Women with Cool Jobs

Automotive Fleet Manager for Shipping & Postal Carrier, with Michele Galloway

September 21, 2022 Julie Berman
Women with Cool Jobs
Automotive Fleet Manager for Shipping & Postal Carrier, with Michele Galloway
Show Notes Transcript

Michele Galloway is the Automotive Fleet Manager at UPS (United Parcel Service) for the entire state of Utah. She runs the department that maintains and fixes all the UPS vehicles for the state.  She’s breaking ground for women in the automotive field, as she is the only female UPS Automotive Manager in the Western half of the United States. (Note: It's not because UPS doesn’t hire women, but because most women don’t see themselves in this type of work.) 

The Utah hub is considered the cross-roads to the West, and under her management, her team ensures that the best vehicles are transporting packages to other states.  Here are a few things we discuss:  

She runs a 24-hours-a-day operation. (Automotive is always there and needed.)

  • She manages 54 employees and over 1200 vehicles every day.
  • She does maintenance and repairs.
  • She forecasts staffing and inventory needs.
  • She ensures employees have proper training and oversight.

Contact Info:

Julie Berman - Host
www.womenwithcooljobs.com
@womencooljobs (Instagram)

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Unknown:

I make sure that my people are safe. I always ask them, you know, is there anything you need from me? I always follow up with them on their safety. You know, if they're working on something I, I want to give them that constructive feedback that, hey, thank you for wearing your safety glasses. Thank you for using the proper equipment to handle that engine that you're installing or thank you for making sure that those shop rags were picked up so now that no one slept in the shop today. It's very important. That's one of the main parts of my job because that's number one, to me, here at UPS and to everyone in our department.

Julie Berman - Host:

Hey, everybody, I'm Julie, and welcome to Women with cool jobs. Each episode will feature women with unique trailblazing and innovative crews. We'll talk about how she got here, what life is like now, and actionable steps that you can take to go on a similar path, or one that's all your own. This podcast is about empowering you. It's about empowering you to dream big and to be inspired. You'll hear from incredible women in a wide variety of fields, and hopefully some that you've never heard of before. Women who filled robots and roadways, firefighters, C suite professionals surrounded by men, social media mavens, entrepreneurs, and more. I am so glad we get to go on this journey together. Hey, everybody, this is Julie Berman, and welcome to another episode of women with cool jobs. So I am so excited to bring you this episode today with Michelle Galloway, she is the automotive fleet manager for ups for the entire state of Utah. That's United Parcel Service. And she runs the department that maintains and fixes all of the vehicles for the entire state of Utah. And this is considered the crossroads of the West. And so her job is so important just in the context of where we're all at today with like receiving so many packages on a daily and weekly basis just for in my personal life like not even to mention, you know, for those of you who conduct business, and need to send out packages and ship things. So it's incredible to think about how what she's doing is affecting so many people on a broad scale, she is one of just a few women in this role. And it's really, really incredible because, you know, it's it's not that women aren't hired, it's more that women don't see themselves in this type of work. And she is really a trailblazer in this area. And while she works mainly with men, she just has such a good perspective on where she's coming from, how she chooses to manage why she does what she does. And so it's super incredible to have her on the show. Because while she is such an integral part of what is happening in the world right now, with getting a gazillion packages, like I never thought to think of her, and I would have never thought of this type of job. So I hope that you enjoy this conversation. She was a delight to speak with. And it's just like you can tell throughout this conversation that she loves what she's doing. And it sparks her it brings her so much joy. And it's something definitely to consider if you are interested in the automotive field like not necessarily that you want to do something where you are working on vehicles, but that you just want to be around the people who are working on the vehicles and helping to do this kind of work. So enjoy this episode with Michelle. And remember if you haven't yet, please go leave me a review. And give me a five star rating if you love this podcast because it means so much. And I appreciate it because it helps me share this work that I'm doing and share these incredible stories with more women around the world. Hello Michelle, thank you so much for being here on women with cool jobs.

Unknown:

Hi, Julie, thank you so much for having me today.

