Women with Cool Jobs

Sport Outside Broadcast Camera Operator & Super Yacht Crew Career Coach Paves Path for Women in Male-Dominated Fields, with Anna Petchell

May 03, 2023 Julie Berman
Women with Cool Jobs
Sport Outside Broadcast Camera Operator & Super Yacht Crew Career Coach Paves Path for Women in Male-Dominated Fields, with Anna Petchell
Show Notes Transcript

Anna Petchell is a woman with not just one, but many cool jobs, including as a Sport Outside Broadcast Camera Operator & Super Yacht Crew Career Coach. The steps she has taken were often seldom paved by women in fields traditionally done by men.

As a Freelance Sport Outside Broadcast Camera Operator, she films the big outside sports events, such as football, rugby, tennis, Formula One, lacrosse, hockey, and cricket. She especially loves women's football (a.k.a soccer here in the U.S.)

She also was an officer on a superyacht, where girls often are not captains, engineers or officers. Now she helps yacht crew discover their inner compass so they can leave the industry and be successful and confident in finding a new career afterwards. 


Anna shares what she does in both the broadcast and yachting fields. She enlightens us with some coaching insights such as “If you know who you are, then you can navigate through life.”  And she provides us with some incredible networking  and connection tips for how to find opportunities and connect with people in an authentic, purposeful way.

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Anna Petchell:

You have to have the confidence and knowledge that you will be knocked down, you will be told no over and over again. But to know that you can get up and the resilience and the grit that you mentioned before, that will keep you going and you will be a stronger person by the time it comes to the end. Also the fact that if it hasn't been done before by women, well, then you're the first person that's going to prove them wrong. And you've got the place to be able to be like, and now it can be.

Julie Berman - Host:

Hey, everybody, I'm Julie and welcome to Women with cool jobs. Each episode will feature women with unique trailblazing and innovative careers. We'll talk about how she got here, what life is like now, and actionable steps that you can take to go on a similar path or one that's all your own. This podcast is about empowering you. It's about empowering you to dream big and to be inspired. You'll hear from incredible women in a wide variety of fields, and hopefully some that you've never heard of before. Women who build robots and roadways, firefighters, C suite professionals surrounded by men, social media mavens, entrepreneurs, and more. I'm so glad we get to go on this journey together. Hey, everybody, this is Julie Berman, and welcome to another episode of women with cool jobs. So there are some women out there who not only have one cool job, but they have more than that they have maybe two or more. And Anna, Petula is one of those people she has two very cool jobs, they sound completely different. Yet through talking to her, I discovered that actually there are a lot of similarities. So without further ado, and perpetual is a freelance sport. outside broadcast camera operator, we use OB for outside broadcast. And she is also a career change coach for yacht crew leaving the super yacht industry. So for Anna, She is originally from New Zealand. She's now living in London, and working as this freelance camera operator. She has been behind the camera on very, very cool large sporting events, things that you would want to go to, or that you've seen on television, things like football, rugby, tennis formula, one, lacrosse, hockey, cricket, and more. She especially loves women's football and women's sports. And overall, she is an incredibly huge advocate for women getting behind the camera, and also doing other cool career. So she became a career coach, because she actually had worked for several years in the Super yacht industry. And those are the yachts are really lovely, beautiful, large, luxurious yachts she worked on your set were 40 to 60 meters long, with five to 17 Crew Member, crew members. And she had this like desire to not just be in any position, she actually wanted to be in sort of a officer or other position that women were not typically in. And she did, in fact, work her way up to an officer on a super yacht. And she mentioned that girls are often not captain's engineers or officers. So in both her jobs as a officer on a super yacht, as well as her job as an outside broadcast camera operator, specifically for sport. She like does not see very many women in either of those fields. It's getting where there's a few more women in both of those areas. But she said in between New Zealand and the UK alone, there's probably only 20 Women who are sport outside camera operators. So are as she says, so there are only about 20 women between New Zealand and the UK, who are sport outside broadcast camera operators. So both of these careers she has either like paved the path, or been treading on very lightly paved path that women have gone down and you know, making it easier or making it more visible that women can do these jobs. So this was such a cool conversation because not only does Anna have these two jobs that are so vastly different and now she's helping coach people for how to get out of the superyacht industry. And so we get to hear like a little bit of her coaching and and that's so much fun to you as a fellow coach and someone who like does workshops and you know likes to guide people and advise people, it's it's really fun to see how other coaches approach things and how they guide people. So this was such a fun conversation. This is one of the longer ones because we had so much to talk about since she only said she not only had one job, but she has two cool jobs. And, you know, this is something that the huge takeaway here is, she did not take no for an answer. In either of these fields that she's now in. She constantly saw herself in these positions. And she figured out a way to make them happen through a lot of hard work through grit through connecting with people, and you know, managing to build this network of people and find people who really believed in her. So that was a huge takeaway for me, she gives us specific advice in this episode about how to connect with people how to ask for help connecting with other people. And I will definitely be using this myself. So without further ado, please enjoy this conversation between me and Anna. And if you haven't yet, please go ahead and take a moment to scroll down on Apple podcasts. If that's where you're listening, push that lever Review button and write a review. It means so much it helps me share this work and what women are doing in the world with others. Thank you so much. Hello, Anna, thank you so much for being on women with quill jobs, you have multiple cool jobs. So we're going to talk about both, both of which are very unusual. And I didn't know anything about either one of them until you know we chatted a bit before this call. So I'm super excited to Anna Petro welcome to the podcast.

Unknown:

Oh, thank you so much, Julie, thank you for having me. I'm very excited. I love these sort of things.

Julie Berman - Host:

Well, I'm so glad to have you on. So you have some very interesting things that you do and that you have done. And so the first thing is that you're a freelance sports, I'm going to try to say this correctly. A freelance sport outside broadcast camera operator is the first thing so no, thank you, I try. Second thing is you are a career change coach for yacht crew leaving the super yacht industry. And so both of these are very different from one another. And also sounds super cool and interesting. So I was just very excited to have the opportunity to chat with you like we met because we were in a group together a few years ago during the pandemic. And then I found out you did this. So we're gonna talk about, like, how you got into all these different cool things, what you're doing, like, what it's like being a woman in particular. And just like if you have any recommendations for people if they want to go into these fields, and I really want to focus, especially I think on that the OB, as you say outside broadcast work that you do, because I think in particular, for women, like I don't know that there are a lot of photographers, there's a lot of women who who do different things with photography, but as far as the outside broadcast world, it seems like there are very few women in there. And that is not something that women in particular think of is an opportunity.

Unknown:

You are absolutely correct on that. So, where do you want to start with?

Julie Berman - Host:

That's a good question to get. Yes. So okay, so we are going to focus on like for the, for the sake of this, and we'll touch on both, but for for the sake of starting out and the majority of conversation, I would love for you to explain, like what is it that you do as the OB camera operator, if you can explain like, just in a nutshell, how would you describe your job?

Unknown:

Okay, cool. So I am a freelance outside broadcast sports camera operator, which is and looks like me going along. And anything that you watch on television, anything sport related, I probably am filming it, or not everything. But that's kind of what we're talking about when we're talking about sports stuff. That outside broadcast world is basically when there is a production that is on site. And that's usually like the broadcast production will be on site. So it's not in a studio or anything like that. The whole production will be on a, like a sports field or in a sports ground or, you know, if it's Formula One, it will be in like an area like that, an arena or whatever it looks like so, my role within that is I'm a camera operator. So I started in the studio world I always was wanting to do like intrepid travel kind of style. videography, didn't get into that, which is cool, but have gone into the sports world like predominantly in sports broadcast, specifically. And most of what my work is within kind of using either broadcast cameras, which are from anyone listening, I don't know how to explain this. Let's say you get like a broadcast camera that you get a long lens camera, which is a big box lens, you've probably seen them on the side of a sports field, if you've ever watched any sport ever. And then you get the RF cameras, which is one that's got on the shoulder and you're running around and doing stuff and you're not attached to a cable, what you get the ones that are just a regular size lens. And so what we do is usually a sports broadcast will have between like, so tomorrow's broadcast that I'm doing has got 20 cameras, and that's a football game. And so that involves 20 cameras doing different particular things, covering this game, so that when you watch it at home, you're watching what looks like quite a seamless sports game. But actually, there's a lot of that lot to be involved to get to that point. So I will be one of those people doing a particular thing with particular shots that I'm getting that I cover throughout the game. So that's kind of how that works. And it looks like sport, from tennis, to football, to motorsport, to boxing to B to swimming to hockey to go to the triathlon and I beat the next week, going back to New Zealand, and a few weeks or a few months to do the woman's FIFA World Cup. It's also Wimbledon to do the tennis. So there's a whole bunch of like, anything sports, is usually anything that's sport related on TV is what we do.

