The Inspiring Conversations Podcast

A Deep Conversation With Artist Adam Carnes--Video Available On Inspiring Conversations Podcast Youtube Channel-Link Below

May 16, 2021 Real, Meaningful Conversations From The Real World
The Inspiring Conversations Podcast
A Deep Conversation With Artist Adam Carnes--Video Available On Inspiring Conversations Podcast Youtube Channel-Link Below
Chapters
The Inspiring Conversations Podcast
A Deep Conversation With Artist Adam Carnes--Video Available On Inspiring Conversations Podcast Youtube Channel-Link Below
May 16, 2021
Real, Meaningful Conversations From The Real World

WATCH ON YOUTUBE
https://youtu.be/Vn8o8B75fpg

Jeff sits down with artist Adam Carnes as he shares very deeply about what informs his work, about how moving to Tulsa and working here has changed his Consciousness, and about his work that is in the Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Project exhibit at Living Arts of Tulsa.

Adam Carnes (b. 1981), is a Tulsa transplant via Brooklyn. He received his MFA from the New York Academy of Art and BFA from the Ringling College of Art and Design.

To learn more about Adam and his work, visit
https://www.adamcarnes.com
https://www.instagram.com/adamcarnesart/



*Photo by Melissa Lukenbaugh & Tulsa Artist Fellowship

GKFF awarded Carnes with the 2017-2020 Tulsa Artist Fellowship. 

Growing up in Florida during the development of the Information Age, Carnes has been striving to maintain his connection with humanity through painting. Skira Rizzoli’s
publication “The Figure” includes Adam’s work and is sold in museum book stores like the Met, Royal Academy and National Gallery. 

His Griots art pieces were published in BOMB Magazine’s Summer 2021
issue #156 and “RELEASE ME, the Spirits of Greenwood Speak” anthology.

These “Griots” pieces are an extension of my “Strangers, Friends & Sacred” series and they honor the 1921Tulsa Race Massacre survivors for their contributions to Tulsa’s Historic Greenwood District, dubbed “Black Wall Street” for it’s thriving concentration of black entrepreneurs. 

The overarching narrative speaks to the triumph of the human spirit.
Griot is a “West African troubadour-historian. The griot profession is hereditary and has long been a part of West African culture. The griots’ role has traditionally been to preserve the genealogies, historical narratives, and oral traditions of their people; praise songs are also part of the griot’s répertoire.


Show Notes

WATCH ON YOUTUBE
https://youtu.be/Vn8o8B75fpg

Jeff sits down with artist Adam Carnes as he shares very deeply about what informs his work, about how moving to Tulsa and working here has changed his Consciousness, and about his work that is in the Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Project exhibit at Living Arts of Tulsa.

Adam Carnes (b. 1981), is a Tulsa transplant via Brooklyn. He received his MFA from the New York Academy of Art and BFA from the Ringling College of Art and Design.

To learn more about Adam and his work, visit
https://www.adamcarnes.com
https://www.instagram.com/adamcarnesart/



*Photo by Melissa Lukenbaugh & Tulsa Artist Fellowship

GKFF awarded Carnes with the 2017-2020 Tulsa Artist Fellowship. 

Growing up in Florida during the development of the Information Age, Carnes has been striving to maintain his connection with humanity through painting. Skira Rizzoli’s
publication “The Figure” includes Adam’s work and is sold in museum book stores like the Met, Royal Academy and National Gallery. 

His Griots art pieces were published in BOMB Magazine’s Summer 2021
issue #156 and “RELEASE ME, the Spirits of Greenwood Speak” anthology.

These “Griots” pieces are an extension of my “Strangers, Friends & Sacred” series and they honor the 1921Tulsa Race Massacre survivors for their contributions to Tulsa’s Historic Greenwood District, dubbed “Black Wall Street” for it’s thriving concentration of black entrepreneurs. 

The overarching narrative speaks to the triumph of the human spirit.
Griot is a “West African troubadour-historian. The griot profession is hereditary and has long been a part of West African culture. The griots’ role has traditionally been to preserve the genealogies, historical narratives, and oral traditions of their people; praise songs are also part of the griot’s répertoire.