Julie Berman - Host:

Well, it is such a pleasure because you definitely have a super cool job. I was super excited to learn all about what you do. because I had never actually even thought about it, which is sort of funny in the world that we live in today, because I get so many packages on a daily basis that maybe it should have been more obvious or apparent, but you are the automotive fleet manager for ups for the entire state of Utah. So thank you for being here to talk about your cool job.

Unknown:

That's my pleasure.

Julie Berman - Host:

So it's really intriguing to me, not only your job, but you know, sort of all the details of what you do, because you run the entire department that maintains and fixes the UPS vehicles for the whole state of Utah. In addition to that, you are the only female UPS automotive fleet manager in the western half of the United States. So it's really incredible, because you're really paving the way for other women to see like what you're doing, and to see that that's an option for them. And so I just really appreciate not only what you're doing from like, getting the my packages standpoint, because I have no patience anymore, you know, after we can get so quickly. I don't want to wait a week or two. So I appreciate that so much, but also, right from the standpoint of just like, what you're doing and showing what's possible, showing women in in this really cool career niche that oftentimes we just like, don't even consider for ourselves.

Unknown:

You're absolutely right, Julie.

Julie Berman - Host:

So tell us in your words, a little bit about what you do, like, what is your job?

Unknown:

Okay, so my job is to make sure that all of the vehicles are properly maintained, that the maintenance is up to date, that we are doing the correct and best preventative maintenance on all of our UPS equipment. And that will ensure the safety for the general public, and also safety for our driver who is driving that vehicle and spends the entire day delivering your packages. So that is mainly what I do my primary responsibility.

Julie Berman - Host:

Thank you. Thank you for explaining that. And I think to give like a little bit more context from what I learned, so because you are automotive, and there's really no no stopping, like when we're getting packages in these days. It's like it's a 24 hour a day type of thing. So I think that was a really interesting point that I wanted to make sure people understood. And then you manage 54 employees, 1200 vehicles, you also do everything you know, from making sure that people have the proper training, for Safety and Oversight, to like forecasting, and figuring out what inventory needs you have, like the staffing needs that you have. And also just what you're speaking to the maintenance and repairs for everyday safety for people who are driving, and then also those of us in the community. So it's just really incredible to think about, especially now, I don't know about everyone else, but like I know, since the pandemic like an after, if you can call it after now I'm not sure. But like post pandemic, the start, like I get so many more packages now than we ever used to. It's like my mom will ask, Oh, where did you get this cute new toy. And it's like, basically either target or Amazon, you know. It's just like, there aren't too many options where I'm getting things. And even like my middle son who's four, he'll be like, Oh, instead of instead of like going to the store to doing so he almost talks about ordering it. It's just like a very different mindset, you know, that that he has because of the times that we're living in versus like, Can we go somewhere and physically pick it out. You don't do that as often as you used to. So it just really puts your work in what you do and what your colleagues do into such perspective but also really highlights the relevance and the importance of what you're doing.

Unknown:

Absolutely. And and just to put it in perspective in our operations, and this has been ongoing, probably since the start of ups and 1907, which we just celebrated 115 years of being in business. So yes, just to put it in perspective, every Christmas season. That is considered our peak and What that means is the volume of our packages are so high and coming through so fast that it's a huge push from the day after Thanksgiving, all the way until January, and even sometimes into February, where all of our employees are working as busily and as hard as possible to make sure we even hire, we have seasonal help that we hire on to help since the volume is so high during those periods. Anyway, backing up to COVID that you mentioned earlier, ever since we went through that, and a pandemic, our volume within the company has maintained so we have been in peak mode ever since COVID. So that I think that that really catapulted everything.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, that's, you know, it that is so interesting, because that is my personal experience. But that is so interesting, that that is actually the case, obviously, not just for me and my own family, but for I'm sure many other families and many other individuals experiencing just the amount of packages right that that yet. And so that's, that's really intriguing. And so that leads me to questions like, I want to talk to you a little bit about kind of your history and how you got here. And so I want to ask, first of all, you know, how long have you been doing this role as the automotive fleet manager for UPS.

