marketing tactics to set him apart from his competition in a highly competitive market. Learn how to show your potential clients why you are different than the competition. 

You can listen to all episodes of Agent Vs Lender on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Play. If you love Agent Vs Lender follow us on YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram for all bonus content. 

Show Notes Transcript

This week we speak to Rod Moser who is a real estate agent and a real estate agent coach even reaching agents in Canada. We discuss with him how he has leveraged his own unique marketing tactics to set him apart from his competition in a highly competitive market. Learn how to show your potential clients why you are different than the competition. 

You can listen to all episodes of Agent Vs Lender on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Play. If you love Agent Vs Lender follow us on YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram for all bonus content. 

Ron Pippin:

Welcome to another episode of Agent Versus Lender. And today we have Rod Moser from Salt Lake City. Rod has been a broker and CEO of multiple different agencies, real estate agencies, he's ranked top 1% in these County, selling real estate. And he's also been a real estate coach for some of the top teams across the country and in Canada. So, Ron, tell us a little bit about just just give us a little bit about about your story.

Rod Moser:

Yeah, well, so I started in the real estate game, actually doing mortgages, did mortgages for about 10 years, 12 years. And learned after a little while that I didn't enjoy that side as much, I wasn't as good as I would like to be. And I was moving back, I had spent several years in Oklahoma City, I was moving back to Utah where I grew up, and was decided to make some changes. And I got into the game of real estate in Cache Valley is actually where I started, moved into a community didn't know anybody. There were a lot of real estate agents that were very established had been selling for years and years in the community. So trying to crack into that market was a little bit difficult. And but after three years in, I was the number one residential real estate agent in Cache Valley, and was selling about 100 homes a year and doing really well. Interestingly enough, is after I got up, and I was carrying about 50 to 60 listings at a time and woke up and the market is starting to soften. We're about 2010 2011. And we go on through a really difficult time. And I woke up one day and got had five voicemails, and they were all sellers. And they were all very frustrated because their houses were still in the market and hadn't sold. And I had a friend call me up and anyways, gave me an opportunity. And a week later, I signed over every listing, I had to my business partner, I jumped on a plane and I went to Hawaii and spend a year in Hawaii, you know, completely out of real estate. That's another story. But after a little while you run out of money because Hawaii is really expensive. And I had to come back. So I took a job as the CEO of the Keller Williams office in sugarhouse, here in Salt Lake, did that for about four years, had a lot of success. We took the office, from about 95 agents to almost 200 agents generated a profit every month for 12 months, which was the first time that had ever happened in that office and and then I got an opportunity to leave and go to a little larger company here in town I started managing the century 21 ever Sophos did that for a year, and then I started a coach real estate agents with Tom Ferry. And so I did that for about five years, and then decided, once again, to make a little change, I get bored fast and make a little change and reopened a small brokerage ourselves, my wife and I, and we've been selling ever since.

Ron Pippin:

So the that is really funny. When you say, you know, you did all these big giant things, then you scale back down, and you go open a small office. So tell me, what's the mindset as to you know, most people are trying to climb that ladder, you know, and you climb that ladder, and you decided that's, that's maybe not what you want to do. So tell me, what's the mindset and why you decided to do that?

Rod Moser:

Yeah, great question. And what I discovered after, you know, doing all those things is that at the end of the day, we all go to work to take care of the people that matter most in our world, right. And for me, that's my wife and my children. And when I was pushing to be important to people that didn't know me, and I didn't know them and didn't really care. And we didn't break bread together at night or anything like that, when I started to realize that the people that matter most to me, were being sacrificed so that I could be important in the real estate world. I made a conscious decision to scale back. We love to travel, we want to maintain a great lifestyle, I want to make sure my kids have the best that I can possibly give them. And I realized that I didn't need to sell 1000 houses a year to do that I didn't need to, to manage the biggest office or or you know, that that I made a conscious effort to sell just enough houses to maintain the lifestyle and to start really enjoying the reason that I go to work and the people that matter most in my world.

