Talent + Talks Podcast

Get Your Time Back... And Connect Better With Your People - Talent + Talks Ep. 10 with Sam Parker

November 18, 2020 Scott Rivers Season 1 Episode 10
Talent + Talks Podcast
Get Your Time Back... And Connect Better With Your People - Talent + Talks Ep. 10 with Sam Parker
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Talent + Talks Podcast
Get Your Time Back... And Connect Better With Your People - Talent + Talks Ep. 10 with Sam Parker
Nov 18, 2020 Season 1 Episode 10
Scott Rivers

As managers of commercial groups in the areas of Life Sciences, Diagnostics, Genetics, and Oncology, you need your teams engaged more today than ever in the past.  We are in a time of mental health issues, loneliness, and fear, but you can do things to motivate and engage your team.  

Today's guest is Sam Parker.  He is the author of books like 212 The Extra Degree, Lead Simply, Smile & Move, and Cross The Line.  Sam's messages are short and simple, but the impact that they have or can have on you and your team are HUGE!  I was excited to talk to Sam to learn more about where his ideas come from and how he manages to put his simple but effective messages in his books.  His responses will surprise you, make you laugh, but more importantly, they will make you THINK.  

Sam will surprise many of you, but he has not found LinkedIn to be an effective marketing tool for his group yet, but he does admit that things change and that he will have to adapt in the future like all of us.  

I most appreciated Sam's honest and direct nature in answering my questions.  He is very genuine, and I think that's why his messages resonate with me and others as they do.  

To find Sam on LinkedIn, you can visit his page here:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/sparker212/
Please reach out and let him know that you listened to him on the Talent + Talks Podcast.  I would really like for you, the audience of this show, to show him how important that URL is right now. 

Also, you can see more of Sam's work on his website:  https://www.inspireyourpeople.com/

Don't worry, I am not making any money on your purchases. LOL

Finally, Sam mentions a blog post during our discussions... here is the link to that post:  https://www.inspireyourpeople.com/blog/how-to-hire-people-with-good-attitudes/

If you haven't connected with Scott, please connect with him on LinkedIn.  You can find him here:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/scottrivers/

Lastly, please check out our latest book on The Art of Hiring A Players.  You can get this awesome resource for free by going to this link:  https://cercatalent.com/hiring-a-play...

Cerca Talent:  https://www.cercatalent.com/


Show Notes Transcript

As managers of commercial groups in the areas of Life Sciences, Diagnostics, Genetics, and Oncology, you need your teams engaged more today than ever in the past.  We are in a time of mental health issues, loneliness, and fear, but you can do things to motivate and engage your team.  

Today's guest is Sam Parker.  He is the author of books like 212 The Extra Degree, Lead Simply, Smile & Move, and Cross The Line.  Sam's messages are short and simple, but the impact that they have or can have on you and your team are HUGE!  I was excited to talk to Sam to learn more about where his ideas come from and how he manages to put his simple but effective messages in his books.  His responses will surprise you, make you laugh, but more importantly, they will make you THINK.  

Sam will surprise many of you, but he has not found LinkedIn to be an effective marketing tool for his group yet, but he does admit that things change and that he will have to adapt in the future like all of us.  

I most appreciated Sam's honest and direct nature in answering my questions.  He is very genuine, and I think that's why his messages resonate with me and others as they do.  

To find Sam on LinkedIn, you can visit his page here:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/sparker212/
Please reach out and let him know that you listened to him on the Talent + Talks Podcast.  I would really like for you, the audience of this show, to show him how important that URL is right now. 

Also, you can see more of Sam's work on his website:  https://www.inspireyourpeople.com/

Don't worry, I am not making any money on your purchases. LOL

Finally, Sam mentions a blog post during our discussions... here is the link to that post:  https://www.inspireyourpeople.com/blog/how-to-hire-people-with-good-attitudes/

If you haven't connected with Scott, please connect with him on LinkedIn.  You can find him here:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/scottrivers/

Lastly, please check out our latest book on The Art of Hiring A Players.  You can get this awesome resource for free by going to this link:  https://cercatalent.com/hiring-a-play...

Cerca Talent:  https://www.cercatalent.com/


Scott Rivers:

Hello, my friends and welcome back to another talent talks podcast. I'm your host, Scott Rivers. And I'm looking forward to another great show today. Before we get started with today's guests, let me remind you, you have access to a free book on our website, if you will go to Cercatalent.com Highlight over the section that says talent review at the top, you'll see a drop down and in that drop down very clearly it says, Discover the Art of Hiring A Players... just by going to that link and I'll put it in the show notes you can have access to this book, I'd love to get your feedback on this. Many people have said it's helpful. Many people have said that these are things that they have wanted to do when hiring and they're going to start implementing them. Now. I think it's an opportunity to make sure you're getting the best players on your team. Starting today. As we jump into today's guest, we are talking to Sam Parker. Now, if that name doesn't ring a bell, I think this will Sam is the author of "212 The extra degree" awesome book, I've actually bought this program and we're going to be using it in Cerca Talent at our end of year meeting. But really inspiring stuff. And as Sam will tell you, he's really there. Just as a reminder, he's also written a book called Lead Simply awesome information. In this one, he talks today a little bit about smile and move. And then finally, as we jump into the last one, this one's one of my favorites, it's called cross the line. As with all of our guests, you can find Sam on LinkedIn at Sam Parker, you can also look him up on his website, which is Inspireyoupeople.com products to inspire your people. That is in fact where I ordered the 212 kits for My team, which we're going to be going through at our end of your meeting. What I really like about the kits is you've got different levels, which have different bits of information within them. I think all of them come with the books, all of them come with the little reminder cards, which I'll show you as part of this video. Some of them also come with presentations that can be used, as well as training books. The last thing that I want to show you is just one link, this is to Sam's blog, you'll find that at his website as well. He talks about this particular blog post as part of our discussions. And so I'll put the link in the show notes. Guys, as always, with all of our people that we interview on this show, I found them on LinkedIn, you too can find them on LinkedIn. If you find this to be useful. Go ahead and reach out to Sam, let them know that you heard about him and heard his message on our podcast here the talent talks podcast with Scott Rivers, I would greatly appreciate it. I know he would as well. Last thing, and this is it, I promise. If you haven't done so already, do me a favor, go on to iTunes or wherever you listen to podcast, give us a rating. I'll always take feedback. But if you don't have time for that just give us a rating 1234 or five stars. It helps us out a lot It helps to get this message to other people. So without further ado, everyone. Please join me in welcoming Sam Parker. Ladies and gentlemen, Sam Parker is on the show. I know that I gave an introduction to him prior to us jumping in. But, you know, this is someone who I've been learning a lot from and in fact, before I even reached out to him, I sent him a message or reached out to him about the show. I sent him a message and said, hey, I've I've gone out and purchased this from my team. And I'm really excited. It's no longer as I mentioned to you earlier, Sam, it's not going to be a surprise anymore. But as a surprise to my team. Your messages just resonate with me and I think they're gonna resonate with a lot of our listeners. So Sam, thank you so much for joining us today.

Sam Parker:

My pleasure.

Scott Rivers:

No, it's my pleasure. Let's talk a little bit about your background and obviously we're going to jump into you know some of your work and hopefully a lot of your work just to get people a feel for what it is that you do but you know what got you into preparing all of this information and going out and training leaders to be better leaders today. How did you get into this?

Sam Parker:

Uh Well, I kind of variety of things that that that led to all of this but really, you know, I used to carry a bag in several different industries before starting this company back in 1998. I sold insurance products Office products, I sold pharmaceuticals both branded and generic. I sold hip and knee implants. So I've been out there carrying a bag and I had an idea for a radio format for salespeople because I was in the car back then and listening to the tapes and, and always thought it'd be great if there was a radio format that I could listen to, while I'm driving around these different states that my territory is right. And my business partner and I, over breakfast one early morning said, hey, what if we did it on the internet. And that led to us starting a site called just sell.com, which was, it still is operational right now. But it's not what we focus. But it was really tips and ideas on how to better manage your sales team, how to how to better sell, ask open ended questions, listening better, all those types of tips. And that led to, we did that for several years and, and then a few years after we started the business, really, in 2001, I had breakfast with a guy. And it was fairly early in the morning. And we're talking about how to motivate sales people was one of the conversations and he shared with me how his boss used the boiling point as a metaphor to inspired people to try just a little bit harder. And my light bulb went off in my head it connected with something oddly, I'd heard Brian Tracy talk several years before, in DC when I was a young salesperson, and he talked about how in horse racing, the difference between a horse to finish first horse second was usually very small, but the earnings difference could be exponentially different. And I pulled those things together. And then I started writing down these essays and things and started to put them into this little book. And you know, that led to, so I self published it. And then several years later about, I would say, in 2005 2006, maybe it started to really catch on as we've made a derivative version of it a gift version of it with another organization. And there we are. And that's kind of it started as a long winded way of explaining it.

Scott Rivers:

Now. That's, that's great. I appreciate it. And, you know, there there aren't a lot of new ideas out there. But I think what you've done with 212 and crossed the line and others is really just put it into an easy to understand format with some actions behind it, which I think can lead people to do some amazing, amazing things. And we'll go into that. It's interesting, kind of your concept on putting together these books, they're all very simple to read. They're all very short. You also, you know, give some cue cards to go with that, which we'll walk through this in a minute. I can make that. We'll walk through that in a minute. But you know, what's, what's the reason for that? Is it that people have no time to read this? Or is it? Is there some specific science behind the short books?

