Real Kidney Living

Covid-19 and it's Effects on the Renal System w/ Dr. Andrew Bomback

September 16, 2020 Northeast Kidney Foundation Season 1 Episode 6
Real Kidney Living
Covid-19 and it's Effects on the Renal System w/ Dr. Andrew Bomback
Chapters
Real Kidney Living
Covid-19 and it's Effects on the Renal System w/ Dr. Andrew Bomback
Sep 16, 2020 Season 1 Episode 6
Northeast Kidney Foundation

Welcome back, everyone! Today, I thought that I could take a crack at spinning a positive note on one of the most prevalent topics in the world today: Covid-19. Join me and my guest – Dr. Andrew Bomback, an Adult Nephrologist and Associate Professor of Medicine at the Irving Medical Center within Columbia University as we explore the effects of this disease on the renal system and what we can do to stay healthy during this time. We’ll explore current research, outcomes and everyday practices that can be instituted both in the kidney community and general public!

Dr. Bomback’s Questions – 

1.) Tell us a little about yourself!

I am nephrologist for adult patients and specialize in glomerular diseases; which are some of the rarer forms of kidney disease. I still perform general and hospital-based nephrology care and Irving focuses on a large spectrum of kidney diseases.

2.) It’s been noted that there are renal effects as a result of Covid-19 – what kind of extra precautions should those with underlying conditions be taking and why might they keep changing?

I think the most important thing that anyone can do is follow the science (i.e your nephrologist as a kidney disease patient). Yes, it’s out there and can be lethal. It’s also something that you can protect yourself from with mask usage, social distancing, avoiding large groups or any non-essential travel. The most impressive portion from my being a New Yorker is the adherence level to these protocols. We recognized what it could do and now we know to protect ourselves.

3.) To your best knowledge, what is the current research and data showing with the effects of Covid-19 and the kidneys?

We generally see a condition called acute tubular necrosis – the patients are getting extremely sick, developing sepsis with ischemic injury to the kidney (a “kidney attack”) and it is the inflammatory response that causes this damage. If the patient shows signs of recovery, the kidney will follow that course in these instances.

4.) Is anyone, even the average, otherwise healthy individual at risk for kidney damage if they contract Covid-19?

Yes, there are asymptomatic cases but the patients with severe infection that have an exceptionally high inflammatory response will correlate with higher outcomes of kidney disease. 

5.) Given your specific background in glomerular diseases, have you seen this disease act any differently within your own specific patient population.

No, and it’s because glomerular disease patients tend to be young. We know that youth is a positive risk factor and we expect better outcomes in these patients. 

6.) What was the transition period from pre Covid-19 to practicing in what became the epicenter?

We benefitted immensely from having colleagues in Europe to set our expectation level. It was important to get that heads-up. Everything became operationalized and It was a rapid transition to the post-crisis time where we started seeing a decline in cases. Care has transitioned to a normal sense with the exception of virtual care, personal protective important and potentially even immunosuppression protocols. 

7.) Where do you see this going in the future with testing or effects on the healthcare system in the next few years?

It looks like some medications are helpful and we are optimistic for effective vaccines. I think it’s more likely that a vaccine will alleviate the morbidity and mortality rates but also that that this will likely be the norm for the immediate future. 


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Show Notes

Welcome back, everyone! Today, I thought that I could take a crack at spinning a positive note on one of the most prevalent topics in the world today: Covid-19. Join me and my guest – Dr. Andrew Bomback, an Adult Nephrologist and Associate Professor of Medicine at the Irving Medical Center within Columbia University as we explore the effects of this disease on the renal system and what we can do to stay healthy during this time. We’ll explore current research, outcomes and everyday practices that can be instituted both in the kidney community and general public!

Dr. Bomback’s Questions – 

1.) Tell us a little about yourself!

I am nephrologist for adult patients and specialize in glomerular diseases; which are some of the rarer forms of kidney disease. I still perform general and hospital-based nephrology care and Irving focuses on a large spectrum of kidney diseases.

2.) It’s been noted that there are renal effects as a result of Covid-19 – what kind of extra precautions should those with underlying conditions be taking and why might they keep changing?

I think the most important thing that anyone can do is follow the science (i.e your nephrologist as a kidney disease patient). Yes, it’s out there and can be lethal. It’s also something that you can protect yourself from with mask usage, social distancing, avoiding large groups or any non-essential travel. The most impressive portion from my being a New Yorker is the adherence level to these protocols. We recognized what it could do and now we know to protect ourselves.

3.) To your best knowledge, what is the current research and data showing with the effects of Covid-19 and the kidneys?

We generally see a condition called acute tubular necrosis – the patients are getting extremely sick, developing sepsis with ischemic injury to the kidney (a “kidney attack”) and it is the inflammatory response that causes this damage. If the patient shows signs of recovery, the kidney will follow that course in these instances.

4.) Is anyone, even the average, otherwise healthy individual at risk for kidney damage if they contract Covid-19?

Yes, there are asymptomatic cases but the patients with severe infection that have an exceptionally high inflammatory response will correlate with higher outcomes of kidney disease. 

5.) Given your specific background in glomerular diseases, have you seen this disease act any differently within your own specific patient population.

No, and it’s because glomerular disease patients tend to be young. We know that youth is a positive risk factor and we expect better outcomes in these patients. 

6.) What was the transition period from pre Covid-19 to practicing in what became the epicenter?

We benefitted immensely from having colleagues in Europe to set our expectation level. It was important to get that heads-up. Everything became operationalized and It was a rapid transition to the post-crisis time where we started seeing a decline in cases. Care has transitioned to a normal sense with the exception of virtual care, personal protective important and potentially even immunosuppression protocols. 

7.) Where do you see this going in the future with testing or effects on the healthcare system in the next few years?

It looks like some medications are helpful and we are optimistic for effective vaccines. I think it’s more likely that a vaccine will alleviate the morbidity and mortality rates but also that that this will likely be the norm for the immediate future. 


Instacart - Groceries delivered in as little as 1 hour.
Free delivery on your first order over $35.

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.