Lead With Soul

Activism & entrepreneurship with Meagan Ward

February 22, 2021 Kimberly King Season 1 Episode 3
Lead With Soul
Activism & entrepreneurship with Meagan Ward
Chapters
Lead With Soul
Activism & entrepreneurship with Meagan Ward
Feb 22, 2021 Season 1 Episode 3
Kimberly King

In this episode of Lead With Soul, we're diving deep into activism and entrepreneurship!

I'm so excited and honoured to have Meagan Ward as a guest on today's episode. Meagan is a Spiritual Sales Expert & Coach for spiritual entrepreneurs who are ready to magnetize high caliber, high-ticket clients with sales strategies and rituals.

Join us as we talk about making money as a spiritual entrepreneur, the difference between internal and external activism, how to integrate activism into your business from a place of integrity and alignment, and projections for 2021 and beyond when it comes to infusing activism into your business and brand.

Connect with Meagan:
Instagram
 
Find me on Facebook and Instagram or visit my website here.
Find more episodes of Lead With Soul and show notes here.
Download the transcription here.

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode of Lead With Soul, we're diving deep into activism and entrepreneurship!

I'm so excited and honoured to have Meagan Ward as a guest on today's episode. Meagan is a Spiritual Sales Expert & Coach for spiritual entrepreneurs who are ready to magnetize high caliber, high-ticket clients with sales strategies and rituals.

Join us as we talk about making money as a spiritual entrepreneur, the difference between internal and external activism, how to integrate activism into your business from a place of integrity and alignment, and projections for 2021 and beyond when it comes to infusing activism into your business and brand.

Connect with Meagan:
Instagram
 
Find me on Facebook and Instagram or visit my website here.
Find more episodes of Lead With Soul and show notes here.
Download the transcription here.

Episode 3: Activism & entrepreneurship with Meagan Ward

Intro:
Welcome to Lead With Soul — The podcast for spiritual entrepreneurs who are ready to build an impactful and profitable brand, create a thriving and sustainable business that aligns with your values, and experience more freedom, fulfillment and abundance in your life and business — while making a positive difference in the world. If you’re ready to elevate your business and brand to a new level, manifest your vision into reality and embody the leader you know you’re meant to be — this is the podcast for you. I’m your host, Intuitive Brand Strategist & Designer, Kimberly King.

Kimberly King:
Hey, welcome to another episode of Lead With Soul. I am so freaking excited for today's episode. I have my first podcast guest, Meagan. She is my coach, also my client, also someone I consider a very good friend and I am super excited to have her on the podcast to share all of her wisdom today. So Meagan, thank you so much for being here. I would love for you to take some time to introduce yourself, tell us who you are, what you do.


Meagan Ward:
Thanks for having me. I'm super pumped to be here and see your vision brought to light. I know that this has been on your vision board for a while and listening to the past episodes, I am excited to be a guest and so honored. For those of you who don't know me, my name is Meagan Ward. I am a sales coach for spiritual entrepreneurs. I blend energy and ritual to create a really seamless sales process that feels so freaking good.


Kimberly King:
Amazing. I love it. I've definitely had the honor of experiencing your work for a few years now and I can say it is absolutely incredible and transformative and life changing. So I am so excited to have you on the podcast to share your amazing energy. So today we are going to jam on activism, which I know is something that is very important to you and your business and something that I am also very passionate about. So I'm really excited to hear more about your perspective on it and any wisdom that you want to share on that. First, I'd love to hear, if you are open to sharing, a little bit more about your purpose and mission behind your business. Why do you do what you do and what calls you to do the work that you do in this world?

Meagan Ward:
Absolutely. So I believe that every single spiritual entrepreneur or an entrepreneur with passion and mission on this earth is here for a reason. And part of my purpose is to get more money in the hands of spiritual people so that we can change the literal foundations of how this world operates. We see so much disparity and discrimination and so many things that we could fundamentally and foundationally change by healing the hearts, the minds, the communication, and the mindsets of people around the world. So my work and my passion and my mission is to get as much money into the hands of spiritual beings so that we can have a seat at the table where decisions are being made in this world.

Kimberly King:
Amazing. That’s incredible. So can you tell us a little bit more about what that looks like with the work that you do? Like how do you bring that into your business and the way that you support your clients?

