Wealthy AF Podcast

Insider Tips for Successful Real Estate Transactions

November 17, 2023 Martin Perdomo "The Elite Strategist" Season 2 Episode 327
Wealthy AF Podcast
Insider Tips for Successful Real Estate Transactions
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Ever wondered why women seem to pay more for real estate? Our guest today is Rosemary Medel, an urban planner and realtor with 30 years of experience, and she's got some insider tips on how to avoid falling into that trap. She shares strategies for navigating city hall, unearthing the true value of a property beyond its 'curb appeal', and making the most of your partnership with a realtor. Rosemary's advice can help make your next real estate transaction a success, whether you're a first-time buyer or a seasoned investor.

Negotiations and permit verification can make or break a real estate deal. Rosemary lends her expertise to these complex aspects, stressing the importance of operating with integrity and full transparency. She also highlights the necessity of due diligence, ensuring that you're aware of potential future costs and the benefits your property can reap from the city. Her insights are designed to equip you with the knowledge you need to stay ahead in the tricky world of real estate transactions.

Lastly, we delve into a topic close to Rosemary's heart - the impact of homelessness on California's real estate scene. She talks candidly about the state's pros and cons, from the flourishing job market to the pressing homelessness issue. As an urban planner, she encourages listeners to voice their concerns and actively participate in community issues. To wrap up, Rosemary offers a masterclass on analyzing neighborhoods from an urban planner's perspective, promising to add another tool to your real estate arsenal. Trust us, this is an episode you can't afford to miss.

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Speaker 1:

Hey guys, welcome back to another episode of Latinos in Real Estate Investing Podcasts, where individuals just like you come to learn how to create wealth through real estate investing, entrepreneurship and business ownership. Today's guest is Rosemary Medell. Rosemary offers women the opportunity to learn residential due diligence to save time and money when purchasing their dream home. She combines 30 years as an urban planner with land use and development expertise, including being a realtor. She teaches women how to navigate city hall in order to verify what they are purchasing. Rosemary teaches how to determine true value of a property while collaborating with their realtor, renegotiating the deal or walk away from the table. Rosemary, welcome to Latinos in Real Estate Investing.

Speaker 2:

Oh, martin, thank you so much. I'm so glad to be here and have this opportunity to share the results of a study that was released by Yale University in 2020, in January of 2020. And they determined that women are paying 2% more than men when it comes to purchasing real estate, or they are more likely to give a discount when selling real estate. And I've read the study and it's not that women cannot negotiate well, but I believe, based on my expertise, it's that women do not know how to determine the value of a property. So, unfortunately, some of the mistakes that are being created when women initially tour a property is they look at can I afford it? Yes, if the price is commensurate with what they can finance, sure, but if you're falling in love with curb appeal, curb appeal is just the dressing on a window, whether or not you like what it looks like. The second is looking at the structure itself, the interior. Are you falling in love with decor, but you're missing all the small components. And then the third is not following up with the disclosures that are being given to you If your deal is accepted. You're not following up with the home inspection or you're even bypassing the home inspection. We saw that a lot in 2021 and 22, when it was truly a buyer's market and you just wanted to get the deal accepted because the interest rates were so great, but you were missing the fine details of what it could potentially cost you. Because you were missing and not following up on your due diligence all those disclosures that are being provided to you by the seller's agent. So those things are huge and, because of my experience in the past 30 years and seeing what women have endured, or their intimidation about going into city hall and anyone, if you're buying home for the first time, you're probably asking yourself why do I need to go into city hall? My realtor is the one that's telling me everything I need to know, but, in actuality, you're responsible for following up with your due diligence.

Speaker 1:

So I'm really glad that you got a niche and you like to work with women, and I just want to make sure that the listeners know that these things also apply to males. So, gentlemen, stay with us because she's going to share some information that you can also utilize to your advantage. But I want to ask you a question. You came in with the statement of a study was done that women historically pay 2% more than their male counterpart as it pertains to real estate. Can you be more specific on that? Can you say that? We talked about off air a little bit, the three common mistakes and I think you kind of touched on it three mistakes that people make when, specifically, you mentioned women. Women make when they're purchasing a home. Tell me about this study. Why does the study say that women are paying 2% more than males in transactions?