Julie Berman - Host:

I love that. And, you know, I think it was interesting when we were talking before. So I could learn a little bit about what you do and how everything works. One of the things that I thought was super fascinating was that you were talking about how your as part of your job, you and your colleagues, like you mentioned, you know, the game tomorrow, there's 20 People who are going to be on cameras, altogether, covering different angles. But you also mentioned, so you're covering one, right one angle, or like one purpose, and then you have headphones on, and then you're listening to like all this stuff on different channels going on. Yeah, so that was so interesting to me, because I would love for you to explain that because with the idea of like your job in this sense of like, being really on and like being in the moment and just the ability for you to like focus in specifically on your role. And then having so much else happening in your ears, you know, and trying to to sort of navigate that is such an incredible skill. And something you know, where I really feel like you thrive like in the moment like in the action. So can you explain those four channels because literally my mind was blown. This is like so amazing for me to like, imagine you doing this. So explain the four channels what you're listening to.

Unknown:

Excellent. Okay, yeah, I love I love how energized you were by that when I was doing about it. And it's the irony is you actually don't think it's such a skill when you just do it. And it's just normal practice. And it's just the thing, but then when you explain it to someone else, and they're like what, right? Say, say I'm sitting there and I've got my headset on what's coming through in the channels as you've got four different channels of audio coming into your headset, and so on, like, say your left hand side of your ear, you might have so production. So that is the director and anyone that's in the truck that's in there with the director. So the director's assistant, it might have the producer in there, it might have the vision mixer, anyone else that's a net track that will be coming through that year. And the same ear you might have engineering or in their channels will be all the things that you need to get to vision. So you need to do all your back focus checks, you need to if you have any problems, you'll talk to them on there. Before the game, if you ever need to switch channels or switch like your camera position, you have to contact engineering. So that's on that side as well. The other side you'll have programs sound net programs sound as what's going out on program so that's what you at home would hear in the program sound. So that's the claim light and full mix of audio track that's going out and And then on the other channel is commentary in commentary as what the commentators are saying. So that's mixed without programs. So without any other audit, audio or anything, it's just a commentary sound that's going out. So it means that if you're listening, say we have a game of whatever sort of football, for example, and there's some action happening here, and the commentators are talking about, this person brought their partner today, you know, instantly or this is this better was going on between these two people, you know, that through that audio, that one of those cameras, if you're on the camera that has to pick that up, you know that you have to get that. And so you're kind of pre empting things, even though a director is not necessarily telling you to do it. So with all those four levels of audio, you've got a lot of different things to interpret, interpolate, interpolate, yeah, interact, or not like to put it in different kind of audio feed and your mind. And so by doing that, you have to be able to know we're sort of to focus your attention on, you can control all of them. So on the back of the camera, it will have little dials, that you can turn certain ones up and down. But ultimately, you need to be able to, like, a lot of the time you won't have, you won't have the director in engineering talking to you at the same time, you might do. And you might also have commentary talking, and the output feed well, so it's the ability to kind of listen to where you need to. It's not only that you have the people in the crowd behind you, who are right there, you also say you're doing motorsport, you've got real loud car, driving right past you. And you might also have, say, a floor manager that's trying to talk to you, who's right in front of you. So they might be talking to you, and you'd have to talk to them. But you've also got all this audio. So it is a skill that you learn. And I think the thing is, with yachting, it's another very high paced, fast paced industry, much like television, that you have to be able to listen and interact with a lot of things happening at the same time.

Julie Berman - Host:

I mean, that's so interesting. And thank you for explaining that. Because you know, what was coming to me as you were talking is really like you have in yachting as well, right? Like, because I know we'll get to this a little bit too, like you were an officer on a super yacht. And there aren't a lot of women in those positions as well. And so but for both those sort of career niches, like you are making not only very quick decisions, but you're like, you have to have like a very quick speed, like a reaction speed. And also, to me, like the confidence to make the decision in the first place. Because I think for me, like something decisions have always been really hard. And I've worked even during the pandemic, I've worked incredibly hard on myself to like, notice what I'm doing, especially when it comes to decisions and just like getting better at making a decision quickly. And like trusting my instincts or trusting myself. So that's such an incredible thing for me personally, to hear that you have that that ability and that skill and different completely different settings, but that you're doing it I imagine like so quickly, or do you think about that even the fact that you're making constant decisions? I'm just curious,

Unknown:

to be honest, when you word it like that? Probably no, I hadn't. Because I would say prior to that, I would have thought I maybe struggle, I think it's maybe a skill that you learn and while you're learning the skill that you learn the skill of doing the job as a camera operator. So you learn that skill and you learn like when you should react to something or when you should not react to something and probably in line with that that comes more confidence with the more and more you do that the more and more you learn the more and more the decision becomes a skill of what you're doing a net rather than your I don't know. Yeah, it's an interesting point. Now I probably hadn't considered

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, I but I love that because I think you know, it just goes to show like we have strengths right that are innate to us in these like abilities that we don't always think about like we just don't know that their strengths which but I see that so clearly for you. So I think it's it's really amazing. And I just wanted to like call that out.

Unknown:

My whole career around being a coach and being a career coach is about helping people recognize those things. And I probably hadn't noticed that one and myself so thank you. I really interesting yeah, ovation. And the thing

Julie Berman - Host:

is, it's hard to know, it's hard. It's so hard to know these things for ourselves, right? Even when we are helping people, coaching people advising people. Yeah. And you know, another thing that I think is so interesting about your job, and in particular, for people who are maybe in journalism, or like, have this interest in journalism, or broadcasts or whatever, this is such a different way to get into it, but yet still get into that field and get, like get to experience sort of that energy, right, the energy, the live raw energy of like being there being in the crowd, covering something that's fast paced, and it sounds like you get to not only travel with your job, that you get to probably interact with all sorts of people. So I was wondering if you could speak to like, who are the types of people that you are, you know, working with? Because you're freelance, who hires you kind of like, what is that overarching process that happens?

