"You Can't Say Anything Anymore!" by Diversifying Group

Creating your own tribe: the Black Woman in HR story

October 01, 2021 Diversifying.io Season 1 Episode 13
"You Can't Say Anything Anymore!" by Diversifying Group
Creating your own tribe: the Black Woman in HR story
Show Notes Transcript

In the U.K only 5% of Black British people are in 'manager, director or senior official' jobs.
Podcast host Naomi sits down with Adese Okojie on her journey to creating Black Woman in HR. She talks openly about her struggles and difficulties in finding representation for herself and how creating Black Woman in HR has helped her to find her own tribe. 

About our guest speaker: Adese established BWHR in June 2019 out of her own personal experiences as a black woman navigating her career in United Kingdom. In addition to leading our strategy, Adese is a Senior Business Partner at a multinational Engineering company, a Non Executive Board member and a strong advocate for equity, diversity and inclusion. Adese achieved an empowerment award nomination for her role in the career development of black women in Human Resources from Nations of Women in 2021 and most recently was celebrated as one of the top 50 women around the world by Powerhouse global magazine.

In her spare time, she volunteers at her local Church as a Sunday School Teacher, attends music concerts, researches something new, and travels the world to discover new cultures. She believes that a strong community with purpose will overcome barriers.  

This episode contains TW for: Racism, anxiety, depression,

This podcast is produced by Diversifying.io - Keep up to date on how we're changing hearts and minds on Instagram: @diversifyingio or via our website: www.diversifying.io 

Naomi:

Diversifying.io presents. You can't say anything anymore. The podcast where we bring you the latest diversity news, and in depth meaningful conversations about how we can make the future, better for all. Hi everyone, welcome to this month's podcast. Thank you so much for tuning in to our listeners. And today we have a very special guest with us today. Would you like to introduce yourself, please?

Adese:

Thank you Naomi, thank you BAME, Recruitment. My name is Adese. I am the founder and CEO of black woman in HR. But I say together if a black woman we are black women in HR.

Naomi:

Brilliant, thank you so much. Now, if you just tell us a little bit more about Black women in HR, I'd love to hear more about it. Now, what do you what do you do? What, what is the project all about?

Adese:

So back on Monday, the platform I started in June 2019 around June 2019. To promote the personal and career growth of black professionals in human resources for an initial focus on Black women. Over time it will be black professionals. So initially we will call black woman HR or have remodelled to be called by identified as BW HR. So when I speak I always refer to you as BW HR. So we have different programmes. So we have a mentoring programme. I am going to launch cohort three next week, which is amazing. So that consists of 30 people in total 15 mentors, and 15 mentees. We also have a run masterclass since the beginning of January to date, the master class consists of different topics to for personal, personal and career growth, mainly focusing on courage being courageous, overcoming imposter syndrome, equity, diversity and inclusion and improving the confidence of women because I think that's really key because we all want to make changes and want to make a difference. But we just need that extra to push us including myself. And in future one of the ventures I am going to do is also support organisations with internship, because we do have a lot of graduates contacted the platform saying they find it challenging or difficult to get a look in, especially in the corporate sector sectors. A lot of young professionals study HR or want to pursue a career in HR and they find out it's they keep applying to roles, and they're not successful, so they give up on going to something else. So the studies perform all will remove that barrier by having direct contact with businesses. So if there's any business owner, listening to this podcast, please get in touch, we would like to speak to you or like to introduce our framework. So we also have a job board where we advertise our vacancies, students, erm organisations can reach a diverse workforce, especially black professionals, we do have a mailing list of about 5000. So if you're an organisation or you want to specifically target black professionals, especially black women, for your roles, please get in touch and we will help you publish the roles, write our newsletter, or social media platforms. And also one of the key things we offer is learning and development for organisations. So I have a pool of specialists including myself, who, if an organisation which is off or they want a particular type of training, it doesn't always have to do with equality, diversity and inclusion. It could be on soft skills, it could be on leadership, it could be a well being, I can reach out to the network and connect to the organisation. So overall in summary, Black woman in HR BW HR is growing. So I'm providing this service in a smaller scale, but over time, I'm collaborating with a lot of professionals to make things happen.