Speaker 2:

So the Yale Business School released the study and they were talking about what are the factors that are considered when women are looking at the purchasing of property, especially for the first time You're a novice. Certainly the number one factors could you afford this home? And then the second things, the other things that women typically are burdened with or choose are they're going to be a single mom, so they have to consider school districts. The factor for women is safety. Does the home have fencing? Does the home have all these different things that a woman would not choose to install or wants to reduce the cost of ownership? Another thing is close to family or services, because the male counterpart they typically know how to repair things on their own, so they're already saving money. They're more willing to not worry about the school district that they're in unless they're a true investor and they realize that's an important factor. I'm going to flip this property. That's a selling point for me. So their motivation is different. Whereas a woman may want to have a home that already has all these improvements move in ready if you will. I don't want to paint, I don't want to have to replace flooring, I don't want to do all these things and they have this checklist that they are paying a premium for, whereas the male counterpart is not as worried about that because they are more comfortable moving into a fixer-upper. Do that over time or take that as an investment, do it quickly and sell. So women look at a purchase as a long-term investment. Unless you're a single woman and you have no children, then, yes, you can not be as particular, but look at the property more as an investment. And let's face it, more and more women are learning how to make home improvements themselves, so that's saving them money when they go to sell. The study also showed that women will concede some of the deal because, by nature, just much more compassionate, they want to get sold. If they're selling to a family, they're empathetic. Get all these factors that women that are wonderful qualities to have sometimes are not as good in business, right. So if we looked at a real estate transaction as a business venture rather than setting up a home, right, especially when you go to sell, then you start to realize, okay, I need to collaborate more with my realtor and know what I will concede and a deal or reduce and what I will not, and this is the price point that I need to come out of this deal. With the same token, if you're looking at a property and you start following up on the home inspection right Now, we know with the home inspection you can't open up walls, so you can't verify. Well, the plumbing was replaced, was re-piped, four years ago and that's a disclosure, okay. But do you know how to verify that? By going to a building department at City Hall, right? So those are the things that and it takes time to do that you have to. It's gonna cost you. There's a dollar point associated with it because you have to take time off of work to do that. So if you do go to City Hall, you wanna make sure that you are being as efficient as possible and know which departments to go to have all your disclosures and then know the impact of what you find out, right. So you're either going to move forward with the deal or you realize mechanical, electrical plumbing, there's some issues. This is gonna cost me thousands of dollars. I need to walk away. I don't care if it's beautiful home. The reality of it is it's not a good deal.

Speaker 1:

So a couple of things because I'm a bit confusing your statements. So at the beginning you said, hey, a woman would pay more because of safety, maybe the paint and things of that nature, which makes sense. But then I guess the study implies that the women buying those properties are single women, because if there is a, I guess some type of a male or a husband in the picture would it be the same perception. I'm just curious, because you know of what you just said about the study. I agree with the statement of the, because I have a wife, so I know how she's wired, so I do agree with and she's my realtor too. So she plays buyers or write a letter and she's like let's sell this one to this family. Because I'm like, babe, I don't wanna see that. Don't show me the letters, just show me the numbers, just show me the persona, don't show me that. I don't wanna see it. You don't want the emotional part of it too. Don't show me that. Like, I just wanna know what you know. I could think of a story of a family that they were moving, they were military and they wrote me a letter. They were a property we were flipping last year. They wrote me a letter in early 22, when the market was still hot. As you showed me this letter, my babe, just, can they close? What's the financing we have to commit the letter I would like? This is great, all business right. I got a lot of dough, so I get it. Let me ask you this question, though you mentioned about the plumbing and the things going to city hall. Sometimes a seller would fix a pipe themselves, right, they might fix something themselves and they don't necessarily go get a permit, right. You know, I know some cities are real sticklers about that. You got to fix this leaky sink, to fix a thing. Come on, you gotta be kidding me. I live here. I'm not gonna go there and pay you $60, so I could go buy a piece of plastic and Home Depot and put it in. Some cities are just ridiculous. So let's just say that a homeowner is honest. They're not as person and they're like yeah, we replaced, we put pecs here, we put pecs and we went from the basement up, but you can't verify. What advice are you giving to a buyer that can't verify that kind of stuff in that due diligence, in terms of as it pertains to the city?