Unknown:

Yeah, so like, obviously, you are as a freelancer. So some people are employed as staff, but a lot of the, a lot of the broadcast world, especially as camera operators, and, and the tech side of things, a lot of those roles tend to be freelance so that you work around a broad range of things, and the sport industry itself is quite vast. So there's a lot of people in it, but a lot of people, you know, I'll see this person on this job, but then I'll see them again the next day and the next day, but then I won't see them for six months. So you work with such a range of people. And so like, you know, I just got the call sheet for tomorrow's job. And there's four pages worth of people that are working and involved on it. So that gives you a kind of an idea of like, just how many people it takes to make something that goes on here. That's from directors, to production assistants, to production managers, to vision, mixers, to graphics, to Hawkeye, to var to like all these different roles. And like all the technical people, the people that have to get in there and rig the game, the people that are, you know, like on the actual front face of it, the people you get all like the guests and the presenters and all those sort of things, but also the graphics. And also, you know, like how the show is going to be laid out what the producer, the exec producer, you know, like all those sorts of different people. Ultimately, I'm not, I'm not interacting with four pages worth of people when I'm on a job. When I go to a job, I will be interacting with anyone like so an OB compound is kind of where you would go, where I'd go tomorrow. And that will have all the trucks that will have all the gear and all the equipment that will be provided by one company who will have gone in and wrecked bring to the job. And then we might go in and recall the camera gear and all that kind of stuff. And all the sound is will do their part. And then you have all the technical people like all the vision mixers, engineering, the electricians, the people, like all these different roles that you'll be interacting with all them. And then when you're actually doing the game, you'll be interacting with like the director, maybe the talent, depending if you are, if you've got presentation before it or you know, like, sometimes you'll see them talking to the camera before the game. So we'll have that. Or you might have a reporter who's reporting to do a French channel or something, you know, like a unilateral feed that's going out or a world feed that's going somewhere else. So you have all these different interactions with sort of guests at the time. And then you might actually have the players have the players or the drivers or whatever sport you're doing, that you might be doing interviews with or something like that. And then so you've got all those people to interact with. So on a daily basis, you actually, which really fuels my desire for variety and connection with different sorts of people all the time. Because you see, meet all these different people throughout the day regularly and constantly. And then you've got all the people who are actually in the grounds and or the crowd and the audience of wherever you're at. So it's quite a vast range of people. Not to say that only extroverts do this job, because it'd be too much for someone who is more introverted, but it is something that you are definitely exposed to a lot of people a lot of the time and how do I get the work? Well, I personally so I only got to the UK a year ago, but prior to that I had been around New Zealand and in different parts of the world. It's all about connections, the people that you meet the people Let you interact with how you get work. So a job, for example, like, for example, Formula One, Formula One will have company, and then they will have the company that's making the show. So whatever company that is, so there's farm, and then they'll have Channel Four, or whatever that's making the show. And then they'll have a company that's like a facilities company that provides all the technical equipment and rigs, all the grounds and stuff, I will come as a freelancer through them, they'll have different areas where they have people who will create the show, like what it looks like how many ad breaks, there are, how many different things so depending on what sort of job it is, is where you will get crude from, some people will work for a company, for example, they'll do a company, like they'll work under a branch of a company, and they'll do all the jobs that that company does, or like myself, or work for a whole bunch of different people. And so in order to keep work going, it is about that constant like checking in with the multiple different connections that you've made to get work regularly.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah. So I want to touch on that. Because like one thing, and we realized, we're gonna go back, because I want to talk about like, eventually, how you got into all this, how you got into superyacht industry as well. So don't let me forget that, but because you, you mentioned this, now, I want to, I want to touch on this something that we talked about, which I thought was amazing. And like, I want to do more of learn how to do more of myself. And I thought, maybe people who are listening might want to know how to do this too, is you really touched on the fact that, like you, at the beginning of your career, like when you were trying to get into sport, outside broadcast, you were connecting with like, literally, everybody and anybody who you knew Who knew somebody you knew, just trying to make your way and find how you could get in. And I think this is like first of all, such an incredibly like, brave thing to do, you know, is basically like to go to people and ask, right, like, ask for help ask for connections, ask for ideas. Can you talk about like, how did you do that in the past? And like, how have you done that now, because you are a freelancer, and you touched on this, like you have to keep up basically with people and keep your connections going. So I'd love you know, and maybe we can talk about in this scenario, like a little bit about your past. If if you want to at this point, I'll leave it up to you.

Unknown:

Yeah, absolutely. So connections, like, I think whether you're in freelance world, or you're in business, business is all about connections and relationships, and providing a service or fulfilling a service. The best business deals come from a really good relationship and partnership between two different people or two different suppliers or whatever it looks like. And connections are the key to that. And so I I truly believe that the way to find of with any Korea, if you think about your own career, how you have made the best networks is when you've talked to all of those different people. And by talking to people and asking people and people usually want to help, like, most of the time people want to help you, it can feel so scary that first time you do it. But when you've done it a second time, a third time or fourth time, fifth time, it just gets more it gets easier. And it really does become just a process of going out and talking to different people and being curious. You can't I think where I stepped into it was, if I'm curious, and I'm a learner in this space, then all I'm asking for is someone else's guidance or advice or whatever. People want to give you that. If I was coming in and saying you need to give me a job, that's a different thing. But if I'm coming in and saying I'm really curious to how do you do this, or how how did you get into this? Or how could I go about doing this? Or do you know, like, the question I asked lots of people is like, is there anyone that you know that I could talk to about it? So why? When I first got here a year ago, to the UK, I had no connections and television coaching, yachting, anything. And I went into networks that I was in and I just said to people, does anyone know anyone in television, like Does anyone in this group know anyone in television? You know, like we go to these networking. If you Whatever networks you're in, they might not be the it's not usually those people, it's the people they know that will be able to help you. And so usually by asking someone like, do you know someone? Or who do you know that I could speak to about x? And so when I got here, and I said, Do you know anyone and television, one of the lady said, Oh, I know someone, but I don't know if that will help. But I could contact him. And I was just saying, I'd just really be interested in how the industry works over here. So she put me in touch with someone, he put me in touch with someone. And that's eventually how I got my first job over here. By doing that, and showing pro it like being really proactive is really big. I can't think of the word but it's a really good trait to have being proactive rather than reactive, to being proactive and being able to be like, I've explored or different things like, I just today, I just got confirmation on going to the Women's World Cup in New Zealand. Wow. That came from asking, probably everyone I know and television hours again, get there, I knew that I wanted to do something I knew I wanted to go there. I didn't know how I was going to go about it. But I knew if I could talk to everyone I knew over here, everyone I knew back home and just ask Was there anyone that they knew, or anyone else that I could talk to, and having? So my big thing is about women's sport and women's representation in front and behind the camera. And I think, because that's such a big thing to me, like I really, really want more women in technical roles and technical fields and spaces that they're not seen. And so I came with this, like a real big why behind why I wanted to do it, I wasn't just asking for a position I was asking for, like, because I have a really vested interest in having more women's representation in sport, in the field that it's in. And this being a women's sporting event, meet when I was talking to people and asking people ahead some other reason, I wasn't just going to say, Can you give me work? Can I work on this, I was saying, People are often really keen to help you if you're keen to help them if you can provide something that will be of benefit to them. So in a way, I was saying, Look, I'm really like I really care about having and seeing women behind the cameras, like I have to go the other day into the industry. And now that's hopefully going to have a bigger impact in the future. By being able to show that and say like, look, this is what I can see in the future. And this is how we can make a change. And this is how we can have better representation of women and stuff. It's something that I'm coming with is a kind of deeper understanding. And I think the way if you can do that with your work, and whatever your work looks like, whatever role you've got, I think there's like really empowering thing behind that, because you're coming at whatever with a bit of a core reason.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, I think that makes so much sense. Like, and I think, you know, to your point, it's like, there's a driver behind why you wanted to be there. And that makes so much sense to me. Right? Like, it's your it's like actually a purpose, right? It's fulfilling for you because there's something deeper, it's, I mean, you right, like, that's your job, and you're good at it, but it's also like you saw this vision, like for you for having more women. And I think that's so powerful, and I appreciate you talking about your process. And and just like the question of do you know anybody in this field? Do they know?

Unknown:

Yeah, who do you know? Who Could you help me with? Because in it, okay, someone? Like that specific question is slight shift as well. Because who do you know, that I can speak to? makes people go, Oh, who do it? Rather than do you know anyone? Because do you know anyone as a closed question? And it's not that you're wrong. It's just that Do you know ghosts? Now? I don't know anyone who do you know? It's like, oh, who do I know in that field? And it really makes people's brains connect as many of those dots that haven't like those little fireflies that are around going, Who do I know who can I connect you to? So think that's a really good thing. And this is for whether you're in a career and you're trying to like trying to connect two dots of something that you want to progress in. Or if you You're trying to get into a career and you're really interested. Like you don't have to be in that career. You just have to have an interest and have like that kind of Inspector Gadget curiosity hat on what like what interests you because if say I was wanting to get into any industry if I go and ask someone I'm really interested in this I really like was fascinated by X y&z Who do you know, you could talk to connect me with? Someone's gonna go Oh, wow, she's really interested in this. I know someone I don't know, if my partners partners can't the screen, maybe not partners. But

Julie Berman - Host:

we know what you mean, it's okay.

