The Biz Dojo

S2E6 - MVP Mindset w/Xavier Moon

February 23, 2021 Xavier Moon Season 2 Episode 6
The Biz Dojo
S2E6 - MVP Mindset w/Xavier Moon
Show Notes Transcript

In this week's episode of The Biz Dojo, we speak with Xavier Moon - CEBL Champion and 2-time League MVP.

Xavier walks us through his path, and the transition he has made from new player to trusted (and incredibly skilled!) veteran. We'll dive into work ethic, finding positivity through difficult times, what it takes to become an MVP, and using your platform to improve the community.

After the show, stay tuned for The Podium - brought to you by Beyond A Beaten Path. This week, we're joined by CEBL Fanatic and friend-of-the-show, Brian Bettis. We'll dive into a few of the things that could potentially "take you to the moon" in your personal and professional life.

This one's a slam dunk! Don't forget to click subscribe, leave a rating and a review.

Visit us at the links below!:
Website      |      Facebook      |      Instagram      |      LinkedIn      |      Twitter

Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/thebizdojo)

Seth Anderson:

Welcome to Episode Six, season two here in The Biz Dojo this week, we've got Xavier moon to time. Well, the only MVP of the CBl to date

JP Gaston:

that's gonna be titled to keep for the CBl, like,

Seth Anderson:

the only ever MVP every year. If you can, if anyone can do it, I believe it's Xavier and also the reigning league champion or replaced for the reigning league champion Everton stingers, and also is the was the, I suppose was the Finals MVP. So pretty impressive resume just in the last couple of years. Originally, he's from goodwater, Alabama, and found his way up to playing in Canada, I think, in part didn't really go deep on that. But I think in part, you know, his uncle played for the Toronto Raptors jamario Moon, which I you know, I don't know if you remember, but I do remember him for a couple years with the Raptors.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, no, I remember him. And I know that you know, we talked a little bit about you going back and watching some. We call it tape. It's not really tape anymore. Watch it watching some YouTube. film. Yeah. And I did a very similar thing I looked at I looked up a couple of I didn't, I didn't watch the jam one though. I should that I should check out the top 10 jams,

Seth Anderson:

top 10 dunks he had some. Some some doozies vicious vicious jams. I felt like I was watching a little NBA Jam, video gaming.

JP Gaston:

All Christmas break. The mesh started on fire.

Seth Anderson:

I got to go back and confirm that one. But you know, this was a well rounded discussion, I think. I mean, we talked a lot about basketball. But you really got a sense of Xavier's leadership style, how you know, his mindset, how he approaches not just a game, but life

JP Gaston:

well, and his journey, right? Like he's had a, he's had an interesting path. And I think for a lot of leaders, similar to Xavier, you you grow up without the court, you grew up without the baskets, and you have to learn those skills along the way. And so I think there's a lot of parallels between his journey growing up and leadership in general. Yeah.

Seth Anderson:

And you know, he's, he's taken the, I mean, think back to the first episode we ever did with Vern, the scenic route, I mean, would be a good way to put it right. Like he Yeah, we can't reuse the title enough to come up with a new title. But he's, you know, a couple, he went to two different colleges. And he's just kind of he's played all over the place, which, you know, I think he's gonna take a lot from that, like, there's no way he doesn't like he's 2526 years old. He's sort of been all over the world playing basketball, like, there's no way that that doesn't translate.

JP Gaston:

We talked to him while he was in Israel. It was also our first international podcast.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah. And like doing all of that during a global pandemic, like, I'm sure the experiences that he's getting right now, and are gonna be amazing in the long term. You know, he's still got the dream of making the NBA. And I know, I'm gonna be a huge fan and supporter of him in that dream, because like, why not? Yeah, no, he

JP Gaston:

talked a little bit about being locked in a hotel room during the pandemic, too. And I can only imagine, like, I know how hard it is to be in my house, where I have all of my comforts, and my family and everything. And he talked a little bit about how, you know, they get locked in a hotel for two weeks on their own, they're not allowed to leave the room at all things, you know, the meals just appear, which sounds amazing. But when you're locked in a hotel, I can't imagine that as amazing as it sounds, it's gotta be hard to hold your mindset through that. And not only has he done that, but he's he's done that in a way that's allowed him to excel

Seth Anderson:

well, and I'm sure like the first couple of days, it's fine. But you know, you get 10 days of staring at the same four walls and watching reruns of whatever like that. That's not easy. And to then come out and play in an MVP pace, in an arena with no fans, and just everything that was kind of going on in the world at that time is beyond impressive, I think.