Meagan Ward:
Absolutely. So for me, activism is foundational. If you're not a purpose driven person, if you're just in business to make money, I'm probably not the person for you. I'm probably not the best person to follow or look up to your advice to follow in general, because I believe that if you're operating just to make money, fundamentally, you can't have the impact that you want to have on the world in the world. And if you want to have an impact on the world, you must make money in order to do that. It's not a desire. It's a requirement. Truly, truly, truly. Because those people who are worrying about money, how they're going to pay their bills every month, what they're going to eat, if they're going to have enough gas to put in their car to get to the grocery store, don't have the brain space to think about the bigger problems that are happening in our society. And especially as you dive into your activism, whatever that is for you, you start to see the intersectionality of all of it. So in order for you to have the brain space, to really dive deep into your activism, to really hone in on your purpose, to really step into your mission and how you can change the world, you must have money so that you can have time to really dive into the intersectionality of it all and change the world.

Kimberly King:
Absolutely. That's incredible. I really love that. You really shift a lot of the beliefs that sometimes entrepreneurs have, especially those in the healing space. Sometimes this idea that, you know, if you're spiritual, you're not meant to make a lot of money or it's quote unquote wrong to be rich or to desire to have wealth. And just the way that you explain that so beautifully is that it's not mutually exclusive. They are connected and intertwined and essential for you to share your purpose and to really make the impact that you want to have on the world. And I absolutely love that.

Meagan Ward:
It’s a requirement. I mean, I give 97% of my content away for free because I am fully financially supported. A lot of spiritual entrepreneurs that I know who are still in this paradigm of not wanting to charge what they should be for the work that they're doing in the world feel like they have to hold something back when serving others. And that's not doing a service to anyone. Second, who gave us that belief? Like we need to start asking that question. Who said that it was wrong to make money doing spiritual work when money is neutral, energy, money doesn't mean anything. It's not good. It's not bad. It's just there. So who told us as spiritual beings that we shouldn't make money and be well compensated, abundantly compensated, massively compensated for the work that we're doing. And when you dive into that, then you start to realize, Oh, there's really nothing wrong with making a butt ton of money, doing what I love and serving others. In fact, I can give more and be of higher service if I am well compensated.

Kimberly King:
Mm, absolutely. Yeah. I love what you said about really starting to questio. Like where do these beliefs come from? Like where do they really stem from? Who said that was a thing, like who made these rules? And it's really interesting when you start to dig into that. It's definitely really important work to do for spiritual entrepreneurs so that we can show up fully and show up being supported and not have that hold us back from sharing our gifts. So I absolutely love that. So when it comes to activism and your business, how do you see those coming together? And in what ways can entrepreneurs start to bring that more into their business and start to share more of their activism and their values through their business and the work that they do?

Meagan Ward:
That's a great question. I think that starting a business in general is a revolutionary act. It's bucking against societal norms in many ways. So to say that you have an anti activist or non activist business is just not true. First and foremost, that said, especially over 2020, I think we saw a lot of people battling with what does it mean to have activism infused into my business? What does it mean to be outspoken while also taking time to integrate what I'm learning? And I think my view of activism is that there's two sides to this coin. There's the internal activism and then there is your external activism. Your internal activism is everything that you care about. So I'm a black feminist who is also passionate about the environment and who is passionate about helping the LGBTQIA+ community have equal rights around the world, amongst many other things, equal access, access to education, so many things, but from a business perspective, it doesn't make sense for me to be outspoken about all of those things on my platform. So first determining what's internal, what do I care about and what makes sense for my business to care about? So for me, having equality across race, gender, and ability and neurodiversity makes sense. It's necessary. The other parts, like my passionate about having ethics in the fashion industry doesn't make sense. It just doesn't. That's something that I can do on my personal time, but it doesn't make sense for my business. So when you understand that, I think it takes a lot of the questions of what to talk about out of the picture. Does that make sense?

Kimberly King:
Absolutely. One hundred percent. And I really love the way that you explain the internal and external activism and how you can care about so many different things really deeply and have these values and you don't necessarily have to bring those into your brand and into your business. You can, if you want to, if it makes sense, if it makes sense in terms of your business and your platform and your brand, but it's okay to have those things be personal to you and do things on your own and not have to publicly share about that, or even infuse it into your business or your brand. And I absolutely love that because I think something that I notice a lot of people get stuck with when it comes to developing their brand is just how do you do it? And how do you bring these things in and do it in a way that makes sense, right? Like having these values, having your brand values and your personal values, and where's the intersect and where's the overlap and where is the integration? So I really love how you explain that. And it definitely I feel like gives me permission to have all of these values and things that I deeply care about and not feel the pressure to have to speak about all of them on my platform when sometimes it might not make sense. And to also speak about the ones that do make sense, because it is important to share your values and to integrate that into your business and be vocal about the things that you care about.