Unknown:

But your brain is naturally and like we're all keen to help like most of us, to help others and want to help others progress in life. So I think there's some like, if you've been doing something for a while, you're keen to help anyone else and shed some light and give someone guidance without saying you have to do X, Y and Zed. Like that person will have an insight into a world that you wouldn't find by just sitting there online, in your own space with your own ability to Google.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, I love that. And thank you for correcting me. So it's who do you know that I can speak to I love that? Yeah. And I want to ask like, so let's say right, you get connected with that person, then what is the next step? Like? How do you go about either like asking for guidance or asking for the connection to a job or like the opportunity? Like, what do you usually do is the next step? Because I think to me, like, that's almost seems like the key right that unlocks the door is when you do get to talk to that person?

Unknown:

Yeah, well, I guess it's like, what are you really wanting to know? If it's a field that you're wanting to get into? Well, how did they get into it? What does the field look like? What does the job look like? What does the role look like? What other things are there? If you're in the beginning stages of this, it might be you know, it's just the curiosity open. If you say to something, someone, what's it like to work in this field? They might give you quite a blunt answer. But if you say I'm really fascinated by plastics in the ocean, and how to make a change, and you talk to someone that's in that field, and you say, I'm really curious, like, I'm really fascinated by this, what got you into it, or what really lights you up about your role? If you ask someone about what lights them up about their role, they usually already lit up. And they'll tell you and they will share beyond. Because when someone's excited about what they do, it allows you to really take from that. And then you can ask questions like so what would a working day look like for you? After you've gone through the well? What does the HR role look like? What does a field look like? What does? What other things where could I talk to more people? What sort of events are there that I could attend? Is there any chance I could come and shadow you? Is there any chance I could? How would I go about getting into this? And I think that's when you really start to get into that person's world? And that's sometimes what you wouldn't find if you were going, for example, television. Yeah, most people would go. They think there's a director, maybe there's camera operator, there's a sound D and there's a precinct. I don't know, you might think that there's more. But that that is often what people think, right? Before you that's like looking at iceberg. That's the tip of it. But as I've mentioned before, these four pages work for people that work in the industry. And if someone came to me and said, I'm really interested in television, I really am fascinated by being a camera operator. But what else is there in this industry, and they talk to me, they'll be like, well, let me show you all the different things. And let's talk about it. And like, let me show you from where I met, what else is going on? Because I'll have a greater insight then someone else who's not done it before. And then I'll also as a person in that space, be able to share with you like events to attend groups to attend other people in the industry. It might be that you think oh, gosh, that's really interesting. I'd really be interested in I don't know, another role in it. Is there anyone you can connect me with that does that? Oh, absolutely. I've got five people over here that I'll put you in touch with. Yeah, so getting those initial So connections is really like, a key to finding out more, or just being really curious with a curious mindset. And not thinking with these conversations you have, you don't know all these fields that people do and actually, by talking to people, then you've opened up this whole world that never existed before. And I think that's just shows the power of curiosity. Yeah. That strength is like, really embody the strength of curiosity when you're going into this space, because, you know, it's a whole world that you don't know and have no judgment behind what you're asking.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, it's so I love that explanation. It's so beautifully, like how you shared all that. And it's interesting, because it made me think of informational interviews. And just like the process of going through and talking to people, asking them about what they're doing. And I'm curious, like, have you done almost like, you know, what you were talking about? Where you ask people like, can I shadow you? Have you done that recently? And how people usually react to that if they're like, surprised, or they're like, oh, yeah, like, come along? Have you done that before? Or recently?

Unknown:

I mean, I've done it before. I haven't done it in a while. Okay. I haven't done it recently. I guess, in the sense of where I have been, it might not have been an entire career change, but where I have been wanting to get into something that I haven't done already. And so I've said, Would it be possible for me to come and shadow and just see what's going on. So for example, in a sport that I might not have been filming, this is a bit more niche, but in a sport I haven't filmed before, but I really want to, I have kind of said, Could I come along and see what's going on, because I'd really be keen to get into this because I really see the value

Julie Berman - Host:

of whatever it is.

Unknown:

Um, for example, one of the things that I'm looking at at the moment is I'm really passionate about kite surfing. It's one of my favorite things like I love kite surfing. And this year, I was thinking, Okay, what I want to do is combined, my favorite sports with camera work, like I really want to get more into that space. And so I started getting really curious of going, Okay, how could I do that? Who could I talk to? So I started looking into all the different kitesurfing things, talking to people and being like, I'm really curious to know, is there anything that exists in this space already? Is there anything else that's here? And one guy said, Ah, well, I actually already do something. And I said, we'll be able to have a talk about it. I can just really curious to get into that. I don't know what it looks like already. So although it's not a new career path, it is me saying vulnerably. I don't do this. I haven't done this. This is where my background is. But this is why I'm passionate about that. Would I be able to come along and see what you're about what you do. And I think if anyone listening to this, thinks about that, if someone was to ask you, with vulnerability, say to you, I'm really interested in what you do. And I really, really want to get into that field, or I'm really interested to explore what that looks like in the whole field of whatever it is. Would it be possible for me to come and shadow you and what you're doing? Who like unless you're in a really confidential role, most people are really wanting to go Yeah, absolutely. Come along, I'll show you like, you take someone under your wing, especially when they've got to the point. If you've got to the point that you've asked and reached out for help, people are usually pretty willing to help you. Yeah. So yeah, keeping that in mind.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah. And that's a great example to have, I think, like, sometimes when we, as we get into something, you know, we, we find that we love it, you know, more and more, but or we hear about something new or right, like our hearts really like ooh, I want to do this specific thing as you get into a role. And I think it's really cool that like there's still places where we can learn and grow. And also ask for help based on what we know about ourselves and like what we really love to do. And I think that's so cool that you're like really honing in on the things that you love. Like that's like a goal of yours this year. So that's so cool. So have to keep us updated.

Unknown:

I just think it's like, if when you talk to someone and like you meet someone, and they're so passionate about what they do, and you go that's amazing when someone's really, really, they talk about inspiration and like they talk about it with passion. That's so cool. And whether that's in work or out of work, I think, when people are lit up by something, and you can talk to someone and say like, so for example, I'm not an accountant, and I'm not great with numbers, and stuff like that. But when I talk to an accountant, and I say, what do you love about what you do? And that's my key little statement I use, what do you love about what you do? When you hear them say, I love empowering people, to know how to use their money, and how to do things like that with their money. And you go, that's amazing, because, and they start lighting up. And so gone is any connotation that I had, or may have had around what an accountant might have been. But all of a sudden, that telling me about all these things that light them up about the field that they're in, and why they do it and where that came from. And then you say, oh, you know, like, I see that really excites you and brings you joy and stuff. And it's just seeing that in someone and bringing that back into your own work. And I think if you've not got that, how could you do that? More? Like why? Why did you get into the field that you're doing? You know, like, what, what brought you into that field? And what is your purpose of why you're doing it? Because when you kind of re establish that, and if you feel like you've lost, it didn't kind of go well? Is there something else that I could bring into this, because you might be in, you might have been in a career for 2030 years, and you've kind of lost that sense of why you're there. It might be? Well, where is the small fracture in it, that I could, that I have my niche, or my unique ability to help out, my small that I can help is women entering, or women in the television world, women in this specifically in the technical field, like I love being able to help empower those women. It might not change the industry, but it might be able to help more. And now that I'm kind of more into that I find groups that are involved in that, find more women that are involved in that. And that kind of RE and ignites that passion that I have. And so it's like, if you're listening, and you've lost that, where is your unique skill set? And your unique values that you honor? And how can you reignite your own passion? because there'll be something? And if it's not there, there may be it's about having, like, honest conversation with yourself and being like, well, what how could I do that? In my life and some other way?

