Heal Podcast with Lyme 360

E24: Daisy White, Health Advocate

October 16, 2020 Mimi MacLean
Heal Podcast with Lyme 360
E24: Daisy White, Health Advocate
Chapters
Heal Podcast with Lyme 360
E24: Daisy White, Health Advocate
Oct 16, 2020
Mimi MacLean

Today we have Daisy White. And she's a health advocate and has been dedicated to health her entire life. She's certified in autonomic response testing by the Klinghardt Academy and also a certified health specialist and certified natural health professional through the Trinity School of Natural Health. Daisy has been on our own health journey and struggling with chronic Lyme and Lyme disease as well. And she has helped many different clients who had no hope for their health and is now finding a state of remission. 

Show Notes Transcript

Today we have Daisy White. And she's a health advocate and has been dedicated to health her entire life. She's certified in autonomic response testing by the Klinghardt Academy and also a certified health specialist and certified natural health professional through the Trinity School of Natural Health. Daisy has been on our own health journey and struggling with chronic Lyme and Lyme disease as well. And she has helped many different clients who had no hope for their health and is now finding a state of remission. 

Mimi MacLean:

Welcome to the heal podcast for all things related to Lyme disease and other chronic illnesses. I'm Mimi MacLean, mom of five, founder of Lyme 360, and a Lyme warrior. Tune in each week to hear from doctors, health practitioners and experts to hear about their treatments, struggles and triumphs to help you on your healing journey. I'm here to deal with you. Hi, welcome back to the heal podcast from Lyme 360. This is Mimi, and today we have Daisy White. And she's a health advocate and has been dedicated to health her entire life. She's certified in autonomic response testing by the clean heart Academy and also a certified health specialist and certified natural health professional through the Trinity School of Natural Health. Daisy has been on our own health journey, and struggling with chronic Lyme and Lyme disease as well. And she has helped many different clients who had no hope with their health and is now finding a state of remission. So I'm really excited to hear Daisy and talk about her experience today. Daisy, thank you so much for coming on today. I really appreciate it. I wanted to first start out just having you talk about your own personal Lyme journey, if you're willing to share.

Daisy:

Yes, of course. So I sort of had health issues from the age of in my teens pretty much on I did not know, for many, many years what I was dealing with. Lyme was not a part of the picture. Back in the 80s. When I was in college, I went to college in Vermont. We had all these alphabet diagnoses CFS, you know, it was all these weird things. Nobody knew anything other than that. So Lyme was definitely not something that I had on my radar. And I definitely got onto like a path of taking better care of myself trying to figure out what was wrong with me. When I graduated college in 89, I saw a regular MD that gave me like low doses of an antidepressant thinking I had CFS, EDV, some sort of thing like that. And it became clearer. As I got older and tried to become pregnant, that there was a more complex issue. And at the time, I was working with a doctor in LA and I had taken I grew up in Europe, so I had tons of metal in my mouth. And I was seeing a doctor by the name of Dr. Galletzer who's a dear friend, and he was helping me as I was getting my mercury fillings removed. And I have a very, very bad dental catastrophe that happened on this path. But anyway, long story short, he said, Well, if I were you, I would go see Dr. klinghardt. Because he's great at both those things, you know, your fertility issues and dental. And I was like, well, who is he? And anyway, I did go see him. This was more than 10 years ago, and was sort of the beginning of a long standing collaboration, friendship, mentorship. And he said, we took one look at me, he's like, you have Lyme, I was like, What? I don't even know what you're talking about, like, Can we deal with this, like, I can't, you know, carry your pregnancy in my teeth and my teeth and my teeth. So there began, you know, my understanding of really something way deeper, something that I had no, really hadn't really put my lens on or my microscope on. And slowly but surely my journey into my own understanding of my health and mining that in mining that journey and then starting to mine it for other people. Unfortunately, I had over 20 pregnancy losses. I happily adopted a beautiful little boy who is now five. And it was great, because with all the tools I had on board, I took care of his birth mom through her pregnancy. And she has cerebral palsy. It has cerebral palsy, and was at every doctor's appointment. So it was kind of like caring for one of my clients doing what I do, but also being my son's birth moms, you know, advocate, in some ways, unintentionally, but then I was at his birth, we were at his birth and I breastfed him as an adoptive mom, because of just all the things I knew and had learned and, you know, had done and have also been able to mentor some women through infertility journeys, as you know, not just a Lyme journey, but just because he did so much and learned about reproductive immunology, which is a whole category unto itself. You know, and so, I'm giving you very, very broad strokes here.

