Zesty Marketing Podcast

The National Aquarium in Baltimore dives into a mission-driven campaign.

June 04, 2019
Zesty Marketing Podcast
The National Aquarium in Baltimore dives into a mission-driven campaign.
Chapters
Zesty Marketing Podcast
The National Aquarium in Baltimore dives into a mission-driven campaign.
Jun 04, 2019
Whitney Hahn | DigitalBard.com
The National Aquarium uses mission-driven messaging to align pwned and paid marketing efforts.
Show Notes Transcript

As the National Aquarium’s director of Marketing Programs, Emma Wesoloski is no "fish out of water" when it comes to leading marketing efforts that drive attendance and enhance her organizations brand within the community.

Located in Baltimore, Maryland, the National Aquarium has been consistently ranked as one of the top three aquariums in the nation, hosting more than 51 million guests since it opened in 1981. 

At the head of the Aquarium’s paid marketing strategy, Emma recently worked to find a new agency partner to help the Aquarium develop an integrated campaign that would align their owned and paid channels, as well as drive attendance and revenue.

Let’s dive in to hear more about Emma’s experiences in marketing tourism and non-profits.

The Zesty Marketing Podcast takes a summer hiatus until September, when we return with an all-new format. Stay tuned for details!

Resources: National Aquarium website
CAMPAIGN VIDEOS: "The Water is Calling"

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Speaker 1:
0:20
Welcome to the zesty marketing podcast where we explore the unique challenges, successful tactics and emerging trends encountered when marketing, leisure, and recreation venues. Here's your host, speaker, consultant and marketing geek trapped in a video producers body Whitney harm.
Speaker 2:
0:40
My guest today is no fish out of water when it comes to leading marketing efforts that drive attendance and enhance the organization. Emma [inaudible] is the national aquarium's director of marketing programs. The National Aquarium is located in Baltimore, Maryland and it's been consistently ranked as one of the top three aquariums in the nation hosting more than 51 million guests since it opened in 1981 when the aquarium wanted to align their owned and paid channels as well as drive attendance and revenue, they sought out a new agency partner and Emma was at the lead of that discovery process.
Speaker 3:
1:16
We don't leverage our social media in the ways that many brands do. We actually don't do a lot of posting about the civic things you can see at the aquarium because it's actually not super relevant to a lot of the people that follow us on social but that are so important for our reputation.
Speaker 2:
1:33
Let's dive in to hear more about ms experiences in marketing, tourism and mission driven nonprofits. Am I so appreciate you making time for us on the zesty marketing podcast. I know things are year round busy at the national aquarium, so it means a lot that you've made a little time for our show today. Thank you.
Speaker 3:
1:52
Oh absolutely. Thank you so much for having me
Speaker 2:
1:55
to set a little context for people who have never had the pleasure of visiting the National Aquarium in Baltimore. Um, give us in broad terms and and big round numbers, a sense of how big the facility is, how many guests you may see a year. And I know because I happen to be close to the national aquarium, that you have an enormous connection with the school groups that come in. So maybe even breaking out how many students you may see versus regular guests that that would be helpful.
Speaker 3:
2:20
Sure. Um, so the national aquarium has been in Baltimore's inner harbor since 1981. So we're quickly approaching our 40 year mark, which is very exciting. Um, we are Maryland's largest paid tourist attraction and we see about 1.3 million visitors each year, so pretty busy year round to your point, um, we are proud to have, uh, more than 20,000 animals living in our award winning habitats. That includes fishes, birds, amphibians, reptiles, marine mammals, everything you can really think of. And, um, we also your point provide a lot of opportunities for students to visit, um, both through some grant funding. And then also students can book a group visit at the aquarium as well and they are able to both chore our exhibits and then also take part in education programs that have a real stem focus. And oftentimes I'm feed nicely into the curriculum that the different school systems have in their science education curriculum.