Sam Parker:

Well, I think it's a variety of things. I've always been writing short books, 212 was always a very short book, it was it's less than 4000 words, which is, you know, for most people, I was telling somebody the other day, I've listened to Stephen King's book on right, and he says he writes 2000 words a day. So he could have a book every two days in my world. But some of my books go up to six and 8000 words, but I do it because I want to give people their time back, you know, it's not a, it's not like I'd like to say, a business book should not I don't think a business book should be something that gets us to the facts as quickly as possible, and in the descending order of importance. So you'll notice in 212, for example, I start with that preamble, because those are the first 20 those first 25 words are the most important. So if you hear nothing other than then those words, at least you walk away. In fact, I think I write that in the book, at least you walk away, having that locked in, and it sticks. And it shows up as action later. You know, it really changes people's lives both, obviously, on a professional level, but also on a personal level, it's very lucky to have been a part of it. Yeah, but that's, it's again, it's about giving people that time back. I'm actually talking longer than I write right now. Yeah, I tried it. That's what the pocket cards are. For example, if, if, if you can't handle reading a short book, then we'll put it on the little pocket card.

Scott Rivers:

And I and I love it. My team's gonna love this as well. And we'll talk through this. You know, Sam, what, what initially got me engaged with you was some of your content that you put out on LinkedIn. And you've got a lot of information that you put out on both LinkedIn and YouTube and you've even got some of your keynotes out on YouTube. How are you using LinkedIn today in order to expand and grow your message and your team?

Sam Parker:

Well, the truth is, I'm not. I'm not so I don't know if this is a if this is you know, where you wanted to go with this, but I personally am not a big fan. This is gonna sound awful. No, let's do it where I'm good. I'm not a big fan of LinkedIn. Okay. I, I find myself I get it depends on what you do for a living, you know, but for what I do for a living, you think that maybe that would translate I should be out there, you know, being a voice You know, you see some of these other trainers and people out there, john Mack Well, things you said Gary Vaynerchuk, you see these big names? Tony Robbins. Of course, they have teams probably doing that. for them. We are a small team here. So I go, that we have not been able to show that that works for us in making a connection to people. It's very odd. And I see LinkedIn, you know, I post things every once in a while on LinkedIn just to keep out there a little bit. But when we had a social media effort here, I concentrated effort for a full year, we did not show that it produced much of a result. Okay,

Scott Rivers:

so what are you doing to drive activity? That is it, you've got people that are making calls, you're smiling and dialing? Are you using Word of mouth or so it's,

Sam Parker:

it's predominantly email, email marketing for us, okay, we have a large subscriber base that pays attention to us through email, we've not it's a very odd thing, our our business, we're not in the self help world, but some people think we are, we're really in the employee engagement business, we're really making these tools like you bought the 212 books for your team, right, we're gonna talk about it, we're really about giving the tools and the messages that help people see something in a different way, show that it shows up as sustained action later, and they can improve on something we saw 212 is just another way of saying, you know, try a little harder care a little more, right, give a little more attention, effort and care, and you will enjoy more as a result, right. But we all need fresh ways to say things. And we provide those fresh ways to say things for, for leaders. However, some people use the 212 book and the cross the line book, in particular, it's as self help. But that's not really the market that we go for. We go after businesses or organizations, I should say, because we have a lot of government organizations using us. We have, I mean, locally, here in Richmond, Virginia, we have the Virginia Department of Corrections. So all the prisons, we've got Raytheon missile systems, we've got literally thousands of public schools, K to 12, principals using our material. So we're, we're about helping people care more about the work and each other and the people that they serve. And in that hopefully better results will come from it. It's really about trying to help people have a more enjoyable day, that's gonna try to focus.

Scott Rivers:

I like that I think employee engagement right now is super important. Right? People don't leave the company, they leave their boss, or they leave their manager. But if you can, I've done that a few times. Yes, a day. Yes. But But I believe that I know that we've heard other people say that. But I think that if you can get that engagement, and you can continuously make your people better, and make them enjoy what they're doing more and give them the skills, they need to be successful. They want to stick around and be with you. So all of the things you're talking about make perfect sense to me.

Sam Parker:

Right. And I think in too many places that ball is dropped, you know. And forgive me if you've read something that I'm about to say, because I've really written everything I've said, so it's a very strange thing. But, you know, I talk with a lot of leaders, and, you know, when they when they talk, and I talk a lot of people to people who are not leaders. And so it's because I have both sides talking to me. And they would tell me things that are very personal, and they tell me but are related to work. So leaders, one of the biggest frustrations is their people not being engaged very much of the time it's that or how do I how do I help them? How do I help my people get more excited about work or coming to work? And a lot? So I asked a couple questions. I say, Well, how many people on your team shouldn't be there? And almost inevitably, somebody will say, I got a few of those. And then I said, Well, why do you have in there? You know, why are you allowing that to happen? And that gets a little uncomfortable? And then then I say now for the remaining people? What are you doing for them on a regular basis that helps everybody stay connected? And that answer is almost always almost always nothing? Or some vague kind of comment that they can't get to what they're actually doing so. So what they really the question becomes So, okay, so you catch the situation, the problem and then you go Okay, so well how can they better connect with their people? And I think it's just like, it's always been even in this in this remote environment. You know, we have isolation being a problem. I've sure this is hitting morale on a huge level in many places. Oh, yeah. But not everybody. Some people are having a wonderful time they this this is this this situation has like zoom. I mean, it's worked for them. This has been a good thing but not you know, there's a lot of pain out there too. And there's a lot of loneliness. So I think it all comes back to you know, to me, everything comes down to connection, connection with people connection with ideas, right that so you surround yourself with good people you connect with those people. My leadership book lead simply, you know the three tenants there are Model Connect involved model the behavior you want to see connect with the people you lead involve them as much as possible, right model like pinball, you got to connect, and in so many places. So when I hear the other side, when people call me and say, I really wish my environment was something I could work in a place that is like in your books, you know, if everybody did this stuff, and I'll say, Well, why, why Why? Why do you think you don't have an environment like that right now. And those, a lot of times they'll say, they feel it's the boss who's not connecting with the team and start and, and we're not being kind with the team or pleasant with the team, and doing all the things that they know, they should be doing. So, you know, I get all this stuff is basic, we all need the room, I I live because of these messages, right? I, this is how I eat. And I still need the reminders. I oftentimes say to, you know, when people ask me what I do for a living, I say I'm a I'm a post it note, you know, I'm just a reminder, I just tried to remind people things that are important to their day to having that more enjoyable day, in a way that sticks and see it. And I learned that I think two to 12, because that was a sticky thing. You know, you hear that message, you don't forget it, you're not going to forget that with you for the rest of your life. That's when, and I'm getting notes. I mean, I get calls and notes from people who read it 15 years ago, it's still making a difference. And I'm talking about down to their marriage, you know, and that down to being a better parent. So that's neat. And that's the self help side of our stuff. But really, the other stuff is about leaders and giving them the tools that help them have these conversations, help them connect better so that they can, again, have a more enjoyable day.

Scott Rivers:

Sam, what do you think, especially today, what do you think leaders need to be doing a better job of in order to motivate their team? You know, to get them through? Some of them are very lonely, like you mentioned, I think, I think sales people who come out of a sales environment who are now working from home, yes, they are lonely. They're missing that camaraderie of people in a bullpen people that they're talking to, you know, even some of their sales teams, even outside sales teams, they're still more remote today than they have been in the past. So what do you think leaders need to be doing a better job of in order to make bigger impacts with their teams today?

Sam Parker:

It's what I just said before it's connecting, I think, I think they need to be and when I say a better job of connecting, obviously, a better job of that that includes so how often they connect is a really important thing, and also watching their communication, making sure that their communication is received. Well, one of the things that I talk about quite a bit is communicating well is one of the kindest things we can do. And if we choose So also, so if we choose to do it, well, we can help somebody, it can be encouraging, it can be inspiring, it can help somebody be more resilient. We choose to do it media in a mediocre way. It doesn't necessarily have an effect. And worse, of course, is if we're communicating something in a negative way and bringing somebody down and as a leader, if you're going to have somebody on your team, it does not if you're going to let them be on your team, you may as well do everything you can to help them stay positive and not pull them down. And I think too many people forget that. They think that they don't in leadership roles. I think that they think they don't need to talk about that. That's ridiculous. That's but that's a that shouldn't be these are adults. I shouldn't have to do that. And I go, that's just not true. Yeah. I mean, I tell you, I need it. I I'm in the business, like I said, and I need it from people I need encouragement from, from my colleagues, from my friends. And they need it from me, and we all need it from each other. Yeah.

Scott Rivers:

I agree with that. And it's so funny you say that, because, you know, I think back to it's probably last month, I was on a call with my team. And I was starting to just hear myself, you know, because all of us are remote still. And so I'm getting calls, I'm doing my work. I'm doing the podcast, I'm getting calls from my team, and I noticed myself answering my phone with my team going, Hey, what's up, and it was just it was just a, I actually told them I said, Guys, I'm sorry, I'm gonna fix this. I'm, I'm here to help. And I want to be, you know, your coach. I want to be the cheerleader, whatever it is you need. And I'm sorry, because I've heard myself answering the phone for you here lately. And I sound like a jerk. So I'm going to fix it. And I think they appreciated it. And I've really started focusing on that communication back with my team. And again, going back to the 212 after getting it and reading through it and preparing to present it to my team. It just makes it that much more important. You know, go the extra step, do that one extra thing. And for me as it related to my team, it was making sure that when they call me, they feel comfortable and they're happy that they called me as opposed to hearing this grumpy jerk on the The other side of the phone.