Mimi MacLean:

No, I have so many things. Okay, I have so many notes and so many questions that came out of it. First of all, I am so sorry that you went through that with with your 20 pregnancies that didn't work out. I can't imagine the pain that went along with that. So I really, truly am sorry to hear that. But It brought up a really interesting point that I didn't even know about you. And I just was on the Lyme mind conference last weekend. And it was like, I don't know if you were on it. But there was a whole section about gestational Lyme. And how they're now seeing that they're starting to be able to prove it. Which before no one would actually believe it. And one of the things was just carrying to term, a lot of the women found out they had Lyme, because they couldn't carry to term. And once they figured that out, even if they just gave antibiotics or whatever the course was, while they were pregnant, it was able to hold the pregnancy for the rest of the, you know, of the term. So I'm glad you brought up that point, because it's definitely is something that people need to talk about, and be aware if they're keep having repeat.

Daisy:

So there was this amazing man that is, unfortunately passed away recently in New York, who was a reproductive immunologist, and he actually, he didn't specifically work with Lyme patients, but he had all these things that he did, including giving women Neupogen, and all kinds of things to help women carry to term who had repeat pregnancy loss. Also, in the beginning of my journey with infertility, I found this guy and another guy in New York who was doing a antibiotic pump for what he believed was chlamydia trachomatis. us and he believed that any woman who had repeat pregnancy loss have chlamydia trachomatis. And of course, when I first started working with Dr. klinghardt, we explored this I actually send my menstrual blood to a lab in Greece, where they identify that I had sort of a PCR of chlamydia trachomatis. So we definitely treated that with antibiotics IV. So yes, I mean, obviously, there are so many things, in terms of chronic infection, persistent infection that can lead to pregnancy loss, Lyme chlamydia trachomatis, it's just, you know, I always talk about the Rubik's cube of each person's case. And how do you put together and, you know, part of what I do is try to bring in all the different pieces and elements of that Rubik's Cube, because one particular practitioner doesn't have the ability to manage that.

Mimi MacLean:

Now, were you a health advocate before you even got Lyme, or what were you doing before this is?

Daisy:

I was an actress. I taught a writing class, you know, I wrote a one woman show about my life about how all the things that I had overcome, I had a very complex childhood, very eclectic and diverse and very neglectful. I think I really loved being an actress, because I loved rolling my sleeves up and getting my fingers in the dirt of humanity and humankind. And so my perception of being an actor was, you know, to be able to express all that. And then, you know, as time went on, and stuff, I recognized that the business certainly didn't have that aspect. It really wasn't for me, but I did do this amazing one woman show, I worked with an amazing mentor and director and teacher named Larry Moss, who directed a one woman show about my life. And I mind it deeply. And it's interesting, because in hindsight and working with Dr. klinghardt, he does this thing called family constellation based on Bert Hellinger's work and I essentially did my own family constellation without knowing that I was doing it. So in many ways, I was already doing this work. And I think at some point in my 40s, I surrendered to the fact because I had done so much work on healing my own life, because of my upbringing, that my mission here was to heal myself and help others heal. And you know, not to try to overthink it. And so that changed, you know, my, my course of, of care and dedication in the world, which suits me.

Mimi MacLean:

That's amazing. That's amazing. So would you say you're like, at remission covered? Are you back to normal, or you're better than you were before, because it sounds like you had a lot of health issues growing up.