Ron Pippin:

That's awesome. And for those of you that are that don't know rod he says he hasn't not just he sells enough just to make his lifestyle okay, but he's no slacker he. He still sells a lot of houses. So Thank you, man.

Rod Moser:

Yeah, and, you know, truthfully, people need great real estate agents. And I feel like if you if you can do the business well, and you know how to help people maximize the sales price and, and really make that very challenging time and a lot of people's lives a little bit smoother, if you're good at it, you kind of owe people, you know, you you owe them to, to be out and be active and to continue to do what you do best for them.

Ron Pippin:

So you just said something just a little bit ago, that kind of piqued my interest. You moved from out of state back to Cache Valley, probably over in the Logan ish area. And you didn't know anybody. And it was just a few short years later that like you're you're crushing it, and you're, you know, pop in that county. So how do you go from knowing zero? mean, you don't have like a sphere of influence their route to really call on? I'm assuming? Yeah, from zero not knowing anybody to, to crushing it in just a few short years? How do you do that?

Rod Moser:

Great question. And I had some amazing mentors, and I've studied sales my entire life. But when we got back when I first got started, I didn't know anybody. And it was hard because I didn't know who to even talk to they didn't, you know, put a sign out front of their house and say, Hey, I'm, ready to sell my house and come over and talk to me, it did find out they did do that it was a for sale by owner sign. And that's kind of how we got started and but, you know, we I started put a lot of effort in. In fact, I used to carry a bunch of little plastic beads in my right pocket when I'd go to work in the morning. And I would go into the office. And every time I had a conversation with someone about real estate, I would transfer one of those beads from my right pocket to my left pocket. And I committed to myself that I wouldn't stop working until I transferred all those beads over. And some days that took a little longer to do I mean, I was driving to the gas station and filling up my car and a poor sucker that pulled up next to me. I'm a local real estate agents, you know, if you had any thoughts of buying or selling, you know what I mean? And so I was doing that all the time. And after about a year, it was interesting because I there was a there was a buddy in the office and other real estate agent, we went out to lunch one afternoon, walked into the into the restaurant. And all of a sudden all these people were Hey, Rod, how are you doing? It's good to see ya. And we sat down and got our food. And he says, I gotta tell you, he goes, I've lived in this town my entire life because I play football, you know, at Logan high. And I felt like I know, everybody, you've been here how long and I said about a year and it goes, you know more people than I do. And I just talked to more people than he did at the time and let go of that. You know, people can sometimes reject you colorful ways. And you just have to, you know, understand that. They don't know you they don't hate you. They're You know, they're just telling you they're not interested right now and get get out of your head a little bit. But that's how that started. And then that's cool. Yeah. And then I met a great mentor. Her name was Jett Youngblood. And remember, we went to a cash rich Association of Realtors, I apologize, man, sometimes I'm long winded, I'll be quick though. Down, we sat down at lunch, and my phone kept ringing. And it was people that wanted to show houses and, my clients call in and I was being kind of rude. I was answering the phone and it was really uncomfortable. We got all done with the lunch. And Jet goes, You know, that was really an educated I can't believe you kept answering the phone. And I said, well, jet, you're super busy. You're you know, you sell 50-60 houses a year and your phone didn't ring. She goes I'll teach you the business of real estate. But here's the deal. You take me to lunch, on your dime. And I'll explain to you how to run a business of real estate instead of being a self employed salesperson. So anyways, long story short, I went to work with jet, she had a little book called The Millionaire real estate agent, it was written by Gary Keller back at a time that was kind of her model. And that got me started on that path. So

Ron Pippin:

That you know, that's an awesome story. Because I kind of have gone through that path myself as being a self employed there's a difference between being a running a business and being a self employed salesperson. I mean, there's a total mind shift and people just don't realize, you know, when I was doing a five year four or five loan to month, and doing, you know, a somewhere around a million a month, it was like I could do that. But that, you know, once we started really gaining some momentum and you know, now we're doing 10 times that there's no way that I could I could do that without a team behind me. And so I had to shift from salesperson to business person. And it's actually that's how A big, there's actually a big shift and took me a little while to make that shift.