Speaker 2:
3:28
You've got a beautiful multistory multi habitat facility there at the inner harbor. Um, you mentioned very briefly, you've got birds and amphibians and reptiles too. And so, um, and this feels kind of unique among aquariums. I love aquariums. It's one of my favorite things to visit when I traveled across the country. Um, but the, the uh, rainforest habitat that you have kind of in the, in the centerpiece with all the big glass and everything, that seems a little unusual for an aquarium. Talk about that, how that fits into your educational mission and message and how you help incorporate that in your marketing.
Speaker 3:
4:02
Sure, absolutely. So our, uh, Amazon rain forest is, uh, an exhibit that has been a fan favorite for years and it's definitely one that is unique because it has a really immersive experience. I'm actually similarly our Australia exhibit that opened in 2005 also has that immersive experience you can walk through and birds are flying over head and fish are swimming in exhibits at eye level. And you might see in the rainforest a slot if you're lucky one day they're perched up high in the trees. So you really feel surrounded. And I like to joke that in the winter time, I love going in the rainforest because it gives me a little like tropical vacation for just a few minutes when it's freezing cold outside here in Baltimore. So it's a nice escape. And I think for our guests, it's a really awesome opportunity to feel like they're really there.
Speaker 3:
4:52
Even if they're not able to make a trip themselves to the Amazon, they're able to come see it in Baltimore's inner harbor, which is pretty unique to your point. Um, and as far as the education piece goes, we definitely try to focus on using our animals and exhibits to do a lot of storytelling and to really connect with guests. So most of our guests are coming to the aquarium, either for an educational opportunity or for an entertainment opportunity. And they're oftentimes coming with people that they love and care about. So we find the number one driver for folks as far as what they're looking to get out of their visit is actually spending quality time with people in their lives. So what's really cool is if you have that family coming through the rain forest and the base seat at slots, which is really hard to get a glimpse of a pie in the trees. You know, it's something that they'll be able to remember and talk about and hopefully as they talk about that slot, they also remember what are, you know, volunteer exhibit guides or other folks in the rain forest may have been able to tell them about the rainforest habitat and how we can reduce our impact on not only that habitat but our local habitat. So really using the animals and the experiences as a bridge to inspiring people to take the conservation action.
Speaker 4:
6:04
Okay.
Speaker 2:
6:05
I love that you have the sloths. I have hunted very, very vigorously for the slots on my visits and have not always been successful in finding said sloths. Um, but I always thought it'd be funny to do a time lapse of a slough then just see nothing happen.
Speaker 3:
6:22
Well, funnily enough, um, some of our awesome animal welfare staff that works in the rain forest, I actually not 100% sure if they still do this, but usually when we have babies floss they will actually do similar to you. I know I myself do with my baby at home, have a camera monitoring them and so it is kind of funny to see the adult flaws like moving or not really moving around on the frame when we get to get a glimpse of that. So that's really fun.
Speaker 2:
6:51
These laws are like the cutest. They're amazing. They are.
Speaker 3:
6:54
I totally agree.
Speaker 2:
6:56
In terms of your, your marketing methodology, the, the platforms, if you will, that you use for marketing, we now understand some of the messaging that you use. Where do you find that message best matches up with your target audience and helps them get a glimpse of what they'll experience when they come visit the national aquarium?
Speaker 4:
7:15
Yeah.
Speaker 3:
7:16
So we're a little bit unique, I believe in the fact that we have, so all audiences that are really interested in the aquarium as a brand, we have a little bit of a difference in how we leverage our paid media and how we leverage our earned media. So, um, I oversee our paid media, so that means any kind of advertising that we're doing and our communications team oversees our earned media. And what's been really cool over the last I would say six years or so is I've seen, are, are, are um, owned media, especially our social channels. Um, really take on this incredible following that is a lot of people who are functionally interested in like actually just visiting the aquarium. But then there's just people nationally and internationally who love our animals or who love the conservation content we talk about. So it's been a really interesting journey because we don't leverage our social media in the ways that many brands do.