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, yeah, those are really good points. And like such good food for thought. And I, you know, I think to your point about sort of your purpose, like you love bringing more women behind the camera, as well as showing what they're doing in front of the camera is really interesting. And and I want to touch on that. Before we do though, I want to go back to like younger Anna, and talk about like a little bit. How did you get into this world of outside broadcast, and you were in also the superyacht industry. So can you share a little bit about you know, your history and like, how you got here, because there aren't a lot of women. And I love that you're trying to bring more women into it. But share a little bit about your journey with us, please.

Unknown:

Yeah. So we're actually doing a thing today, and we're talking about frame of mind, and where you frame your worldview from. And I think because I came from a really supportive, caring family, but we're, there was very much an influence. So my dad's an electrician, and I grew up really fixing things and making changes and like being really creative and hands on. And so from the very beginning, there was never, this is what girls do. This is what boys do. It was this might be how girls do and this might be how boys do but you can do it. Do it, what you actually enjoy. And so I started my life very much with a little work desk, like a lot of tools and all these sort of things, and making videos and making like I really wanted to be a director for a while and I wanted to be a pilot and I wanted to be an adventurer and make it like an exhibitionist and all this sort of stuff. I don't know that to work, but

Julie Berman - Host:

I like it that we know what you mean. So it's all good.

Unknown:

And explore so I used to like it was all about very much like having fun and exploring it and being creative, and all this sort of stuff. And so when I was at school really getting into like my best friend used to make little, we had shops. And we had we made videos and we sold stuff that less people wanted to buy. But we made a lot of creative things all the time. And when I went into uni, I remember thinking, I want to be a director, like that's what I at that point, that's what I was wanting to do. And I went and did a television degree of Bachelor of communications, and majored in television minded and multimedia. And with the intention of going and doing that, when I got into the industry, I was like, or even into the degree, I was like, That is not what I want to do at all. I do not want to be a director that has no interest, my skill set, and my desires are not there at all. Which is why I think it's like, it's good to explore these things before you can go straight into something you don't know about. But in the creative field, it started opening up all these other doors and all these other avenues. And even by that stage, I could see that actually, there weren't many women and they collision and feel, but I liked adventuring and exploring, which was very much I wanted to be able to maybe make exploration videos and intrepid style videos of off the beaten track, those kind of videos anyway, started getting into the industry realized back in 2003 2004. Five, that there were very, very few women, and it put me off, it just made it a bit more challenging. And those first years of being in it were quite tough. And so I would go out and I would I would go filming. And I was working in the studio, doing news, working in the studio, doing some outside broker stuff. But it was a struggle to break through that glass ceiling of gender. And that did pose some problems to trying to progress forward. I worked in different kinds of shows and stuff in New Zealand, but women were very much a minority. It has changed, but it's still not equal, but it's much much better. And then after a year of traveling and working around the world, and while working through Europe and and Austria and just traveling and just seeing the world and being curious and out there and adventurous. I found out about yachting and Scipio world, I thought I wanted to get into that. And I wanted to either work on deck or which, during that or being an engineering with my two like driving forces, I wanted to be outside in the sun, doing hands on things. Again, I came up to the Battle of there's not many women at all. And like there was very much a you're not going to do this cuz you're a woman, you should be a chef or a stew. And I think that was that same pushing factor that reminded me of television, and I was like, there is no way I'm listening to that. If they say no, I'm going to go like love, it's not gonna stop me. And so although it was more of a struggle, then it would have been maybe a FERS male, or maybe if I had have gone into the stewardess shifting role. It was something that I was still quite adamant that I wanted to those beginning years of anything that's going through change, I think there's got to be those change makers and those people that do struggle. So I think there's probably an element of like going through the messy parts where things don't necessarily exist, or they do, but they're in their infancy, and creating that change, breaking those barriers. And just being like in a space that's like, we can all do it. There's no reason why we can't. So that kind of took me into that field. And then so after like, five years and television, traveling, working in Austria and stuff, and then seven years working on the yachts and working my way up. When I went to leave then it was kind of like a bit of an identity crisis because you become, you know, you're working at sea. So you become one with your job, which a lot of careers a lot of people get like that by being in a job where you're fully consumed. On a boat, where you're working remotely. You're you there's lots of other things going on. When it came to leaving, I kind of was like, I don't know what to do. I don't know who I am. I've lost a sense of myself. And I didn't know and so that was a process where I was like, right what I actually what do I actually like who actually am I? And that real stuff Helping in talking, trying to find someone to talk to, to work out that next process because I've kept seeing this repetitive people trying to leave, not working, then coming back. And this self esteem just crashing through the floor. But this isn't right. And my thing that had driven through all of these careers was helping empower people to do what they wanted to do, and helping people to be themselves. And yet at this point, I was struggling to work out who I was, and I was like, wait a minute, just sitting there in front of me, like, it's really in front of me, no one else is doing it. And that that point was just a wake up call of like, this is where people need support leaving yachts, people need that support, because no one else gets it. No one else knows what to do. There was only one other person, she was already busy. So I was like, This is what I need to do. And so that's kind of where I started my career transition coaching for your crew specifically, because I knew how tough that change was, and how big of an identity crisis that could be. And actually, you want to step up and off, up and off into a new career. Rather than going back into an old life or going backwards, you want to step up and away, because you shouldn't ever step down into a life raft should step up and often to a life raft. So in doing that, I think it really opened up a space in a world where I started learning about myself a lot more. And now, one of the things I learned was like, actually, one of the biggest passions that I didn't used to have was doing television, was doing camera work. I love that. I love the environment. But I also loved helping people. And so the fact that now I have a career that's really balanced between doing camera work being out there in the broadcast world, doing sport, doing a really like interactive, very physical at times job, as well as really helping people to be like the best versions of themselves and understand themselves. Those two things. For me, variety is such a key thing, being curious, being around all these different people, and adventure and exploration. It's like you kind of create the life that you desire, rather than the life that you feel like you should, or that society might feel like it expects you to do is that you really have to be proactive and take the steps to create that life that's right for you. Not what's put in front of you. So I think, yeah, yeah.

Julie Berman - Host:

I love that. And I think like the life that you have created, it's like, just hearing you talk about it is streaming, because one of the interviews actually, I just had, she wrote this book about, it's called My What if your Alicia had basically done these four different internships as an adult who's turning about to turn 40? Because she had accomplished basically what she had set out to accomplish? And she got to this point, she's like, I don't know, like, Am I happy? No, I don't, I don't know what this is this it like. And basically, she's, she's reworking her life to be what she wants it to be now, at this point, the stage she's at. And so I love that, because I think there's a lot of times where, you know, we have a vision of kind of like, what we want what we should be doing. And then we sometimes we get to that place, sometimes we don't, but usually eventually, at some point, we get to this place where we're over like questioning. Is this it? Like, is this? Is this what I really want my life to look like? Is this how I want to feel every day? And right, like, what's next? And so I love that you were able to combine those two things. And I want to talk like a little bit about what you do in what you did, I should say, in your role on the super yachts, because that was also a very, very much like a sort of a push right to break some of the ceilings to break some of those molds that were traditionally just made for men. And have you talked about that? Because I think to what you'd said previously about how sometimes when that new path, right for places where women have not traditionally been, is being paved by the women who are paving it or by the women who are coming right after it's initially paved. Like it can be uncomfortable. It can be like, you've got to really, it sounds like just from what you said, like put in that extra effort, that extra determination like that grit. So I would love to hear about that. And just how, you know, like, where did you work? got to like, what position you were in? If you can explain that, and how was that as a woman as well in that field?

