Level the Pursuit

Finding Your Purpose with Dierdre Mahon

February 10, 2021 Level the Pursuit Season 2 Episode 7
Level the Pursuit
Finding Your Purpose with Dierdre Mahon
Show Notes Transcript

When we find ourselves in a dark place with no options, it can be very easy to give up. Today we have a great talk with Dee Mahon, the host of "High Vibe Bombshell" podcast and author of "Glamorous." Dee tells us about her darkest times, and how focusing on looking and feeling glamorous helped her to find her authentic self. She now coaches and inspires other women to tap into their inner bombshell.

LTP:

In the race to success, we're not all starting from the same place. Level the Pursuit seeks to fill in the gaps and provide accessible bite sized leadership lessons for anyone looking to improve their skills and prepare for the next step. whatever that might be. Welcome back, peeps. I hope you're having a fantastic week. Now, last week, we talked about the Highlander mentality and really realizing that very few people get to the top on their own, but no one can stay that way. So the more we surround ourselves with good, strong, smart, ambitious people, the better off we all are. Success really is a team sport, you cannot get there alone, you cannot stay there alone. And really, if you want to be the best, you have to surround yourself with the best. So as you move forward in your life, make sure you're taking those good people along with you. Now today we have a treat, we're going to talk to Ms Dierdre Mahon. She is a makeup artist and author and a woman's life coach who has amazing perspectives on a ton of different things. But her focus is empowering women through making them look and feel like bombshells. Now this isn't just about how you look on the outside, but it's about being unapologetically you, and feeling good about yourself no matter what. And I think this is the lesson all of us can learn from. So whether you agree or disagree with the concepts we talked about today, I would love to hear it. But in either case, she has some great things to say and I'm excited to share this conversation with you. Today, we're joined by Dee who is the host of high vibe bombshell podcast. And she is a glam makeup artist who is focused on empowering women not just through makeup and glam, but through being unapologetically wonderful in who they are. And so we're so lucky to have her here and hear a little bit about her journey and her leadership perspectives. So Dee, thank you so much for being here. We're so happy to have you.

Dee Mahon:

Hi, Mary, thank you so much for having me here.

LTP:

We're gonna get through this, we're technology will not meet us down today.

Dee Mahon:

And those who know me know, technology and sound like my strong, strong suit. So anyway, it's nice to meet you.

LTP:

Nice to meet you as well. So glam is a really cool place to be. It's not necessarily as in vogue now as it was back in the day. But obviously there are still a place for feeling empowered, feeling beautiful. And, and it's interesting to have that be your focus of how you do your leadership coaching and how you empower women. Can you tell us a little bit about how that started and where it came from?

Dee Mahon:

Yes, so as a little girl, I was very shy. And I bonded very closely with my mom, my father was a good provider, but he was emotionally absent, and always working. And I felt unseen by him and invisible. I had a little bit of low self esteem, being shy, etc. So I bonded very closely with my mom from about an age of seven, eight, I would sit and watch her beloved old Hollywood movies. So I like to say to people that I was raised on them, because they're a part of my DNA as much as anything else. I absorbed all the beauty and the glamour and the elegance of this era. And though the movies themselves were actually made up, but the error was very real. The clothes were the movie, the makeup, etc. How these women held themselves and presented themselves, their body language of the clothes were very real. And I just I loved it. I loved the feminine power that these women had. And I particularly resonated with the bombshell because she was unapologetic in her sensuality and her sexuality. And so I knew that beauty and makeup and glamour somehow would be a part of my life. I grew up watching all my reading all my glamour magazines every month etc. Playing with makeup. After high school I got my cosmeticians license, I freelanced for several Estee Lauder Lancome, in particular in the New York City Department Stores. And I got burnt out after several years because I really just wanted to help women look and feel good. I didn't want the sales end of it. I didn't want to pressure them into buying makeup that they did not need. So I answered an ad in the paper. I started into corporate for many years, I was a front receptionist met my future husband there and took a detour at the age of 26. He found out that even though he was the love of my life and a beautiful, decent, kind loving human being that we had much common with, I found out he had a cocaine problem. And I thought that I'd be able to save him. And when I couldn't save him on, I couldn't leave him, I started doing the drugs with him. And that took me down a different path of nothingness for 20 years, bouncing from one job to the next and just jobs. But I knew, I knew in my gut, I knew in my soul that I wanted more, and I was made for more. At around three, four o'clock in the morning, I remember watching this infomercial that was from Alexis Vogel, who was, she's passed on now, but she was Pamela Anderson's makeup artist. And she gave Pamela, the bombshell look, she took her from the Baywatch beauty and turned into a bombshell. And she had a line of cosmetics that she was be doing before and afters on what regular women just like you and me, they weren't models, they weren't actresses. And then these women would be given the mirror afterwards. And they would just be floored. They just couldn't believe that they could look this way. They never saw that themselves beyond being a mother or a wife, or boss. They didn't see themselves as an empowered, feminine, sexy woman. I said, If I could ever get out of this dark place, that's what I want to do for women. And so I did fast forward, I got out at 47 got my apartment, started my own cosmetic company and I got into bridal for the last 16 years. But many times I would see that women even brides even younger didn't matter what age, they could be 25, they could be 45, they could be 55. Many times their vision of what they wanted to look like, wasn't meeting what they felt like inside. And I realized that it's the two has to be together, your inner confidence and your outer confidence. You don't get confidence by just putting a dress on or putting high heels on or putting shimmer on your cheeks or lipstick. It has to come from inside. It's your body language. It's It's It's everything. It's the whole of you to be a whole full package. And so I started doing feminine confidence coaching as well.