Speaker 3:
8:16
We actually don't do a lot of posting about, um, specific things you can see at the aquarium because it's actually not super relevant to a lot of the people that follow us on social but that are so important for our reputation. Um, because they're so engaged around all of the mission oriented work that we do. What else I also think is unique as we are lucky to have, um, buy in here for a really strong social care strategy. So where we do see a lot more of visitor based interactions around social media is, you know, in the private messages where people are asking us about hours, about, you know, all the different things they need to know to plan their visit. And, um, we are constantly responding and have a really great team that handles all of that. So it's interesting though to run the advertising for an organization that doesn't leverage a channel that is so strong like social media, um, in that way consistently.
Speaker 3:
9:11
So it's been a really interesting learning journey to try to figure out how do we use that super strong, hopeful brand voice that we have on social media and marry it with paid media that needs to really drive guests to come here and visit, spend money. Um, you know, that's the goal of our advertising of course. Um, so that is kind of how we eventually landed on the water is calling and we're super happy with the end result. I think it's the first time in my eight years here that I've really seen and felt that we were aligned across all of our channels and, and speaking in the same voice. And that's really a great place to be. I think
Speaker 2:
9:49
the water is calling is the name of one of your most recent campaigns and I, I'm so glad to hear that. It feels like it's a unifying message across your many platforms in the audiences that you try to attract to the national aquarium. Um, I would love to just peel back the curtain a little bit if you don't mind to tell us how you landed on that as the theme and how you validated it as this unifying message.
Speaker 3:
10:15
Sure, absolutely. So we, um, in late 2017 we undertook an RFP process and we reached out to, uh, about 20 regional and local marketing advertising agencies, um, mostly full service, um, that we're interested in just bidding for a piece of our business. And we were really looking for a new advertising partner who would help us both craft the creative of the campaign and then also place it really strategically in the right media channels in front of the right audiences. I think a strength that we have at the aquarium is we do have a pretty good understanding from the data of who our audiences are. But what we have, um, struggled to do is to make sure that we, as I mentioned earlier, find that balance between driving people to the aquarium, but also feeling really in sync with all of their really great work that's been done on our other channels over the last several years.
Speaker 3:
11:17
So, um, we ultimately chose, uh, the agency HTC and they have offices across the country, but they have an office located here in Baltimore, which, uh, definitely ended up being a perk because they were familiar with our brand. And of course we always like to support local businesses when we can. So we worked with HCI and did a pretty intensive onboarding process so they could really kind of get in the weeds, understand our brand, spend a lot of time with those other channels that I've mentioned, uh, to try and really dig in and understand what was our brand voice and what were our brand pillars and how did that to translate into a really compelling and impactful campaign that would be carried out largely over paid media. And we, um, actually got three creative concepts from them, which were all really great. Um, and we often, when we're embarking on a new advertising campaign, leverage a partner that we have who does a testing campaign concept testing.
Speaker 3:
12:17
So when we had the storyboards, they were able to take those concepts and test them with people who we consider high propensity visitors. So people that match your profile that would be likely to visit the national aquarium. So they were able to do that. And although we had sort of a fan favorite internally, um, that we really thought like rose to the top, it was actually fascinating because when the data came back it showed that that went actually really didn't resonate with people and was kind of divisive, um, depending on how the person self identified as far as race or cultural or socioeconomic status. So that was really fascinating and a really good gut check for us to be like, well, it's a, it's really good that we do this testing. And you know, sometimes the results will surprise you. Um, so we, we did also like the campaign that the concept that ended up becoming the water is calling.
Speaker 3:
13:12
We thought it was really beautiful. Um, it just, it initially it wasn't the favorite. Um, but we saw that it really have these three concepts was the very clear winner. People really felt like it felt like the national aquarium to them. They felt really motivated to visit from it. Um, and it kind of checked all of the boxes in a really great way. And unfortunately the other two concepts checked some but not all of the boxes. So it was a good learning moment for us. Um, definitely because you know, you kind of, if you have that, it's so hard to get internal buy in yeah. Across the board that it's always a little bit surprising when you're like, oh, that's not how everyone else sees this. So, um, so ultimately the water is calling rose to the top. Um, we were really excited about it.