Rod Moser:

Yeah, for sure. You know, we were talking earlier about the cost of running a business and making sure there's profit margins. And, you know, I used to talk to a lot of agents and you'd ask them, you know, how did you do this year I made, you know, $120,000. And deep down, they really believe they made $120,000. In fact, they live the lifestyle as if they made $120,000. What they didn't take into consideration is business expenses, and licensing costs and taxes and all of those kinds of things. And so, you know, understanding that I think that, you know, if I could start over, and and begin something, I think it would be understanding how to create a budget to be able to run a business on as opposed to just, you know, collecting your commissions, and assuming that that's how much money we're making.

Ron Pippin:

Yeah, I've talked to a lot a lot of agents and and mortgage people as well. Sure. Yeah. In the same business. So it's really, we are so similar that that it's that scary. Yeah, most people go, Well, I'm gonna throw this money at this. And I hope that something comes back out of it, man hope is a terrible business model. Because I used to run on home. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah.

Rod Moser:

You know, you really look at it you make you get to keep about 30 to 40% of your gross commission income, the rest of its going to go to taxes is going to go to business expenses and into savings that you don't have when you're in real estate for retirement. And if you're not budgeting the right way, I think you can get yourself into trouble. Right?

Ron Pippin:

Right. Yep. Totally. So in this business, especially right now, we were talking earlier about, there's so many, so many real estate agents, and I'm gonna let you take this because you're better at this. There's so many real estate agents, how he set yourself apart?

Rod Moser:

Great question. Yeah, we were talking about that they're in Utah. Right now we have just under 30,000 real estate agents actively licensed in the state of Utah. In order to get a real estate license, it's a really simple process, it's a low bar, low barrier of entry. It's 120 hour course, right? after you take the course you pass a multiple choice test is 70%, or better. And a lot of people could probably guess and pass, you pay a token fee to the state, which is a couple of thousand bucks, and they turn you loose on society to help people sell and buy their biggest asset. It's no wonder so many people have had kind of a bad experience with real estate agents and why sometimes they get kind of a bad rap. And, you know, almost everybody I talked to know somebody who has a real estate license, whether it's a family member, whether it's a friend, they know somebody who dabbles in real estate. And so you know, they default and maybe hire them instead of interviewing. So one of my favorite questions is, let me just ask you, if you didn't know somebody, or if you didn't have a family member, the sole? What criteria would you use to ensure that the agent you hire is the right agent for selling your home and not just somebody that's carrying a real estate license, I pulled the stats up, I've been pulling stats every year, since I got or every every Monday since I got into the game of real estate. And right now in Salt Lake County, we have 3588 homes on the market in the last 30 days, 1600 of those homes sold. So when you're looking at that, that means that we had almost 2000 families hire a real estate agent and fail to sell their home, even in this kind of a market where we have a low inventory, a tremendous demand. We're still you know, more than more than half are not finding a buyer and are carrying that through the average days on market for those 1600 homes that sold last month, 30 days. So it's taking an average of 30 days, even with the light inventory. So when you start to look at those kinds of things, you know it, it's a challenge. And what a lot of people have done is is they say, Well what does a real estate agent do? Well, they put my home on the MLS, they get it out on several websites like Zillow or realtor.com. You know, they they fill out some paperwork, and they sit back and wait for somebody to come along and buy the home and they get paid a lot of money. So there for a while real estate agents spend all their time when they go to an appointment telling people about all the cool things they did well we hire a professional photographer. We have a social media campaign, we're going to put your home on thousands of different websites so that every buyer on the planet knows it's available for sale. We've got somebody that's going to come in and help you to stage your home. Our signs are the prettiest My company is number one, I'm number one, they kind of go through that process about everything that they do. Well guess what? All of us basically do the same thing. Right? If If, if you're not having a professional photographer, go out Right now and you're taking pictures with your phone, you're probably doing your cleaning service, and it's going to cost them some money. If you're not getting the exposure on the websites, which it's mostly automated anymore than MLS does it for you. So, you know, all of us basically do the same thing. So if we're all going to do the same thing, then if I'm a consumer, what I would do is I would just go find the cheapest possible person to hire, and I would hire them. What's interesting is this. Have you ever noticed that two houses built at about the same time in the same neighborhood with the same basic floor plan, sometimes sell for different prices?