Daisy:

I have a lot of difficulty with that terminology. Because, you know, like, I feel that remission is a term that we borrowed from the cancer world. And I don't really know if I agree that we ever really have remission, I feel that the paradigm shift for a Lyme patient, I'm speaking about myself, but I also see it a lot with people that I work with, is different, I have been able to look at my health as an evolving I guess I should say are you symptom free? Like do you still and shifting process throughout my life. And so I don't ever want to be how I was because how I was didn't include who I've become, and all the knowledge in terms of how I managed my health, and who I was at 20 and ho I am now at 54 they're co pletely different. And you kn w, my experience of my body th n versus my experience of my body today are completely different. So there really is o comparison. have aches and pains or brain fog or? I don't have brain fog. I never did have fog that was not really one of my symptoms. So not fair to use that as a comparison. I did have severe and chronic pain throughout my body. And sometimes I even limped. I don't have that anymore. I do not have that. No. And so yeah, I mean, I can use certain symptoms, you know, to see as a marker. Let's just say this. I work with anywhere between 30 to 40 families at any given time, I travel all over the world. And I have a five year old and a husband. And that's a lot to do. And I can do that.

Mimi MacLean:

Great. Yeah, that's a sign right there that you can kind of your back and better.

Daisy:

Yeah, exactly.

Mimi MacLean:

That's amazing. It's amazing. So can you tell our listeners like what an health advocate does? Like, what do you do with each family?

Daisy:

Yeah, so I mean, I coined the phrase for myself that I was a health advocate. But I'm not really even sure if it's an accurate terminology, to be honest with you. I do, I have noticed that many people have cropped up his health advocates now. And I recognize that it's become a thing. And I'm happy about that, because we need more people helping. My job is very multi test, I do many, many different things. And it's different with each family. Because sometimes families have different needs, I often come in to a case when the person or the family or family members, because sometimes it's more than one family member has exhausted a lot of their resources in terms of and I'm not just talking about financial resources, but emotional resources in terms of like, we have no idea where we are or what we're doing, we're in a dark hallway. And we've seen 1000 people, and nobody can give us any information about really what's going on. And that's not entirely always true. Sometimes I come on board when people are newly diagnosed, because they've heard, this is what I do. And they want to guide themselves in the proper course of direction, which actually is a great thing, because then I can cut a lot of, you know, the years out where people are coming. So part of my job is to assess where they're at, assess what they've done, figure out what's working, what's worked, what hasn't, and look at all of their data and see, well, did anybody address this or you know, and then start working forward. Now I work with multiple practitioners all throughout the world. And part of my job also is to find the right person that fits that particular case, that particular temperament, that particular set of needs, that families picture could be financial picture could be, you know, some of their belief systems. I mean, it's, it's a little bit like finding the right fit. But then it's also being the on the ground protocol, police. A lot of times it's planning travel, you know, and making sure they get the right care. When we're on the go. And on the move. Sometimes it's being a counselor to the family members that just don't understand, or helping the family develop context for the patient, because nobody understands what they're going through. I mean, I could go on. But what I do is, branches in many directions, sometimes shopping for people's food or setting up, right, you know, or finding the right IV care at their home or...

Mimi MacLean:

Yeah, I mean, I wish I had found you. I remember saying to my husband when I was like, under my lowest point, just saying, This is crazy that like, we need to remember when someone's sick that that you can't expect them to be making their own doctor's appointments. Like for me, like when I was at my lowest to like, but like my husband, you know, I love him to death. But he would be like, we need to find the right doctor and like, I don't feel well enough to even sit up to research it to then go make the phone call, like, I don't have the answer. If someone were to tell me the doctor, I need to call I'll call them or I'll have them come I just to even make that make that appointment. There's a lot to do and you don't feel well.

Daisy:

Exactly. And oftentimes, it's not just calling one doctor, like I think I wrote an article for Lyme nation once about, you know how most people have like 25 doctors and 25 protocols, and 10 of them are on their counter. And then they have any ordered because they don't really know if they're good for them or not. And they have to vet them, but they're running late to an appointment and they have to you know, get an IV but they don't really even have their clothes on. You know, it's like, so part of what I also you know, I like to say to people like okay, so you have 25 chefs in your kitchen, you don't know who the executive chef is, you've got 20 of them being the executive chef. My job is to be the sous chef and to tell you which one is the Executive Chef or appoint an executive chef, and then tell you when guest chefs can come in, because this is a mess, you know and are not actually accomplishing anything.

