Real Kidney Living

Donations and Transplantation: Where Does the Gap Lie? w/ Ms. Aisha Tator

August 17, 2020 Northeast Kidney Foundation Season 1 Episode 3
Real Kidney Living
Donations and Transplantation: Where Does the Gap Lie? w/ Ms. Aisha Tator
Chapters
Real Kidney Living
Donations and Transplantation: Where Does the Gap Lie? w/ Ms. Aisha Tator
Aug 17, 2020 Season 1 Episode 3
Northeast Kidney Foundation

Welcome back, everyone! In this episode, I thought we could reflect on one of the core topics that the Northeast Kidney Foundation and its partner organizations promotes: organ donation. Currently, Donate Life NYS aims to utilize outreach, advocacy, legislative, research and education efforts in order to encourage the donation of this gift of life.  Listen in, as I am joined by the Executive Director of Donate Life, NYS: Ms. Aisha Tator as we explore the outreach models used to make this topic positive and prevalent in our society. If you haven’t signed up yet, here’s the link to make it easy: https://donatelife.ny.gov/register/

Aisha’s Questions – 

1.)   What is your role and what is Donate Life NYS? What is your mission?

I am the Executive Director of Donate Life NYS. We look to promote this message and question of: "will you give this gift of life?" through state and local organizations that encompass a multitude of realms including: legal offices, healthcare profession networks and organ recovery and procurement organizations while creating a collaborative avenue of support.

2.)  Why does this gap exist between donor enrollment and potential recipients in the state of New York?

 The gap is 9:1 in terms of enrollees and potential recipients as there were 9,000-9,500 on the waiting list and only 1,000 potential donors in the registry. The issue becomes streamlining our strategies and resources while creating an equal market given our common altruistic tendencies as people for our message. 

3.)   How can we streamline the registration process? How can we create avenues that allow this message of enrolling in the registry to be heard?

We have worked so hard to place the “Donor Designation Question” in as many avenues as we can. We have to get in front of college applications, income taxes etc. and where the greatest exposure is. It becomes a matter of “what does everybody do?” We can create a cultural message in “we” the state of NY believe that this topic is important. 

4.)   Why could it be that this topic of organ donation is so passive to the average person?

Let’s look at a survey: 86% of New Yorkers have said: “sure, I’ll do that.” There are different factors such as: lack of streamlined methods between cultural and theological realms that spell out “let’s do this.” There might be language barriers or additional challenges that exist. Therefore, there has to be a “cultural sensitivity” with communication. There is state level work in progress to enroll individuals who could be on the registry. It takes a sense of connection to make this topic prominent and known throughout the community.

5.)   This month is National Minority Donor Awareness Month. What are a few forums, activities or events that we can participate in to make this topic prominent in these multi-cultural communities?

Let’s look at this from a larger lens: National Minority Donor Awareness Month is a collaborative initiative of National Organ, Eye and Tissue Donation Multicultural Action Group and also DonateLife America, etc. 36,000 transplants performed in 2019: 21% to African Americans and 45% to a minority population. We want to create a sense of connection and positive understanding using: -virtual awareness, information counsels and become embedded in these communities to use common language and nuances in order for them to understand the need.


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Show Notes

Welcome back, everyone! In this episode, I thought we could reflect on one of the core topics that the Northeast Kidney Foundation and its partner organizations promotes: organ donation. Currently, Donate Life NYS aims to utilize outreach, advocacy, legislative, research and education efforts in order to encourage the donation of this gift of life.  Listen in, as I am joined by the Executive Director of Donate Life, NYS: Ms. Aisha Tator as we explore the outreach models used to make this topic positive and prevalent in our society. If you haven’t signed up yet, here’s the link to make it easy: https://donatelife.ny.gov/register/

Aisha’s Questions – 

1.)   What is your role and what is Donate Life NYS? What is your mission?

I am the Executive Director of Donate Life NYS. We look to promote this message and question of: "will you give this gift of life?" through state and local organizations that encompass a multitude of realms including: legal offices, healthcare profession networks and organ recovery and procurement organizations while creating a collaborative avenue of support.

2.)  Why does this gap exist between donor enrollment and potential recipients in the state of New York?

 The gap is 9:1 in terms of enrollees and potential recipients as there were 9,000-9,500 on the waiting list and only 1,000 potential donors in the registry. The issue becomes streamlining our strategies and resources while creating an equal market given our common altruistic tendencies as people for our message. 

3.)   How can we streamline the registration process? How can we create avenues that allow this message of enrolling in the registry to be heard?

We have worked so hard to place the “Donor Designation Question” in as many avenues as we can. We have to get in front of college applications, income taxes etc. and where the greatest exposure is. It becomes a matter of “what does everybody do?” We can create a cultural message in “we” the state of NY believe that this topic is important. 

4.)   Why could it be that this topic of organ donation is so passive to the average person?

Let’s look at a survey: 86% of New Yorkers have said: “sure, I’ll do that.” There are different factors such as: lack of streamlined methods between cultural and theological realms that spell out “let’s do this.” There might be language barriers or additional challenges that exist. Therefore, there has to be a “cultural sensitivity” with communication. There is state level work in progress to enroll individuals who could be on the registry. It takes a sense of connection to make this topic prominent and known throughout the community.

5.)   This month is National Minority Donor Awareness Month. What are a few forums, activities or events that we can participate in to make this topic prominent in these multi-cultural communities?

Let’s look at this from a larger lens: National Minority Donor Awareness Month is a collaborative initiative of National Organ, Eye and Tissue Donation Multicultural Action Group and also DonateLife America, etc. 36,000 transplants performed in 2019: 21% to African Americans and 45% to a minority population. We want to create a sense of connection and positive understanding using: -virtual awareness, information counsels and become embedded in these communities to use common language and nuances in order for them to understand the need.


Instacart - Groceries delivered in as little as 1 hour.
Free delivery on your first order over $35.

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.