Naomi:

That's fantastic. I love how you ended up there make things happen, wooooo. You know, it honestly sounds like a really great platform. That is just what you said it's growing. You want to tell us a bit more about you if we go back to the beginning of this organisation and what what what inspired you to start the company what where did it come from? How do they get off the ground?

Adese:

And if you, I think I've pondered with the idea for a while. It I didn't know what he was going to be called. So you I wanted.. I... let me... I searched for black woman for a tribe for black woman a child. I searched for a platform like Black Women HR, but I came across so many platforms providing support for black women, but not being specific for black women in HR. And I thought to myself, while having a discussion with a friend that I as a person, and for my upbringing, I come from a family whereby, my parents are leaders in their own rights. My dad, when I tell people this is, is different. So if you're Nigerian, you understand, my dad is a first of my team, my mom is the first of five. So I've grown up seeing my parents having to give back having to train the younger ones. And in the Nigerian culture, when you're a leader, or when you're from a big family, your extended and immediate family reach out to you for support all the time. So you kind of like have that community mindset about helping and supporting. So growing up, I've seen that happen. And when I couldn't find black woman, the tribe, I have always something from the moment I could, I'm a Christian, I've always volunteered in a church and Sunday school teacher for many, many years. I've always volunteered for many charities, especially during a Christmas to feed the homeless, or when the winter to feed the homeless. So I thought if no one does it, why not me and what it difficulties is looking back now, there's so much greatness, so much appreciation and so much love by doing a platform, but it's not an easy journey. But one thing is, I am glad that I chose to set up the platform because I have a vision, and I have a strategy. And when I do get the feedback that brings joy, to me,

Naomi:

That's fantastic. I love how you tied in omens about your culture, your upbringing and your faith that came together to bring you on this journey to create, Black women HR, and I think there's something so, so relatable for a lot of people about looking at their for their for their tribe, you know, see and not seeing not seeing that being present already. So there are a lot of, you know, black women organisations, but not ones that focus on that the industry that you're particularly interested in you, you have a lot of expertise that you are, you know, within. So I think these kind of organisations, they are just so needed. And you know, all it really takes is someone like yourself to look around the thing, hang on a second, this part of this specific platform isn't being elevated? Um, yeah, did you have any other sort of resources or people that helped you get started? Was there any particular things that were really helpful to you,

Adese:

Um, I think social media was a massive help, because I can't imagine it if I started a platform without social media. So my first step to start me was on LinkedIn, creating a LinkedIn profile. And eventually I didn't, I didn't see the need for Instagram and Twitter, because I felt my client base was in LinkedIn. But over time, I realised everyone is on Instagram, and you professionals on LinkedIn, Instagram. So social media played a big role to create an awareness and reach in my audience. And I only then I had a landing page for the website. So I didn't have any fancy website like you can see today. No, it was just a landing page. So that's when you search for us, you know that we exist. And I did have a lot of support I have, I don't do it all by myself. So I have some administrative support or do the IT, I write the coms, the communication. And I also have a lot of mentors. I have mentors, I wouldn't call them coach. Because I've had a career coaching path in the past, before Black women HR, I have a lot of mentors, I have a lot of senior black women who are semi retired, who are HR directors who I have reached out to and they just advise me day to day, they just guide me and point me in the right direction. And I say maybe we should look at this. And also another person that supports me is my partner. So I would say back I'm going to HR, even though I am the founder is not the success is not only on me, I am the vessel, I am the face, but I have an army of black women supporting me and I'm still open to more black women supporting me. So if you're listening to this podcast and you're wondering, oh, there must be something I can do for black women in HR. Do you want to deliver a masterclass? Do you want to mentor someone? Do you want to just reach out to the community Do you have any insights or tools or knowledge anything you want to share, please? I'm always open because we're I charity open to listening and he Hearing more ideas.