Mimi MacLean:

So if someone was newly diagnosed right now and they're either waiting for an appointment for you or didn't know about you What would you recommend that they could do right from home right away? Like, is there anything that you're like, Okay, you need to do immediately to get you on the right path while you're waiting for your appointment.

Daisy:

Sure, and that's a good question. Unfortunately, that's not there is no one size fits all answer. You know, if someone's newly diagnosed and they have Lyme, Western blot positive, then of course, you know, they should do a longer course of doxy than anybody will tell them. But that's, you know, complicated at best. But for some herbs, I mean, Bio Pure has a cocktail, which is a great, you know, Bio Siden is one. I mean, there are, there's some great herbs out there on the market. Now, the Cowden protocol has a lot of herbs also that kind of mimic some of that, or the cocktail mix. Some of that are, you know, I'm not big on like propriety, when it comes to all these things, because everybody's like, well, I invented that, but I invented that. But ultimately, they're amazing herbs that can be used for more chronic cases that don't even know where to begin. There's just so many tools, you know, if somebody was diagnosed newly and they had access to getting high dose vitamin C, that would be a great place to begin, or even taking it orally, you know, there's just there's a lot of things that can help with infection. If people don't have a place to go yet,

Mimi MacLean:

Do you find that most patients should be on the same kind of diet? You know, like a low gluten low calorie, or now?

Daisy:

Well, yes, I don't think anybody whether you're healthy or not eating gluten. But I mean, I'm going to repeat myself again, and again, but I just don't think that there is anything one size fits all, like, people have a tendency towards elevated A1C, you know, because that's just a, you know, that's one of their genetic predispositions. And some people, you know, have low A1 C, so, you know, they do really well with smoothies and fruit. And, you know, it's just not everybody's the same number one, and not everybody, you know, it's funny, you see, you see Lyme patients that are like super, super thin. And you know that Lyme has impacted them in a particular way. And then you see Lyme patients more like myself, that wrestle with their weight, you know, and that's something that they have to manage. That is one thing that hasn't disappeared for me post, you know, my life journey, I'd be really thin person. And now I managed, you know, it's more difficult for me to manage my weight. So it affects and impacts different people's bodies, you know, and so there's never, I never say there's one specific diet. And I don't also feel that like, super restrictive diets are always good for people.

Mimi MacLean:

Anyway, yeah, I noticed that you have your certification in autonomic response testing from the clean heart Academy. Can you talk a little bit about that? I've heard a bunch about that. Do you actually practice that and do that for patients?

Daisy:

I am able to test people autonomic response. Yes, I am certified by what was originally Klinghardt Academy, which is now klinghardt Institute. And it's an amazing tool, Dr. Klinghardt, invented autonomic response testing, and there is applied kinesiology. And people use that much more ubiquitously. Nutrition response testing is much more pervasive and everywhere. But autonomic response testing uses, in fact, I happen to have one of these in front of me. So it uses this signal enhancer, which is light refraction, and it uses testing into the body and how it refracts light, and how it refracts light, helps us understand what working are not working within the body. And so it's a very difficult and sophisticated form of testing that Dr. klinghardt teaches still, and it's amazing. It's an amazing tool, especially for people who have complex cases, it helps us dig deeper and look at what's missing, or what's not being looked at. And I do you know, when I'm working with clients that are they're working with, you know, traditional MDS that don't necessarily have an understanding of muscle testing and are more open like I work with Dr. Lehman in La who's a wonderful open minded MD, obviously, who's functional, but she's, she's very open. She's very open to muscle testing, and some MDS are and so if somebody has like a babesia case, and Dr. Lehman will prescribe, you know, say, well, these are the four things that could work, I can test which one could work better. And because each body always going to respond to the same treatment, and so what's great about that is that it kind of refines the things for you know, the treatment course for people. And it also I think it helps clients patients, I like to call them clients because I'm not medically licensed and it's better for me to call them clients. They get a compass of sorts for themselves. And one of the things that I find really true for Lyme patients, or chronic illness patients is that they have lost Their own internal compass, because I've had so many people tell them what's wrong with them. And they develop a relationship to trusting their own inner compass again, because there's an outer compass that's letting them know that what they feel is accurate.