Sam Parker:

Right and, and so I talked about the issue of being approachable. You know, we have these opportunities where every day where we can choose, I call them one second opportunities, one on one second opportunities where we can choose to be encouraging, inspiring, positive, uplifting, being approachable. And the importance of approachable because reason I bring up approachable, is because it invites relationships, it invites opportunities, invites, you hear things, if you're approachable. you're inviting somebody to say something to you, rather than saying, Don't tell me anything, right. And if you're an elite, and if you're in a leadership role, obviously, you want to hear things sooner rather than later. You want people to feel comfortable coming to you. I know there's a balance there, you know, in terms of being interrupted, too much as a leader. But I always find it funny. You know, when leaders don't feel like they need to connect with their people. I go, what do you think you need to be doing? What, what is what is more, you know, so you've already likely turned up talking about strategy and come up with come up with strategy, but a leaders job is connecting with their people. I mean, it just, it's, it's a, it's a primary thing, and you're watching, you're helping out people, that's what it is. It's also the if you have somebody who isn't performing well and can't perform well, it's also your job to make a change there and help you remain team. But it is. So it's not just all like this fluffy, let's give each other a hug kind of thing. And all this encouragement, inspiration. I mean, sometimes there's some tough talk too, but you can always do it in a kind way. Yeah. But the point is, you're still connecting. Right? you're connecting, and like, and so, this so covid, 19, I, somebody asked me the other day, they said, you know, what can we be doing? Like, I think you just asked it to me, what can we be doing in this remote environment, I go to the same thing, as always, as we've always done, it's connect more with your people. And you can do it over the phone, if you have to, you can do it over zoom meetings, or whatever your MS teams or whatever you're using. But the point is, you don't need to be in front of somebody to connect with them. You can have a relationship with people and a strong, keep that relationship strong and hear things as long as you're having the conversations. And, you know, something maybe less obvious would be also how you communicate your emails. Think, okay, if you're in a if you're in a leadership role, when you land a sentence for somebody, I don't want to stress people out too much. But you can, if you just watch your phrasing, you know, what's your phrasing so that it's something or if you have a high trust environment, which is ideal, if you can get to there, where nobody takes offense to anything, which is a beautiful thing, if that can happen.

Scott Rivers:

But it's tough to find that environment.

Sam Parker:

That's the idea. And, you know, one of the I'm reading a book now called The Four Agreements, okay. I, I hadn't, I'd got turned on to it by friend on on Sunday, and almost done one of the, one of the Four Agreements is not to take anything personally. And my version of that is to just remove your ego, if you can subordinate your ego and just not not attach all this meaning to what somebody says, necessarily, and go through all that just remove all that away, the day would be much better,

Scott Rivers:

it would, it would. And I find, especially during this time is just people need to have more empathy, right? Be able to put yourself in someone else's shoes, because you have no idea what they're going through. And so I think you've said, if you're kind in your communication, and you think about that, but also have empathy behind it, you'll get a lot more done than you will by just thinking about yourself and just going after something.

Sam Parker:

Right and kind of excuse a kindness all almost always pays. But, you know, I don't know, I don't have any data on that. Maybe it doesn't. But I know that you have a choice. I think I heard Jon Meacham say this recently on a podcast I was listening to. With him as a historian, you have a choice as to which side of history you want to be on. And he's, of course, a historian. So he's talking, he's big. But we also have a choice as to which side of history in our daily interactions we want to be on. So you got to decide do you want to be the guy? Do you want to be the person at the end of the day? Who did? Who was kind more often than not? Or do you want to be the hard driving person who at least got results, but you were, you were a jerk? I think you can get results. And you probably can get results by even being Kinder I think, you know, I get a lot of people. You know, in a talk when I do a keynote back when the world was the way it was better times. You know, they'll bring up Steve Jobs, and they'll go well How do you explain Steve Jobs, he was not known to be a nice guy, but he got those wonderful results. And the key is, you know, maybe he would have gotten better results, even better results if he had been a kinder guy. But the fact is, he was who he was, he got wonderful results made some wonderful products that we all love. We're all using all over the place. And that's a neat thing, but, and we spend stupid money for him. And, and but do we, but he didn't need he he succeeded, despite the fact that he was like that, not because of it. I think or I'd like to think here's the deal. I know, at the end of my life, I'd rather look back and say I was Kinder more often than I wasn't, because, you know, that's just, it's just a better place to be.

Scott Rivers:

Yeah, I agree. So as we are obviously still in the middle of a pandemic, things are starting to spike in different areas. I feel like that a lot of people right now have some fear or trepidation. This is kind of a time to overcome the odds, if you will, which which makes me think this is almost across the line, movement or opportunity, not movement, but an opportunity to kind of talk to people about crossing the line and that book. I, I was not familiar with that. And maybe you can give us some backstory on that, Sam. But as I started looking at that, it just made sense to me, of getting people to overcome fear and go ahead and make the move. You can be on this side, which are all of those leaders that you've talked about. Or you could be on this side, Which side do you want to be on? What What was it that led to that book? And how do you think that applies to people today?

