Investors Community Bank's Podcast

Money Matters with Matt - October 30, 2020

October 29, 2020 ICB
Investors Community Bank's Podcast
Money Matters with Matt - October 30, 2020
Chapters
Investors Community Bank's Podcast
Money Matters with Matt - October 30, 2020
Oct 29, 2020
ICB

Every day, thousands of people fall for fraudulent emails, texts, and calls from scammers pretending to be a bank. There are certain things that a bank would just never ask you, especially via email or text message.  On today's show, you'll learn some tips for keeping yourself safe. 

Show Notes Transcript

Every day, thousands of people fall for fraudulent emails, texts, and calls from scammers pretending to be a bank. There are certain things that a bank would just never ask you, especially via email or text message.  On today's show, you'll learn some tips for keeping yourself safe. 

Speaker 1:
And now Investors Community Bank welcomes you to Money Matters with Matt, on 1240 radio, WOMT.

Jim:
Matt Lemke, joining us remotely. Good morning, Matt.

Matt:
Hello, Jim.

Jim:
Great to talk with you and I love talking security and scams and protecting yourself and that's our topic today because this is a pretty program that you've got going on.

Matt:
Yeah, absolutely. We've talked countless times on this show about different scams and making sure that you're aware and you understand what's going on. And the American Bankers Association had been running a cybersecurity awareness campaign throughout the nation and it's really focused on and created a tagline called, "Banks never ask that." And it's a way to bring attention to the types of information banks will never ask you over the phone or via email. And it may seem simple, it may seem easy, but it's a great way to get the message out there and make sure that people really understand what's going on in terms of scams as well as tips and things to look out for.

Jim:
Take for instance, a bank will never call and ask you your Social Security number? Is that one of the questions or one of the points?

Matt:
Correct, yeah. And so, any time you get a suspicious or what appears to be a suspicious email, text or phone call, the idea of this campaign is for the person to think, "Well, a bank is never going to ask that." And they've actually created a website, www.banksneveraskthat.com, where you can go out and take a very short, six question quiz to test your knowledge and also educate about some of the things banks may or may not ask. And as an example to your point, Jim, one of the questions talks about here's a sample text message, would your bank ask you this? And you answer either yes or no and if you get it correct, it congratulates you, gives you a little bit of an explanation. If you get it wrong, it provides some education and highlights some of the reasons that you may have got that question wrong.

Jim:
So banks never ask that, did you take the quiz?

Matt:
I did take the quiz.

Jim:
Okay. 
 
Matt:
It was six questions. It was quick and I passed. I got six out of six, so I feel like I can continue talking about this for our listeners.

Jim:
That's good. And it scores you as you go along and it's Six questions. We've got plenty of time on our hands these days, that shouldn't take long at all. But the value that you get out of answering those six questions, whether they're right or wrong, the knowledge you gain is priceless.

Matt:
Absolutely. It again reminds you that if you receive an email, a text or a phone call, asking for
confidential information, that's a definite red flag. Banks are never going to ask that, so it's better to be safe that sorry. And in those cases, if you get a text, an email, a phone, and you think to yourself, "Oh boy. My bank wouldn't ask that," simply end the call, delete the text, delete the email, whatever it takes, but certainly don't follow through with that sort of request.

Jim:
And some of those emails that are sent are pretty official looking. You really got to... It's buyer beware, isn't it?

Matt:
It absolutely is and some of the things that we discussed before that are worth reiterating is look at the email address that it came from and if it isn't matching what you're used to seeing from your bank or if its suspicious and it's got numbers and letters and @gmail, it's in all likelihood a scam attempt to try to gather your information. Same way with a text that comes to you asking for something like that, the bank isn't going to text you.

Jim:
Never. Never. And a simple way, Matt, would be to not answer it until you contact the local phone number of Investors Community Bank and ask them.

Matt:
Yeah.

Jim:
It's a straight up question and you have great, trained people that know what's going on and on the lookout for any type of scam.

Matt:
That's right. Always, a couple of good tips in that regard is, if you're uncertain, call the bank at the number that you know and that is valid off of their website. Call the number on the back of your debit or credit card. But if you are the one initiating the request or conversation, then you know it's safe. If it's the other way around, chances are incredibly high and more times than not that it's simply a scam because again, banks are never going to ask that. 
 
Jim:
banksneveraskthat.com. It should be fun. Maybe gather everyone around and try to take the quiz themselves. Matt, I love these topics and it's always fun talking with you. So thanks for joining us today.

Matt:
Thank you, Jim. Take care.

Speaker 1:
You've been listening to Money Matters with Matt, presented by Investors Community Bank. Let your money work for you. To learn more, visit investorscommunitybank.com. And don't forget to tune into Money Matters with Matt every Friday morning here on 1240 radio, WOMT. Investors Community Bank, we promise to walk in your shoes. Member FDIC an equal housing lender.