Speaker 3:
13:59
It was the first time we actually filmed in our building in many years. So actually featuring our exhibits and all of our beautiful assets and animals in our buildings. So that was really fun. It was the first, um, full scale, like a television advertising production that I had really run on site. So it was a really cool opportunity for me and my team. Um, and we sort of went from there. We worked with HCI to determine what channels we could possibly want to be on before the media plan was fully fleshed out. But just to know that we had all these assets teed up for now or later, so we can be nimble as we see what's working. Um, so we did a lot of filming and photography and ended up with three really strong television spots with some six second spots that we've run on social and then with lots of great stills that could be used in, out of home and, and other digital iterations. So we did all of that last June, end of May, early June, and then we went into market at the end of June. So it was a whirlwind, but I really, um, fascinating and like productive time as we worked to align this campaign.
Speaker 1:
15:10
You are listening to the zesty marketing podcast with Whitney, Huh? Managing partner at digital bar, a video production and promotion partner for the Leisure and recreation. Right. So one of my superpowers here at MIT is finding the patterns and breaking the big Chunky building blocks that I think I just heard you describe. Let me see if I can summarize some steps that somebody else might be able to take
Speaker 2:
15:33
and apply to their own organizations. You first of all picked an amazing creative partner and didn't necessarily rely on everybody in house to do all that. I think that's an important first step to know when to tap out and bring in the professionals who come. First of all, it gives them different perspective and talents to to the project and then you let them do their job and come up with some interesting creative that you tested outside the organization and that sounds like that was an incredibly valuable tests you might had. You pick the inside favorite, you might have launched a campaign that outside completely flopped and in fact sounds like it may have turned off some of your audience not just been received neutrally but been a turnoff. So that was an incredibly valuable test and then you invested the time and the effort to get not just the assets you would need immediately, but I think I heard you imply you grabbed in the filming and the photography more than you would need immediately so that you could roll out companion pieces over time. Is that right?
Speaker 5:
16:43
Challenges about when making,
Speaker 3:
16:46
that's absolutely right. Yes. We had gone into it knowing we are a bit unique, but I'm sure a lot of other folks have their own interesting challenges about when they can fill all men when they can. And because we are open every day of the year except Thanksgiving and Christmas. And because we have a lot of um, rules and regulations that we definitely need to follow no wiggle room because of animal welfare and health, um, concerns. We are so limited in when we are able to film in buildings. So if we're going to do it, we're going to go all in and we recognize this as a big opportunity to capture a lot of photo and video that we could use in the future so that we would have a, you know, fresh options as this campaign lived on for
Speaker 1:
17:33
well, you know, in the past several years as we performed well and what didn't
Speaker 3:
17:39
and where we may need to pivot a little bit. So yes, that was like,
Speaker 1:
17:41
I think our really core part of [inaudible]
Speaker 3:
17:43
of what we did.
Speaker 2:
17:47
I've just, I've just heard the industry. Yes, exactly.
Speaker 3:
17:51
I love that you compare to Sophie out video yet. I will always be happy to be compared to be. Yeah, I've just, I've just heard the street happy overnights. Yes. We had two nights to film and we filmed, um, yeah, as we were closing at the end of the day when there were no, just, you know, some guests in the building and we weren't impeding the experience. And then into, yes, the wee hours of the morning to robotics. That's a bad place to be as you know, where you all like as soon as you're finished creating these
Speaker 2:
18:29
magnificent new pieces for, for print, for digital, for television. And you started to roll them out a little bit about how you budgeted for the promotion of it as it relates to the production of it. Because I think this part can be surprising sometimes. I, for example, off it, we just had a new Avengers movie bull bloom in the theaters. Right. And uh, and it is very common for big budget films, for example, that they budget at least as much for promotion as they spend in production or they don't do the movie. So they're looking at a, I'm just making a number up cause I don't know what the Avengers cost, but let's say it was a hundred million dollar production to put the film together. They're putting at least a hundred million dollars into their promotion, lining up their brand partners and all of that stuff. Um, how does that compare or do you have a rule of thumb that you use and would be willing to share with us about how the national aquarium does that budgeting
Speaker 5:
19:24
leverage last year?
