Women with Cool Jobs

Women's Safety Boot Founder and CEO Supports Women in Nontraditional Fields, with Emily Soloby of Juno Jones

April 19, 2023
Women with Cool Jobs
Women's Safety Boot Founder and CEO Supports Women in Nontraditional Fields, with Emily Soloby of Juno Jones
Show Notes Transcript

Emily Soloby is on a mission to advocate for and support women — physically with her safety boot company, Juno Jones, and in general — by normalizing the idea of women in nontraditional fields. From a high schooler known for her boots to now creating her own footwear company, Emily's varied career path has always included helping women.

 

She’s the co-owner of AAA School of Trucking, a trade school, and also the host of the Hazard Girls Podcast and Face Book community that helps move the conversation forward on women’s issues in hazardous and male-populated industries. While growing a small truck and heavy equipment safety training firm into a national business with her husband, she noticed that there was no women's safety boots, especially ones that she'd actually want to wear. In 2020, the Kickstarter campaign for Juno Jones was fully funded in only 29 hours, and she began her mission to pair safety with style.

 

Emily has a BA in Women's Studies and worked as a domestic violence victim advocate while in school. During law school she served as Legal Intern at the National Organization for Women in DC, which solidified her passion for advocacy work. Following law school, Emily worked as a trial attorney with Legal Aid, helping women and children in family law and domestic violence cases. She went on to receive her master’s degree in Broadcasting and is now using those skills as a podcaster and storyteller. In all of her current and past roles and jobs, the consistent part has always been advocating for women.

 Contact Info:
Emily Soloby  - Guest
@emilysoloby (Instagram)
Emily Soloby (LinkedIn)
Juno Jones website

Julie Berman - Host
www.womenwithcooljobs.com
@womencooljobs (Instagram)
Julie Berman (LinkedIn) 

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Unknown:

Fashion has always been on the forefront for me, because I love fashion. And I'm a strong believer that fashion is for everybody. Fashion isn't just for the very rich who can who only buy the, you know, the most expensive designer brands. That's not what fashion is. If you wake up in the morning and you put something on your body that you chose... that's fashion, you chose that that's you expressing yourself, right? So I think that fashion, it needs to be equalized in society, people need to recognize that they have a right to express themselves. And they it's okay to express joy through what you're wearing. And it doesn't make you any less serious of a person to do that. So that's important to me.

Julie Berman - Host:

Hey, everybody, I'm Julie, and welcome to Women with cool jobs. Each episode will feature women with unique trailblazing and innovative crews will talk about how she got here, what life is like now, and actionable steps that you can take to go on a similar path or one that's all your own. This podcast is about empowering you. It's about empowering you to dream big and to be inspired. You'll hear from incredible women in a wide variety of fields, and hopefully some that you've never heard of before. Women who filled robots and roadways, firefighters, C suite professionals surrounded by men, social media mavens, entrepreneurs, and more. I'm so glad we get to go on this journey together. Hello, everybody, this is Julie Berman, and welcome to another episode of women with cool jobs. So I have a super cool guest, as always, for you today. And her name is Emily Salahi. She is the founder and CEO of Juno Jones, a safety boot company for women. She is also the co owner of AAA School of trucking, which is a trade school. And the reason that I was so excited to talk to Emily was because she is really an advocate, and all about empowering women. And she does this through creating these boots for women that physically support women in non traditional fields, often women who are surrounded by a bunch of men, so women in transportation, construction, engineering, architecture, manufacturing, the trades, the scientists, and more. And her whole goal is literally about supporting women about helping to normalize the idea of women in non traditional fields. So of course, when I saw her company, when I saw Emily, and what she's doing is all about that. And I love also how we talk about, you know, she is in these two different roles, one with her husband, and a one where she is the CEO running this company. And we talk about you know, what is that like for her navigating as a woman as a mother? What was it like to do the Kickstarter and start this business right at the, at the time of the pandemic. And we just had such a good conversation. And I love that her whole mission. And you know, even her where her career journey has taken her. She has degrees in women's studies. And she has a law degree and a degree in broadcasting. And it's like, wow, those are so different. But she's always had this mission of really empowering women of bringing their voices to the forefront and conversations and helping them. And I am clearly all about that. And so it's amazing how she has turned, you know to what she's doing. Now, she's always had a love of boots in particular, as a young girl in middle school in high school, she was known for that. So it's just fun to have this conversation, see where life is let her see what she is up to and how she's supporting women physically, and otherwise, through her work. And I hope that you enjoyed this conversation as much as I did. And if you think that you know, a specific person you can send this to who would really resonate with what she's saying and some of the takeaways please take a minute to do that because that is how we share this podcast and this work and women's voices and what is possible for you what is possible for me what is possible for all of us. If we see it, we can be it and it makes it feel real impossible and doable and payable. So thank you so much for taking your time to be here. I hope you enjoy this amazing episode with me and Emily. Hello Emily. I am so excited to have you on today to women with cool jobs podcast, and you are a woman who has some super cool jobs. You are the CEO and founder of Juno Jones which is a safety boot company for women and the co owner of sure A place called trucking, which is a trade school. And I saw you at first, like, years ago, I think when I first started the podcast, and I sort of always had in the back of my mind, like, oh, cool, like your company was just like very unique and very different. I think that's why it's stuck out to me. And then I came across your name again, recently, and I was like, oh, I want to have her on the show. Because your company, we're gonna focus on Juno Jones and kind of what you built there, mainly in your experience. But you've built this company with specifically women in mind, to ensure that women from all sorts of different backgrounds, different trades, primarily women who are often surrounded by men in whatever industries they're in, have the right footwear to help them do their jobs and keep them protected. So I just thought, first of all, the fact that you made this company was super cool. And I really looking forward to having you on talking to like, how you got started in this career? And why like what your vision is, and just how it is having a shoe company, like what is that like? So thank you so much for being here.