Speaker 2:

You know you're going to be required to have homeowners insurance and we know that insurance companies are very good at verifying what's gonna be covered and what's not. So let's just say someone says, well, I upgraded the electrical on the house, so are this room? It's like okay, did you do it with a licensed electrician? Right Now that starts to kind of back you up, that you hired the appropriate person. Not I did it myself, because I watched a video on YouTube and it's so easy and I saved myself $3,000. That's wonderful, but now I'm gonna take on the risk. So that's where you need to be careful. You could say, okay, you did that, but I need you, seller, to bring in an electrician just to verify your work. And that electrician is licensed. That proves that they have the appropriate credentials to do the work or to evaluate the work that was done. And that starts to reassure you that, okay, this is paperwork that I can show the insurance company to make sure if there is a fire or something, a hazard that occurs in the future, I can demonstrate that I did everything that was possible to make sure that the work was done properly. And, yes, you should be able to cover my claim should something happen. So in homeownership or in purchasing in any deal, as you know, you're trying to reduce that level of risk, and electrical is a big ticket item, right, it's always about health and safety. Building departments across the nation. They will fight tooth and nail because if they sign off on a plan, they are putting the city at risk. So that's why there is such a push to what things are you going to get permitted and what things are not? Certainly, replacing a sink, faucets, a simple plumbing yes, probably you could do it yourself. But if you're replacing a main line or if you're doing connections that touch the sewer line, now you need to get the experts in there, because it's not about saving money, it's about protecting your investment. And when you go to purchase, then that's the whole reason. What are the disclosures? What have you done? What can I verify to reduce my risk? Because I'm putting, I'm making this major purchase. People wouldn't spend that kind of money. Probably the only time would be purchasing a home. Right, so you need to protect that huge investment and you always need to maintain health and safety.

Speaker 1:

Do you think that there is a gender gap as it pertains to real estate and transaction and transacting in real estate?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and that's what the Yale study did speak to. There is that gender gap because of what motivates the female buyer as opposed to the male buyer. So, as I stated, female buyers like you alluded to that. Your wife, even being a professional realtor, knows that the importance of somebody sent you a letter. Now they're making you a part of the emotional part of the transaction, right, cause we fall in love with stories. Oh, I don't know it really it's this young family and if you just are looking at paperwork then, like you said, I'm looking. Can they close, can they retain this property, especially if you're holding back a note, all these things? And we know that sometimes if a woman's going to purchase and her name is on that, would she be more likely to get as good a deal if it was a male? On that, possibly, but it really depends on how good a business awareness of the buyer has, regardless if they're male or female, right? So? And that's where you can start to negotiate a better deal once you can verify true value, because you can call them on that right. Yes, you did an upgrade, but you know what. I went to City Hall and I can verify the permits that you said. So now you want me to assume more risk because you want me to take your word for it that it was all done and you have added a value to it. However, my insurance company does not care that you did that upgrade because I can't verify it with permits the city someone could complain anything exterior additions done by a owner without permits, you know the city could have you demo it because it doesn't comply with code. So those are all the things that female buyers as well as male buyers need to be aware of, what they're purchasing right and they anticipate. Could I take this financial hit if I had to remove it or repair it or have it done properly by the licensed professionals?

Speaker 1:

From a real tourist perspective. I want to get, from your perspective, right. So when you encounter these kinds of things and you're negotiating in this kind of way, like hey, you did this and you're saying did this, but there's no permits or we can't verify it, what is that experience like in that negotiation? I'm just curious with an experience, let's just say, with a flipper, because I'm hearing you and I'm kind of putting myself on the seller side because I sell out properties and I will tell you, if I get a seller it's like, hey, this is, I'm gonna say, just buy, just next. Right To me, it's just an asset, right To me. It's just, I don't get enamored with houses, they're just to me, I buy them, I fix them, I sell them, I buy them, I fix them, I rent them. I buy them, rent them for five years, two years, three years, and then sell them, Like I just, I'm just, I'm just transacting all the time. So I'm just curious what your experience is like. What is that like on that side when you're telling a seller, hey, man, you didn't do this this way and you know what is the typical response that you get from a seller?

Speaker 2:

They were were certainly would say. You know it depends the integrity of the individual and at some point you need to provide full disclosures. We know in real estate, failure to do that we'll get you in a lawsuit, right? So we are in the business as fiduciaries to represent our client well and then to also work in integrity with who's going to purchase it, hence the disclosures. So you give the disclosures. No, the plumbing has not been updated since the time of construction. Well, how old is your home? Well, it's 20 years old. All, right, you buyer, you can determine whether or not. Can I live with that or do I need to add that as a future cost Could be next year, could be in 10 more years, but that is the risk of being a buyer. So, making buyers more intelligent about that risk factor, right, creating this awareness, it's all about that. So I would tell my sellers it's like you need to disclose to me everything that you've done and we have it on paper. Nothing is being held back and they can take your work for it. They can go to city hall and verify what they can and then they determine the buyer, the level of risk they're willing to assume. Right, so we know, the most important thing is location. Then what are the values that this particular city brings to this? Property, services, parks, schools, access to transportation, all these things? That is up to the buyer to say. Is this a good deal for me? Right, then they run their numbers, but always we want to operate in integrity and let our clients, our sellers, know just be honest with me, whatever that is, because if I'm representing you, I need to be able to disclose everything we can and allow the buyer to make their choices based on their level of risk.