Speaker 3:
19:31
Sure. So, um, when we look at the total budget that we're able to leverage in any given year, especially, you know, we don't produce a new integrated campaign every year. So last year was, you know, my big budget year, so I had to really make the most of it. Um, we look at putting roughly 20% into production of our total. Um, I guess advertising budget is the best way to kind of lump it all together. We spend about 20% on production and 80 or 80% on actually either purchasing media or the, do you know the account? Yeah. Hours around the placement of that media. Um, so we definitely spend a lot more, um, sounds like even then marvel studios yeah. On the promotion side than we do on the production side. Now that said, we certainly aren't skimping on the production side, but we have to be really efficient with our production budget because what we've found to be successful is the more that, you know, the seems kind of common sense, but the, the fruits have have proven this. Um, that the more we are in market, the more return we see. So we are always looking at how can we be more strategic in what channels we're using, how can we leverage channels like digital that might be more inexpensive, um, to generate a higher ROI. Um, and so we recognize that we really need to spend that money to get in front of people. Um, and so we want to have a high value
Speaker 2:
21:05
credentials or you know, marketing campaign. And I believe we did sample, but we really are trying to get some, um, some digital video that they want some ads for Facebook, let's say. Um, except that you don't really think about the promotion side of it. They, they think about, well, this is what it might cost me to get that video ad done. And they think, well, I'll just put it up on Facebook and I'll share it a few times and that'll be enough, right? Like, nope, nope, that's not nearly enough. And that, that can be surprising. And the other thing that is often surprising to them is when they get our recommendations on how long that particular asset will be viable for, because often the client is tired of seeing it and they think, oh, nobody else is looking at it. I'm tired of seeing it. It's old. I need something new. Often that threshold comes internally far before it happens externally. And it sounds like you would agree with that. What is, what is your, again, rule of thumb, if you don't mind sharing it for how long an asset is going to be attractive and viable, or, or what metrics might you be looking at to say, okay, it's on the down slide. It really is old for everybody, not just me.
Speaker 5:
22:10
Sure.
Speaker 2:
22:17
Yeah,
Speaker 3:
22:20
yeah, sure. Um, well it's really interesting and I 100% agree with your statement that we are over it internally.
Speaker 2:
22:28
Well before that's the
Speaker 3:
22:29
public is even aware. Um, yeah, I have more anecdotal evidence. I mean, I think what we really look at as far as if something still performing is, are people still highly engaged with it? So tracking all the engagement metrics that we can, especially of course across digital. And then are we still meeting our attendance and revenue goals because obviously that's, that's the end game. That's the north star that we're pointing towards with these campaigns. So, um, you know, a general rule of thumb is we look to keep something in market for maybe two to three years. Um, but we're obviously constantly checking in to see does it still seem to be resonating? What is always fascinating and especially for any one who's listening who is from the Baltimore area, it's, you know, called small tomorrow. And so we get a lot of anecdotal feedback, um, in the local market.
Speaker 3:
23:19
And it actually is extremely helpful because we, um, for example, before we produced this campaign, we were running the same radio spots at strategic times throughout the year for about almost four years. And every time they went into market, we would get someone telling me or my boss or someone on our team, oh, I heard your new radio spots. I really love them. And they could have been, you know, four years old at that, but they still felt fresh to those people. So that's actually a really good gut check for us when we're getting that kind of feedback. Um, and then again though, what we're really looking at is are they performing and doing what we need them to do. Um, but it is helpful to hear feedback from the local community because they're, they're the closest to us, you know, so you would think that they would, um, it would feel maybe a little bit older to those and in the Baltimore market before it would two people out of market.