LTP:

Wow. Fantastic. Thank you for sharing that. So there are a lot of people that have big hurdles in their lives, whether things they couldn't control or things they could and I have to think that there were times when you were using the cocaine where it seemed like you were never going to escape from that lifestyle. Can you tell us a little bit about how that felt and what you did to get through it.

Dee Mahon:

I had many days where I thought that this was it. This is the rest of my life. I don't know how to get out of here. Because I had before I had met my Michael. And I refer to him as my Michael. Because by the third day that I I met him I was smitten, I got literally hit by the cliche the lightning bolt, I felt a current of electricity shoot through my body. I felt that I knew I was so comfortable with him immediately. And felt that I knew him my entire life. And I was still kind of shy and a little awkward. Even though at 26, which is when I met him, I still had more outer confidence than I had inner confidence, you know, and I felt that God put before meeting him, o man would ever disrespect me. I would never put up with anything. But because I was so connected with him on a spiritual level. I felt that God put me here for to save him. That was my purpose. And like I said, when I couldn't save him, I started doing it with him. But I couldn't leave him I didn't know how I was going to stop. I just couldn't leave him and I had thoughts of suicide by maybe year 15. And I would watch Oprah many many days but I couldn't get out of bed until I watched Oprah. She was my personal development, my first personal development, you know, and I'd read books and during the day, I would be productive. I would write my journals and one step forward and then two steps backwards, one step forward two steps backwards. It's hard to explain to another person in just a couple of minutes, but I just knew I was destined for more I was determined for more at around 45 I think around 43 I stopped doing the drugs but he was still doing the drugs. And I that's when the first stirring happened inside of me that happens in many women it happens in midlife when they reach their 40s there is a stirring that We know we're cold for more that we need to, we need to answer that calling. And around 45, I had a full blown panic attack. I was like, I was anxious. I was pacing. I was I couldn't sleep. And I called my father and my father said, dd tomorrow, you'll just get the newspaper. That's all you have to do. Because I was like, Daddy, I have to get out of here. I don't know what to do I want to get out of here. I don't know what to do. Because I can't leave him. How can I leave him? You know, I'm extremely loyal and committed, and I love him. And how do I how do I leave him. But there comes a point in your life, that you have to realize that you cannot save somebody else, you can only save yourself. And these are what these are life lessons. You know, these are one of the lessons we have to learn in our lives. It took me 20 years. Sometimes it doesn't take a woman that long. But you do have to realize at some point, you cannot change another person, you cannot save another person, the only person that's changes, and many times not for the right reasons is yourself. You change. And then you have to save yourself. And my father said Didi tomorrow, you'll just get a newspaper. And you'll start there. And that's what I did. I got a newspaper and I found an apartment. And that's how, that's how I got out.