Meagan Ward:
I think it's like, I think it's really important, especially as you start to grow, right? A lot of people are facing this internal struggle because they are the business right now. You are a business of one, you're a solo entrepreneur, but think about long term, you're going to grow a team. You might expand your business to places that you can't even comprehend right now. It's important to think about that when you talk about your activism versus who you are, because hopefully, I don't know about everybody else here, but hopefully, eventually I don't want to be my business. I want my business to be a thing that's running and I want to be me, but for now they're intersected and intertwined. But what makes sense for the long term vision of your brand?

Kimberly King:
Yes. Oh my gosh. That's something that I definitely fully believe in because I notice, you know, having worked with entrepreneurs with building their brand, sometimes we're not looking at the big picture and the long term vision, and when you're not doing that, you're setting yourself up to not have a business and a brand that is sustainable, and that is aligned with who you truly are and that you can separate yourself from and have the freedom that you want and do the things that you want to do outside of working in your business. As much as we love our businesses and love supporting our clients, it's something that I really value is having freedom and having time to do the things that I love within my business and outside of my business as well. So, yeah, I think it's really great to have that perspective and to think about the long term. So when it comes to your values and your activism, what does that look like for you personally, your journey with that and figuring out what do you bring into your brand and what does that look like in a tangible sense?

Meagan Ward:
Absolutely. So I'm going to bring it back to 2020 again because I feel like a lot of this stuff was brought to the surface for many of us in that year. As a black woman, living in the United States, it smacked me in the face and this is not that it was new or different, but in the fact that I couldn't not talk about it for the first time in my life, on my platform and on my brand. So for the first few months of the year, I really struggled with this. How do I navigate this as a human being? And how do I navigate this as a business? So early on, I was really outspoken from a personal perspective on what mattered to me, what I cared about, how people could take action. And as I started to integrate it more and more into the fiber of my being, it started to naturally evolve into how I run my business. So much of my activism isn't public. Now I don't talk about a ton online in terms of specifics. I don't say that I'm passionate about X, Y, and Z, and you should care about it too. Even though I am really passionate about a ton of things. What I do a lot is on the back end of my business, like working with you to make sure that my brand visuals really communicate who I am, what I'm about, what I'm here to do and how people can work with me in a way that's aligned, finding a bank that aligned with my values and my vision. It's not the bank that I'm going to be with 10 years from now, but it's perfect for where my little, in the grand scheme of the world, business is right now. It looked like building out standard operating procedures for what are we going to do as a company? So I am just me right now, but I think about my business like a company already. What are we going to do as a company? If we cross a line, if we do something that offends another population where we don't intend to, what's our called out standard operating procedure, doing this stuff behind the scenes is just as impactful as speaking out publicly. Did that answer the question?

Kimberly King:
Yes. There's just so many things I feel like I want to dive into on that because yeah, I mean, 2020 definitely brought up so much stuff to the surface for so many people and it's definitely been incredibly eye-opening for myself and just how I have unintentionally contributed in some ways to things that I don't fully align with, to things that I don't believe in, how I may have been part of the problem. And it really starts with the internal work. It's not just about what you talk about on your platform, because you can say whatever you want on your platform, right? People can say whatever they want, they can say they support this, they believe in that, but it's really the work, the inner work that you're doing to make sure that things are aligned. Like you said, finding a bank that aligns with your values and really taking a look at the actions that you're taking day-to-day, outside of your business, and making sure that you're in integrity with the things that you believe in, and it's not going to be perfect. It's going to be a process, but it really starts with the internal work and making sure that how you're showing up is aligned with what you believe in and what you stand for.