Speaker 1:

I'm curious. I have a question for you. On the due diligence side, right Probably advise your client, your female counterpart, take a look. They're saying this says this on the seller's disclosure on the SDA, not the SDA seller's disclosure, whatever my wife calls it something. Yeah, that thing, it's so painful for me because it takes so, they're so long and they're so, it's so tedious and I have a lot of property. So I don't know. A lot of times I don't know and I don't remember. So when we're buying a flip, we buy a fix, we fix it, boom, contracts are in there, we're out of there, and a lot of times I don't know. I really generally don't. I don't know. I fix, I put a new kitchen sink, I put a new sink, I put a new counter, I put new floors, I paint it, I put new windows. You could see it obvious. But a lot of times I don't know. So I'm curious to what happens when, like, out of 10 people that go and check right, like say, you got, you recommend, you make a recommendation, hey, go to the city and just confirm that indeed, this was done. Just, I'm just curious, this is a curious number 10 people. You go they say, hey, we did this and they go to city hall. People go to city hall. How many, how much of? What's the percentage? In your opinion, from your experience, that can actually be verified through permitting.

Speaker 2:

At least 10 to 20% people because of the price point that they're spending, especially in California. They, you better know, and all the time.

Speaker 1:

So 10 to 20% have permits. You can verify that they pulled the permit. That's what I'm asking.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, I think. Yes, it really depends on the age of the home. So building departments retain building plans and permits probably for about 10, maybe 15 years. It really depends on how large the cities are, and so you can verify that there are some work that can't be verified. However, you can get an after the fact permit. So, yes, you can do all that. I would say the most important thing is, if you're buying a home because of it's square footage and there's been an addition done that one, that one, that's the big one that adds to the price point, right, you're paying for that square footage, yeah, correct, and you better verify that that was done with, because the city can make you demo it. And now you've just paid a quarter of a million for that huge addition and it's gone right. And I don't know if you've encountered it on the East Coast. I mean, you have structures that are certainly much older than the West Coast, but the non-conformity of setbacks, those are things that get very specific, right. But if you're flipping, you're probably not doing additions, you're doing just aesthetic improvements, landscaping, paint, you're in, you're out. But for those that are making major purchases or purchasing for long-term, then that's where the due diligence gets critical, because you could be on a half acre lot and you have certain setbacks and you go oh well, yeah, I want to add on to that and I'm going to maintain this setback. Really, are you sure you could do that? Because that is something that you want to do, but you better verify it, because if you can't, that may cause you to walk away from the table right, that makes sense.

Speaker 1:

Yes, yes, that makes a lot of sense. So you're in California right now, right? Yes, you're in California, perfect. This is my final question to you what is the state of the market in California and here in the fall of 2023, as it pertains just to the real estate? How is the market? How do you see it? Are you seeing our prices actually softening there?

Speaker 2:

People still want to live in California. We pay for our weather.

Speaker 1:

You ain't not kidding. I was just talking to someone. They were like yeah, we California a great place and got all these issues going on in California, but the weather is great. And we're like weather is great, but you're getting taxed. You're going to kill the taxes, the weather is great.

Speaker 2:

Well, but look what our taxes cover, right? We have great infrastructure. We have great roads, those cost improvements, the open spaces that we value so much. So, yes, so our properties continue to go up? Yep, they are. They're slowly going back up and as soon as interest rates change, it's going to go up even further, right? Right? So Our state is so large you can really pit your price point of where you want to live, but the job market is certainly going to determine that. So we're a commuter state, because you keep moving out to the suburbs but you're working in LA. So that's the value that it brings Our job economy, our weather, our services. You can be in the ocean in an hour, or you can be up in the mountains in an hour, or surfing whatever you want. One of the most beautiful things about our state is our diversity in culture. We have just like New York, I mean, just tremendous food choices, and to hear just multiple languages being spoken is I love it. That is really a benefit. But certainly the housing choices, yes, we still have a shortage. Our largest group still are the baby boomers and we're not selling our home. So what is available? So we look at and, as you know, the success of the city and its growth is how many building permits are being issued for new construction. So is that happening in California? Yes, lots of homes are being developed in Lin, empire, northern Cal, central California. All of that is still happening. So there is a demand for people to want to live in California, to work in California. And are people moving to other states? Sure, there are. It's always happening, right, and you should try it. But if you own property in California and you want to try living somewhere else, I tell my clients don't, sell, lease it, try it out and then come back because you won't be able to afford to buy into California again. Right, if you own real estate.