LTP:

So it sounds like there were a lot of days that you maybe didn't feel like you had options. But you still had something inside that said there was going to be more.

Dee Mahon:

Yes, I you know, as you grow and evolve as a human being, you, you many times don't know what their calling is where but you know that you have a calling. And I remember hearing Elizabeth Gilbert speak once she was on stage with Oprah. And she spoke about the hummingbird her Hummingbird story that I now pass on to others. And hopefully your listeners and my listeners will get something out of this because I am also in some over 4040 plus groups on Facebook. And this is a typical question that you hear many times as I say women in their 40s it starts happening mid 40s, definitely by your 50s you're like, I want to do something I know I'm called for something I have a stirring but I'm confused. I don't know what to do. I don't know what my gifts are. I don't know what my strengths are. I've always just been a mom or wife or, and I say to them, I tell them the hummingbird story that helped me. So I always felt like a loser. Why do other people feel like they found their calling and they're happy and and they're they found their passion? And here I am I just going from one boring job to the next boring job and doing nothing with my life. What a loser am I. And then Elizabeth said, some people come into this world knowing exactly from day one, they're going to be a ballerina or a doctor or whatever. And they stay on that course their whole life. And other people are like hummingbirds. They have to go from this job, that job and this tree and that tree and that flower and that fly. And they just take a longer time. Their journey is not one straight line. It's like it's all over the place. And I realized, yes, I'm like a hummingbird. I'm not a loser. I'm a hummingbird. And I realized in that moment that even though I wasn't sure maybe yet exactly where I should fit into this world, I knew that every job even every boring job, every bad boss I ever had, every stupid coworker I ever worked with, or, you know, every job that I had, that wasn't my passion, taught me something it taught me. You know, you can learn a lot about what you don't want just as much as what you do want. And you can you find your way sort of the back through the back door rather than the front front door. And you learn about what kind of person you don't want to be what kind of boss you don't want to be, what kind of job that you're not good at. And that will lead you to knowing who you are and what you are good at what your strengths are. And I knew I was meant somehow to be in front of people and helping women and being a motivational speaker. I admired Oprah so much that she had that platform and that she could help women and she did help women. And she helped me there were many times I couldn't get out of bed until her show came on at four o'clock and then all of a sudden the energy came through and I was like you know what i can get out of this. I am going to get out of this. I you know, so that's what I want to do for other women and I knew I couldn't stay in corporate. I am not meant to sit behind a desk. I'm meant to shine.

Unknown:

And so I agree with everything you just said, I definitely feel that way, I have had lots of different jobs that I absolutely think I went from. I started sewing when I was 14 making my own clothes, for a lot of reasons, went into hospitality for years, graduated from college and became a firefighter, and then went into medical school to become a surgeon. And I can tell you discrete things in each of those things that absolutely contributed to my being better at the next job-- no question, as unrelated as they seem. And people are like, Man, you can't focus on one thing. But every one of them has, absolutely. And so that's one of the things I try to talk to my listeners about is understanding that everything is contributing,. One thing that I think really resonated just now you talked about kind of being in your 40s. And feeling like you haven't found your purpose, and where are you, but I think, you know, I have listeners that are in their 20s and 30s and 40s, I think we have a lot of young people that feel the same way that feel like they're supposed to, especially when you have these young tech people or you know, people that are getting into because industry is exploding in so many different ways. People are getting rich at 15 or 12, or whatever, you know, and I feel like there's a lot of people that feel like, if they're in high school or college or just graduated, they're supposed to have already accomplished something. And so I think that feeling of not being sure what your purpose is, is, I agree that we have we feel it more as kind of you look back on your life and you think, Okay, what have I accomplished, but I think a lot of young people are struggling with that as well.