JP Gaston:

Yeah. And I love you know, we talked to Mike Murali not too long ago about the Eli Manning and I love that we we dug into that from a player's perspective, too.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, I mean, we you know, even in business, we do this where, you know, you have an idea for innovation, and it sounds great, or it looks great on paper, and then you roll it out to the frontline team members, you know, as it were, and a lot of times, it's maybe not what it seemed to be, and not every player is gonna have his perspective, per se, but it's it did seem like there was buy in and they were enjoying, or at least he enjoyed the implementation of it.

JP Gaston:

I think a lot of times as a leader to you, you get those ideas, you implement them, because you think they're the right thing to do. And then you might not even necessarily hear or get the feedback from the from that frontline team that actually is the one experiencing it. So it's nice to nice to get that.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah. So I mean, like I said, we touched on a lot of different topics. You know, when I said off the top, it was well rounded, partially trying to think of a word other than great See, I came up with something. But, you know, we touched on some, you know, some of the things that have influenced his life, you know, losing his stepfather at a young age, which was something that, you know, we could kind of talk about as I had a similar experience. And we also talked about some of the, you know, the social challenges that have been going on and sort of the platform and what he'd like to really is platform just around bringing awareness and education to the subject. So, you know, for those of you who are listening, I know that highly politicized topic, but I think what we can all do is just educate ourselves and learn more and immerse ourselves in it and try to make the world a better place. Yeah,

JP Gaston:

well, let's, let's get into it.

Voiceover:

This is the steadies with ghosted. Today on the pod, we speak with two time MVP MC EPL champion, Xavier moon. We'll talk about embracing the leadership, positive mindset and life after sport. Then on the podium, brought to you by beyond the beaten path will talk to special guests, Brian Bettis about growth and ways to get yourself to the moon. So welcome to The Biz Dojo with Seth Anderson, and JP Gaston.

Seth Anderson:

Welcome to The Biz Dojo. This week. We've got Xavier moon, welcome to the dojo. Xavier. Yeah, we're super, super pumped. He made the time coming to us all the way from, from Israel, where you're over just getting your basketball season started. Just a little bit of a tale of the tape on Xavier. So you're originally from goodwater, Alabama, yes, sir. made your way all the way up to the northern reaches of Canada to play for the Edmonton stingers. And you're the two time reigning MVP, or the only MVP of the CBl has ever existed last year league champion, and also Finals MVP. So congratulations, very impressive run in the inaugural seasons of the CBl. Thank you, I really appreciate it. And maybe that's a good jumping point. You know, there's a few things we were hoping to talk to you about today. But you know, that's sort of that the headline MVP, two seasons in a row winning a championship, but really two very different seasons, right? He sort of had one more normal season, and then you've got this like, bubble COVID thing? What was that experience like for you, if you look at those two seasons in the rearview mirror, the first season,

Xavier Moon:

I didn't even kind of know what to expect, like you said it was the inaugural season for newly a new city I've never been to before. So I kind of took a chance on signing with standard and sign would CBl but I definitely don't regret the decision that I made at all. And the second year managers, no fans, everything, you got to follow protocol as far like COVID guidelines. So just make sure that we were staying safe in the best way possible to even give us an opportunity to play basketball, which on which I'm grateful for,

Seth Anderson:

you know, obviously winning MVP in both seasons. But I'm curious from your perspective did the second one mean a little more when you also brought the league title in there as well,

Unknown:

it definitely meant more winning MVP and winning the championship on top of that, because we came up short the first year. So it definitely meant a lot more than winning VP That same year, and then come up with a championship,

Seth Anderson:

what did you learn about yourself, you know, kind of going through that experience of the bubble and all the protocols and just a totally different challenge. And I you know, anybody's really ever been through before, but as a leader of the team, you know, you're kind of growing in your game. What did you learn about yourself last year,

Unknown:

not many people know like when we first got to Canada, coming from state who had to quarantine for two weeks in a hotel room. So not being able to leave the hotel room may bring you breakfast, lunch and dinner three times a day. So I had to learn how to how to cope with that just being stuck in a room for two weeks. But once I got out of quarantine and was able to see my teammates, man, it was a lot easier. did a lot of reading a lot of working out in the room. So just try to do what I could to stay ready for winter season. do you start?