Unknown:

Yeah, sure. Just before I start talking about that, which ties in, but I think, a big thing. And as you said, the past woman, she had been looking at these different things, I think living your life, according to your values, like really like, what I really do now is help people understand it and a compass, because if you understand yourself, then you can keep making sure your life is according to you. So keep adjusting each year. And when you live your life according to your values, then you can create it. So it's like, it might look like this now, three years, five years time, if you if you kept thinking oh, well, I'm only aiming for this thing at the end of the path. It's like being at sea, if you aim for that day, and then you get there and you thought that was where you want to be, and you anchor in it, and it's washing your ground, and it's got a terrible tide, and like, the winds blowing in the wrong direction, you're like, great, this is what I thought of my life. But actually, it's terrible. Or I'm not actually here. It's, I'm okay, but it's not great. And I think when you keep adjusting your campus each year, or keep adjusting it, and like, going, okay, what are my values? How am I living a life aligned by them, then you can make sure that it's right for you. And thank God going into yachting was the thing, and you're saying was that it fulfilled at the beginning of my career, it fulfilled a lot of my dreams, a lot of those values, so the values of adventure, the values of connecting with people, it like the curiosity, or these sorts of things, it was really good in that space, I think there probably is a level of grit that you touched on, that I am drawn to, like, I'm drawn to that, like those people who are those people who step into a space that doesn't look like them in the beginning, I think I like lead, like empowering from a place where other people can feel okay to be supported. And that may look like uncomfortable positions, or uncomfortable messy steps I'll take that can be comfortable for people behind me. Or it might be that they sit their own way. But at least someone's done something in front of them. And you're saying I think what changed was by the end, my values didn't line up anymore. And that's where I kind of was like, right, my value of adventure is no longer there. Because it just was not being fulfilled my value of like the environment, and like really looking after the environment and empowering or maybe caring for the planet that was so blatantly not there. And it was so in contrast to each other to what I believed in at the time. And what we were doing, it was really hard to turn that off. And so I think when your values don't line up, and that's why I say keep adjusting, keep checking in. Because if at this point, your values are here, and then five years down the track your values don't necessarily look the same. The things that are important to you the things that motivate you, and the future might not be those same things. That's okay, that's life. But if you keep thinking it's the same all the time, during your life, you're probably not going to be happy because you probably going to look at it and go oh, right, like a chief what I thought and now I've got nothing else. Whereas actually, if you keep checking in and going, Oh, actually, this thing's more important to me now. And this thing is more important to me. But besides that, so tell you what I actually did. So that's in the yachting space. But when I got into this space, and apologies because I do have a New Zealand accent. This is going to sound inappropriate to a lot of people who don't understand my accent, but I wanted to be a deckhand when I joined. And when I joined in 2010, working on deck was very much not the done thing for women. Being an engineer was absolutely not the done thing. Like I don't know, I think I know one female engineer at that time, and maybe now there's two or possibly three. That's probably an overstatement. There might be two on deck and as officers there is a lot more now than which was amazing because it did require, you know, I wasn't the first person to step into that. But I was definitely in the first kind of years of people going through that. What that involved was when I started, there was a lot of pushback. There was a lot of people saying, No, you're ago based up a chef, that you know and me saying, I want to be an engineer, I want to be a deckhand. I want to be an officer, I want to be a captain, them saying no bare stupidity if you're a female, that's the role that this industry puts you in. And I think by that was a bit of a massive push to go. Right? That's not, that's not going to stand up to my desires. What that looked like was me trying after months and months of not getting work at all, because I was persistent. I like putting all my efforts but I just could not get work as a deckhand. So I ended up getting Dexter rolls, which was a joint double role. So it means your halftime, a stewardess, halftime, you're a deckhand. doing that for a couple of years on different boats, and then going through my yacht masters, which is a course where you get your captain's license up to 200 ton. You learn all about navigation, learning about all your different things that it takes to Captain a vessel. And so you do all your tickets and stuff. And so I got that. And by the time I got that Vin, I could get a deacons position, which the irony is you've now got a captain's license, and you have to start at the bottom. But that is the natural progression of that field. And then after that, you start working towards your officer tickets. And so that's your officer of the watch tickets, which is about eight or nine modules, I think, which between naught and 1000 euros to 3000 euros per thing. And they might take a week to two weeks, three weeks a month, each module. And they have to do so many like a solid book of different things to say that, you know, you're running drills, and you're navigating, and you're taking the boat on and off the dock. And you're able to do all this sort of safety stuff, and all these inductions and all sorts of different things and you work your way up to officer. And then beyond that you work your way up to Chief Officer and then beyond that you wake you up to masters. That's kind of the progression. So I was on my way up that progression ladder when you're actually working on deck. So a yacht the structure of a yacht, depending on the size of a boat, it functions very differently. But a super yacht is basically a yacht over 24 meters, that has a whole bunch of other things, but that's kind of where we're talking. And it can be a sail yacht or a motor yacht. Those are the two different types of boats or bicycle yachts, motor yacht sail yacht structure wise, you have kind of a captain who is at the very top. And so say for example, we took a 60 meter yacht, you'll have a captain and then you'll have two departments or two you'll have interior and exterior. And on your interior department, you'll hear the chief steward is seeking stewardess and then maybe three stewardesses underneath. And so they will look after the Interior Department of the yacht. So from service of keeping and laundry, the chef may have a chef and a sous chef or a chef and the second chef, and they'll look after the guest meals, the crew meals, everything in terms of provisioning, what comes and goes from the boat, what the crew have

Julie Berman - Host:

to the guests. Okay, the exterior department

Unknown:

is under the deck department and the engineering department. Engineering is like you'll have your chief engineer then you may have an eto which is someone who looks after all the kind of electrical and kind of IT stuff on the boat. And then you might have a third engineer or a fourth engineer depending on the size of the ship. And then on the depth department, you might have a chief officer a second officer, a boson and then a lead Deacons in a bunch of decades and they look after everything from the outside. So anything that's on the outside of the vessel might be from your cleaning the boat has to be these are super yachts so they have to be clean all of the time. So cleaning to painting to vanishing to anything like repair work on the outside of the boat. So you've got all these people get really good skilled at really well, knowledge of like teak and like the wood that's on a boat like the punishing to the paint. Think to all that kind of stuff to systems around hot tubs to jet skis to all the watersports and all the toys and all the stuff that's in the boat as well as all the the tenders, which are, they're like little smaller boats that you take, you might have the ones that are on the boat or in the boat, where you might have big ones that you tow, or big ones that you drive as well. And then you have all the stuff from the navigation. So everything in the bridge, so your deck department looks after all the bridge, doing passage plans doing like chat corrections and chat updates to all your bridge equipment that keeps up to date, you have to know everything that's going on in the bridge, you have to know navigation while you're at sea, you have to know how to navigate, you have to know your rules of the road, you have to know how to communicate et Cie, you know, on all that different platforms and devices, you have to be able to take care of the guests when they're actually on the boat outside.

Julie Berman - Host:

Makes sense.

Unknown:

Yeah, you're also in charge for the safety and security of the vessel. So that means that all the safety equipment onboard, so all the crew will be trained as firefighters as well as first aid responders. And because if you have a accident or something at sea, you have to be able to respond, you have to be able to put out a fire if you have a fire. So you'll have like on the deck department, you're looking after all the safety drills or the security drills, we ran those ourselves. So you had to keep all the crew up to date on all those drills. And those have to be done. While you've got guests on, as well as while they're off, you have to look after all the firefighting appliances on board, all the smoke, all the fire extinguishers, all the everything, like security wise, you have to do your security drills, you'll have certain different security drills and so everything on that vessel functions from the crew. That's amazing. And yeah, so it's quite a lot of stuff. So when you get to going well now what I do with my life, like I've got such a very skill set to quite a high degree and high level but what do I do with it? So

Julie Berman - Host:

yeah, that was an amazing, amazing overview like I don't think I mean the most I know about Super yacht is what I've seen on like the shows that are the reality show.

Unknown:

Like this is like I'm just putting this out there, Julie, to anyone watching this below deck is rubbish. It is not correct. A terrible, terrible show that has ruined the industry, FYI, okay. Not a good example.