Meagan Ward:
Absolutely. I think that a lot of people last year got caught up in the sense that I have to say something before I even know what I'm saying or before I even know how it resonates with me. And that can lead to a lot of accusations of performative activism because at its essence, that's what it is. Right. Do you really believe the things that are coming out of your mouth or that you're speaking about on your brand? It's okay. Like for anyone listening, and Kim, you do an incredible job of holding space for this for your clients, I can say that from personal experience. It's okay to be quiet and integrate first, but once you know, you must take action because you can't operate from a position of ignorance anymore. That was stripped from many of us last year. Regardless of what your activism is, whether it's anti-racism or something else, the veil has been pulled down. Now that we know, what will you do?

Kimberly King:
Yes, absolutely. I think that's really important to talk about as well, because especially with social media and with some of the pressure that sometimes we can feel about what we should be doing and what we need to speak out on and how we do that. It can be a lot. And definitely for me personally, from my experience, it has definitely had an effect on my mental health. And I think it's really important to give yourself that space, that you need to really go deep and do the inner work. And I love the way that you said, once you have that knowledge, once you know, you need to use your voice, you need to be vocal about it. You need to take a stand because staying ignorant is not an option. And I absolutely loved the way that you said that. And I think that it's really important to give yourself that space, but also know when it's time to take action and to do the work and to integrate that into your business and your brand.

Meagan Ward:
Absolutely. And there's no timeline for that. There's no timeline. I think that many people feel like if they care about something, they need to act fast when that's not necessarily the case. Make informed and aligned action your priority after full integration has happened.

Kimberly King:
I love that. Are there any other things that you feel called to share around activism and your business and anything that you feel is important for people to really think about and to know that we haven't yet talked about?

Meagan Ward:
I think the only other thing that I'll add is, start where you are. Take imperfect action. Nobody expects you to be perfect, regardless again, of what your activism platform is, do something. You can change later, you can mold later, you can amend things later. So I've created tons of content over the years that I've repurposed into freebies for programs and bonuses for programs. There is some language that I use in some of them that I no longer use. I can still use that content, but I make it very clear either in a disclaimer or through the editing process, that that's not who I am anymore. That's not what I believe anymore. And what has changed about who I am, the actions that I take, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. So don't feel like you have to burn everything to the ground to be a good activist. Don't feel like you have to totally negate who you were in the past to be a good activist. Activism is a journey. It's a process. It's like yoga. Like not everyone can do a handstand on the first try, but you're going to keep trying and you're going to keep evolving and integrating the more that you know, and the more that you've learned and your clients, they want to come with you on that process. They don't want to wake up one day and have you be woke. They want to see what you've done to get there because that's so much more relatable and accessible.

Kimberly King:
Yes, definitely. I think that also brings up so much around leadership and I love you know, you don't try and just pretend that some of the things that you may have shared in the past never happened and you fully own, this is where I was and this is where I am now, and take people along on that journey with you. And I think that really shows leadership. It's definitely scary to be vocal about the things that you care about and to put yourself out there and to be vulnerable and to sometimes receive judgment and sometimes have people who choose to no longer follow you or support you. So I love how you share that and just really encourage people to be transparent about the journey and where you're at and how you've evolved along the way.

Meagan Ward:
It's the only way that I've found that works. We've all seen it in politics and entertainment, hiding your past and trying to pretend like it didn't happen, it doesn't work in our new reality and our new state of consciousness. What does work is open, honest communication, deeper levels of integration and conversation around it because what led us to where we were in the past is these things were happening, right? Regardless again, regardless of what your activism is, things have been happening for years, decades, millennia. And the reason we're in the positions that we are right now is because we haven't been able to have open and honest dialogue about them. So even if you mess up, like the way that I look at it is if I mess up, I am opening the doorway for a conversation that we weren't even having before. And I'd much rather us be able to talk about it, I'd much rather have someone call me out publicly and have us have an honest conversation about it, then us not be talking about the issues that really matter for the ascension of humanity at all.

Kimberly King:
I love that. Yeah. I think it's really important to be willing, to be called forward and to open up the door for those conversations. Because at the end of the day, like you said, like, no matter what your activism is, what your values are, what you support, what you believe in, we're also human and we're going to make mistakes. But as long as you are willing to be open and to learn and to listen and to have those conversations, there's so much power in that. And you mentioned about the deeper integration and I would love if you're open to sharing, what does that look like? Or how can people get started on that journey of really going inwards and doing the deeper integration work when it comes to activism in your business?