Seth Anderson:

You know, now the year you're getting back into it over in Israel? Obviously the CBl is a summer league so you get an opportunity to kind of go play some ball overseas. Have you noticed that anything has changed in your game or your mindset having gone through that as you as you get ready for this season, me being here, my

Unknown:

leadership skills, the team that I'm on right now, we're very young, you have a lot of guys that have never plan. This is our first year let me actually getting one or two older guys for the first time in my career, just having to take on a leadership role being more vocal and just lead by example. But it definitely helped me and when it's time to roll around and CBO starts up

Seth Anderson:

another thing I you know, just looking back a little bit you kind of started playing basketball a little later, maybe then then some people have in what I was reading sort of grade seven before you got into the organized game, but obviously you've had a lot of success. Just looking at sort of your journey to getting into college ball playing it at Morehead. I know that you sort of switched After your junior year, what experiences Did you take from Morehead that sort of sets you on this path? and and you know, looking back what was that experience like

Unknown:

great experience and more at the college days man are a lot more different than playing pro in college you practicing every day, maybe two, two and a half, three hours a day. So that definitely prepare you for that for the pro level where you probably practice twice a day, but is more some more chill, you might have a shoot around in the morning. And then art practice in the afternoon but coming coming from college man it definitely teaches you teaches you that work ethic that you need. At professional level more he was probably one of the best schools I could have went to as far as like trying to teach Were there

Seth Anderson:

any you know inspirations or mentors or coaches that you know really helped you on your way to kind of get those habits that have helped you adjust to the life of being a pro

Unknown:

pretty much all of my coaches and more a person's brylane Jonathan Mannix by all the guys that I had on the staff a while I was there a monocle. Of course, those guys really pushed me. We stayed in the gym early morning, late night. So putting in that work, man, it definitely helped me prepare for it for your pro life.

Seth Anderson:

You mentioned your uncle there. So for those of you who don't know, and I'm a huge Raptors fan, but your uncle jamario play for the Raptors actually went back and, you know, I remember him being quite the Dunker. So I went back and watched his top 10 dunks and he had some vicious vicious jabs back in the day. What is he meant to you as as you know a mentor, obviously your uncle but just sort of, you know, helping you get in that mindset and set you up for success.

Unknown:

I tell a lot of people man it's like having a cheat code. Because he's been through everything that I'm going through right now. He played overseas played an NBA play now he different leagues overseas and him just having the experience and in me just now getting started. I could talk to him about a lot of stuff just being away from home like how you dealt with it. Like I said, it's pretty much a Chico and he do what I'm doing right now.

JP Gaston:

Was there a point where like, you mentioned that you feel like this the season two that now oversees it? Was there a point where you felt in your career like you were becoming a leader? Like I know it? Yeah, especially in sport. Sometimes you can feel like you're kind of the the grunt worker for a while, was there a turning point where you thought, Hey, I'm actually you know, I'm gonna run this thing. I'm gonna be in charge here.

Unknown:

Probably after I left the Raptors National Fire training camp and went back to London for my second year. From my first year, my second year in London, my my role changed tremendously. Like I said, my, my game went to another level from that summer back to that winters that winter season. So I feel like I took on that leadership role. Once I got back to London,

Seth Anderson:

I must have been an amazing experience. I know. It didn't work out with the 905. And he was sort of one of the last cuts there. But again, what did you take from that experience that, you know, obviously propelled you to where you're at right now,

Unknown:

man, I'll tell you the same thing I tell everybody else. I probably learned more in those two or three weeks that I was with the 905. And I probably will learn that a whole season anywhere else. Everything was broken down analytics, everything from a shot chart to defensive pillars closing out getting being in the gaps, like every day, we broke it down to a tee. So when you come into practice, now you're getting to see if you're if you're improving, or if you're decreasing, that really helps you grow your game. And being a wonder to Final Cut, man, you're pretty much there with the guys that are on the team. So I was a sponge the whole time I was in training camp and I got cut. And obviously it was it was discouraged me because I got cut but at the same time I took it as a learning experience. And when I got back to London, man, like I said I was ready to take on that leadership role. That's awesome. Which