Unknown:

So the automotive fleet manager position was presented to me in March of this year, okay, so I was living in Illinois, as they automotive supervisor. And I also was a safety trainer for UPS, automotive, and the desperate where I was residing. And then I was approached with a promotion to automotive fleet manager, and given the opportunity to relocate since the company had a need in Utah. And I decided to take the job, my personal life, I have four children, and my children are raised. My youngest son will be 21, this upcoming year, he's 20. And so I felt that it was time and that was the opportunity of a lifetime, to have this chance to help make a difference in the company. So yeah, I checked, I took the leap, and I landed in Utah, so So in answer to your question, April, this year, as of April 1, so a few months, I've been into this role, and I'll tell you, I have made great strides. And just the time I've been here in this in this role. Of course, I've had wonderful leadership and mentors and people who have been in my position that have helped me along the way, but that's what we hear a PSU is, that's what's so great about the company, as everyone has been here, or been in your spa, that the director of automotive started out, you know, loading packages in a trailer. So everyone has been in your possession, and everyone's either to help and pull you up and teach you the right way. So awesome.

Julie Berman - Host:

And, and I think like, it's first of all, that was very brave, moving, I like, want to acknowledge that. That's not an easy thing to do. But I think it's so cool that you did, and, you know, I'm excited, like, maybe we'll have to connect or something like in a year from now, and sort of see, see what you're up to or two years. But But I also wanted to say, you know, from the standpoint of having that support from not only just people who believed in you to take the leap, but then also from people on your team to help help you in this new role and, and to support you in that way. And that fact that they've been there sort of done that is so incredible, and I think over and over again, in some of the conversations that theme really pops up of having that, like someone believing Can you that mentorship that support is like such an incredible piece as and so many times to, especially when women are in fields that maybe are male dominated, or that women typically may not be in as much numbers, you know, it's just like maybe because we just don't think about it as an option. That seems to just always come up as that theme of having those people there. Yeah. So yeah, in your experience, I'm curious, like, how did you get into this field in general, because it is not a field that a lot of tip like, are typically not a lot of women will go into this field, like, let's put it that way. So how did you get into this area.

Unknown:

So growing up as a child, my family, I had a grandfather who was in involved in automotive and worked on his own cars at home, and he even worked for a parts manufacturer, and my hometown, and he actually patented a vowel for carburetor. So he was always tinkering and doing things around home. And I obviously had a lot of exposure to my grandparents and was around that and, and then I did go to college, graduated 95, from Illinois State University with a business degree. And I got married, I started a family and I started an automotive repair business. So that business was open for 10 years. We started from scratch. And I had my husband at the time he turned the wrenches in the shop, and I worked in the office, and I did the billing, and I did the inventory. And I did everything on the computer and what we needed for the business, I brought the kids when they were babies in the office and even created a playroom for them, so that I could work in the office and still be available to watch them. Then moving on, I was able to work for a advertising agency. And I got contract and billing experience for a major advertising agency for apartments, anyone searching for an apartment. It's a very popular website. Anyway, I worked out of that corporate office, and I learned how to do their billing. And I handled the entire East Coast, Florida and state of Texas for any contracts or billing needs for that company. And then I saw an opening for an automotive admin. And I wanted to get back to what I knew automotive. And so I thought this would be an opportunity for me to do that. And then to use my business administrative skills. So I took a chance and I applied for this job. It was part time, it was less than what I was used to as far as hours. So that was going to be a cut. But I went ahead and I always had in my mind that there could be potential for opportunity and growth. And so I thought, well, I could do this position and be in automotive, which I enjoy and love and so familiar with me or to me, and also use my skills that I already have built in the administrative assistant role. And we'll just see where this goes. So I did I got the position and started out and it wasn't easy. I will say learning the UPS way so to speak because we have our own acronyms and even doing the billing as the administrative assistant. I took care of the central part of the state clear down to the southern tip of Illinois. And so any of the billing or any of the ordering for oil or grease or tires or anything that we needed in any UPS location. Those orders off payment to me. So with that, just, you know, maintaining that getting a flow and submitting the bills, making sure they were paid on time, making sure all the orders were in by this certain day of the week, making sure I took care of just prioritizing and time management really started to kind of fine tune me into, into the position to where I was spending. I mean, I could pretty, I pretty much had it handled. So it's a slow start. But eventually, I was rolling along pretty well. So then our district manager at that time, he sent out an email. And in that email, it was addressed to all this automotive supervisors. And then he attached me on it. And mind you, I was an administrative assistant at that time. And I thought, why would he ask me to do this? Because this is out of my normal, you know, comfortable zone. So if the question that he sent out was, I need to know, what technicians what the most at risk for injury job that the technicians out in the shop are going to do today? And how is that technician going to work to make sure that they stay on injured and stay say? So I took that and I went out to I didn't know the technicians very well, because the supervisors always had the one on one interaction. But I took that and I went out, and I interviewed all of the technicians out in the shop. And I had their answers. And I went in, and I typed up my email back and press send. And he came right back. And he said, Michelle, this was not intended for you to answer, but I appreciate it, that he was setting the standard of how important safety should be to all of us in the operation. And so then, a couple months later, I was presented with the offer to become the automotive supervisor, you know, what I'd be interested, and this is what the automotive supervisors responsible for. And of course, I worked around the other automotive supervisor. And I thought, yeah, I can do that. And that that was a significant change in my, as far as my income, it made a huge a life changing difference for me to take that move. And I did. And I was in that role for three years. And then just recently, I was presented with the offer for the automotive fleet manager position. So awesome.