Mimi MacLean:

That's great. What would you attribute? I know you can't attribute it one thing. But if you were to do top three or five things that kind of got you back to normal, or better?

Daisy:

Yeah, that's always such a tough question. Because, you know, what's the what's the one thing question?

Mimi MacLean:

It's not right, because you don't, you're all we're always doing multiple things. I would say to me, Well, like when I was already gung ho on Monday morning, I did these five things. I started actually taking my peptides I actually started eating well, I actually, so it was, Which one was it? You know, where was it? All of it?

Daisy:

Yeah, no, I can't really say you know so much about the one thing and I can certainly say about multiple things, I can definitely highlight or pinpoint some of the things that were very, very important in my case. And certainly, my dental was a huge, huge thing. For me, I have an honorary dental degree, unfortunately. But I had, you know, 17 mercury amalgams, which were poorly removed. And when they were taken out, it was just the person who is no longer alive, dug way too deep, and really pretty much created a mouthful of root canals. And even though I didn't want the root canals, I mean, I literally I was, I mean, barely 40, I literally had very little choice other than to lose all my teeth at 40, or to, you know, get root canals. And at the time, I was not savvy enough. And I certainly didn't want to be toothless at 40. So I opted for lots of root canals, and I did them with ozone, I didn't want this and I didn't want that. And then I took all of the special resin out, and then I went to a special dentist that would irrigate them with, you know, hydrogen peroxide medical grade, like once a month and, and I would go home and I would be in like massive amounts of pain because it was just a disaster. And I finally conceded that they have to come out, you know, and then I had to, you know, stop having chronic infection in my mouth. And I work a lot with Swiss biohealth clinic for myself, and for many of my clients, and I, you know, was brave enough to remove all 14 of my root canals and their conium implants, which I do. And that was a huge, that was a huge necessity, and, and brave journey and choice, which I really did not want. But it worked, it helps. And then one of the things that was amazing for me, and I'm trying to potentially implement more of these throughout the world in the country, and is I have a friend in Tarzana. And he has what we call, he calls it he boo, I call it RHP, re circulatory hemoperfusion, it's ozone, dialysis, and he's patented, now a machine that is able to be used more everywhere, you know. And so the thing is, is it's amazing, because it's like, a third or more of your blood volume within an hour sitting of ozone. And I did about 12 of those at the juncture in my health where I really was struggling. And I can't tell you how that shifted things for me. And it's not for everyone, it's definitely not for the newly diagnosed person. Because it's it's intense. And especially if you don't have any experience with ozone, it's like whoa, you know, you're in one arm out the other and it's like dark and bright cherry red. But it's an amazing treatment. And it was really, really hugely helpful for me. parasite treatment was hugely helpful for me, my journey began in Africa, when I first got sick, and I had very bad dysentery. I see when I work with clients that many, many people have a parasite instigation that they don't think is part of the thing that they're managing, you know, they were in India, they were in Africa, they were and so they don't always look at that as the, the beginning of the journey of then weakening their immune system, and then, you know, launch sort of setting up residence. But for me, that was definitely true. And I guess in some ways, what I'm describing is what it is that I do. So when I look at all these different things, like for example, if I were to somebody were to come to me and I, you know, hear all the things I'm describing to you, I'd be like, Okay, well, we're gonna have to go to Switzerland, we're gonna have to do this, we're, or if they can't afford that, then I'll have to find another way to make that happen. And, you know, I guess in some ways, I would recoin my title as sort of like your ultimate best health midwife. You know, how to kind of birth, everyone's greatest health.

Mimi MacLean:

Kind of like an event planner for your body. For the best body for the best party.

Daisy:

The party in my body.

Mimi MacLean:

You're making you have the best party, we're planning the best, you know, and then you're going to coordinate everybody and get that going.

Daisy:

That's although I'm going to muscle testing during the party do.