Sam Parker:

Well, the book, The premise of that book came out of a after soccer practice, when I was coaching my 12 year old son at the time was now 23. His team was being pretty apathetic at practice. And I mean, it came to me in the car, I said, Look, man, everything's got a line on one side of the line, good things happen. The other side, let and then it so anyway, I built it into something. So for the people who are not familiar with cross the line, it's really the the premise is this, with everything, you have a line and on one side of that line, there's a better chance for good things to happen. That's where you find the people you admire. The other side of the line is less of a chance where good things will happen. And with every line, you've got a choice, you want to cross the line or you don't, and you want that better shot at those meaningful things, or you don't. So there's, it's really interesting, and this was not planned it just after I laid it all down on paper, it just happened to be this way. But there's one line, there's two sides, there's three things that get in the way of crossing that line. And there's four ways to overcoming it. So 12342, you know, a lot of my work. Like I said, I feel lucky to be a part of it. It's not something it's something that I, for me, it's been something that I discover, actually, Stephen King talks about, he looks at his stories as a, as you know, they're fossils, and he's uncovering these things, stories. And I see it the same way. I something pops out of my mouth that I like or, and I say like, you know, we have a message called work kindly, for example. It's this, we only have a pocket card. It's not a book yet. But that line be a better part of someone's day. I said that on a stage once and I thought, wow, that's, that's interesting. And I said, What what? How can you be a better part of someone's day? What's the best thing you could possibly do? And I think everything for me, everything starts with work. Work is most sounds cold. But work is the most important thing. If you work as contribution, you know, work is care work. And my favorite quote, five words work is love made visible. Imagine a world where people thought that way about their work, that's where everything begins, you enjoy this, this technology is all happening because somebody gave a deep level of care to their work and created something where we're talking like this. And you know, over states, you know, however many thousands of miles, it's just fantastic. And it all happened from work. So you do your work. But then the key is and do a kindly so work kindly and then I. So then we build a brand around it and the whole thing, and then that what we're trying to do is make it sticky so that people recall these things. So it stays with them. And so again, so it shows up as sustained action. And that's the key sustained action, not just action, you know, when I talk with groups, even people who are listening to this podcast, the truth is, all of this is a joint effort between people. This communicate, you and I are having this conversation. Hopefully some people hear it, it becomes valuable to them. Some of these nuggets become valuable to them. They can use it to inspire their people inspire themselves. It's a wonderful thing and but but the key is how does it stay? And I always say it stays true solid and ongoing reinforcement internally and externally, so it means within ourselves as individuals and amongst ourselves as peers. And we have to remember that it's solid and ongoing reinforcement that need need never ever, ever ends. It just doesn't I, like I said earlier, I am 55 years old, and I still get a lot of things wrong that I know I shouldn't do. You know, I shouldn't talk to my wife that way. I shouldn't talk to a teammate that way. But I lose, you know, I, so I have to get back in the moment. So reminding ourselves, continually reminding ourselves of things and accepting that need for that solid and ongoing reinforcement. I think that's key. And I think that's where leaders consistently drop the ball. Okay. They forget, they think that they, too many leaders, I think, think that they don't need to say that again. And I get it because it's exhausting, right? Of course, I shouldn't need to tell you that again. And that's true. If you have a person who you know, is a primary thing, like a salesperson who's not making the calls, not making the connections, you shouldn't have to tell them certain things too many times, because that's their profession, of course. But there are other things that are ongoing, you know, and helping people be resilient, for example, you ever thought about that? Like, how many people think about what does it take to be resilient? Have you I mean,

Scott Rivers:

I haven't but I me n, I think what, where re ilience comes from, for me at le st. And I think a lot of pe ple, it's being a part of te m sports, and, you know, at letic background, starting co panies, getting your teeth ki ked in, you know, all of that st ff kind of builds resilience. Bu if there's if there's a be ter way to teach it I'm in.

Sam Parker:

Well, one of the things I think is important on resilience is to remember our lace, I find this there's four points to resilience, that I've used that have been really helpful to me and also helpful to people that I've shared it with, okay, it starts with being results focused, you know, just just trapped your ego, get yourself, it's kind of like that Ford remise thing I said earlier, don't take part, don't think about you right now, just think about the result you're going for. So be results focused. And when you make a mistake, just accept it as tuition for succeeding later, try to learn what you can on whatever that is. But then the key is to keep moving, right? Keep moving smarter, as a result of what you learn from your lesson. And then the fourth point is remind and encourage yourself and the people around you of the first three points, because you're going to be back here again, right? So there's no cute acronym here. But it's a great four points, if you can internalize it, to recall. And the key is removing yourself from it, not taking things personally and just going okay, what can I learn from this? And how can I move on? smarter? Yeah. And then, again, reminding ourselves and encouraging ourselves in the people around us to do the same thing. That's resilience. And but the key is also having bouncing back faster. Because you're probably going to bounce back. It's just like forgiveness, you're probably going to forgive people. So you may as well do it sooner. I know there are extremes that there are, where you won't forgive somebody. And that's a tragedy when it's that extreme. But, and I'll say where you won't bounce back. There are horrible things that people can't bounce back from. But we're not talking about that we're talking about the bulk of our day, most of us are going to bounce back anyway. So you may as well do it faster. And most of us are going to figure forgive, so you may as well do it quicker. And when people minimize this at work, especially that forgiveness that gets in the way of a lot of good work happening. The grudges and resentment, the things that get in the way of work, oh my gosh, we could cure diseases, and we could feed the planet if we could just get out of the way of ourselves.