Naomi:

I love that I love that you're always open to more people come into the circle. And you know, the idea that it's the success is as many people behind that I think that's amazing. Just about the mentors, and how did you come into contact with the instead of the senior retired, successful, but how did you come into contact with them?

Adese:

Some of them reached out to me, some of them I reached out to. So some people just approached them on LinkedIn and say, Hi, this is me. Help. And they will and a lot of them are open. They're quite, they, they actually appreciate them, which is awesome, because some of them have been in HR 30 years, and they've actually wanted black woman in HR, the BW HR tribe. And by me developing stuff in the platform. It's like, Oh, well done. I've always wanted this to happen. And why don't you for doing it. So what can I do to support so it's about so if anyone is reaching out if you're, if you're if you're doing anything, it could be if you're in any business as an entrepreneur, if you're selling something, if you provide a service, and you feel a need to be alone, just reach out to people because you never know who would help you. Because not everyone, so you definitely get some no's. But you get the yes's are very fulfilling the yeses actually really want to help. And when you meet someone really wants to help they go over and beyond to make sure you're successful.

Naomi:

That's great. I mean, I think that's the thing is a lot of people don't even know where to begin with reaching out. But you're saying it's got a lot of no's? But yes's it's very successful -

Adese:

Yeah, plays a big tool, because 10 years ago, like - now, if you're looking for something, you just need to go on Google or ask Siri, just say sometimes I get lazy to say, Siri, where is this? I just go on google and type it out. But sometimes they do say that don't rely on Google. Google is not 110%. But it's there. So the internet makes things really easier. And social media has its positives and the negatives. So the goal is to make the positive work for you. And you, you will get some challenges, you get some trolls, we do have people from time to time that when we post something on Instagram, they challenge our posts, or they challenge our comments. And they're there to challenge me. And when they do that I appreciate because it gets me to think that am I doing the right thing? Am I saying the right thing? Do I have to adjust my tone? Do I? Do we have to do things a little bit differently?

Naomi:

Yeah, absolutely. I think it's always that minefield, navigating social media and understanding the kind of -

Adese:

I don't, I don't manage my social media anymore is not away from my hands, it's too much for me.

Naomi:

I think that's the thing that isn't is understanding your role as a leader. And like you said, there's many brains behind your organisation, they all play an important part in that. Um, yeah, just a little bit of , actually moving on a bit to the highlights. So what have been some of the highlights and the challenges in the journey of black women in HR?

Adese:

Urm, focus on a positive stress. So one of my my highlights I added is a mentorship programme. Especially when, because the when launching a new cohort, which is going to be three months, but prior to that the cohorts were six months. And by - we always have a check in after six weeks. And by the sixth week, if in the past, if we've had a mentee set a goal to a to one of their goals could be to secure a new role. And buy we're getting six weeks, we're hearing good news, you hear it all I was able to apply for this role. And I was successful all I didn't apply for this role, but I got an interview to the support under the coach of my mentor. So that's been amazing. And when, after the programme, you get the Yeah, absolutely. I think there was a lot of you said that, but feedback, the mentees are saying oh, I've actually my confidence is improved. Or and sometimes the mentors again, reverse mentoring because some of them are in a particular sector and match them to mentee in a different sector. Because it's not always - even, even though it's a professional programme, there is an exchange of relationship exchange of business exchange of family values. So we've had people from different family background, and they've extremely about women, but sometimes they there's an age differences, a cultural difference. So just hearing all that positive feedback is really good. Another one of our success stories is our master class. So we've had master class every, every month until July and I had a break. But it''s also feedback after each master class. I said, well thank you for doing this. It's free. And how can I contribute to the platform of gained, I've taken notes, gained so many insights and there's so much knowledge, I love all - sometimes, even the the master class chain, I guess, businesses, if you think about it, HR do hold some of the training budgets of organisation. So some of my master class speakers, I've got some connections got in businesses. So one, an example is I had an Instdagram Live with a speaker, she got a speaking gig with with AXA, and I paid her good money just from speaking on the Instagram Live. So one of my key principles is to amplify the voices of black women. And I want to do that i want i want to do so many black women are doing amazing things, but we don't see them. We don't hear them. So I want to use my platform to amplify their voice. Some of some of them are good voices already amplified, they already have a visibility for your song, somebody is so amazingly well, that I want to do that. So. So this weekend, the feedbacks, and those are the highs and the lows. There are so many lows, believe me, it's not an easy journey. It's what I have. I have days where I pull my hair out and tell myself, why am I doing this? Why am I? Why am I? Why am I trying to make a difference? Should I shouldn't I just focus on my own development or my own journey, and be selfish to myself, I have days whereby I, you do something and you don't, I'm not. To me, I don't believe in social media likes and bots, I believe in support. I believe in public support. So if you like something supports it, if you if you like a business, if you if you see a black business, if you see a black business, go and eat in a black business, where black businesses if making a dress, and find out and engage in this every so I think for me is you know, as much as I've approached so many women, I say yes, I also have so many women that say no, I also have so many women that don't even reply to your messages. And I always say it takes a minute for you to say, No, thank you, I can't help you at this time. Oh, I'm busy. But you. And so if. I just think black people, as a community, we need to really, really not just me support each other in general, come together, lift each other up. And because we are doing this for our community, because if I win, you win. There is no competition, because I don't see anyone as my competition. Because I remember, at one point I was applying for grant, and the ads lists the businesses that your company that I acquire competition, I'm like, what was that relevant to the grant, you want to give me a grant based on my strategy based on my vision, based on what I want to deliver stick to the community? Why do you need to know who my competitors are easier to use, try to evaluate to see if my competitors apply for the grant as well. So I thought who and who are my competitors? I think there's enough room for everyone to win. There's enough room for everyone to succeed if you want to excel and everyone to attain their goal. Well, they are good days. I do have good days. And I have absolutely is a win for you is a win for everyone. And it's I bad days. But I embrace my good days and learn from my bad days. think it's like you said once you stop looking at it as the you're in competition, that everybody needs to fight for their scrap of space is no, you know, if everybody wins, you know, there's there's different parts, there's different elements within every single community. And, you know, creating space for this only helps everybody only helps other spaces to be made and helps other people to be lifted up. And I think Yeah, you should you said an important part earlier about. It wasn't about it's about the exchanges of relationships between your with your mentors - It was about the reverse mentoring.

Naomi:

Yes, yeah, I thought that was really interesting. And the fact that you said that the feedback you got where people feel that they really improve their confidence and that it really helped a lot of people and you know, just what a what a difference. This kind of mentoring can make people that sadly, a lot of the time, a lot of people have access to this or they don't know about these services, or they don't find mentors that they kind of feel kind of can relate to a lot -

Adese:

If mentorship relationships are successful is not from your approach to be a coach or successful. Sometimes it may not work out, but the goal is not to give up. It seems find another mentaor , find another platform. So I've had a very few percentage of my mentoring that haven't worked out. And in some cases, I would rematch the mentor or the mentee, and realise it's just a personality thing. So if you are here, if you're looking for a mentor, and you've you don't quite click your mentor , or if you're a mentor, and you're supposed to be an individual, just, it's okay to say, this is not for me, and I will thank you thank the person for the time, if you had to pay for the service, it's an investment and you will learn and you just have to find somebody else.

Naomi:

Like all things in life, it's just about communication. And like I said, it's not always gonna work out. But when it does, it's great.

Adese:

Great. It's great.

Naomi:

I think Yeah, you touched on simple points as well about it, how important these opportunities are for people, and over here is a good time to take a break. So listeners will be back after the break.

Bame Recruitment:

diversifying is a purpose led career platform that is proud to promote opportunities for all, check out our website for job opportunities at diversify.io. And don't forget to follow us on social media.

Naomi:

Hi, listeners go back after the break. I think if we wanted to take a little bit a second about what are some of the barriers that many bipoc women face today? And of course, specifically, obviously, black women within the industry. What do you feel are some of the biggest barriers that they face within the professional industry specifically, obviously HR, and that they continue to face Really?