Speaker 1:

But I want to just talk about really quick, because you just said all the wonderful things about California. California is a wonderful state. I don't disagree with you. I agree with everything you said. But what I have been seeing in my experience in California that you have a big problem with your homeless issue and that drags down. That's big problem. I'm speaking as an investor now and that's a big problem. Why would I take my money and invest my money in real estate, or even in anything, when you have such a major homeless problem and the government is doing Jack's jitterly squat about it and just like, what about the citizens, right? So what impact is that having on real estate, if any, from your perspective as a realtor?

Speaker 2:

Certainly we have a major problem all along the West Coast because of the weather is so conducive to people sleeping outside. There are programs that are being implemented, certainly not fast enough. We have from the planning. We provide affordable housing in development. So we have inclusionary housing requirements in various states and various cities in California and so, as development occurs, we are getting people affordable housing. But it's not really addressing the socialist issue of homelessness, because we have a variety of factors. Some is economic, some are mental, some are drug use. So how do you address all of those all at once? So, as a realtor, you can't. The only way you could do it is you people need to be involved in their communities, in their cities, pressuring the decision makers to what are you doing to address the homeless issue in our city? Right, you can't handle the whole state because the problem is too massive. So every city has to take on their particular issues and that responsibility. Now I would advise my clients as you invest in a city, then you need to be truly invested in your community. You need to get involved and find out what can you contribute to your city, the expertise being involved in the public hearing processes. Let your voice be heard. Now, what can be done? When you move into a city and you're seeing homelessness or you're seeing debris or you're seeing a person not taking care of their property, you contact code enforcement right, and they need to know who you are, because the people in a community and a city start to determine the values of a city, what we will tolerate, what we will not tolerate, and you have to constantly. Your voice has to be heard by the decision makers. So is that a problem that will go away soon? No, are we doing things about it? Yes, but it's an issue that goes way beyond real estate. Our job, and we would tell our client, is how do I protect my investment? But it does impact. I show me steps.

Speaker 1:

Those ways beyond real estate, but it does impact real estate to use. You made a statement A if you're an investor, your voice should be heard. I agree with that. Where I have big investments, my voice is heard. I know the mayors, I know the players. No, I know I schedule meetings with mayors and meet with mayors and city councils and all that good stuff. However, before right, so if I am the CEO of the state or I am the CEO of a company and I want to attract money there, right, what is being done to attract? Because if there is this problem and it's not being addressed, I'm not going there. I'm not taking. This is just a reality of life, rosemary. I'm not taking my capital there. It sounds great Everything you said sounds great, but the truth of the matter is I'm looking to where can I deploy my capital that don't have? Am I going to deploy my capital to the city that has this problem, or am I going to deploy my capital to a city that doesn't have this problem? And the mere fact that I'm deploying my capital to a city, that is my value, because my value me deploying my capital brings jobs and provides housing and provides and in my space I like to play in the affordable housing space, so I like to create affordable living for people, because there's a crisis in our country for that. So why would I go and put my money there, versus some city that doesn't have that issue or that's dealing with the issue head on or didn't let the issue get to that point? So I'm talking about a situation where, hey, if I want to take my money, why should I? Why should I take my money there when you have this problem? And, yes, I could be part of the solution? But I'm talking from a strictly logical, as an entrepreneur, as a businessman. Hey, strictly logical, why should I take my money there and then have to deal with that? And I know what happens with this. Like, listen, we're both, we both know what happens. I invest my money in a city. All of a sudden, there's a homeless problem. All of a sudden, do you look at Seattle? Right, there's pockets in Seattle where it's just a, it's a nightmare there. All of a sudden, there's issues with homelessness. Guess what happens? All of a sudden, the quality of resonance that I can qualify that want to move it. I'm not gonna get the nurses, I'm not gonna get the working class, I'm not gonna get the, the single working-class mom, that professional, they're not gonna feel safe going there. So the quality of my resonance goes down, the value of my property goes down. I have to bring my rents down because I got to bring a different type of tenant, different type of resident in there. So it creates a night, it creates a, it creates a problem and it does impact real estate. It absolutely does like no one wants to come home and have to feel unsafe Seeing a crazy local there, you know, shooting up or all drunk and people camping out in front of your house Like it's embarrassing for me to be like hey Rose, come to my house for dinner and you got to walk over caps and stuff like that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you know what I mean. Yeah, that's that's where. I know exactly what you mean. Sure, and that's you know, in your conversations with city officials, the decision-makers they are. If you're a large developer, they are courting you as well. They want you to invest in their city. But part of that negotiation is Well, how can you assure me Right, if I, especially you know, from ground up construction, right part in California part of your fees are going Towards those services, those emergency services, police, fire, all those things. It's like okay, I'm bringing in this major investment, it's going to address your housing requirement numbers and this is the value I bring. I'm bringing more people to be able to utilize all your retail services and I'm contributing a lot. What are you providing for me? And that's part of the negotiations that need to be done. Perhaps it's part of having on-site security, someone at the door, a doorman, you know. All these things are on-site parking to reduce the requirement of having to walk, you know, a block or so to get to your home. One of the things that we certainly require in California is you have to have on-site parking for your Development. But if you start to get more people living there, then certainly you're going to use all that parking. Now you yeah, you have to park on the street right. So those are problems that people are creating, but at the time of the initial approval they are meeting the required parking standards. But yes, if you can see how it just keeps more and more complex, the issue gets.