Dee Mahon:

It's a different era, you know, when I was in my 20s, there was no internet and clubhouse and instagramming there's so I feel I do feel for the young generation, because they're over loaded with so much and comparing themselves to Hey, you know, when I was 20, I compared myself to Susan Hayward and Lana Turner, you know, now this is there, some millions of people on Instagram that these poor, young girls in their 20s are comparing themselves to. And, you know, you'll find your way, you'll find your way you really will, you. And the other thing that I want to say is that you can't be influenced. I know it's easier said than done, but you just can't be influenced by family or friends that mean well, you are your own individual human being. You come into this world, you know, you're attached to your mother by the umbilical cord. But once that is cut, you are no longer attached to your mom. And you're influenced by many people, but you are your own soul. You came here to find your way and your mission and your purpose and you have your own goals and your own dreams and your own personality. And you cannot let yourself be swayed by what other people want for you. So stand stand your ground and and it you know will happen

LTP:

So speaking of purpose let's let's talk a little bit about your so we we had chatted a little bit before, but there's a kind of a backlash a little bit. There's a feeling that you're not supposed to have to feel feminine in order to feel like a woman you don't have to wear a dress or wear makeup or wear heels in order to be the embodiment of a feminine view or of womanhood. I agree with I think we should all you should you should be the woman that you need to be whatever, however that looks for you. But I know for me personally, if I'm tired if I'm stressed if I'm nervous about something I'm going to put on a full face of makeup I'm going to maybe my hair looks exactly the same but I'm going to spend a little bit more time on it My hair looks the same every day for work because I have to wear it certain ways but I do I do feel more powerful when I'm a little bit glammed up. And I know other people that feel more powerful when they're wearing, you know, some sensible shoes and no makeup and hair in a bun and they that that's that's rocking it for them. And so I don't think there's a right or wrong answer to that. But I think playing up how you feel most powerful is a good thing. So how do you see that in the glam world do you have do you deal with the backlash or most people pretty like yeah, this is this is what I'm excited about?

Dee Mahon:

Yeah, this is the age old story of a society. Men, women all kind of fashion The female you know she's not good enough she's not tall enough she's not heavy enough she's not this enough. She is right we get it from everywhere we turn. And my my message is not that even though I resonated you know, I grew up a girly girl I had a sister, an older sister, who kind of put me down and made fun of me because she was not. She had a wounded feminine somehow something happened. And you know, she, she she was more girly in her teens in her 20s. But she she was more tomboy, you know, I think she was wearing the makeup, whatever it was, was expected of her and it came natural to me it didn't come natural to her. And that's okay. I'm not saying that all women have to be girly and wear frilly dresses, and we all come into this world with our own, you know, idea of what femininity is, for me, I resonated like I said, with a bombshell. My message is not that all women have to be bombshells. My message is that you get to be how you want to be. But don't put other women down for not being who you are. You know, I won't put another woman down because she feels like always wearing her hair and about bond and flat shoes. But I don't want her to put me down because I choose to wear a full face of makeup and perfume or wood. So let's stop with the Who does she think she is? Okay, because we've all experienced it. Stop it. Okay, we have to start addressing women as the queen and me sees the queen in you rather than Who does she think she is right. Oh, so yes, independence and feminism and all that stuff is we get to be the female we want to be in this world. But we should not be afraid to be a certain type of female, you know, the girly female because of who does? She thinks she is? That's my message. So if somebody resonates with the when I say unleash your inner bombshell, we all I feel have an inner bombshell, that we're suppressing it because society says good girls Shouldn't you know be bombshells and men think, act differently towards the bombshell, you know, and other women have to Oh, I'm going to lunch with the girls today. But they're all going to show up in jeans and a sweatshirt no makeup, so I guess I have to tone myself. No, no, no, no, no, no. If your personality is a bombshell, then shine it, you know, shine it and whoever doesn't like that is not your people, male or female, you know, if they have to put you down or shame you for something that comes naturally to you, then they're not your people. And vice versa. If you're going to be around people that are saying, well, you're always wearing pants, put some makeup on. But it is true that we live in a society that we make first impressions. You know, our first impressions are by our parents, how we speak how we carry ourselves how, how our grooming is, so we do have to care about our grooming. And it doesn't necessarily have to be a full face of makeup, we all look a little healthier, if our under eye circles are a little covered or we have a little gloss on our teeth and our eyebrows are filled in to give us definition on the face. So there's nothing wrong with makeup.

LTP:

No, I agree and you know makeup has branched out where there are a lot of men that are using makeup to some extent to accentuate their appearance and to kind of have the same kind of things I mean sometimes full face but a lot of times just to fill in the eyebrows or filling you know just even out there skin tone things like that. So you know I can understand why I know people I've heard people judging that behavior but also think why not?