Mimi MacLean:

Yeah, yeah, no, that's great. Um, now how would someone find you if they want to work with you? Because I don't get people calling and being like, where do I start? And unfortunately, a lot of people don't have the financial resources. Unfortunately, I and a lot of it's not covered. So I, you know, I always say to people that I don't have the money. But what do I do?

Daisy:

Really sad to me, and I have done pro bono work, and I do do pro bono work. And I think it's important for all of us to do that. Is that even if I were to take on your case and manage your case, you know, pro bono, and I'm not this is not an advertisement for pro bono?

Mimi MacLean:

No, but you're making a point that like, even if you are free, the process...

Daisy:

My resources are not, you know, exactly. And I don't know what we would potentially do for someone who had zero. You know, I have a fantasy that someday, you know, I'll have like, some sort of donation from God, where I'm allowed to like, manage 20 cases per year, and there's unlimited funds for each of them.

Mimi MacLean:

It's just sad that none of this is covered by insurance, like, the basics of like a vitamin C draft, you know, that can be huge, beneficial, like, how is that? Or even the antibiotics? Like you said, like, I had the pump antibiotics in from a doctor in New York City, it was costing me 1500 dollars a week in antibiotics?

Daisy:

I know, I know. Unfortunately, that conversation is very arduous. And we have lots to say about it.

Mimi MacLean:

Yeah, exactly. It's a whole other world like a documentary.

Daisy:

And if you were, you know, a documented Lyme patient, your insurance company, will be even harder on you. And all these things are true. But and part of the conversation in this political health climate today, is it valuable conversation? Because how do people carve out health for themselves in the world that we live in today? And if our belief system is that it should all be taken care of, we're not going to get well. And ultimately, it's about personal responsibility, and what do we want for our own bodies and our own health and for our families, and, you know, a lot of my jobs, education, you know, teaching people about things, they've never heard of teaching people about what worked for me, or teaching people about what works for other people, and also teaching people about what's available, and what might suit them. And so it's, you know, support education, support, education, you know, getting to the place. And we have to educate ourselves. We all have to educate ourselves. There's so many things that are being said, some of them are true, some of them are not true. And we have to find our way.

Mimi MacLean:

Mm hmm. That's true. So do you have a website or something that someone could reach out?

Daisy:

I do! It's just Daisywhite.com. My Instagram is @anAprilDaisy, my name is April, Daisy, White, so an April, Daisy, and you can find my website on my Instagram. And I've never advertised unfortunately, that's not been my thing. I just really made a point of being of service to people who need help in this community. And I just keep serving.

Mimi MacLean:

That's how I found you through word of mouth, I've had different some of your patients say, Oh, you need to talk to Daisy. And so it's like, oh, my gosh, I kept hearing your name. And I was like, I gotta call I got to find you. And I, that's when I googled you and found you. Yeah, thank you. This has been amazing. I really appreciate it. I know, we could talk for hours and hours out this because I could really dig in there and really find out what's going on. Because I don't think people have realized the whole out there is health advocates out there to help you that you don't have to do this alone, especially if you have the resources because it is daunting. And like in my case, we're here I'm sick, my husband is trying to keep the pieces together with my five kids and also make income, you know that it leaves me kind of hanging, you know, and so maybe if I found you five years ago, it wouldn't have been five years.

Daisy:

You bring up a really important point I have this lovely mother daughter that I work with on the East Coast that are amazing, wonderful people and their relationship as mother daughter was highly negatively impacted by the Lyme journey and the mother becoming the advocate. And when I came in to be the advocate the change their relationship back to mother daughter, and I actually was able to do the work and take care of the situation in a way that made the family find their health again as a family. So that's an important point. And I love to be able to make an impact in that way.

Mimi MacLean:

That's great. Thank you so much for all that you do. It's really amazing and I wish you the best and I thank you so much for your time.

Daisy:

Thank you so much. Have a lovely day.

Mimi MacLean:

If you would like to learn more about Daisy right check out our website at Lyme360.com we have our transcript notes there from each podcast episode. And please subscribe to our podcast and also subscribe to our newsletter we send out each week a newsletter with the transcript and who's on the podcast. Thanks again. Take care!