Unknown:

Well, thank you for having me, generally. And first of all, the idea for your podcast is such a great one. It's so much fun. But it's also so important, because I think so many of us have had that experience of growing up people asking us what we want to do with our lives. And we might have an idea, but we don't really know. And there's just seems like it seems like there's so many options, or for some people, it might seem like, there's nothing that looks interesting. So this really exposes so many people to wonderful ideas and inspiration. So thank you for for doing this podcast.

Julie Berman - Host:

Oh, thank you. I love it. So it's, it's something that I hope to keep doing, you know, for many years to come. I appreciate that so much. So tell us like a little bit, how would you describe your job or jobs, if you want to talk about, you know, your role as CEO of Juno Jones and founder or if you want to also talk about, you know, how you help run the AAA schools tracking? So feel free to talk about both or just your shoe company?

Unknown:

Yeah, no, it's funny, because you did mention that I have more than one job jobs. And I don't think of it like that is very focused. My mission is really to empower women, and male populated industries. And I sort of do that in different ways. I think the main one being by providing options and safety footwear that actually fit women's feet and give us different options and style. And, of course, all the safety features that are needed for different jobs. So yeah, so I so really, even though I started out, maybe in a lot of different jobs, it kind of all in to this one here, and that's really my main focus. But um, yeah, so to put it to give you an overview, I started out as a lawyer, and I was doing women's and children's rights work. So I did that for a while. And then my husband and I took over us small family business in the trucking industry, which is the trade school you were mentioning. We built that business over about 10 years, from a small mom and pop truck driving school with a couple of trucks out in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. And we expanded that into more of a national level firm, where we do consulting work, and we send our instructors nationwide. And so it was during my time as an executive with that company that I really noticed the footwear issue that they're not just the footwear issue, really the PPE issue, the personal protective equipment issue that it wasn't there for women, there were no options in the proper fit, and some of the styling that is needed or wanted. So for me loving shoes, loving boots my whole life, that was the area I really wanted to focus on. So that's how I got the idea for Juno Jones. And that's how, you know, I got the impetus for it and how we got it off the ground together as a team.

Julie Berman - Host:

Awesome. Wow. Thank you for that overview. And it is so interesting, because I've had, let's see about two women who are specifically in the trades on the podcast, and they both have I haven't met them in real life. You know, it's all been virtual, but they have specifically told me that they are more petite women. And I imagine they've also had that similar problem where they cannot find properly fitting protective clothing or shoes. So that's an incredible place I think to come from and you're you're solving this problem for women, and you know, trying to keep them safe. How How did you get into shoes, specifically, like, Was it because you love shoes? So much or is it because through your experience you just saw issues or accidents happening? Were that really called out to you? I'm just curious because because that is definitely like a specific niche.

Unknown:

Yeah, well, so for me, I've I've been a lifelong shoe lover, but not in like the Imelda Marcos sense, or I have like a big closet of hundreds of shoes or something, I've just, I've just always had a few pair of boots that I absolutely love, and I wear them to death. And I'm kind of known for them. So that that was me, even in high school. And in the yearbook, there's a picture of me from the knees down. And it says, like, you know, who like known for my shoes are my boots. And I live I grew up in in Philadelphia, the Philadelphia area, we have a shopping district called South Street, it's sort of like the, the hipster punk rock shopping district. And I used to come here from junior high, I take the train over in junior high shop in the stores, not that I could really afford anything at that time, but love to window shopping inspired by all the boots that I would see from all over the world. And over the years, just loved it as something that I would that I appreciate it and more, then I started taking a few shoemaking courses as a hobby. So I did that. in Cuernavaca, Mexico, as well as in the Brooklyn shoe Space in New York, in Brooklyn, and develops a more of an appreciation for how shoes are made the terminology as the different styling.