Julie Berman - Host:

Well, thank you for explaining kind of that, that path that you took. And you know, it's so interesting that about that email you were talking about, and that a manager wasn't really expecting for you to answer but that you because you took that extra step to do it. And I'm sure that that said something on your dedication to making sure right, that like, not only were you doing your job, but like you were going the extra mile to get these details from people who were doing the job and like, so thoroughly you were doing it by just talking to one person. And so I can see that, obviously, they I'm sure that helped build trust, you know, within the company, not only for just you and you being able to do your job, but then also having that faith in you to be able to say okay, well we've seen you go out and and do this additional stuff that wasn't in your job description. And right and so I think that's a really interesting point to people who are listening any you know, not just in, in your case, but in any career in general is just being able to show that you have the skills or you have this willingness to go out and find out the information, find some answers you know, and to help even if it is outside quote your job description or your job responsibilities solo and I'm doing no one of course can see my air quotes, but when I do but it's like, because I think that too is so representative of What employers now are really looking for, in in like these 2020s. And beyond is not just someone who can do the job, but someone who's able to sort of change as the world is changing. And it seems to be changing so quickly, like, yeah. So it's just having that ability and that willingness, it's really speaks volumes of you. I just wanted to point that out, too, I really feel like that will be cool. You know, we can see where you are in one or two years, like, what do you do? And so going to now, like, you being one of the only women in, you know, not only in in this particular role of automotive fleet manager being the only one and basically, this huge area of the United States doing your role. But also, I'm imagining people within other roles in your department, or the departments that you work with, I'm imagining there aren't too many women. So correct me if I'm wrong in that, first of all, and are there a lot of women that you get to work with? Or is it mainly males, who you're working with?

Unknown:

It is the majority are males. Okay? There are probably more women in the operations part that predominantly companywide it is male dominated,

Julie Berman - Host:

okay. And so I'm curious for you, because you are working with a lot of men, and particularly in automotive, right. And if people are fixing vehicles, we often think of mechanics and in these positions, we think of men. So how, how is that to be now a manager, because you, you are managing not only so many people, but you're managing like this huge fleet of vehicles. And then because you're at this hub in Utah, and they described it basically as this huge hub, where it's like, the Crossroads to the west. So it's like things going in things coming out. And it's just like this sort of like a port almost. Yes. So, like, I'm curious, like, what are the dynamics for you? Have you noticed? Like, is there? Is it obvious sometimes like, you being a woman does? Does it feel different? Or like, does it not affect the dynamics? Or do you feel empowered by it? Because you are one of the few I'm just curious, like, what are your thoughts around this?