Dee Mahon:

You know, logically it makes complete sense now I've always been you know, I I like to be a feminine woman. I so I like a masculine man that can complement my feminine. But I love a man that's well groomed and has you know, takes care of his nails and puts a little clear nail polish on his you know, where's aftershave and all that stuff. But I have to tell you, I don't know. Like I logically I'm just standing but if I saw my boyfriend or my husband putting on like, contour, be like, what are you doing? Yeah, I think

LTP:

I think like anything, it probably takes getting used to.. You brought up And I want to go back to that. So a lot of my listeners are male. And I think that the glam and the femininity, especially in the workplace can be a challenge for a lot of men, because they're not sure you know, take bias and take the the judgement of competence and all those things aside because hopefully we'll work through those. But for a woman or a man, if someone comes in looking beautiful, we have created our, in our society, we were in a place where you can't say "Wow, you look beautiful today." It that's, that's not seen as being a positive thing. Now obviously, making specific comments about someone's actual physical attributes or you know, those comments can obviously get very inappropriate. But there's a lot of circumstances where people feel uncomfortable even saying, "You look lovely today." Like "I really like the way you've worn your makeup or your you look quite flattering." So what have you seen or what are your thoughts on the difficulty with kind of interacting with that femininity in the workplace?

Dee Mahon:

Okay, good question. And I just want to because I just want to bring up this one, I want to make clear something because I use the term bombshell. Most people don't understand the term bombshell when you say bombshell, especially to the younger generation, they probably are thinking big boobs, blonde hair. Dumb, you know, and that is not a bombshell. If you look up the word bombshell in the dictionary, it just means an extremely attractive woman. You know, it means like, wow, you know, like, look at this woman. It's a woman who turns heads because she radiates she radiates femininity, she radiates confidence. She's well groomed and well put together that's a bombshell. bombshells come in all shapes and sizes. You all Ah, you know, Mae West wasn't a bombshell until she was 40 and she was considered a bombshell even into her 80s before she passed, but bombshells are smaller chested bombshells or larger chested bombshells or blonde bombshells a brunette and bombshells are intelligent. You know, Jayne Mansfield, who is the you know, the classic? Yes, right, the classic a dumb blonde bombshell. She had an IQ of 165. And she was very determined to get that she wanted to be that the dumb bump bombshells, nobody put her in that she put herself there. Heidi Lamar was a bombshell in the 40s. She was referred to as a bombshell but she wasn't the classic, you know, big busted. And we have Wi Fi today, because of Heddy Lamarr. She was brilliant. She had an extremely high IQ. And she gave during the war. Her her Wi Fi, you know, she came up with the idea that she developed a code, right, she developed the code, and they didn't exactly use it right then and there. But then it was tweaked or whatever into what we have as today. So you can be a bombshell and still be intelligent, and still be classy, and still be elegant, etc. So now to answer your question. Yes, there's, look, we have been, we have been abused and bashed and disrespected as females since the beginning of time. We know that. And we are fighting for respect. And, but there's not a female on this earth that doesn't want to be admired and get respectful attention. It is why we get dressed and we do put makeup on and we we like to be looked at that's part of the feminine. She likes to shine. She likes to radiate, she wants to be noticed. And it gets suppressed because we're so fearful of the disrespectful comments, were the snide remarks, were afraid of the other woman saying who does she thinks she is looking are trying to get ahead and get the boss's attention, all this stuff. And when we originally spoke, Mary, I told you this little quick story of in a Facebook room that I was in, a woman commented that she went to work today. And a man told her her a co worker commented how nice she looked. And somebody else immediately said call human resources on him that is not appropriate and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. You know, I don't know what has happened. No matter what era we're in, I don't care if it's 1913 or 2021. It doesn't matter. There's females and males on this planet. And there's, there's attraction, you know, and you can and you should be able to say to somebody, you look nice today. You know, without it being a sexual you know, disrespectful, disrespectful, you know, I don't understand what's happening. It's, it's, it's not right. You know, I just think that it's unfair, it's unfair to both sexes, that we, we have to walk around with turtlenecks and paper bags over our heads or no makeup or we can shine. But in all fairness to you know, the men have to learn how to address a woman, how to respectfully address a woman. And as women, I believe that we know when it's respectful, and when it's disrespectful, you can take anything and say anything and turn it into some disrespectful it or say it in a sexual way. You know, you could say, look, the sun is shining today. And if you say it in a certain way, it's going to sound creepy. And you can say, Mary, you look really nice today and be respectful and it not sound creepy. So

LTP:

Ah, yeah. So you think it's more related to emotional intelligence and kind of paying attention to the people around you than the actual words that you use?