Speaker 3:
24:15
Um, but that's not, that's not what we found. So that's been really interesting. Something that market research has borne out to us is generally speaking of visit to Baltimore Mo more often than not does equal a visit to the aquarium. So people are either aware of us before they come. Not saying that the aquarium is necessarily there a reason to visit, but if they are in the area, more likely than not, they are going to be paying a visit to the aquarium. Um, we actually see 70% of our visitation comes from outside of the Baltimore Metro area. So there is a pretty high awareness and we do invest in some key feeder markets, um, in advertising there to your point, uh, to ensure that we stay top of mind. But we have actually partnered with some local tourism partners in the past actually give a portion of our advertising by to them for their spots because we know that if we can get people to Baltimore, yeah, oftentimes we can get them to the aquarium. So it's kind of an all ships rise with the tide type of thing. Um, in our experience. So, um, that's a obviously a good thing. Um, yeah.
Speaker 2:
25:24
And the value of you have you all done advertise both ourselves, right? And [inaudible] nation in [inaudible]. So I like to kind of wrap up with a summary and ask you to imagine if you're preparing a, a blog post or a short seminar and infographic on the water is calling campaign and, and what you learned from it, what might you share that someone else could borrow and take inspiration from and apply to their own attraction or destination?
Speaker 5:
26:04
Really.
Speaker 3:
26:07
Sure. Um, so I think you've actually called out some of the big highlights, which is, you know, testing is incredibly important and really key if you're going to be investing, you know, a good chunk of your marketing budget, especially as a nonprofit, which I'm sure some other listeners are also nonprofits. You know, we, I think look at our Roi probably even more closely than for profit companies do. Um, because we have to be so lean and mean and nimble. So that testing kept us from making a potentially big mistake in terms of being able to drive that, that Roi through our campaigns. So that was the key learning for me, watching it happen in real time. I was like, oh my gosh, I'm really glad that we didn't go with our gut to be honest, which doesn't feel great, so admit, but our gut was wrong.
Speaker 3:
26:56
So, um, that was really critical. Um, this was the first integrated campaign where as I mentioned earlier, we did really focus on making sure that we felt brand right in this campaign, but still, you know, finding that balance between communicating our mission and also inspiring people to not only hit conservation action but also to come visit us and spend some time at the aquarium. And so we were successful in doing that. Um, you know, the, we're in market throughout the year, but the biggest, you know, our bread and butter is the summer. And so we saw a 3% year over year increase last summer, which definitely showed us that we were moving the needle in the right direction. And then we saw a really nice tail from the campaign and actually our September really overperformed as well. Um, even though we were out of market. So that felt really, um, positive and a good indicator that things were, were working.
Speaker 3:
27:55
And then we were able to, because we leveraged and layered so much digital advertising in this campaign, it was the first integrated campaign where we really moved a lot of our money into digital. We had been dabbling in digital. We knew it was really an important channel to be, you know, paying to play on. Um, and you know, our social content strategy does promote posts, but we really hadn't done a consistent, you know, advertising effort on Facebook, on Instagram. Um, you know, and leveraging all the other great channels, especially searches is a real moneymaker for us as it can be for many folks. Um, and so it was really great to be able to track everything so closely and to see that what in this case, our gut was, right. Our Gut was that we could really leverage digital channels more successfully than we had been. And using a partner that had that depth of bench that we don't have in house. We have some really smart folks in house, but they have, you know, three other jobs on top of contributing to strategy around digital advertising. So being able to have a partner who was dedicated to that daily monitoring, um, you know, taking money from one channel to another if it wasn't performing on that channel, that was really huge for us. And really, yeah,
Speaker 2:
29:13
prove to us that we were correct that digital was the way we needed moving. And finally I'll ask number two, you're not, you're not a Newbie to this all kind of the key lessons that we've learned even with things and be been willing to test and adjust even some of your own preconceived notions or what your experiences led you to so far. So look into your crystal ball and tell me what is coming up in the next three to five years. Let's say that has got you excited. What just has your little spider sense is tingling. There's another, there's another superhero reference. Your spidey senses are tingling. It says that's going to be interesting, that will be important for us to be able to manage and leverage for the national aquarium. What is that?