Julie Berman - Host:

Wow. And so was that, like, after, when you did those courses, like got that sort of education? Was that after you realize there was an issue with shoes? Or was that before?

Unknown:

Oh, oh, I did it way before I ever thought of the idea. Because I love shoes. And I love you know, the idea of learning how to make them by hand. And then when I did get the idea, and I it became apparent to me that it was a real thing that was needed out in the marketplace, because I spoke to so many women who encouraged me and told me and asked me Yes, please do this. Then I went back, and I did more force more studying of it.

Julie Berman - Host:

Wow, that's amazing. I think that is so interesting that you had that passion as a as a young girl, like a young woman, and then you were able to sort of find this need, like this huge need, and then translate that into creating this company. And, you know, I went on your website, I was obviously doing research on you and everything. And you have the most amazing reviews. I mean, like, and people love their boots. And it's like they're taking pictures of their booth or posting it on there. So you've clearly done a very good job filling not only that need, from the practical standpoint, the safety standpoint, but also people really love how they look and how they feel, which is awesome, right. So I think that's really such a cool thing that you've been able to fill that need. But as women, right, like, we want something nice to look at, too, that feels good. So I think that's so cool, that you took this thing that was a passion you built on that you were able to learn about it. And then like truly craft something so beautiful, and so purposeful. And I'm curious if you could share with what you're doing. Now, I do want to get into like a little bit more of what you're doing in your current role. But I want to go back because I did see that you have a few different degrees. And so I'm curious, like, how, how you got all these degrees? And then kind of does that help you now and just your everyday, everyday life, your everyday job?

Unknown:

It does? It definitely does. i My grandmother always said, a degree is something no one can take away from you. It's you know, you always have that knowledge. So it's yours to use, and you do use it throughout your life, no matter even if you don't think you are you probably are using it. Yeah, so I put law, I did practice law for a while. And when I was originally when we started, you know, John said I was telling the brand story. I was originally struggling a little bit with how do I explain that I was a lawyer? What does that have to do with what I'm doing now? What does that have to do with a truck driving school? And what does that have to do with women's safety and PPE. And it was funny because it was my husband who looked at me and he was like, It's the it's the same. It's the exact same you don't see how you are helping women and children be in safe situations. And like it hadn't occurred to me. So when I began to sit down and look at it, step back out of myself and look at it from another perspective, I realized how similar what I was doing was to what I'm doing now. I'm trying to keep women safe. Yeah, it's all very related. The first degree as I mentioned, well, I had to have a Women's Studies degree. Well, that was so obvious, right? That's an obvious obvious interest of mine back when I did it, it was called Women's Studies. I think they call it they have other names for it now. I started out at American University in Washington DC because I was interested And politics and human rights and women's rights. But American University at the time did not have a Women's Studies major. So I did the minor and then I transferred to a state school and Minnesota University of Minnesota, where they had a wonderful women's and huge Women's Studies program. So that's where I studied that, at that degree, that was my BA, and then took that straight to law school, where my original idea was, I wanted to work towards women's rights using the law as the avenue for that. So I did that for a little while I worked in Washington, DC at the National Organization for Women. And then I work as if that was as a legal intern during law school. And then when I graduated from law school, I worked for legal services, which is helping women and children who couldn't afford to hire a lawyer. It was it came through a private organizations and brands, public and private grants. So that's what I was doing as a lawyer. Then I went back to school, and after. After doing that for a little while, I went back to school, and I went into broadcasting. And you might wonder why I did that. Yeah, I was still on the same mental track that I wanted to do something to help people I wanted to tell stories when I was when I was representing women in the courtroom, even though that particular job, turned out really wasn't for me. In the long term, I still wanted to do something to tell women's stories. So my idea was going to go to school to learn how to make documentaries. So that's what I was working on in broadcasting and tell women stories through documentaries and through that type of medium. So that's what I was learning. And that's where I met my husband. And that is how the path sort of began to veer where the two of us graduated. And we had the opportunity to take over a family business in the trucking industry. That's how we got into that field. So while we were, while we were working in that industry, we still are working in that industry, of course, but over about a 10 year period. We were growing that business. And then that is when I launched you know, John's got that idea. And of course, the hazard girls podcast. So I am using my broadcasting degree to tell women's stories in that way.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yes, I love that. Okay, so funny how it came full circle. But yeah, I was so fascinated by all your different degrees, because I guess one of my favorite things about doing this podcast and interviewing women is to see sometimes how people have connected the dots in their life and like, either had these full circle moments, or how you've brought in your passions in different ways, how they show up, and how those actually end up being these huge strengths, often for women, and sometimes in in a surprising way, sometimes in a really obvious way. So I love that story of like how you're doing the podcast, now you're using the broadcast skills. And like, interestingly, my undergrad is in journalism and PR and and then me starting this podcast, it literally only dawned on me like the second year I was doing it. Oh, I'm actually using some skills. It's the same sort of thing. Yeah. So I always just think it's so funny how, you know, life happens sometimes. And for you now for your business, like tell us a bit about what it is like running Juno Jones, you're very much I've seen, you're very much in the community, right? Like telling women's stories, talking to women, about their needs, and and very much like sort of interwoven within within those communities. And I know specifically on your website, like front and center, which I thought was awesome. You say specifically that you collaborate with women and transportation, construction, engineering, architecture, manufacturing, the trades, the sciences, real estate, professional kitchens, and many other industries. So I I'd love to hear about what is it day in the life like or if that's too hard to talk about, like a week in the life what do you do as you