Dee Mahon:

I believe that men should learn how to seriously I think men, little boys have to grow up respecting females, first of all, respecting females, these are, these are we come in to this world to, you know, we we we carry life, we bring life, there is nothing more important than the female, you know, and we need to be respected whether or not we give I don't have human children, I've animal children. But I'm still a female. And I'm a woman and we need to be respected a little boys need to grow up knowing the value and the beauty that is the female on this planet and what we bring here and under no circumstances are we to be touched inappropriately, or disrespected, in any way, shape, or form. And from that, if little boys grow up into men, knowing that their approach to women will be completely different, but I don't think we need to stop opening doors for women or pulling chairs out for women. I mean, I would hope that, that our Madam Vice President, you know, even though she is in this position, now, somebody's still gonna open the door for her if you know, if there's a man around that she she, you know, obviously she can open the door herself. But it's just a form of respect, I believe, for the female, that when doors are opened, and and shares are pulled out, and things like that for for the woman doesn't matter what position you're in, or if you make more money than the man or, you know, I think it's respectful.

LTP:

Absolutely. And I think the respect piece is huge respect is something that really everyone deserves, it doesn't matter what you look like, doesn't matter what you believe you deserve to be respected as a human being.

Unknown:

I'd be curious, I'm sorry, I just want to say one more thing on the thought. Women have to learn how to better carry themselves. And men have to learn how to be more respectful. And what when that happens, then I think that, you know, we can reach a point where, because right now, I think women are playing themselves down. We're hiding, because we're afraid to shine our light for both the the the female remarks and the male remarks. And we should not change who we are. We should not dim ourselves down, dumb ourselves down, or, you know, dim our light in order to not be disrespected. We should be ourselves in full force, you know, but carry ourselves with dignity and class and confidence. And men have to learn how to respond to that. It's not us that have to change. It's the men that have to change.

LTP:

Well, I want to I want to ask you about that. Because I agree that the respect piece is absolutely universal, and it has to happen. But I'd be curious your thoughts on so I know a lot of men who are good people who are respectful people who in interacting with women who feel very strongly about some of these issues have had their head bitten off had been a few things or those kinds of, you know, where where the pendulum has swung so far, that they're backpedaling, when they were trying to make did come from a place of respect, and admiration and you know, from a good place. So what advice would you have for men or for women, in trying to create that, that mutual respect so that the man is given the benefit benefit of the doubt when he deserves it? So the man can speak in a way that creates rapport instead of barriers? What do you think about that?

Dee Mahon:

Well, yes, you know, I love men. I don't want to live on an on a planet without men. I love men, the good men, you know, we know there are good men we know there are kind Decent, helpful, respectful men in this world, thank you for being here on this planet with us. And, and that is sad. And I always try to explain to the woman, you know, it's I think, you know, I grew up seeing, I grew up seeing the respectful men, you know, taking care of the woman, the standing outside, you know, down, walking down the sidewalk, the man stands up on the outer towards the car. So if a car comes, he's the one or taking a handkerchief out. And I mean, the whole reason a man carries a handkerchief, not the outside, but the inside with him in his inner pocket, is to be able to give it to a female if she needs it for whatever to clean a park bench off, or if she's sniffling, or whatever. So all those charming little things I love and you don't see them anymore. And you know, men are afraid to open a door for a woman or pull out a chair, because the woman is like, what? I've seen it with my own eyes. What's What's the matter? You think I can't like open a door? Oh, my goodness, you know, I feel for the man. Yeah. Women have a wounded feminine, you know. But I asked the man to please try to understand where the woman's coming from, and how she has been disrespected. For so long that she's afraid. She's She's just afraid it's just a wound that she has. But yeah, I wish that women wouldn't do that. I wish they would see it because they see it as they see it differently than what it really is. to the man, it's a sign of respect. I want to open the door for you because the man is here to serve and help be helpful to the female. And so he just wants to open the door pull that she wants to be a gentleman he fee he was taught that that's what women like those things, and to get your head bit off. So yeah, we have to, we have to, you know, teach the woman that it's a sign of respect. It's not a sign of disrespect, when when somebody's doing that.

