After the ‘End of History’

Trade Wars Are Class Wars: Part II - Smith, Ricardo, Containers, and Tax Law

May 05, 2021 After the 'End of History' Season 1 Episode 20
After the ‘End of History’
Trade Wars Are Class Wars: Part II - Smith, Ricardo, Containers, and Tax Law
Chapters
After the ‘End of History’
Trade Wars Are Class Wars: Part II - Smith, Ricardo, Containers, and Tax Law
May 05, 2021 Season 1 Episode 20
After the 'End of History'

Welcome to Episode 20 of After the 'End of History.' 

Adam Smith's thoughts on industrial specialization and David Ricardo's theory of comparative advantage take center stage in this week's discussion on Chapter 1 of Pettis & Klein's Trade Wars Are Class Wars. We also consider how the history of globalization has borne out their insights in light of the rise of containerization and the production of intermediate goods around the globe.

While the world's economy operates in an increasingly interconnected manner, the methods by which economists traditionally track international trade have been disrupted by breathtaking Tax Avoidance schemes and overly simplified bilateral trade accounting. We discuss the role this plays in distorting the true extent of global economic integration, which can lead to harmful macroeconomic policy and create unnecessary tensions in the interstate system (chiefly between the US and China). 

The music that you hear on After the 'End of History' is kindly provided by Jason King.

If you're interested in becoming a subscriber of the show, please visit our Patreon at patreon.com/afterhistory. You can also find us at hawksnsparrows.com

Show Notes

Welcome to Episode 20 of After the 'End of History.' 

Adam Smith's thoughts on industrial specialization and David Ricardo's theory of comparative advantage take center stage in this week's discussion on Chapter 1 of Pettis & Klein's Trade Wars Are Class Wars. We also consider how the history of globalization has borne out their insights in light of the rise of containerization and the production of intermediate goods around the globe.

While the world's economy operates in an increasingly interconnected manner, the methods by which economists traditionally track international trade have been disrupted by breathtaking Tax Avoidance schemes and overly simplified bilateral trade accounting. We discuss the role this plays in distorting the true extent of global economic integration, which can lead to harmful macroeconomic policy and create unnecessary tensions in the interstate system (chiefly between the US and China). 

The music that you hear on After the 'End of History' is kindly provided by Jason King.

If you're interested in becoming a subscriber of the show, please visit our Patreon at patreon.com/afterhistory. You can also find us at hawksnsparrows.com