Speaker 3:
30:08
I am super excited about, um, the emerging personalization capabilities. So what I think will be really interesting over the next few years is we have so much data to inform our work now and to be really thoughtful with, you know, every dollar we spend really and trying to reach the quote unquote rate person who might be really receptive to our message and then purchase a ticket. Um, I think that in the next few years we're going to be able to tailor our messaging even further and get really, you know, in the weeds on how we're reaching people. We're already starting to do this, um, on some of our own channels here, but like, you know, email kind of being the first one that comes to mind. We're doing some really exciting things in our email platform right now. Um, but what I think will be really interesting though, this is all super exciting to me.
Speaker 3:
30:59
It also calls up the question that and the conversations that everyone's having right now about privacy and security and data breaches. And so how are we as a responsible brand able to leverage the information we have and give a message, deliver a message to someone that they, you know, really why are really receptive to but also do it in a way that feels authentic for our brand and feels like we are not being a pest or you know, worst case scenario, you know, violating them in some way. So I think that's going to be a really interesting thing that everyone in marketing needs to deal with. But I'm super excited to see how we're able to continue making marketing or really personal experience for people in the best way possible. And how brands are going to have to, you know, work to avoid how to do it in a way that feels right.
Speaker 2:
31:49
Yeah, that is, that is that I feel really good. [inaudible] certainly not the first of all mentioned that. Can we as marketers, I think we can so quickly go from concierge, you know, I'm anticipating, I'm caring for you. I'm paying attention to what you like and feeding you things you'll thank me for. We can so quickly move from there to ski creeper and you gotta be careful.
Speaker 5:
32:15
Yeah,
Speaker 2:
32:19
yeah, yeah. It'll take some managing. We'll probably make some mistakes along the way, but I think with the integrity and, and good ethics in front of us, we'll find the right direction. Ortunately yeah, this has been wonderful. Again, I can't thank you enough for your time and the, in the midst of a busy season, you've, you've probably got a 47 million students at the facility even as we speak, uh, plus sloths cam to monitor and that's a full time job right there.
Speaker 5:
32:45
Okay.
Speaker 2:
32:48
Well thank you again and I hope everything continues to go swimmingly at the national aquarium. You see what I did there?
Speaker 5:
32:55
Yeah,
Speaker 3:
32:55
that's super important. Exactly. Okay.
Speaker 2:
33:06
I love you so much. Just wave after wave on the ocean.
Speaker 3:
33:12
Um, please call, call me because we are also swimming in them over here.
Speaker 2:
33:17
Neat. Courage me.
Speaker 5:
33:20
All right.
Speaker 3:
33:23
Oh yes, I'm officially out of them for today, but uh, Tony, I know. Sorry. Um, well, thank you so, so much. Uh, and this has been a pleasure.
Speaker 2:
33:39
Thanks for listening to today's is SD marketing podcast. I really enjoy finding and interviewing these guests and helping us all learn about new ways to become guest magnets. The show. We'll be taking a summer hiatus so that we can get out and enjoy some exciting new recreation and adventure activities too. So if you haven't had a chance to catch up on the dozens of podcasts we've created for recreation and tourism marketers over the last two years or so, now's your chance to catch up. The zesty marketing podcast returns for a new season in September. And I can't share too much just yet, but I can tell you that our new shows we'll provide tips and tactics are from a very different point of view. I really hope you like it until then, have a great summer.
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