Julie Berman - Host:

Yes, well, I figured the reality and I'm using air quotes here. Reality TV, as we probably all know, is not actually probably really real realistic. So there you go below deck is not what it's really like,

Unknown:

below deck and working in television and working in yachting had a car crash and they created below deck. That is my opinion of below deck.

Julie Berman - Host:

There you go, Well, we have it from a source. We've got the inside scoop. And I want to like so I want to ask you and uh, first of all, like, I know, you said you got to an officer position and you had like a lot of as an officer, right? Like you have a lot of high level responsibility. So you got like you attained the position, like one of the positions that you had really aspire to attain which so like I'm clapping for I can't really clap, you know, but I'm clapping. I'm Eric clapping here. And I, first of all, like, that's amazing. I want to ask like, in particular, because you are currently paving a path for women in an OB right and open broadcasts, you did pave a path like and help right helped make that easier for subsequent women in the superyacht industry. Like I'm curious how that feels to you and like I, I'm imagining that there's a certain level of discomfort, that there's a certain toleration for hearing no hearing, that's not possible things in this vein, and I would love to hear your thoughts on if women are listening to this. And they are wanting to go into a field where they likely may hear those things right where they're either paving the path themselves, where they are going on a path that has not been tread often by women, where they feel like or there will be that sense of discomfort there will be that those people saying no, you can't do this. Why? Why are you even going to try Why are you here? That's not that's not something that we have seen before. That's something that's been done before? What advice would you give them? What can you tell them from your experiences that may give them that sense of that they can do it too, that it is possible?

Unknown:

I guess it's not. It's about reconnection with Why do you want to do it? Like there is a level of I think you have to really understand why you're wanting to do it. And what difference you what is your purpose behind why you're getting into it, what, like you have to be really, you have to be really sure that you're going to make the world a different place or anything, but you have to have the confidence and knowledge that you will be knocked down, you will be told no, over and over again. But to know that you can get up and the resilience and the grit that you mentioned before, that will keep you going and you will be a stronger person, by the time it comes to the end. Also the fact that if it hasn't been done before by women, well, then you're the first person that's going to prove them wrong. And you've got the place to be able to be like, and now it can be like this is how change, I love change. And I love when change happens. I know a lot of people feel I'm not great with stability, probably you could tell. So change is my driver. And if change is something that you actually thrive in, and being adaptable and being flexible, if you are going into a path that hasn't been carved before, you have to be able to flex and adapt and maybe thinking about a different approach to it, what you're gonna bring to it that maybe someone hasn't brought before. I think the big thing that, especially females in both of those industries bring as a whole, like, I go on a job, and people say, Oh, it's so different when when women are on the job, you know, unit managers will say, it's just a nicer place. The guys don't talk so much rubbish when girls around, like you do bring that you bring a change and you bring something that doesn't exist before. And so you won't be worth walking the same path and to you won't walk the same path that someone else, maybe a male in that role has walked because it will have looked different for them. But it will have looked different for them to the person beside them as well. It might have their path may have looked more similar to someone else's. But I think having a strong network of people around you having good support network around you, whether they're people in it, and like knowing yourself knowing that, even if you fall over, you'll get up and you'll try again. And you'll hear Oh, that's amazing. Or like, oh, we'll give you a go or being really proactive in the space. Because the likeliness is there will be no hours. But there'll be people that believe in you and as well. And there'll be people that you who will want a change, but they won't have ever seen the possibility that there could be. And because no one's done it before, it doesn't mean it can't be done. It's just no one else has taken that approach that you're going to take. And so if no one's done it before, either reach out and find out if anyone else has, if there are other people connect with them, those people want to talk to you. Other people in that space are quite likely to go. They may be a bit like when you're starting to interspaces that others haven't been and this is with gender, race, all sorts of different things. There's sometimes a little bit of hesitation and resistance initially, because the person that's gone there before may have found that they've fought their way to get through there. And so they may be like initially hesitant, but actually that probably one of your biggest supporters because they want more people like themselves or more like you more diversity and more change. And also, my big thing is, we want a diverse, adaptable world. We want people to learn things and be curious and open minded, or how's that going to change if we don't make the change ourselves? So if you've got the ability to make that change, you know, you've got the ability to shift the way things are. Why wouldn't you? Why wouldn't you? You know, use your unique skills, use your strengths, understand who you are, and start stripping those parts because just because it hasn't been done before it does. I mean, it can't be just means you need to be the one that changes it. So I'm a big advocate. And if anyone's thinking about stepping into that space, talk to me, because I'm very keen to support you, and give you all the support. Like there is now that I'm over here, I found women in film and television, I film like these groups, women in sport, this huge collective of women who are doing things that are all talking about the same things. Yeah, it doesn't exist before. And look at all those people in that group. So all those people have found that this is a space that they didn't exist in before. And look how many of them there are in it. So pleasing, there's possibly people who are in your space. And genuinely, if you look it up online, you'll probably find women and insert here. And it probably just doesn't create it.

Julie Berman - Host:

Right. There we go.

Unknown:

Yeah, more people.

Julie Berman - Host:

I love that that was such an, like, a really incredible and inspiring answer. And, and I, I love that sort of going back to the idea of like, why why is it important to? Like, why does it match with your values and what you're wanting for yourself for your life and, and paving that path? And, and I want to talk about, you know, because one of the things I always like to mention on here is for people who are interested in going into this field, and I think like for this we'll we'll talk specifically about the broadcast. But, you know, like for women who are looking to get into this field where they want to get behind the camera, what are you mentioned a few, but what are the resources or the ways that you have found if you don't mind sharing those for people to do a bit of research to find connections. And I know you are based, you started in New Zealand, where you're from your base now in London. So if you could speak to like, if you just know the ones where you are, that's fine, if you know any that are like worldwide, or wherever you'd love them all. Yeah.

Unknown:

So yeah, I did start in New Zealand, and I still have connections back there. So if anyone was wanting, if anyone's got anywhere in the world that they are, I could probably connect you with someone who's already there. Eye connection is one of my things that I love to do. So Ask me, ask me who you need. And I'll give you the answer. Or I'll give you the person over here in the UK, women in film and television is a really good group. Women in sports is another group, good group for like sports area. There are lots of think, ladies and film and television is another one. To be honest, if you just look up on things like Facebook, and LinkedIn, and look up women in whatever field, you probably will find them. In terms of other things looking up on Google and going groups. In this field, there are so many like, in the last. When I got here last year, I found there was a broadcast website that you could go on, it didn't specifically relate to what I specifically do, but I think

Julie Berman - Host:

you can always send it right, you can send it after and I'll put it in the show notes. Because I always include resources in there. Okay, that's that. And that's great advice, too. I think like I was gonna mention also, I know, LinkedIn sometimes has some really cool groups, in addition to Facebook. But the ones that you mentioned, are, are wonderful. And I think that like for you, I feel like I've said, Wow, a lot of times in this conversation like maybe I don't know, maybe I didn't count them before maybe I say Wow, a lot. I have to like go back and listen. But I feel like I've said it a lot in relation to our conversation today. Because like, there's just so many great things that you've shared, and also so much experience that you've had, that's just really unlike any any thing that I've ever heard of before, which is why I love doing the show. It's just so interesting to hear about you in these two completely different fields. And basically, very diverse skill set like you have for each one, but yet some really interesting ways that they interconnect, and some of the skills that you have. And I think that's such a beautiful point that I just wanted to mention like to you and then also to people who are listening. It's like sometimes for ourselves. It's really hard to recognize this skill sets that we actually possess. But when other people see us and like hear about what we're doing, we see them so clearly and so like for You you've got so many interesting skill sets of like, you know, this ability to make quick decisions be confident, right like to pave these paths and like the grit and determination and like the ability to be told no, and probably many different ways, in many different countries and like, still continue on this path that was so, so clear to you, and navigating that and, and so I think that's so beautiful. So I wanted to point that out. Because I think like, you know, sometimes it takes someone else outside of us to like, if you're wondering to what you said, like, and I have this great quote from you that I wanted to share, like, you know, and then we'll, we'll wrap up a little bit, but you said when we were chatting originally, and you said something similar today is like, if you know who you are, then you can navigate through life. And I thought that was so beautiful. Because sometimes it's hard for us to realize, like the things that we're incredible at the things that spark us the things that are really our own strengths, and that are innate to us. But I think sometimes like asking our friends, asking our family, the people who see us people who interact with us, having those conversations with them, like they see it right very clearly. So I wanted to share that idea to like for people who are, who are like not sure how to navigate, but they're hearing this and like, Ooh, there's something so great about this conversation. That's like one way to tap into that a bit. And you're just such an inspiration. And like, I I think that you are besides being super cool. You're helping other women, right? You're you're getting there yourself, and then you're lifting other women up along the way, which I appreciate so much. Because that's that's how we show women like what we're capable of what we're what we're able to do, and that there's so many possibilities for us. It's just like to continue and you're doing it like you're doing the work.