Scott Rivers:

Yeah, I like how you phrase that. I think, for me talking about resilience. You know, I always tell my team and I've always told people, that failure is no problem. As long as you learn from it, the only time that you truly fail, is if you don't learn from something and you keep trying to do the same thing. Right? You've got to learn fail forward, fail fast, fail forward. But it's only failure if you don't learn from it. So I appreciate what you said, for sure. That's awesome. What I would like to do, Sam, you talked earlier about the three things that keep people from crossing the line. What are those three things? One of them has to be fear, right. I talk about fear a lot and how that that's stifling and keeps you from being successful. Is that one of them?

Sam Parker:

That's actually it's funny. I'm trying to think how it might be one of Yeah, I guess that could fall into so I guess that could fall into the first one which is this the the natural hurdles and obstacles that we face. So fear, I think would fall into that fear of failure. But that's interesting. I don't think I have addressed that. So I'm a little concerned that I have a flaw in it.

Scott Rivers:

But if I could be a co author on the next book, let me know I'm happy to jump in.

Sam Parker:

But then the set so it's it's the obvious hurdles and the obstacles that will get in the way of you making something happen. And then there's people, there's the things and then there's the people. And the people are the naysayers, the people are the people who would prefer you didn't succeed, you know, they get in the way of you by not encouraging you are withholding encouragement at the right time, or whatever it might be. And inside of people also is yourself. And maybe that's where fear would fall, because maybe you tell yourself, you're not deserve that, or you don't want to take that risk, or whatever it is. So you have the things, the actual things that make the work difficult, the obstacle, and then you have the people and then you ultimately have the work that you might not put in because of the first two things, right. So you may get all bogged down with, I can't do it because of the lack of this resource of that, or this thing's in the way or that guy's doing this, and I can't do that. And, or it might be you got people telling you bad stuff, or you tell yourself the bad stuff. And so you just go, I'm not even gonna put in the effort. And that's the third thing you don't put in the work, right. And then you overcome it by choosing to commit, you work hard, and you focus and you bounce back when things get tough. And that's it, those are your four points, and inside of there to work hard. And the focus is really a 212 message, you know, it's can sometimes it's those small things that can have the biggest impact. And you have to remember that balance, obviously, is that you could end up worrying too much about small things that don't matter. And that's where things get tough, you know. And I I'm guilty of that. Sometimes I get bogged down in details, and sure play that to 12 message in my head and I go gotta pay attention. And I go and I find out No, I didn't have to that wasn't important. Yeah,

Scott Rivers:

I think a lot of people do that here, I'm going to use a little product placement here real quick, if you don't mind.

Sam Parker:

Thank you, thank you, I'll do the same. This is I'll I'll hold.

Scott Rivers:

There you go Rise and Reac

Sam Parker:

I use this one. This is actually so you're always rising and reaching your either your rising from the bad you're reaching in the good. And reaching is really kind of a 212 message too, because you don't want to rest and complacency you want to be you know, once you once you do something, well, you want to ask what's next, right? That's the reach part. So you want to rise from the bad reaching the good, that's cool. That would have been in 212. If I had written it, if I've come up with it sooner, but I didn't. So

Scott Rivers:

well. And I was gonna ask you if there's an update to 212 that's coming out or anything else. But I want to read this real quick. And what I'm doing is I'm looking at this is a cue card that Sam sent out a hide my face for that to zoom in the cue card that Sam sends out for teams, when they order the 212 the extra degree you get the books, the cards, I ordered it, I believe with the presentation, and there's something else with it. But on the back of this card, it says the power of extra effort and care to extra acts of kindness weekly. And then there's some information below that then 15 extra minutes a day, that creates over 90 hours a year for what's most important to you. one extra contact daily sparks more than 180 personal connections every six months. And two extra risks taken each week leads to over 100 opportunities annually for excitement and possibility. B to 12. Yeah, awesome. My team is gonna get this they're gonna love it. Sam, tell us where we can find more information about you and tell us more about inspire your people calm? Or is that it?

Sam Parker:

I mean, pretty much tells you everything I think but you can find us on the web at inspire your people calm and if and, you know, all kinds of information on this site about me. And the messages that we produce here and have created for leaders are very easy to find. And if that if you can't remember inspire people calm if you do, Sam and number 212. I'm all over the place.

Scott Rivers:

Yes, Yes, you are. I just based upon the quality of the material, and the cost of the material for me to get it for my team. I mean, I, I find it to be so reasonable, it makes sense. I would pay for this for my team, even if it wasn't my team or my company, right? It just makes sense for me. And I think other people will say the same thing for people to reach out or connect with you. Do they go to the website? Or do you want to send them an email or just send them to LinkedIn what works best,

Sam Parker:

they can go to the website, they can do it however they want. I'm on LinkedIn, I'm everywhere. But most of the attention, you know, our relationship is primarily with our subscribers, you can sign up for our email newsletters, that keeps you in tune with some of the thinking that I do and some of you know some of the material that we produce. Okay, and then ideas on how to use that material.