Adese:

Oh, one of the main one, one big experience, I'll talk about the experience I've had in Black Women in HR. One of the barriers for black women in HR is that knowing that believing in yourself, let me start with self believing in yourself. When I say believe in yourself believing you can do the job. Believing you can apply for the job, believing you deserve the promotion, you might you may not know how to eloquently speak to your manager that you deserve the promotion, but is believing in yourself. So once we overcome that belief in himself, we could do that true distant learning, listening to podcasts, listening to different training media with a book, but we need to start with me, we need to start with self. Once you overcome that obstacle, you're on the right path. Then once when you talk about organisations, organisations, when I talk about when I let's dive into recruitment, organisations need to start having a gender neutral job description have agenda decoded and address not use like strong word just some words that women see that oh, I don't qualify for this role. I don't think I can do this role. But my point is there and it's worth any advertisement in the job description in my looking for because I always say is regardless of what job you are successful which you secure, they will always train you you always have an induction. So if you don't really necessarily have to have 100% of the skills or knowledge and experience because the your new manager will train you I know some rule says and we want someone who can hit the ground running but at the end of the day, regardless of what your finance, HR it You still have to give them some form of training. So organisations to remove those type of words so that an ethnic minority can apply or black women or people who don't have that confidence. And also organisations can advertise and diverse job boards like us like but black woman in HR, I have a I have a job board that it's there so it's a need to use job board and like BAME Recruitment you have a job board.So o organised so when I speak to organisations by advertising on the job board is not an extra cost is an addition is an additional cost. However, that cost is showing that you have a commitment, you have a further commitment you're supporting. So if I was if I saw, for example, a director of HR role in a corporate industry, and his salary is like maybe 200,000 pounds, and I'm like, Oh, well, I'm not going to get a look, because I'm a black woman. But if I saw that role advertised on Black woman HR or BAME recruitment, I would think, Oh, I probably will get it looking because the organization's have invested to advertise this role on a diverse job board, meaning that they are more open to receiving applications from from diverse candidates. So they have 70% chance of getting the look in. So I will confidently apply for sometimes you see jobs, you're like, Well, I'm not going to, it's a waste of my time. So organisations can be more open organisers, we can also practice positive inclusion, or positive, positive also, in terms of recruitment. So for example, if you're working on gender, if you're working on race, for example, if you if you're trying to secure a new person, and you already have a new look around your team, everybody's white or a particular race, and there's no diversity, because you think about diversity of thoughts, diversity, of experience, diversity of shared values, and you might need to be diversify your team, and allow either a woman or a black woman, to apply. So in terms of what sort of so many things organisations can do, there's so many things you yourself can do as an individual, and just starting with yourself.

Naomi:

I love that I love that it comes from self, and I think that's a really, really important message about starting with the self, I think that you know, from what it sounds like, a lot of experiences, you know, I've heard from friends and you know, people is that there's little, you know, little incidences or little microaggressions, or little things, like you said, with the job, things, you know, like saying you need to the ground running, or you'd have this year's experience or must be, you know, implied, you know, like, must be from Russell Group University, things like that can all kind of chip away your your confidence about, oh, I can't apply for this, and it can all just, over time accumulate into this kind of get chipped away since and I think, you know, your idea that we have to start from the ground that we have to bring it up is, you know, is a very important step. I think a lot of people, when they start to think about that, just think about the awkward near the wider the organisational aspects that need to be covered. But there is also a personal aspect as well, that needs to be built up. And then communities such as these do help empower people. Yeah, I mean, is that is that kind of what you're finding? Yeah, I agree with you. 100 % Yeah. So we've talked a little bit about what can be done t the industry such as on what accessible for and welco ing for women of colour, and you know, how organisations can he p create more inclusive di ersity of thoughts. Say I just ant to move on to a little bit alking about I understand that ou have a an event coming up. Ye , yeah. You'd like to tell us a it more about that, please. Yes,

Adese:

We still - it breaks my eart when I speak to black wom n who say I've never ever hea d of it, we have an event, Oh an they're like you event like you have an event. I'm like, oh my god. It breaks my heart becau e I'm thinking I'm paying so muc to promote it and you haven't they missed one person. So ye , we do have our first confer nce. So it's not the first e ent is the first conference, the first annual networking con erence happening this year on t e ninth and 10th of Novembe . It's a two day event. The nigh is virtual only. And you cove masterclass on a variety of t pics, from health and safety, o employment law, to overcoming adversity, to how to position ourself on social media on L nkedIn, how to be more visible, and how to have a career portfo io. So the second day is hybri . What that means is there will be an audience at a venue at t e Hallam Conference Centre in central London. The neare t station is Oxford Street in London or Great Portlan Street, and anyone virtual wil stream live to the impassive v nue, which means on the day, ou can choose to if you're r nning late, you can watch the vent on your mobile app and it's like watching TV. So think abou If you have Netflix on the go, and also, today, ther will be a number of keynote s eakers who will talk about t e journeys, we will have ca e studies from different differe t individuals talk about what ou're doing the changes, t e game changes, and case studi s of equality, diversity inclusi n, we're gonna hear from Peter C eese, who is the icon of our ke note speaker, and who is the EO of CIPD. And a people manage ent, we're going to, and I still have a few of my speaker on yet to confirm. So I have approached them but it's just based some logistics, so you hav to seek permission from the em loyers. So it's going to be an mazing event, I say that becau e I'm the organiser. But t's going to be a lot of l arning a lot of a lot of lear ing a lot of connecting. And for the first time, you will walk in o a room, that's will be f lled with a lot of black profess onals in HR. So I walked i to many rooms, with black pro essionals. But I've never wa ked into a room with many bla k professionals in HR. So hat's what is rare. So if you' e looking to connect with lack professionals in HR, ple se come to this event, if ou're looking to learn if y u're even looking for new roles Because some people will be ecruited, you will have a v cancy, you never know ou might just be having a conv rsation with a head of HR r a talent recruiter, and th y're saying, and you just ight be open to work. And they' l probably be like, Oh, I ctually have a vacancy or som body leaving my business, woul you like to have a chat. An sometimes you could have app ied for a role. And maybe the HR person eventually sees you. o it's a good day, it's a go d opportunity to meet new peopl , harness new connections and learn. I'm definitely loo ing forward to do that. I can' wait. And working really hard to make sure the event is su cessful. Making sure I do everyt ing. And you guys are one of o r partner sponsors, thank you so much for helping us t promote the event really appr ciative and grateful. And most of the people I'm workin with doing this, working toge her, black organisations, becau e I wan

Naomi:

And that's amazing. I think that the point you said about, you've never walked into a room where you've seen, you know, majority black professionals in HR. I mean, I think that just says it all for itself, isn't it? The fact that there's something so powerful in, yeah, just just walking into a room and seeing so many people that look like you that are in the same profession that had that same goal as you have that same - potentially even similar experiences to you professionally. So I think that's very powerful. Just a bit. So where do where do people sign up for this? How do they kind of get, get more info get about the speakers?

Adese:

How do they want?

Naomi:

How do they sign up for this?

Adese:

Oh, they can sign up on our website, which is www.bw hr.co.uk our events where you can go on any of our social media pages, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter and Facebook. And there will be a link in our profile profile that directs you to websites, or you can send us an email, we do offer discounts on group bookings, and send us an email on admin at Black woman hr.co.uk. And yeah, so I'm encouraging everyone to because it's a personal and professional development is like a trading day. So speak to managers after use your training budgets, what your training budget for this year, a good 10% of your salary should go towards your learning and development. And this is a good opportunity to spend our money spend it in a black business.

Naomi:

yeah, of course, always supporting black businesses, black on initiatives as well. Yeah, I think just before we come to a close, I just want to ask you about if you could speak to kind of the next generation of black women in HR, or any people that would like to get into HR or they would like to support Black Women in HR what would you say to them?