Unknown:

Oh, thank you. I think that's the thing that I, I hope if anyone takes stuff away from this conversation, it's that they will sit there and go, What makes and this is, this is my big thing, discover your inner compass, because when you know who you are, then you can navigate the ocean. And you can navigate the world and you can keep you can keep adjusting your compass as you go, you know your values, you know, what's really important to you, like empowering people is so important to me. That's why it's something I do on television. It's something I do in yachting, it's something I've set up, I set up to charities while I was back home, why can't women in business and keep Hamilton beautiful, both ways to empower people to do to do themselves in a space of a supportive space. And so like, I know that the things like connecting and empowering and supporting people are my key things that what drives me being adventurous, being creative, being curious, having variety, that the things that are thriving, I know my values now. And I think if people can understand their own things, and you can look around, you can ask people around you, you know, what strengths do you see? And me, people, like you said, people will be able to identify those straightaway. And it's not a it's not a hard thing. And if you can get like I get all my clients to do this, if you can get answers from a whole bunch of people, people who you respect people who value family, friends, work colleagues, people, you know, say what do you what are the three strengths that you see within me, and you actually write them down? That's a massive way to be able to go, oh, I had no idea that you saw this within me or? Absolutely, that reinforces my thoughts around x and y. The more you understand that, then the more you can, like, keep adjusting that compass, rather than blindly navigating through fog, and going, I don't know where I'm going. So you can live a life according to you, rather than where you feel like you should be going. And the other thing I was thinking, while we were just talking was like, you know, really knowing what your focus is, but not being only focused on that. Because if you're only focused on one thing, then I mean, you could be just focused on that. It's not my it's not my particular way that I variety is so key to me. But if I have my focus here, but I'm also aware of what's going on outside, I can see opportunities, I can miss the action that's going on right beside if I'm just solely focused on here, but if I was able to shift my camera adjust, I can see this other action that's actually way more important than what's going on over here. And I can put all my attention over here and then all of a sudden I've got an opportunity that I would have missed if I was only focusing in one day Action. Yeah. So I think just being really aware, especially if you're going through a career change, or you're in a place that in a workplace, or you're in a career, as you may have been driving for one thing, and actually, the key thing is sitting right beside that. But you've been so focused and narrowly so narrowly focused, which is what sort of society tells you really focus on something, but that you missed a thing that was your natural flow to get to over here? So yeah, be aware of that other things that are going on. They might not look, it might not look that same path, but it might be right beside it. Or it might be the thing that actually over there, no one's gone down that path. And that's something that you would naturally be able to easily go down. So it's just keeping that curious mindset and that curious. Hat, Inspector Gadget hat on

Julie Berman - Host:

Yeah, as well, an inspector Jack gadget was very cool. When I watched it, it was, um, but yeah, I like that you're talking about sort of that open mindedness, like going towards your goal, but also, letting therapy a little bit of curiosity around, like, over here could look interesting to like, should I, you know, should I just quickly look over there and see, are there opportunities that that also would be fun to see what they look like? And, and I think that too, you know, it takes a little bit of often a willingness to be vulnerable willingness to do something and, and be a little bit fearful about, like, where's that gonna go, especially if you've been so focused on something, but can also, like you've said, lead to this incredible opportunity or experience for you that you wouldn't may have never seen otherwise. So I think that's really cool. And then I wanted to mention along the lines of this, I don't know if we ever talked about this, but something I'm doing now is I help people figure out like what sparks them. And they can do it through like finding their spark type. So I wanted to mention that too. Because it's like this, this assessment that people can take for free. And it helps you figure out like, in addition to what we're talking about, you know, like talking to other people who know you doing some inner work about your values, but also like, it's you can go to spark type.com, and you can figure out your spa archetype. And it's just like, more clues more insight into like, who you are, so you can navigate and figure out you know, like, where do you want to go in life? What makes you happy? What lights you up? So this has been such a good conversation, I want to make sure we we ask my favorite question at the end, before we wrap up. And so to end our conversation, will you share a sentence that uses verbiage or jargon from your field, and then translate it so it is understandable to us?

Unknown:

Well, I feel like I just said it. So I'm gonna probably shouldn't have voted on myself. So discovering your inner compass. So you can navigate through life and navigate your own journey, rather than going blindly through the fog. And ending up in a place where you're feeling a wash and obey. That's not the right place to anchor is a really key point to understanding who you are. And when you understand yourself and you understand who you truly are that inner compass, and you keep adjusting it. And then you can go your own track through life. You don't have to keep doing what you feel like you should do, but you do what's right for you.

Julie Berman - Host:

I love that and I love especially that you mentioned adjusting, like be being willing to sort of reevaluate where you are coming by. Yeah, like coming back to that. Because I think that's so key. You know, a lot of times like we have, especially when we're younger, right? Like we have the it's like the to do list in our head of like, this is how it's going to be this is how I want my life to look. And then as we're going along, I don't know that we always take time to reevaluate right to assess, like, is this actually true for me now? Does this feel good? Is this aligned with with who I am now and what I want and what I've learned along the way, so I think that's such an awesome such an awesome, just sort of metaphor for, you know, not only boating and yachting, but also in general life, and you just like have I feel like I've had like my own sort of like coaching session with you almost. And I was just so which is so great, because you have so much beautiful wisdom to share and like such cool jobs that you do, you know, and you've you've crafted really, such a neat life built out of all these pieces that you've you've put together And what you love based on what you love. So thank you so much for just sharing those details for the work you do to like, empower women. And it was very inspiring. I really loved our time together.

Unknown:

Thank you so much for having me totally.

Julie Berman - Host:

And where if people want to find you? Where can people find you? Like, if they are interested in coaching, if they want to connect, because they saw like, ooh, this would be so fun to maybe be an outside broadcast? How can they reach you?

Unknown:

So if you are thinking about a career to transition, or career leadership, or anything in that space, you can find my website, which is a picture coaching.com, which Joe Lee will link in the

Julie Berman - Host:

show notes? Yes.

Unknown:

Also on Instagram, LinkedIn, and Facebook, you can find me on all those platforms under the same things. And we'll put all the handles in there. But yeah, just get in touch. I'm always about connecting and having conversations and I, if I talk to whoever it is, I'll try and see how I can help you out. If you've got a question, or if you're just curious, this chat. It's amazing what can come out of the conversation.

Julie Berman - Host:

I love that. Thank you so much, Anna, it was such a pleasure. Thank you. Hey, everybody. Thank you so much for listening to women with cool jobs. I'll be releasing a new episode every two weeks. So make sure you hit that subscribe button. And if you loved the show, please give me a five star rating. Also, it would mean so much if you share this episode with someone you think would love it or would find it inspirational. And lastly, do you have ideas for future shows? Or do you know any Rockstar women with cool jobs? I would love to hear from you. You can email me at Julie at women with cool jobs.com Or you can find me on Instagram at women who will jobs again that women will jobs. Thank you so much for listening and have an incredible day