Unknown:

Wow. I do a lot I wear a lot of hats. We are you know, we're growing business. Not a huge team. But it really varies each day is completely different. I may be at the warehouse looking over merchandise, or looking over the boots and the products doing extra quality control, talking to the staff over there. I may be traveling visiting a factory we have our factories in Mexico we also have other factories that we work with as well I mean factories in Mexico. So I may be doing that and meeting with the team's production teams. Or I may be sitting at my computer talking to podcasters because I love spreading the word about our my company, Gino Jones and all So just getting a chance to interact with people like you mentioned, I'm in very much woven into the community of women in these fields because I'm it, I am one of them. I am in the trucking industry. So I am involved with lots of organizations, of course, like women and trucking, National Association of Women in construction, I'm on the board of directors here for the Philadelphia chapter, a bat. So a lot of interacting with people and having meetings and connecting. I do a lot of talking to businesses about their needs. And I do a lot of talking to individual women about their needs to always keep in touch with what's going on in their jobs and finding finding out what they're looking for and safety boots and other products. I work with fashion shows a lot I never you know, I It's funny, I started my very first organization that I got involved with when I launched, you know, Jones was the Fashion Incubator. So fashion has always been on the forefront for me, because I love fashion. And I feel I'm a strong believer that fashion is for everybody. Fashion isn't just for the very rich, who can't who only buy the, you know, the most expensive designer brands. That's not what fashion is. If you wake up in the morning, and you put something on your body that you chose, that's fashion, you chose that that's you expressing yourself, right. So I think that fashion, it needs to be equalized in society, people need to recognize that they have a right to express themselves. And they it's okay to express joy through what you're wearing. And it doesn't make you any less serious of a person to do that. So that so that's important to me. So working with a Fashion Incubator working with fashion shows around the country. Today, I had a meeting with Amy Brusa, who is the head of the safety rack, Amy does a YouTube channel all about women's PPE. And that's personal protective equipment. And that's like a term that I that is thrown around a lot. And not everybody knows it. So I always want to make sure I clarify that. Talk to me a little bit about the fashion show that we just participated in with her in Iowa. And then about another fashion show we have coming up that that I'm participating with with her as well, which is empowering women and industry happening in Chicago in October. So lots of stuff all over the board, working with influencers looking at data sheets, is growing brands. And there's exciting parts of the job.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, I mean, it has a lot. So I wanted to ask you about how you design the boots like what is the process? Like? What are your thoughts when you're creating this, these boots, what sort of things go into actually seeing them through producing them? What things may people not even know about that goes into producing, you know, like an actual physical item that people are wearing, I would love to hear about how that all works.

Unknown:

It's a big topic there. I mean, we could really spend a whole show just talking about that, right? But for me, my process is very continual. I'm always looking at everyone's shoes, everyone, everywhere I go, I'm staring at people's feet. I've always done that. So I'm always saving ideas, I'm saving things that inspire me, I save pictures of buildings, I save artwork, just pictures on my computer, on my Pinterest on my phone. And things give me ideas for books that I feel like would be an amazing shoe design. But when it comes to deciding what we're going to produce, because we're limited and how many shoes we How many designs we can produce right now. Really, I depend on the community around Julio Jones. So we talk about it in our Facebook group hazard girls, I send requests out for people to let me know what they're looking for what they can't find, I send surveys out, and I do focus groups. And that's really how we narrow it down to the styles that we want to create. So as far as create actually creating the boots, well, so I'm not the primary designer I have I do a lot of the idea work and the vision, of course, but we have designers that we work with, they create the technical pack. The technical pack, is what the factory uses to create the patterns and actually do the cutting and sewing and putting together. Our main our primary factory is located in Mexico. And so we work very closely with them. It's a fourth generation bootmaker they have been doing this for a very long time. And we work when I say we work closely with them. I'm on WhatsApp with them pretty much all day every day talking about different things that are happening, making decisions and solving problems and get down there as much as I can to Mexico and meet with them in person and go through, you know, visit, visit our tannery, which is one of the most sustainable tanneries in the world, which is located in Mexico. And looking at leathers, feeling them with my hands and trying to test them out and scratch them and stretch them and just look at different colors that are out there. And that's how the process is done. And then that takes time, of course to create those shears because they're made primarily by hand. Wow.