Adese:

And I will say, go for it. Go for it. Don't let any barriers hold you down. If you want to walk in HR, go for it. Then find different mediums support system that can support Do you, for example, black women in HR, for example, I had our own organisation today called Black in HR, there is a byp as well, there's so many platforms, which helps you LinkedIn. Just if you want a career in HR, go for it, you may not be successful at your first attempts, we'll keep trying and keep applying for get someone approach. Someone who already works in HR, if it doesn't have to be a manager could be a grad and a graduate HR they can, they can talk you through the steps that you need to follow. Be confident people put in the work, and you'll be successful, because I studied HR. So I was I'm not a one trick pony. But that's all I have done. I studied HR as a degree. My internship was in HR. I wanted to work in HR. Go for it, don't give up. And even they may be scamming you, you may have setbacks. But try and if you want to, we have a mentoring scheme. One of my mentees an HR graduate, she literally just graduated this September. And when I spoke to her, she's actually secured her first HR role. And one thing I said to her was well done, well done for putting yourself forward as a mentee, because once at that age, she's what 20 in our early 20s, you want to have a good time, you're not thinking about your career. But she's a recent graduate, she's got her first job in public areas, so much money because she got a good job, you know, very, in the corporate but, she's still she's already planning and investing in her career, she's taking the right steps. And I said to her in five years, I touch word, she probably be a be a manager, business partner. Because she's doing what I didn't have the opportunity to do, I didn't have that platform. I didn't have that support. So if you started really early, you're really going to go far. So what I'm saying to black people, anyone either you don't have to want a job in HR, if you just want a job, or you're already in a job, you want to change career or you're returning Mom, you're going on maternity leave, or you just been made redundant. I will say there's so many free resources online. There's so many organisations that offer free coaching, free support, you just need to do your research and find it and just reach out to people but there will be setbacks but keep going for it.

Naomi:

There will be setbacks but keep going for it. Okay, um yeah, so I think that's what we've got time for today. Just wanted to thank you very much again for coming on the podcast and talking about HR obviously sounds like a fantastic initiative

Adese:

thank you so much for having me and thank you to you too. You've been very patient and I know we had to reschedule bought and thank you so much. It's been a pleasure doing talking about black woman in HR talking about the next generation so thank you so so much

Naomi:

thank you so obviously as you know it's always amazing to see things that people are passionate about and I can just I can just see that you're so passionate about this and you know the conference that you said that that moment when you when you walk in and you see a room filled with majority black women HR it's amazing yeah just one question before we go actually is where can people find you on LinkedIn? Or did you say Twitter as well?

Adese:

So on most on all our social media, we are Black woman in HR. So just typing back woman in HR, you find us and we have a website which is www.bwhr.co.uk Ah, that's a rebranded part of a bwhr.co.uk so we are black woman in HR. We are bwhr Don't confuse yourself. Just but yeah, so we're here. So if you're here, if you're a black woman, even if you don't work in HR I used to you because one of our mentees, one of the mentee I'm I'm recently she doesn't work in HR. She's worked in. She's She's currently not in HR, but she was a role in HR and I have matched up with a mentor. And I did say to her I'm hoping by the end of the year, she can call me with our good news. I told me she secured a job in HR. So even if you're not in HR just and you feel you can learn from us learn from our values and from our strategies and from our master class. Please connect

Naomi:

fantastic and people wanted to can they contact you on LinkedIn at all, you know if they wanted to.

Adese:

If you want to contact me directly, just contact me or any of our social media and one of my colleagues will forward your DMs or ask me to look at the DMs and our check so I'm not on social media anymore because I have my colleagues manage in a box if you need to reach me Definitely through email or social media and I will definitely connect with you. I am one of those blatner never say no, I wouldn't even know your messages or your phone calls, I would definitely engage.

Naomi:

So that's pretty good. Anyway, thank you again so much. And thank you to all our listeners. And we'll speak to you all in the next podcast. Thank you.

Bame Recruitment:

Thanks for listening to you can't say anything anymore, a podcast by diversifying dot Tayo. If you like our show and want to know more, check out our website and sign up for our newsletter@diversifying.io or please leave us a review on iTunes. Join us next time as we explore more diversity news.