Unknown:

Well, I would say that when I was a brand new supervisor, I had all men that I was supervising. So that was three and a half years ago, that was very intimidating for me. However, I tended to look at them as they were a family member. So I have a lot of male, more male family members than like all my cousins growing up were men, I tend to think that way more so then I'm singled out. If I'm the only woman, I mean, that's kind of a weird way of thinking. But that's what gets me through. And that's what it gives me strain is, you know, that these men are a son, they are a husband, they are a brother, they are and that is what helps me to connect and to communicate and keep me strong, because I have received pushback from men, especially when I relocated recently. I have and not shut down, it takes the wind out of your sail, it makes you think, second guess yourself. But you have to put it in perspective that that is some issue they have within themselves. And it has absolutely nothing to do with my ability to do my job. And it has absolutely nothing to do with the decision that someone made who is very important to the company to to know that they put me here for the right reasons, and that I can make a difference. So I just have to keep thinking of the positives and not let what others personal views or how they feel affect me and what I'm trying to do. And the difference that I'm trying to make. Yeah,

Julie Berman - Host:

I I appreciate that. You shared that because I think I've always worked in the opposite. Like I've always been in education and there's so many women and like very few men and I I know just like, within myself, I take criticism and it's like to, to heart like, almost like too much, you know, and it can be like the most minor thing, like, you know, when I was an editor, it'd be like, Oh, you forgot to do XYZ, and it was some like, minor thing. And I'm like, Oh, terrible. That was a while ago, but you know, so it's like I can imagine, and being in a new position in a new place, and then in a supervisory role as one of the few women. And, you know, I can imagine that that would really affect you, in hearing that feedback. But so I appreciate your sharing that and being so vulnerable with that, because I think it is really helpful to hear you know, how you sort of work through it, and how you think about it and process it. And knowing also, that it's not necessarily a reflection on you or of you. And instead, it's actually a reflection of that individual's experiences and their thoughts. And I think to I'm curious about you, like, in the times that you have, especially in this current role, where you have had to make some decisions, like whether there's been a difficult conversation, or there's been like, an emergency situation? How do you approach these types of decisions, knowing that it does not only affect your team, but it also directly or indirectly affects so many people who, you know, are trying to get their packages or these things that are important to them? I'm curious, like, because I think you you have one of the jobs and I don't know, I mean, I'm trying to think about it, but like you have a job that really affects so many people. So I'm curious, like, how do you go about your decision making? And especially knowing that you may get pushback? Or you may people who like or you may have people who are like, I don't know about that, Michelle, like, what is your process? Or how do you go about that?

Unknown:

Well, just recently, we actually ran into this last week, I, I make sure that I really stop and think this particular instance, was a reaction to a new process that I put in place in the shop. And this certain individual wasn't happy with the decision of what was put in place. And so he was very vocal with his feeling on the decision. So I pulled him aside, and I asked him to speak with me in private, and then took him up to my office, and we talked it out. And I think that that is the most important thing to me to resolve anything, is to make sure that we communicate and talk through, I want to understand where you're coming from, I want you to understand where I'm coming from. And that is going to make such a difference and the resolution to where we both come to a, you know, an agreement. We both understand, but ultimately, the individual works for the company, and has to follow, you know, what the company has set in place. So but but it's just having that patience and time to help the individual understand as to why, yeah, why we are doing what we're doing. And this is why and if we do it your way, this is eventually what could have happened. So I think just communication with with each other and not taking it so personal, this individual's reaction. There were a whole lot of other reasons I'm sure as to why he flew off the handle or was upset in that moment and the heat of the moment. Yeah, you have to understand that, that you don't know what other people you know are going through or thinking and you have to be understanding. That's that's my perspective.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah. I think it's such like I've never been in the manager, but I know that my husband has managed many people over many decades, and just has a lot of experience. And so I think it's such a skill set to be a manager. And to sort of, like you said, make sure that you're seeing the humanity in someone like, as you're also trying to work through the situation. I think it's so key. And it's such a hard part of being a manager. So I admire that. We're all good managers, like, it is not easy, I have not been a manager for me. So I really, really like that perspective. And I'm curious for you, as far as what you do on a daily or weekly basis, like, could you kind of describe what is it like for you, you know, like, what kinds of things are you doing? Who are you talking to?