Julie Berman - Host:

So what is the process like, as far as the timeline goes from sort of like when you maybe finalize the design with your colleagues, and then like, when it's actually out into the world?

Unknown:

That is really a hard question to answer because of COVID. So in an ideal world before COVID, I'm gonna say, I don't know, maybe it would take, it was supposed to take like 60 to 90 days, but in the current world that we're living in, we still have a lot of supply chain issues. And so it's a constant, uphill battle of you know, figuring out solutions to problems when things aren't available. And those going to be going on for a little while. I think it's until things really start to settle down and go back to normal, if that ever happens again. Oh, yeah. So we do do pre orders on our website where you can pre order designs, and then we try to give an estimate, but again, with this time with the timelines that are happening with the supply chain delays that happened now it's very hard to predict. Yeah, no, ever. So we're not really going to be doing pre orders as much going forward. It's more like when we get them, when we get our products in stock. That's when we sell them. Because it's it's really too hard to I don't like telling people that they're gonna have something and then it's not ready. That's the worst feeling. So even though our customers are amazing, and very patient, I don't like that. So we get it in stock. That's when it's it goes up for sale.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, that completely makes sense. Okay, well, thank you so much for explaining that process. It was really interesting. This comes from sort of selfish places like me asking because I just got myself into the entrepreneurial world. So for anyone else who's like listening, and as always dreamt of being an entrepreneur or wanting to start on their journey, how do you manage dealing with the unknown, right, like you're in? You're building this company, and doing so for a niche? Right? That is like very particular? And I don't know if if there are competitors to you, but I imagine even if there are, they're probably very few overall. So I'm curious, like, how do you deal with when you are building when you are growing this company, you're managing the day to day like the fun things, the unfun things. And then you also are like growing and building, and I'm sure you have like this larger vision for yourself and where you want to go. How do you manage that? From a from an entrepreneurial standpoint? I'm curious, like what, you know, if you have any tips or anything,

Unknown:

how to manage the unknown? Yeah. So I think I'm used to managing the unknown at this point, I think it's become just a normal thing for me. But when we started, it was definitely harder. Because the unknown was so vast, you know, it was such a large base of unknown. And I, I didn't know where to start. Because this when we, when we, when my husband and I took over our business in the trucking industry, it was an already established family business. So although we grew it, and we put all of our efforts into growing it, and we were very successful in that it had nothing to do with starting something brand new from scratch, right? It's a completely different thing, right? So when it came time to actually get Gino Jones off the ground, it was a lot of trial and error. And there were times when I made the wrong choice. And I put a lot of effort or money into something that didn't end up being the right path, or the right decision at the time. So for example, I'm a lawyer, I'm a former lawyer. So that's where my mind goes. And I spent way too much time dealing with copyrights and getting the getting the name copyrighted and choosing the right tagline. And, you know, just the logo. And even though I love our name, and I love our logo, I think I didn't need to put the amount of maybe time energy and money that I did put into it at first maybe I could have spent that time on something else. So I've gotten gotten off the ground a little bit faster. Things like that. But managing it now it has become just part of my life. Like I It's okay, it's okay not to know exactly what's gonna that's the excitement of it to not know exactly what's what's next. Right? You can have plans, you can have a vision, but you have to be open to the possibilities and you always have to be ready to take advantage of opportunities.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, thank you for that. And I like the idea that the unknown also is like the fun part. Right? Because I guess that's, that's what leads to like the fun things that you don't know about to. For you. So as a woman, I particularly like one in sort of, in the trades or in trucking, you know, kind of on that side, but then also in the shoe industry, I don't know if they're the majority of women in the shoe industry, because I have never been in that. But I know, obviously, for the trades, I'm imagining for trucking that you're a minority on that site, what is it like being a woman in your industry? And if you could share, like kind of your experience growing the business? Either one, but particularly Julio Jones, like, what is that like, and if you have any tips for people, so I think, you know, when I look at people like you, when I look at other women who are really leaders in their field, I'm not quite sure if I've have the right wording, but they have this, this ability to be really confident about what they're really good at. And they're also very confident about where they need help. And they've just got a really amazing way of leading. So I'm curious for you like, what is that like in your industries? And if you have any suggestions or tips for for women who want to be leaders as well?