Speaker 1:

It gets complicated, yeah, it gets it does and California solution such a beautiful state. You know, I look at the city of San Diego. I love that city. Oh yeah, I went there in 2004 and, man, I fell in love with that city. I did that drive, that there was a drive. You you see it in the movies and you're driving by the ocean and you see the ocean Right over the mountain on one side and I crossed over. We crossed over to Mexico, my wife and I, when we were there in 04. It's such a beautiful city and I hear I have, I've seen videos and I you can never believe Everything you see, but I've seen videos and I spoken to people. They're like mad San Diego. It's not that anymore with this homeland, with some of the homeless issues that's happening there.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, like I said, the entire, you know, west Coast is experiencing that Because of its beauty, its weather, where people you know they're probably don't have a big homeless issue in Minnesota because it's the weather is not, may not be conducive.

Speaker 1:

We have in New York City and New York the weather's not conducive, right, so there's an issue that's a whole other thing. But, rose, yeah, thank you so much. It's been my pleasure to have you here on the show. Thank you so much for coming on. Oh, there it's us having this, this wonderful conversation about your state and how people can avoid Challenges. We're about to go into the untitled round where I'm gonna ask you a series of questions you you can think, you can justify If you want. Whatever, however you want, be sure they could be long, whatever you want, are you ready to play?

Speaker 2:

They're all play.

Speaker 1:

Okay, real estate is Financial freedom. My advice to all women is invest your money. I've always wanted to travel to. Italy never underestimate the power of Determination. The market right now is still exciting. I think the president right now is still exciting, family or business.

Speaker 2:

Ah, family yeah family Amelia.

Speaker 1:

Amelia more time or more money, oh, oh, more time wine or beer in California wine. You got the great gossip, great winery.

Speaker 2:

We have great wine.

Speaker 1:

Book smart or street smart, both success or happiness both.

Speaker 2:

Happiness does make you feel successful, provided that you are also doing book smart and you're learning from your street smarts. There's always a A lesson right. Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn angry client or angry angry co-worker. Oh, co-worker.

Speaker 1:

Thank you so much, rosemary. If people want, thank you, but what did they get a hold of you? Connect with you? How can they find you? Are you if you're on social media? Where can they find you? Where can they get a hold of you? Maybe they're looking to buy a property in California. Talk to an agent, maybe learn more from you. How do they go about that?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely. They can certainly Go to my website at rosemary medallcom. I'm on Instagram, but they want to connect with me because I've created a masterclass that'll teach you how to Look at a neighborhood and the way an urban planner would, so that you're not missing. So you great this Awareness right now. I want to have that as my gift to your listeners, who are all, I'm sure, just trying to get that first property or their 10th, but then I believe it'll be a value to them and, where they can, I'll give you the link. I'll give you the link and you can put it on your show notes.

Speaker 1:

Okay, so we'll make sure we put that on the show notes. Guys, make sure you guys look at you, look that up on the show notes and that's rosemary medallcom and Connect with her. You said you're on social media, you're an Instagram and I'm on Instagram, facebook, linkedin okay, so you can look her up. And rosemary, thank you so much for coming on the show really Appreciate it was an honor to have you.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much, really appreciate it you.

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