Meagan Ward:
I love this question. For me, almost everything in my business and in my activism boils down to curiosity. I have the mind of a five-year-old when it comes to the things that I care about. Why is this the way that it is? Why do I think this about whatever's going on? What can I do? Will that have the impact that I desire it to have? Do I need to learn more? Do I need to hear different perspectives before I take action? Am I getting information from valuable sources, credible sources. All of these lines of inquiry are how you start to do the deeper work, whether it is in your business or in your personal life. If we are not questioning things consistently, not just once, right? Because this work is not linear and it doesn't stop. It continues. Even after we have learned one lesson, there is a thousand and one other things that we can learn. So are you asking yourself the right questions to allow you to dive deeper into whatever your activism is? If you need a place to start, one of my favorite questions is what if? Insert whatever after that. What if nothing changes about how I run my business right now when it comes to my activism? What if I make it mandatory for all of my team members to actively care about my personal activism? What if I decide to take two weeks off to go on a mission trip to South America, whatever it is. What if, what if, what if, what if, and what you'll find is your truth, whatever that is for you is what matters. Nobody's telling you to think a certain way or be a certain way, or act a certain way, whatever your truth is at the end of the day is what matters most for your personal and business alignment and integrity.

Kimberly King:
Yes. Integrity and alignment. Two of my favorite words and I love that question or that prompt. What if, because it just really opens up space for you to explore and to also get clear on, what are your values, you know, what is your truth? Because without that, it's really hard to bring in the activism. If you're not clear on what do you believe and what are your values and what is your perspective and what do you support? And once you have that clarity, it's so much easier, like you were saying to figure out, okay, how does this make sense in terms of my business, in terms of my brand, in terms of my platform. Also, I think it's important to figure out in what ways, and this is something that you've definitely taught me is, in what ways do you feel most expressed or what is the way that feels most aligned for you to express yourself? And I feel like that's different for everybody. So for some people, it is having a podcast or going on video or writing it in their content. For some people, when it comes to activism, it's going to protest, for some people, it's not. For some people, it's donating to organizations, for other people, it's not. So I'd love to talk a little bit about your perspective on that and if you have any words of wisdom on what that can look like for entrepreneurs, when it comes to your business and integrating activism in a way that is aligned with you.

Meagan Ward:
Love this. Expression is everything. Expression is everything. And when you operate from, I believe personally, that each of us has our primary potent communication style, whether that is writing, speaking, video, behind the scenes, whatever that is, how can you infuse your activism into your most potent form of communication? So for me, I’m great live. I'm great on video. So I started this series last year about inclusive business, and I started talking about it with my clients on calls and in group settings. So it was a lot of things that people didn't, like, if you're not into video, you probably didn't see a lot of what I considered to be my most potent activism, but it existed and that's what matters. So for you, how do you show up? How can you use your particular brand of potent communication to share what matters most to you? For some people, that's not even speaking. I have a friend who has a product line, a clothing line, and the words on the shirts changed as a result of 2020 and what they learned. For another client of mine who writes contracts, the contracts and the language that was used in the contracts changed. So it doesn't necessarily have to be public, but it does have to be yours.

Kimberly King:
Amazing. I love that. I think that also really speaks to the importance of not just talking about it. Not just saying the things, but actually integrating it. You know, what actions are you taking within your business from something as seemingly simple as your contracts, right? And the language you're using and thinking about how you're delivering your content, the messaging you're using. That's definitely something that I've become more aware of for my own business and brand, like my messaging and the language that I’m using and the words that I use, and just having more awareness around that and being more conscious of it. And also definitely making mistakes along the way, but being open to learning, which I think is so, so important.

Meagan Ward:
Yes. Your activism can show up in so, so, so many different ways, from your language to your imagery, we saw this a lot last year, to your tools that you're using and your spiritual practice. I think there's a lot of cultural appropriation that happens there that's not really talked about. It can exist in many different ways, shapes and forms, and it doesn't have to be radically huge action that you take. One of the biggest things that I'm about to do, have not done yet so holding me accountable to this, is for all of my welcome forms, I'm adding a spot for people to choose their pronouns. Like, what are your pronouns? It's something that I've known and I ask for people that I don't know, but it doesn't have to be hard for it to be potent.