Ron Pippin:

Yeah,

Rod Moser:

yeah. What do you think the reason for that is?

Ron Pippin:

Probably, probably a better salesperson. It's either salesperson better marketing better, it's better something because houses are better. Yeah. It's something outside of the house itself.

Rod Moser:

There, there has to be something that differentiates. And it's not the house, if the house is the same condition SR built same all of that stuff, then then it probably was the real estate agent or some factor of what it is that they did. So when I go to a presentation, I just tell him, Hey, I'm going to save you some time we do the same thing everybody else does. There's two little things that we do differently. And those two little things make all the difference in the world. Right. And I, you know, I'd be happy to share those with you. I don't want to bore you. But I can maybe point out a couple of things that that might make a difference, right. One of the one of the greatest marketing campaigns I've seen in a long, long time, is a new company in our community called Homie. It's brilliant, right? They figured out a way to be a full service brokerage by providing professional photographers in the signs and getting it on the MLS and making sure that it's marketed everywhere. And all of that is happening. But what's interesting is when I ran the numbers, and I just compared it with a large Keller Williams office here in town, because they do a lot of sales. They sold on average for 3.8%, less on a price per square foot basis than a full service agent. Good. So the marketing campaign was brilliant. We're gonna save you thousands and thousands of dollars in commissions. And they do. But the other side of the story is if I sell your home for thousands and thousands less, I'm still saving the Commission's but at the end of the day you walk away with a smaller paycheck. Did you really win? Yeah. And that's where I think the education needs to come in is real estate agents need to make sure that they understand how to sell a property, how to market a property for the highest possible price.

Ron Pippin:

Man, if there's any real estate, I've had multiple real estate agents talk to me about that company.

Rod Moser:

Sure, yeah. And it's a great company right into another company. They do something really, really well.

Ron Pippin:

And yeah, they're just they're totally disrupting the business right now.

Rod Moser:

No question,

Ron Pippin:

talking about how do you how do you overcome? And how do you? How do we win against them? You just gave them the answer?

Rod Moser:

Well, that's true. And we can support all of that with statistics. And it's easy to it's easy to see, you know, and the other thing is, you know, all the homes that they list 45% of themselves, 55% expire, cancel, which in and of itself is telling, right? Would you hire a company, if you had less than a 50% chance of selling your home? A lot of that stuff is there. But you know, the the interesting thing, and again, I think it's important for people to interview the agents that they're going to hire and make sure that they ask them some deeper questions. Right. So an example, we recently listed a home on the east side. I could find comps for the home because it was a it was a 4500 square foot home, you know, area work quite a few sold. And I could find comps in the highest comp that I could find was about 820 to 825,000. Right, the absorption rate in the area was two which means on average, in this price range. And in this location, there were two homes that sold every single month. So two buyers per month in the price, reason location. So that was my expectation. There was another agent who listed a home two houses away same your bill, same builder, same quality construction, same neighborhood. And his sign went up one day and then it went down the same day. And my client had taken a picture of the sign because he wanted me to call and figure out what the comps were and everything else for as we were selling his home and I called him and he said yeah, we're in that we're in the low seven hundreds. Well, my first thought was, oh my gosh, did I miss price this property by $100,000? Right. So he said yeah, low sevens. There hasn't been a house in the neighborhood that sold over 700,000. My parents live in the neighborhood. My client didn't want this to go on the MLS and luckily enough We found a buyer before we went on the MLS, so we're not, it's not going to be there. And he goes, I talked to your owners and I know what they're wanting to sell their home for, and there's no way it's going to happen. So I said, Okay, we put the house on the market. The very next week, my clients had to get a hotel room because they couldn't go home. They had so many showings for two straight days from sunup till sundown, we ended up getting eight offers on the property, including three cash offers, you know, way over asking price waiving appraisal, waiving due diligence, all that kind of stuff, we just closed on that house at $870,000. And we had an agent who went to school 120 hours passed his test, you know, new people in the neighborhood knew the area really well. And he underpriced the home by almost $150,000. That's the kind of stuff that can happen. If you don't interview if you You know what, whether it's a family member or a friend, somebody that you know, they mean, well, they want to do a good job for you, but if they don't know how it can cost you 10s of thousands of dollars.