Unknown:

Well, for me, being in the trucking industry, I was I am in the trucking industry with my husband. So I think that's a different dynamic. I wasn't coming when I whenever I was interacting with people, when I was there full time. And before general Jobs was launched. A lot of times people looked at me like, oh, that's the owners. That's the owners. Why. So she must, you know, she must be helping. She must be you know, that Secretary, you know, Oh, do you? I've had people say to me, like, Oh, do you answer the phones, things like that? No. I wasn't surprised to hear that type of language and that type of attitude. It's just a lot of times, it's just so assumed that people wouldn't even say anything, but that's what they're thinking. So I understand that coming from that place of having to overcome those assumptions. And that bias. Because I am the founder and CEO of Juno Jones, I have not encountered that it's different atmosphere completely, I can, I can't tell you how different it is to be in a room as a co owner of AAA with my husband's in an unknown group, an unknown group of people who didn't warm or like previously know us, and say something and have the room. Maybe Listen, or maybe talk over me or maybe ignore me and talk to someone else, or maybe look at my husband, to see what he has to say about it. Versus speaking to a room of people as the CEO and founder of Juno John's. And when I start to say something, the difference is palpable. It's quiet. People are listening to me.

Julie Berman - Host:

Wow, that's really interesting. And it's interesting that you can make that comparison to like, probably not that many people would have the opportunity to have those two different comparisons, and be such a stark, a stark difference. And reaction perhaps from from people in the audience. So that's interesting. And I guess, do you have any advice or suggestions for either of those situations, I guess for women who are trying to get their voice heard, or for women's who women's voices who are being heard, I would love to hear what your thoughts are on that.

Unknown:

I mean, don't allow yourself to be interrupted. If I guess we're talking about the scenario of sitting at the table and being ignored. Don't stop talking. When someone starts talking over you don't just stop and let them start talking. Keep saying whatever you're saying. It doesn't mean you have to start shouting over them just calmly keep talking. And you can also if it's getting bad, you can also say their name a couple times. And that sometimes shocks people into thinking that you're about to call say something to them, and then they'll stop talking and you can finish what you're saying. But so that's that's a practical tip. But yeah, I mean, don't let yourself be silenced.

Julie Berman - Host:

Now, that's, I mean, yeah, is an amazing example of like two different situations. And just the perception for for you now because you are this leader in this space and you are a founder and the CEO. What are the biggest, I guess characteristics, or tools or things that you feel like when And leading need to either have innately to develop, learn from your experience,

Unknown:

you have to have a passion for what you're doing. It's hard to be successful in something if you're only going through the motions or doing it for because it's your job and you've got a job. And now you have a salary to make, and you have things to check off a list. So I think it's really important to, I know this is easier said than done. But search until you find that thing that you do feel very strongly and passionately about, because that's what gets you up in the morning. And that's what gives you that energy to lead and inspire other people. No one's going to be inspired if they don't see that you care about what you're doing. So I think I mean, of course, that's that's advice, not just for women, but that's for anyone. But I think as women, you know, we have that uphill, uphill battle. So we have to fight that much harder. But it is important to, to keep searching until you find what it is that you feel the most passionately about.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, I love that. And I, I just saw something like very briefly. And it was this. The story that came out like it was I get the Forbes, women newsletters, something and it was something about how like, women often wait until their like 60s 70s 80s to go back to what they were passionate about, and like what they always wanted to do. And I'm like, how sad in general, that we would wait, you know, and often right, because we have longer lifespans in general. So it's like, Oh, I'll do that later. But how's that right to go through like 6070 years of life? That's what I just said, you know, like, wow, because that's still I'm almost 40. So it's like two more decades, at least before I can do what I love, like, wow, that I don't want to do that.

Unknown:

Yeah, well, I mean, I think a lot of that has to do with a lot. Still, to this day, much of the childcare burden. I don't want to call it a burden, but the childcare responsibilities put on women and a lot of women maybe are making less money than their husbands and their husbands careers. And then in those type of situations, they might have the pressure to, you know, support their husband's career, because it's more lucrative, and then they have to put their own molds. And I mean, there's just so many societal and familial pressures happening, that I that's probably part of that reason. But yeah, ultimately, no. women pursuing your dreams now.

Julie Berman - Host:

Exactly. Yes. That's all about what the show is trying to do. I want to talk about that like a little bit, if you don't mind, because I know you mentioned that you have kids. And I'm wondering, and I have kids, too. I'm wondering, you know, like, how have you balanced that aspect of having a family and running a business running these businesses?