Kimberly King:
Yes, absolutely. Sometimes the smallest things can have the biggest impact. One of your posts that you recently shared on your Instagram, where you shared tangible things like even adding a section on your welcome form or your application form, what are your pronouns, you know, just acknowledging that and giving the opportunity for people to express themselves in that way and to be seen and to be heard and to feel understood is so freaking powerful. So I absolutely loved that.

Meagan Ward:
One of the biggest things that blew my mind last year, I had a coach who, as we were navigating the murder of George Floyd and Brianna Taylor here in the US, asked me, what do you identify as? And do you want me to identify you as one of your primary identifiers as a black woman? Holy heck, blew my freaking mind because for me, I grew up not in traditionally black cultures. I grew up in international communities. I primarily identify myself as a woman first and a black woman second, which is not necessarily your norm. So me navigating everything that was going on in the country was very different than one of my peers who identified herself as a black person first, a woman, second. So it was really interesting to just have someone ask, like, who are you and how do you want to navigate this together? And how can I support you in that process? I think sometimes we feel like we have to come up with all the answers and all the solutions when in reality, people just want you to ask and they want to be heard.

Kimberly King:
Absolutely. I love that. It's definitely so important to recognize that everybody is their own person and everybody has their own unique experience and really taking the time to acknowledge that and recognize that, and also opening up that conversation to be like, how would you like to be seen? And how do you express yourself and how can I hold that space for you? I think that's something that's definitely lacking in the coaching industry. And I think that there's a lot of progress that's being made with that, especially with a lot of coaches becoming more trauma-informed and trauma-aware and so many great mentors and teachers around anti-racism and inclusivity and diversity and all of these amazing things. So it's definitely something that I am continuing to learn and integrate into my own business. And it's just really part of the inner work I feel like is so, so important to do. So I love that you bring that up because I think it's something that a lot of people don't think about when it comes to their business and how to hold space for your clients during difficult collective experiences.

Meagan Ward:
Absolutely. If you're trying to think about your activism, that's a great place to start, and that's an easy place to start. Like, what do you do as a business when a client is triggered and needs space to process because of their past trauma?  Are the actions that you're taking in your business, traumatizing, retraumatizing people? This happens a lot in the sales process, and I wish people would talk about it more. It happens. It's woven into the fabric of the coaching industry in general, because when we think about who our ideal client is, we are constantly trying to put people in boxes to make it easier and easier for us to make money. Going way back to the beginning of this conversation, that's part of my mission in this world is for people to realize that you don't have to put people in boxes for you to make a ton of money and serve really freaking well. You can have highly customized work and use really potent and inclusive language in your messaging and still attract soulmate, swoon worthy clients. And this is part of why I was so drawn to work with you Kim, was because I knew that in order for me to really create an inclusive experience, it couldn't just be the words that I was saying on a live. It couldn't just be the text captions of my Instagram posts. It had to be the brand. It had to be the images, the text, the whole experience of coming onto my little slice of the internet had to inform people as to who was welcome here without being like, I only help female entrepreneurs, you know?

Kimberly King:
I love, love, love that I love what you're saying about not fitting people into boxes. I don't like labels, so I definitely resonate with that. And I feel like it's so important to honor that everybody is their own unique individual and make sure that comes through with your content and your messaging. And, you know, this is something that I get really fired up about because I see people and hear people talk about how, you know, you don't need branding. It doesn't matter, it's not important, focus on XYZ. And yes, there are so many different important things to create a thriving and sustainable business. But your brand is the experience that people have when they come in contact with you and that is the way that you express that you do have an inclusive business. There's an energetic feeling that people have when they come in contact with your brand. So when you are doing the inner work, that is how you are expressing it, through your brand. That's how people know, is this somebody who I feel truly sees me and hears me and is going to be able to understand, or at least hold the space for me to be the full expression of myself.

Meagan Ward:
Yes. And this, I was the number one offender. I'm going to call myself out right now. Number one offender early on in my business of, you don't need a brand, but you do. It's the truth. It took me a few years, but I came around. You really, really do. You really, really, really do. And I think some part of the reason why people are hesitant, part of the reason why I was hesitant is because it would require me to state what I'm about unequivocally, who am I, why am I here? And who am I here to serve? And one thing that I've realized through our work together is that that's never changed from day one of my business. The packages, the programs, the ideal client may have changed, but the core of the brand has always been the same. And you do an incredible job at this harnessing the essence of a movement into a visual representation that will stand the test of time.