Ron Pippin:

Yeah, I seen that on the on the mortgage side as well, where somebody will, start shopping and, they find somebody that gives them, you know, break a couple hundred dollars break on their closing costs, or they say, Hey, I'm going to discount something, whether it's a rate or fee. But, and, and they come back later and go, Ron, that several, several hundred dollars just was not worth what went through. So it's, really important to get people that are professional, and they know what they're doing. And they have some experience. Because that experience really matters, especially when you're dealing with, with properties that are some of the biggest investments you're gonna make in your entire life.

Rod Moser:

So you can't mess around with stuff like that. There's an interesting, you know, talking about these things. And I appreciate you allowing me to kind of share some of this because I think it's important, there's an article, it's one of my favorite articles. In fact, I bring it with me, when I go on listing appointments, and it was written by Forbes magazine, you can Google it. And the title of the article is our real estate agents colluding to rip you off. And the article goes on to talk about how real estate agent well, homes that are listed at a discounted commission, you know, 5%, or 4%, or whatever I mean, Commission's can be anything but typically a lower priced commission, that they take longer to sell, and they sell for less money. And I'm like, well, that's interesting, because it's all legit, it follows the law of supply and demand. See, I can't control the supply of homes out there, I can't, you know, keep a neighbor from listing their home. But if I can artificially increased the demand on your home, and the supply stays the same. What does that do to your value? Right? So how do I artificially increase the demand on your property? I'll share with you my secrets, right. So here it is, you offer a slightly higher buyer agent commission than what everybody else is offering. We know that there are 30,000 agents in Utah. You know, in Salt Lake County, we sold a grand total of 18,289 homes in the last 365 days. So if we've got all these agents selling that many homes, the average agent is selling maybe three or four sides a year, maybe three or four houses a year which means that every time they have a buyer in their car, that buyer on average represents 25 to 33% of their annual income from real estate. So if I have five homes out there and by the way, when you when you sold as many homes as we have, you realize pretty quick that the homes are kind of the same, right? They they have the same number of bedrooms, they have a roof they have a foundation, the difference is cosmetic maybe one has new carpet or one has granite countertops, but at the end of the day, a house is a house so people are making a 30 year decision based on the color of carpet or the color of paint when you can change just about anything you'd like in the home. Right so so if you've got a buyer and they're looking at seven different homes in the market and four of them are offering two and a half percent as a buyer agent commission, and two of them are often 3% and one's offering three and a half percent as a real estate agent which of those homes would you be the most excited to sell

Ron Pippin:

if you're a buyer's agent?

Rod Moser:

Yeah,

Ron Pippin:

well you're gonna get in it being all things being equal here you're gonna go to the one that's going to pay a little more right gonna pay

Rod Moser:

you a little bit more see here's what happens every age which is a really cool marketing trick because that is going to increase your your an artificially increases the demand right? I mean literally, I can't control the supply. That's out of my control, what I can't control is the demand. And if I can artificially increase the demand, I'm going to be able to put more money in your pocket. It's counterintuitive, people think that paying a lower commission saves them money. But what it does is it actually shrinks the demand. Agents are going to do everything they can to not sell your home and to sell somebody else's, it's offering them a little bit more money. I learned a long time ago that sales is nothing more than a transference of feeling when I can get an agent, who is a trusted adviser, in most cases, excited about a home that excitement oftentimes translates to those buyers that they're representing every agent with a buyer in their car is going to do everything in their power to get their clients through your front door. The more people I get through your front door, the more money I'm going to be able to get you at the end of the day. The other thing that I found out later, that was a nice bonus is that even agents that have a client in the price range, but not necessarily looking in your area. They're going to do everything they can Hey, there's a home in Draper, I know you're looking in Sandy. But there's a home in Draper that I think matches everything you're looking for. Would you mind if I throw it on the list today, all of a sudden we're increasing the demand. The other thing is one out of four transactions that go under contract in our state, right now are failing to get to the closing table one of the four. A lot of times the failure comes whether it's maybe maybe a pre approval that wasn't vetted properly, or, more likely, there was an inspection issue that came up. Well, what's interesting is when we're negotiating, we usually have a listing agent trying to get the highest price for the home buyer's agent trying to get the lowest price for the home. And we're a little bit of a tug of war until we can come to terms. What I found out is that when you're offering a slightly higher buyer agent, commission, that buyer's agent comes around and starts negotiating on your side of the table and helping to convince their clients that your house is the best one, and probably deserves to gain a little bit higher offer. And when it comes to inspections, the agent is doing everything they can to keep that deal together. Because if it fails, they've got to go back and they're going to sell their client another home where they're going to make less money. So it's more likely to stay under contract, it's more likely to get more showings and more activity. And it's more likely to sell at a higher price. We sell homes at a higher price per square foot than our competition, because we do things a little bit different. And it is counterintuitive, but paying a higher commission to the buyer's agent will actually net you more money.

Ron Pippin:

Man, I tell yeah, like, man, my head just exploded. This is that is really profound. That's and I hope that those that are listening, take note, because that's a really incredible marketing tactic that probably few if any, are taking advantage of

Rod Moser:

The last part of the equation. And I hope this doesn't go too long. You'll have to you'll have to edit this year. Okay. There's been one seller in every community in the United States that has sold more homes as an owner than any other seller and it sounds like a trick question. Any guesses as to who that owner might be?

Ron Pippin:

No, no, idea.

Rod Moser:

It's a bank. Short Sales foreclosures banks have sold more homes in the real estate market than any other seller. Now here's what's interesting. When a bank goes to market with a foreclosure short sale property, they have an option when they go to market the property, they can price the property above market value to leave room for negotiations. They can price it at market value. But unless the buyer that's going to buy the home is in the room with us, we're all guessing at market value, or they can price it below market value. Now when a bank takes a property back as a short sale or foreclosure, what strategy do they use?

Ron Pippin:

Well, I know that the banks are still looking at market value. They're not they're not selling it for I mean, there was there was a time a long time ago that you could get deals on foreclosures, but that time have long passed. So they're just they're just looking at market value they're not selling last

Rod Moser:

Is that what you're used to represent? Wells Fargo, the largest banks in the area that now with a lot of their REO properties are mostly foreclosures and short sales. Here's what's interesting. Everybody always wants to look for short sales and foreclosures, because they're always priced below market value. Now in all of my years, and I've now been around for quite a while in all of my years, I've never met a bank in the business of losing money, you know, so why would they work for a bank? So now, they're not in that they're not in that game? So why would they intentionally if they have more experience than anybody else on real estate? Why would they intentionally price the property below market value?

Ron Pippin:

If you've ever been to an auction that exactly that's exactly why they start low is because you get in this this feeding frenzy. And prices go up? You nailed it, right.

Rod Moser:

I call it the eBay strategy. What's interesting is people used to say, well, they're trying to get rid of their inventory. Well, have you ever been through a short sale process? How long did it take to get the approval? I know you have Ron and I have. It's not. It's not as a it's typically months. And there was a period where it took six months to a year. Yeah, it actually takes five minutes, right? There's a guy at the bank, and he looks at the numbers, and he says yes or no. Right? So why did they drag it out that long and price it below. And it's exactly that people that are emotionally involved in a bidding war, will always pay more for a product than they would if that product were on a shelf by itself with a price tag on it. The best strategy is to price your property slightly below market value to artificially increase the demand. And here's the other thing. So you have a house worth $500,000 in the market today. And you decide to price it at 510 or 515. To leave room for negotiations, but you're willing to come down to 500. When buyers are out looking at homes, they're looking at seven homes again, all priced at 515,000. Well, if your house is worth 500, and priced at 515. And everything else is worth 515. Which one is the worst House of everything, they're looking at yours. But let's say you have a $500,000 house and you price it at 485. And it's really worth 500. And buyers out there looking at $485,000 homes and yours is the best valued home? Well, if we have an absorption rate of five if we've got five buyers in the price range and location, and you're the best valued home of all five of those homes on the market. How many offers Do you think you might see, if you're the best value you're gonna be you could potentially see all five. Yeah, and again, people that are emotionally involved in a bidding war will always pay more for a product than they would if that product were on a shelf by itself with a price tag on it, the best thing I can do for you, as your real estate agent is somebody who understands marketing and understands how to maximize your profit is to do two simple things. Offer a slightly higher buyer agent commission to drive the demand up. And to price your home slightly below market value. The best thing you can do is to underprice your home and offer an abundance of commission and you'll walk away with a bigger bait paycheck. At the end of the day. The question that people ask me all the time that they probably shouldn't ask is What are you charging commissions? The question they should ask is, how can you help me to walk away with the biggest possible check? I don't care what you're going to get paid? I want to know how I can walk away with a bigger check.

Ron Pippin:

Yep. That's really what that's really the question for all of us. And which, which most homeowners don't think because they don't don't think of asking because they equate more commission as less money in their pocket, and they just don't understand the business aspect.

Rod Moser:

There's always a fear, right and underlying fear, am I gonna lose money? Am I gonna underprice my home and only get one offer? There's always that. And here's the other thing that's interesting. And this is why it's important interview, you can hire an agent who uses the exact same strategies that I do. But if they don't know how to communicate with the agents on the other side and help people through a multiple offer process, oftentimes they lose the multiple offers, because people don't want to be in a bidding war and then walk away. So having somebody who, who understands how to communicate with the other agents, who is professional and and understands what they're going through and the process and how to help them help their clients to go through this a little bit better. If you can communicate that through the other side through experience because you've done it enough. You're going to help to maximize your your your profits, at the end of the day, maximize the sales price for your clients. And when you can do that you need to be as actively involved in real estate as you can because people need your help.

Ron Pippin:

I don't even know what to say. I mean

Rod Moser:

hopefully that helps. Right hopefully somebody's like,

Ron Pippin:

yeah, I hope people are taking notes when they listen to this episode because there's a lot that I mean, you just packed in you back down a whole coaching session. You pack in multiple coaching sessions in this little in the short podcast so hopefully you're taking notes.

Rod Moser:

Well I appreciate you having me on today. Man. I hope I didn't talk too much and you got

Ron Pippin:

no Love it. Love that. We appreciate you being here. How can people get ahold of you?

Rod Moser:

The easiest way is through my cell phone and I carry it with me at 435-232-0427 if you have any questions you can always email me and my email is rod at Utah PR e comm Forgive me, Rod at Utah pra comm we do have a small office and we're always looking for, you know, like minded agents. And so if you're, you know, thinking about making a change, we'd love to hear from you and see if we might be a great Fit moving forward.

Ron Pippin:

Awesome. Well, you'd be a good one to mentor from because you you you've not only you're not only talk the talk, but you walk the walk so

Rod Moser:

Well, it's fun man. I, I mean, at the end of the day, I truly love what I do for a living. This isn't work for me when I get a wake up and do what I enjoy and help people at a high level. You know, it doesn't feel like work anymore. I'm just grateful for the opportunity to do it, to be honest. So

Ron Pippin:

That's awesome. Thanks so much for being with us today, Rod. And that'll bring to close another episode of agent versus lender. And if you ever have any questions about the lending side, please feel free to reach out to me or anyone on my team. The best way to reach us as at 801-628-7667. And look forward to to another episode of Agent Versus Lender.