Unknown:

Well, yeah, it's hard. I do try to be as present as possible in the moment. But I have to also be aware, and my kids have to be aware that if I have to stop and I don't know, answer an email or do something like that, it's not that i Yes, I taking time away in that moment. But they know that ultimately, I because of what job I have, I have the flexibility to be there with them so much. I have very flexible jobs. So I can, I can travel when I need to travel, if if I can take off in the afternoon if I need to take off in the afternoon for a school event. So I think it's just a matter of everybody kind of being on board and the family like everyone knows, you know, the kids know that what my job is, and why I do it. And they're all about it. I have a boy and a girl. They're both so supportive. And my daughter has stickers hazard girl stickers all over her water. So I think they feel very much a part of the company as well. So you're supportive in that way.

Julie Berman - Host:

Awesome. And explain briefly what is hazard girls are who are hazard girls is maybe a better question. Well, hazard

Unknown:

girls started as the Facebook community with around you know, Jones, and it just it was just people forming a group to interact with each other and connect with each other women and its hazard girls, women and non traditional industries is I think, originally is what we called it. And it just sort of branched into women in construction trades, but also any male populated industry. So it can be like finance or private. I mean, we have all kinds of women in various industries. So the hazard girls podcast developed in 2020 during COVID Because of course we were in that was what we launched, we launched new joins in February of 2020. So you know, that was right move for it. And it was launched on Kickstarter, and the Kickstarter campaign was like midway through when COVID So we had already funded we funded our campaign on the first day, thankfully with the support of our awesome community, but Then we had to produce the shoes and everything was shut down. So we had like, you know, we had a lot of time to, beyond just talking to people to actually do something else while we were waiting. So that's when we launched a podcast. And so has our girls is community. It's a podcast. And it's just a fun term that we use to describe women in male populated industries.

Julie Berman - Host:

I love it. Okay, thank you for explaining that. So, so well. So let's say that women are interested in specifically starting a footwear or apparel brand. And where would they go? Who with the talk to start finding the resources and get an idea of like how they could get started themselves?

Unknown:

Okay, well, so I was part of the Fashion Incubator, and here in Philadelphia, the Macy's Fashion Incubator. And so I work with a lot of apparel brands very closely as my friends and just colleagues that we would be working side by side on our own projects, but relying on each other for support and being there for each other. So I have had a lot of experience watching other brands get off of the ground. But I guess it's a matter of just having the pieces of the puzzle, put together and worked on one by one, they don't all have to come together at the beginning. And there's no specific order that you have to start in. So you may if you're a designer of clothing, say you want to make you want to make women's protective vests or high visibility vests, and you want to make them to fit a woman's body, what are you what's the first thing you're going to do? Well, there's a variety of things you could do, you could go the legal route, like I didn't get all your copyrights in place, and spend way too long on that. You could be meeting with people and talking to them about their needs. So you just work on the different pieces of the puzzle, and decide on your launch date. And make sure that you have everything ready to go by Oh, finding production, that's the big one, you're not going to sit up be sitting there selling it yourself. You need someone to do that for you. That's that's a huge task, because a lot of times factories who make these things don't really take you mentioned earlier, what's it like being a woman in the footwear industry? Well, guess what the footwear industry is a lot of men, a lot of very old school philosophies still hanging around. And that same thing with the apparel industry. So you're going in as a young woman or as a woman, you're going to come up against a lot of people not taking you seriously. So it's a lot of finding the right partners to work with. I mean, it's just working on each separate piece of the puzzle until your launch date. And making sure that you have already put your formed a community around your brand before you launch.

Julie Berman - Host:

Okay, that's a great, like a great piece of advice, just forming that community. And for you like are there organizations that you're part of? Because you know, you do have Julio Jones, that are, you know, specific to apparel or specific to shoes and in or boots, or PPE. What, like, what would you recommend? Or are there other ways to connect with people, particularly in those trades? Or those areas?

Unknown:

Yeah, there's so many organizations, I don't even know where to begin listing them. But there are several different footwear organizations, there's groups on LinkedIn, there's women and safety organization, if you're talking about PPE, women and safety, excellence, and then there's the American Society of safety professionals, which is the big safety organization and, and under their purview would come all of those things that you mentioned, okay. And vests or whatever other equipment you're talking about.

Julie Berman - Host:

Okay, great. So then people could look, they're finding the big organizations, and then find like, the smaller niches within those sounds like, yeah, thanks. Okay. Okay, awesome. And for you, like, is there anything that because you did the Kickstarter, which you did it at, at a very, like interesting time in the world? And then you had like, the time of the pandemic, but you are like doing really incredible work. And you got such such good reviews? Is there anything that you would say now like to encourage people who are building right, they're building something to that you do like in your everyday life, or like how you sort of map out your vision for what you want for your future like what you're looking to do with Juno Jones?