LTP:

So, looking back at kind of where you've been, and how far you've come in, and it sounds like you're feeling pretty good about where you are now, what advice would you give to someone who finds themself looking at hurdles, or still trying to find where they're meant to be?

Dee Mahon:

Don't fear, do not give up hope. I believe that anybody can rise up, you know, I'm also a widow too. I lost my husband. We were together even though I picked myself up at 47. And I moved us to separate a separate living conditions. We were still married, and he was still in my life, you know, for till his death. So next month, it'll be 10 years that I have been a widow. And I've also overcome being caregiver and losing both my father and my mother. And most recently, one of my dogs she passed eight months ago. There's always challenges, but there's always hope you could always rise up, you could always reinvent. I was very frumpy, in my 50s and very challenged and very depressed in my 50s. And now I turned 63 in two months. And I am completely I you know, I found where I'm supposed to be. It was a long journey. But I found my happy place. I feel good. I look good. I have a profile upon match as of four days ago, okay, so don't ever give up. Hope you just keep learning. Keep experiencing and keep digging in deep journaling. Trying to, you'll find you will, you'll find your way. There. Everybody on this planet has a purpose. And you can turn all your obstacles and all your mess and you know what they say your turn your message, your message, turn your pain into your purpose. We all have pain. We've all had challenges, we've all had grief. And we've all had struggles. But you could always reinvent you could always rise up you could always level up and you can always improve and there's always hope.

LTP:

That's amazing. I love that thank you so much for being here today. I've had a great time talking to you. The podcast is "High Vibe Bombshell". A d your book was called "Glam rous."

Dee Mahon:

Yes, "Glamorous" and it's one woman's journey through adversity addiction and loneliness to find herself worth through glamp the first half of the book is the journey. It tells the story and my my my journey and Then the second half is the glamour and why I pushed court towards glamour, why we really need to bring glamour back glamour and elegance. And there's a chapter on skincare chapter on makeup, a chapter on bringing lifestyle tweaks into your, your everyday life in your home. And then the very last chapter is a list. It's only a partial list because my editor said you need to stop. I could have kept going a list of my favorite actresses and the movies, my favorite movies of my favorite actresses and why I love them.

LTP:

that's fantastic

Dee Mahon:

on Amazon.

LTP:

Thank you so much for chatting with me today. I really enjoyed it.

Dee Mahon:

Thank you, Mary for having me.

LTP:

So that's our discussion with D man regarding bombshell behaviors, overcoming adversity, and living your life the way it's most authentic for you. If you liked the discussion today, please give it a LIKE, SUBSCRIBE or share. If not, tell me what can do better. If you'd like t learn more about Dee check out er book Glamorous, wherever bo ks are sold, or her podcast "Hig Vibe Bombshell". This week, take a little time to look at yo rself. Do you feel confident? Or do you feel insecure? What th ngs in your life what times of y ur day what outfits what peop e make you feel the best, t e most powerful, the most you w atever they are, play them up, find a way to maximize that fe l good about who you are. If th re are times or people or ven an outfit that don't make y u feel great, then maybe it's ime to minimize their presence n your life. There's no rule or how you're supposed to look, or act or dress or feel to e your best. Only you can defin that. But spend some time th s week figuring out what tha looks like for you. Because t e more you own the greatness hat is you, the more you' l find success. And regardless f what success means to you, t will never feel real unless ou can embrace it as you tru y are. Thanks again for joinin Level the Pursuit. Well, w can't choose where we start. We can choose our dreams and how we pursue them. Remember, uccess is a team sport and there s room for all of us to achi ve our goals. So be a good leade . Be a good follower, And Do S