Unknown:

So, the main thing that I do is I make sure that my people are safe. I always ask them, you know, is there anything you need from me, I always follow up with them on their safety, you know, if they're working on something, I, I want to give them that constructive feedback, that, hey, thank you for wearing your safety glasses, thank you for using the proper equipment to handle that engine that you're installing, or thank you for making sure that those shop drives were picked up. So now that no one slept in the shop today, it's very important. That's one of the main parts of my job, because that's number one, to me, here ups and to everyone in our department. And the next thing is monitoring the equipment, making sure that everyone is keeping up on the preventative maintenance, which is the bread and butter of what we do here ups, we want to make sure that those trucks are safe. We want to make sure that those trucks are reliable. And if you if you just focus on the PMI everything else falls in place. So I mean, I would say that that is the core been to what we do. And everything else that I monitor is around that PMI, I have to follow up and make sure how many trucks do we have that need repaired and need to be in service so that they can move the packages that night? Or how long till we get that part? To get the truck up? So that operations can have that truck back? So that you know the packages can be moved? So

Julie Berman - Host:

and can you what is PMI stand for?

Unknown:

Preventative Maintenance inspection.

Julie Berman - Host:

Got it? Okay. And going to like sort of other parts of your job. It sounds like you're interacting daily. It with like a lot of different people. Are you communicating then also with people outside of your team with the other teams such as like operations and other other parts of the organization? Yep,

Unknown:

absolutely. So I communicate with our feeder manager. So one word that we use terminology is feeder. So what theater is is a tractor and a trailer tractor is a semi and then the trailers of course, you know, everyone understands what what that is, that's why holds our packages so feeder, the reason that we call the department that is because those trucks feed the packages to our smaller buildings, like your customer centers that may be in your rural setting. So like right here in Salt Lake City, we have a major hub, which you know, it looks like a big commercial size. It's a it's a million square foot facility. Wow. And we load all of those packages into these trailers. And then the trailers then start moving. They move around 9pm 10pm And they'll run those packages five hours away to you know, another facility and then that facility has people there that are sorting those packages to their zip codes. And then into those package cars, which are the brown trucks the smaller delivery drags, okay delivered to your home. So then those packages will be sorted into so a lot of moving parts the packages changed A lot of the go down shoots and

Julie Berman - Host:

so interesting, it would be interesting to like follow the life of a package, you know, the moment you send it along to get to the destination to like, actually how many hands or machines?

Unknown:

It has actually, exactly. Yeah, exactly. There's a whole lot to what gets that package from the place you order it from, to your front door.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah. So interesting. And I'm curious, like, Do you have any statistics about how many packages you know, sort of go through your location in Utah per day or week or something like that? Does that exist?

Unknown:

And fortunately, I do not. Okay. Statistics, however, the they do exist. Okay. They do there is someone that is monitoring.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, I imagine though, right? I wonder yet. Maybe they have a cool job, too. Right. So if that's Yeah, and it's so it's interesting to like, in talking about, you know, your role. And then we also talked about how not only, you know, you deal with the automotive repairs and maintenance, for the actual vehicles that are transporting things. But then also, you mentioned that you helped maintain the ground support equipment for next day air, which helps load the packages onto the airplane, which I had not even thought about either as something. So that was a really cool, just little nugget of additional information. And I'm curious, like, is that very different managing that aspects that's related to air travel versus the ground transportation?

Unknown:

Yes, it is different, you know, you have for the most part, the same mechanics, you know, as far as are engineering, and what makes a piece of equipment move as far as the engine or the components, but they are are different, its own entity, so to speak, different than, like, I don't even know how to compare it, what to compare it to, but it is different. We have different names for the equipment, and they load our airplanes on a belt that you drive behind. And it will carry the package up to the plane. Because if you think about how high a plane sets and our jets are pretty big, you can't just walk up and get in it, you know, there, there's a huge staircase that the pilot has to climb to get into the jet. So you have to have the appropriate equipment to be able to reach to get the packages into the plane, we have huge cans. Without showing you it's hard to help you visualize, but we have huge cans that are moved around on a ball platform. And with these cans loaded, they can weigh up to 4000 5000 pounds a piece. And one person can live that and adjust it around with that mat with the balls underneath it. So a lot of engineering the weight distribution while moving that can around on that ball platform. UPS has thought of everything to get the job done and made it available to be able to get the job done. So