Unknown:

Well, my friend Jennifer Lynn Robinson, she's a motivational speaker and she has one of her talks is about putting together a vision board and I'm I'm a huge fan of this, I actually do have a vision board on my wall, but it's not on a board. It's just stuck. Right behind me right now. But um, yeah, I think it's really, it's a really great exercise. And it's a really great tool because it allows you to literally envision what you want. And it could be something that you've specifically drawn or had an artist draw for you if you're talking about designs, or it could just be mood. And you could just, you know, you could have things that that remind you of your vision and your goal for the future. So I definitely recommend doing something like creative practice like that.

Julie Berman - Host:

Okay, I love that I started one and I haven't finished. So maybe that's good incentive to actually finish it. Okay, so to end our conversation, will you share a sentence that uses verbiage or jargon from your field, then translate it so it's understandable to us?

Unknown:

Oh, okay, love it. Well, the first thing that comes to mind for me is, of course, the safety and the OSHA terminology. So, okay, so here's the sentence. Do you know Jones boots are ASTM certified? I 75. C 75. Pr, eh? Okay. And that's ASTM stands for the American Society for Testing materials. And that's the body that create safety standards for many things, including safety footwear, I 75 is impact rating of 75 foot pounds. And then C 75 is compression rating of 75, which is 2500 pounds of pressure. Car is puncture. So that's underneath that that goes in our midsole that's preventing nails from hitting your foot. And then eh, is electrical hazard.

Julie Berman - Host:

Wow. Well, thank you for explaining the alphabet soup. It's always really fun to hear about what examples people have for each industries, because they're all so different. And it really, it makes it so, so apparent, right? Everyone has their own specialty, and really like this knowledge in this one area. So that was awesome. Thank you, Emily.

Unknown:

I was talking yesterday with someone from John Deere. And she kept saying CAG CAG. And I'm like, I know it's not just me I have with me. She's like, Oh, I'm so sorry. That's an internal acronym.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah. Yeah. And it's, it's funny, because like, a lot of times, you know, you mentioned that and it happens all the time. Like, when you're in your field, and you've been doing it for however long, you've just used this verbiage or acronyms or what have you for so long that it's second nature to you, and many of the people you talk to every day. But for those of us who are not in that field, it's always so interesting to figure out like, What are you talking about? Like, what does that mean? So yeah, so that was a very good example. Well, it was so much fun having you on Emily, thank you so much for sharing a little bit about, you know, what you do a day or week in the life and then just also what it's like to be the founder, CEO, Julio Jones, also running another business with your husband, being a mom, like you're just doing so many things. And I'm excited to see you know, the next few years, like, what you continue to put on your vision board and what you dream up. So I appreciate you being on today.

Unknown:

Thank you, Julie. Thank you for having me. It's been an honor to be here and it's been a lot of fun chatting with you. You're You're a great interviewer you definitely have i somebody who interviews people, I have to say you have a great way of asking questions that are just relevant in the moment, keeping the conversation going. So it makes it so much fun. And I hope you do continue with your vision board because the world needs more Julie, more of your vision. Oh,

Julie Berman - Host:

thank you so much. That's so nice. Especially from like a fellow podcaster I always appreciate that like even more just because it means a lot. Podcasting is definitely like it's something that I love but I've learned along the way for sure as I as I go along. So thank you so much for all those beautiful compliments. And I want to end to where can people find you like if they want to learn more about what you're doing? Which you know, John's if they just want to connect with you, how can they reach out to you?

Unknown:

You say go to judo John, stop calm. That's our website. You can find our steel toe boots there you can find some of our other products and you can also connect to the hazard girls community through that and listen to the hazard girls podcast on there. And I am on LinkedIn. So if anybody was if anyone wants to connect with me personally, I am I definitely take calls and help people out and help young entrepreneurs and budding entrepreneurs out answering questions. So connect with me on LinkedIn, it's Emily Celebi.

Julie Berman - Host:

Awesome, thank you. It was such a pleasure.

Unknown:

Thank you so much, Julie.

Julie Berman - Host:

Hey, everybody. Thank you so much for listening to women with cool jobs. I'll be releasing a new episode every two weeks. So make sure you hit that subscribe button. And if you loved the show, please give me a five star rating. Also, it would mean so much if you share this episode with someone you think would love it or would find it inspirational. And lastly, do you have ideas for future shows? Or do you know any Rockstar women with cool jobs? I would love to hear from you. You can email me at Julie at women with cool jobs.com Or you can find me on Instagram at women cool jobs. Again, that's women cool jobs. Thank you so much for listening and have an incredible day