Scott Rivers:

And then obviously, you told us earlier you're not super active as a company on LinkedIn. But yeah, that that is how I found you. So it's definitely a way to reach out to you and connect

Sam Parker:

right and then there's always that and then I have to think because we have all kinds of examples where you know, I find some places I didn't think it mattered, ends up mattering. And maybe it does at times. And it's just, I don't, I'd like I said, I don't know, it just seems like sometimes it depends on what you do for a living, of course, in your world, I can see exactly why you would use it. And it makes complete sense. And even a mine, you might say, use it. But one of the things that people use our material for, they have to come to the conclusion themselves to use this kind of material, there's a lot of leaders out there who don't think they need anything. Mm hmm. And also have no interest in using anything because they're not connecting with their people. So we try to find people who are active, you know, we'll have people come, and they'll buy enormous amounts of a company by 500 books in one shot, and we never talked to them. Right. And and so, did we do that? I don't think so. They came to the conclusion on their own. They had a conversation and they decided, as a team, hey, this is something we can use to make our team help our team be have a better day. And so they decided to do it. If I run an ad, sure, but I got an so we could go into conversion marketing. But that's not why we're here.

Scott Rivers:

We'll do that on another one. Sam, we're all about talent here. That's what we really focus on. So so as you are working with your clients and advising them on how to attract, engage and retain talent, what is it that you're telling them? What What advice do you give them? Or maybe what tools do you give them to help do that?

Sam Parker:

Well, so where we can help with that is in the soft skill area, is we're about inspiration and motivation. So they already know, depending on what type of person they're trying to hire, they already know they want this skill set and this experience level or whatever that might be for their environment. But then more what I think is equally important, although actually, maybe not equally important, the most important thing I would say, the most important thing, we even have a pocket card on it. The most important thing is to deliver what do you deliver? Do others enjoy working with you? And am I growing? So I personally, when we hire people, we look for that? Do I have a person in front of me, obviously. So can they deliver number one, right? Everybody knows that. But I need somebody who can deliver and be a part of a team can be a colleague can be an encourager, right an inspiration rather than a drain on people. So I watch for those things. That's where we can help, I think, and one of the suggestions, it's been popular for a lot of our customers, is we'll suggest taking one of our books, in particular, we'll use my smile, a mood book. Because it's about attitude and action. And we'll say use this, give this book to somebody that you're going to have back for in this environment, send it to them, but that you're going to have back for a second interview, and ask them to read it. And then you type a discussion around the points because there's not there's five ways to smile, there's four ways to move. And in that discussion, and we have a whole blog on this on how to do this on our site. But okay, in that discussion, it'll be very telling, you'll start to see and hopefully hear things that will either be helpful to you, where you feel positive about this person be able to being able to be an inspiration, encouragement, good soft skills person at the office or on the team or not. And some of those things might show. And it's really, maybe you don't do that with an executive level hire or something like that. But you're doing it, it depends on where you are. But you also need to use our material, you could use whatever is important to you. I mean, you could use a magazine article, the boring thing is having more of a conversation, and putting more work into that conversation at the front end around what's important after you've decided that they have the skill set. Because all of us have been there with somebody who has a wonderful skill set. And then they have to have to be tolerated, which is of course an ugly thing to have to. It's an ugly word tolerate. It's

Scott Rivers:

not a good thing for a team, that's for sure. And it doesn't lead to to a group all functioning in a way that's going to be successful for that organization. So I definitely like what you're saying.

Sam Parker:

And very few people really are that special. Despite what they think. And I get it that there. There are, there definitely are some people but it's not. You know, it's not as many as we think,

Scott Rivers:

Well, Sam, we've all done it right. We've all held on to somebody that was not good for the group or the organization because they were producing. And in the end, it hurts everyone.

Sam Parker:

Yes,

Scott Rivers:

it really does.

Sam Parker:

Including the customer, or whoever you serve.

Scott Rivers:

Yeah, that's so true. Yeah. Well, Sam, I really appreciate you being on the show today. I know people got a lot out of it. I'm going to put a lot of information in the show notes. I'll put links to your stuff in the show notes. I'll find that blog post that you mentioned as well and I'll make sure that that's included also. Thank you. Thank you. All right, everyone. This has been another talent talk. podcast. Thanks so much. Take care. Bye. You've just listened to another talent talks podcast with your host, Scott Rivers. Today's guest, Sam Parker, I hope you found that useful. I know that there's some takeaways that each and every one of you can use with your teams in order to get and have better communication. please reach out to Sam, if you haven't already on LinkedIn, let them know you found out about him through the talent talks podcast. If you get an opportunity, and I suggest you do go ahead and jump out to his website and find something that would be useful for your team, again, inspire your people calm is where you're going to find that information. I'm going back to buy some more stuff. I'm telling you this podcast is costing me money, but I'm loving it and I'm loving the people. And I think we're giving great value to those of you out there right now during COVID-19. I look forward to seeing you next time on the talent talks podcast. Until next time, everyone, take care