Julie Berman - Host:

yeah. And what is the can do or like what was that, sir? That can

Unknown:

it serves a purpose as far as keeping all of the individual boxes because they're small, keeping them all contained in the cans. So there could be eight cans in an aeroplane and they are conformed. They look like an igloo almost. But they are they're shaped in the same way that the plane is shaped. So they fit like a block inside the plane. And they carry all your packages if you order next day air or second day air. Those packages fit inside those cans and fly on the plane. Wow though, that's fast. Yeah, so our our GSC equipment, ground support equipment is what gets those packages up to the plane. And in order to You? Yep. And route to our customers.

Julie Berman - Host:

Cool. Yeah. I love to think sir explaining it. So yeah, it's just I always find it so fascinating to learn about all these things that like I never even thought to think about. It's like, and and especially because I get so many packages like, I never thought about the backstory of each of my packages. So now I think I'm gonna like, ponder what was their journey, so much more than I ever did before. So fascinating. So I want to pivot a little bit and I want to FQ for women who may be listening to this and think like, wow, she has a cool job. How would you suggest for someone to kind of follow in your footsteps to be able to get into this type of management position or this type of career within automotive specifically? Because I think that is an area that, you know, is not very prevalent in what women consider even as an option. So I'm curious, like, what advice would you give someone? Or where could they start,

Unknown:

the My advice to someone would be to maybe to attend a technical institute, maybe get some technical knowledge on automotive or truck repair and how it's done. You might even be able to complete that online, or, it's always helpful to have a degree in something, you know, minus business, just as long as you have something to back you up, and then have really work on your time management and multitasking. That is one of the number one things that my job does just multitasking, it's, you've got to be able to change gears quickly. And you never know what's coming. So to be able to have that, you know, behind you is super helpful. And doing well in this

Julie Berman - Host:

career. And as far as because I know, you know, you mentioned those skills. I was thinking also while you're talking like sort of being able to problem solve, and prioritizing also sound like super

Unknown:

components, very much so. And

Julie Berman - Host:

I'm curious, like as far as being able to reach out or connect with, like associations or organizations that are there any that exists for this industry in particular that like, you know, whether it's a magazine, or it's like a conference that's yearly or something does that exist in in your industry for like a mail package related?

Unknown:

Actually, ups and so you know, has a lot of those programs within? Yes. So great.

Julie Berman - Host:

So maybe if someone was really interested, like they could start out in a position and then find out what the learning opportunities are sounds like within the organization? Yes, yes. Okay. Which is really cool to be able to have that opportunity to learn and grow on the job.

Unknown:

That is one thing that I will say that has helped me so much I attended an automotive development program within UPS when I first became a supervisor. So that taught me everything, it laid the groundwork for what I needed to know, in order to be successful at my job. That's so yeah, so there, they are very good company at providing you the training, and everything that you need to do your job and do it well. So

Julie Berman - Host:

great. And is there anything else that I didn't talk about or, or mentioned that you think is really important, that I might not even know to know, for someone who is in your type of job and in your role that like, you know, maybe it's industry specific, or it's just specific to being in that automotive sort of section of UPS.

Unknown:

So, I would have to say, to make sure that whatever job that you're doing, you're making a difference every day, and that you keep at it and follow up skills, communication skills within your department or wherever you are, are very important, and I wouldn't Make sure to that the way that you treat others, that's going to make a huge difference. If you're doing a good job, I feel that the feedback from other people are your best opportunity to push you up to the next level or where you want to be. So if that makes sense,

Julie Berman - Host:

no, it does. Yeah. And I think to like, just the fact that you're listening right to others, and you're really taking a heart, like, what you know, what they're sharing, is really, really great to do from a managerial position as well, because, like, just sort of not only showing that you're listening, but that you're like reinvesting. Right, you're like you want to hear what they're saying. Because you you know, like you're invested. So I think that's really very, very important and very valid. So I, I'm curious to like, from your standpoint, like, what is your favorite part of your job? Like? Why is it that you just like wake up every morning, you were willing to move to, to a complete other state? What are some of the things that you just like love and would be happy to do again, and again,