Kimberly King:
It's truly been such an honor to support you through that. And that's something that brings me so much joy is helping entrepreneurs express themselves through their brand and allow themselves to be seen. And it does take so much courage to make those statements and to really express your values to the world. And, you know, it's definitely a process and there's so many layers to it as well. I'm going through the process, myself, just going deeper and taking myself through the process. And, Oh my gosh, it brings up so much stuff, which is why I also believe it's so important to bring your activism into your brand so that people know your values are aligned with them. So I'd love to talk about when it comes to activism and entrepreneurship. Are there any projections that you have for this year and going forward on how you see that unfolding within business, within entrepreneurship, within the online space, the coaching community?

Meagan Ward:
Absolutely. So, number one, I see in 2021 and beyond activism becoming a pillar of almost everyone's brand, regardless of what that activism is. We're seeing millennials and Gen-Z-ers having more and more purchasing power and becoming a larger and larger part of our target audiences. And we know statistically that they make purchasing decisions based on values, and they will quickly stop buying from someone, or a brand in general, if that brand does not align with their values. So I don't think we'll see an uptick in a particular type of activism, but I think we will see people really honing in. And this is where I'm so freaking passionate about your work. We're going to see a lot more brands diving in and claiming what they stand for and what they believe in and not wavering from that. So that's the first thing. Second, I think we're going to see a shift away from, and I cannot wait for this to happen, a shift away from gendered identities and client avatars to more inclusive language, which is going to be incredible, but it's also going to have to, it will fundamentally change the way that people operate their businesses and how they hold space. Because if you are holding space for a more inclusive set of people, you have to run your business differently than if you're holding space for a homogenous population. Third, I think we're going to see an uptick in inclusivity around people of different abilities. So adding captions, adding photo descriptions to our content and just to make it more inclusive in that perspective as well. So those are like my top three, I have a whole lot, but those are the top three for 2021.

Kimberly King:
I love that. Yeah. I think it's also important to remember that being a spiritual entrepreneur doesn't necessarily mean that you're a coach. You know, it's easy to think that integrating activism or your values into your business doesn't matter, or that you don't need to think about these things like using inclusive language, having your content be accessible, but you absolutely do. Because if you are serving people, human beings, then it's something that you need to be conscious about and be aware of. So I absolutely love those projections and I can definitely agree with all of those. And I really hope that things do start to shift that way and I think they have already started doing that, which is amazing. And I love that there are entrepreneurs out there like yourself really leading the way and showing people how to do that in a way that is aligned with who you are, in a way that is sustainable, in a way that supports you in your long term vision of your business and your brand, which is incredible.

Meagan Ward:
Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. Regardless of what you do, like you said, you don't have to be a coach for this to matter. Great example, tarot card readers. If you're still saying it's the Rider-Waite tarot, there's work to be done there. Like, a person of color made those images and has not gotten credit for a long time. So it's in every industry, it's in every niche, there's work to be done. And you as a business owner listening right now can contribute significantly to that, regardless of what you do, who your ideal clients are, how large your audience size is you making subtle shifts can have a massive difference.

Kimberly King:
Yes, yes, yes, yes. Oh my gosh. This conversation has been absolutely amazing. And I love talking about this topic with you because I know that it's something that you're so passionate about, and I absolutely love the work that you do in this world. I really want to thank you for taking the time to share your wisdom. Is there anything else that you would like to share or feel called to share? I would love for you to also let people know how they can connect with you.

Meagan Ward:
Yeah, nothing else that I feel called to share other than for each and every person listening, you are amazing. You are incredible. We see you. We hear you. We feel you. You're an important part of our community regardless of what you do and who you are or how you identify as. Take up space. This is your permission slip. If you needed one, hopefully you didn't. For those who want to find me, I am primarily on Instagram @thespiritualrevolutionary. And that is pretty much it. I don't have a website or anything as of yet.

Outro:
Thank you so much for joining me on today's episode of Lead With Soul. I'm so grateful for your support and excited to have you in this community. If you would like to hear more episodes of Lead with Soul and be the first to know when new episodes are released, please subscribe to the podcast and connect with me on social media. If you receive value from today's episode, I would love for you to leave a positive review or share the podcast on your social media channels and tag me so I can connect with you. You can find me on Facebook and Instagram or visit my website here. You can find more episodes of Lead With Soul and show notes​ ​here

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