Unknown:

I, my favorite part of the job is the feeling of accomplishment. And what I do every day, the feeling that I've made a difference. And not that I made a huge impact and getting 100 trucks available for operations. But I take it down to the smaller scale. And just given the people that I work directly with, I like to be able to make a difference in their lives. I want to make it enjoyable for them every day that they come to work, I can't allow certain things do go on. But that's where my managerial role comes into play. But I can make it as pleasant as possible. And I want them to enjoy. You know, it's hard enough being a technician, the labor intense physical job that it is. But if I can somehow make a difference and let them know how appreciated that they are, what they do for the company. And if they're having a bad day, just take the time to understand what they're going through and listen, give them advice, let them get to know me, as as a person, I think that is the most rewarding part of my job that really is is just to make a difference in people's lives. And then when you all work together, that is another favorite of mine is when we all collectively work together in our operation. And our to watch our outcome to get that truck that we thought we couldn't figure out what the problem was and to get that truck up so that they can have it to deliver 3000 packages the next day. To me that is rewarding how we work together to get that truck up and on the road. That's my favorite part.

Julie Berman - Host:

That's awesome. I can tell that it really lights me up. So I love Yeah, and it's, you know, it's like, one, right? It's like one part as a whole, but it's like such an important part. Right. As you said, if there are no trucks running like it's not the package is not going to go far. Yeah, yes. Yeah. So I really like I'm so excited to have you on I want to end with our very last question, which we gave a sneak peek of, but we're gonna go into, you know, a little bit deeper. And so tell us if, basically, if you can share with us a sentence that uses verbiage or jargon from your field, and then translate it so it's understandable to us.

Unknown:

Okay, so for me, I would like to share perfect PMI. That is something that is talked about in our shop all the time is perfect PMI. And so what that is, of course, no one's perfect. However, we want to make sure that when we do our PMI, which is that preventative maintenance inspection FM, which is what we focus our, it's our bread and butter of our operation. That is what makes us safe for our employees to drive our vehicles. And it also makes that truck safe and reliable to be out on the road around the general public. So we always talk about how is that perfect PMI? Did you complete that perfect PMI? Well, we may not be perfect, but we're going to make sure that when we complete that PMI, it's as close as perfect as we can get. So that that's one jargon word that we use. Yeah, every day. So yeah,

Julie Berman - Host:

it knows that was such a perfect example. And it's so interesting to get to speak with you about what you do. Because, as you even mentioned, like in the beginning, it's my experiences sounds like it's really reflective of the country as a whole. And that, like, we all just receive so many packages now. And so much so that it's changed even how my four year old talks about, like getting gifts or getting things you know, it's like, ordering versus, you know, when I was little I would go to the store, you write something out. And that doesn't always exists anymore. So it's just so interesting to talk about that in context with what you do. And because that perfect PMI is a very important part of that of that whole situation, for my benefit, and also my kids benefits that they no longer have to wait a long time to get something right. Like you can have a nice day. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. So Well, thank you so much for being here. Michelle, it was so much fun to learn about what you do, and all sorts of different facets of your job.

Unknown:

Julie, thank you for the time and to all the listeners. You know, I hope I opened up the thought for many women on the call that there are other career avenues out there and automotive. There's definitely a place for women and automotive. So don't be afraid to go outside of your comfort zone.

Julie Berman - Host:

Exactly. Yes. I love it. Well, thank you for being here. It was a blast. Your lady. Thank

Unknown:

you.

Julie Berman - Host:

Hey, everybody. Thank you so much for listening to women with cool jobs. I'll be releasing a new episode every two weeks. So make sure you hit that subscribe button. And if you love the show, please give me a five star rating. Also, it would mean so much if you share this episode with someone you think would love it or would find it inspirational. And lastly, do you have ideas for future shows? Or do you know any Rockstar women with cool jobs? I would love to hear from you. You can email me at Julie at women with cool jobs.com Or you can find me on Instagram at women who will jobs again that women will jobs. Thank you so much for listening and have an incredible day