Seth Anderson:

would be Shay, I've been there when you ever plan or which players were you playing with

Unknown:

alert? Tyler Ennis was there. Obviously Dwayne Otis, David Robinson, a couple guys played in the league have been in New Jersey for a little minute now. So they definitely have some high caliber guys. And

Seth Anderson:

yeah, I had an opportunity I sat in on a Raptors coaching development seminar was like a two day thing. And all their coaches kind of game came and just talked about, you know, their approach. And there was a little bit of X's and O's, but a lot of talk about leadership. And I left that session just like that organization, they they really put their people first and they seem like you know, leadership is top of mind and everything they do for sure. It is definitely

Unknown:

one of the top pains they talk about. And it trickles down from the coaching staff to the players. And it's definitely something that's that's top tier and in the league and in the G league.

Seth Anderson:

Is that still the goal? Xavier like NBA or or Where's your mindset at on that front? This

Unknown:

has always been a goal. I mean, I've come to the realization like even if I don't make it, I'll be happy with whichever way my career takes me. But that's, that's always gonna be my goal. My ultimate goal, and I actually feel like I can get there. So I'll put I'll put in a word man and I'm just taking my journey one day at a time. That's

Seth Anderson:

amazing. And you know, we're rooting for you. That would be a great story, obviously. What What is your experience been like in Canada? I'm a little curious. Obviously, that probably wasn't the plan growing up, you know, they end up playing And Canada but you know, here you are. And what's that experience been like for you?

Unknown:

It was a great experience. Obviously my uncle played there. I came to Canada when I was 16. My 16th birthday when he was playing with Toronto, I didn't know what to expect. I hadn't I don't even remember like being in Canada or what it was like to be in Canada. I just knew when I got there was when I got when I actually when I got to London, my first year. In October, it was this I was out the weather was nice. So I'm like, Man, I'm looking forward to this and probably like a week after that it was covered in snow. Oh, man. I don't know if I could do l do if I could deal with these. But it was it's been a great man from from London to Edmonton to Toronto Mississauga, like, every everywhere I've been in Canada has been a great experience. I've met some great people. So I'm definitely grateful for all the people that I've met. And the journey that I've that I've taken that took me to Canada.

Seth Anderson:

And I guess you weren't having fun in the summer. So you had Did you get the full winter experience yet?

Unknown:

Before the winter experience. So I mean, I can I can deal with London snow, because it's not that bad. But I heard everything is pretty bad. So I think I'll just stick around there for the summertime.

Seth Anderson:

It's one of the most beautiful places in the world in the summer. But that winter is a different game up there.

Unknown:

Winter, pretty brutal. So I think I'll stay away from that.

Seth Anderson:

Reading up and doing a little bit of research on yourself, obviously, last year, you know, challenging on a number of fronts. You know, there's an article that we're reading, particularly on the Black Lives Matter movement and some of the social stuff that was happening down in the States. How did that I mean, obviously, where you're from, it's a it's a big issue and something you've lived with your entire life. What was it like sort of being an arm's length away up in Canada and sort of watching some of the things as they were happening last summer,

Unknown:

like you say, a man where I come from, is it sad to say, but stuff like that is like normal racism, all that type of stuff. Prejudice is where I come from, it's just like everyday thing, you ride down the street, you might see a confederate flag in somebody's yard or on the back of somebody's throat. So to see the Black Lives Matter movement going on, I love to see it. I love to see the athletes like getting out and, and supporting and trying to make a change. But from my perspective is is hard to say that things are changing. Because I've seen it for so long. I've been seeing this for so I've been growing up. And I just feel like no matter what happens, like no matter what, say no matter what it's done, no matter who says in the south, I feel like it'll always be like that, like, that's just my opinion.

Seth Anderson:

One of the things you mentioned is you want to use your platform to drive change to make things better to help out in whatever way you can. Our podcast is predominantly going to be Canadian, white people who maybe aren't necessarily exposed to this kind of thing. Is there anything that you would share or put out there on how we can help or what we can do to potentially support you

Unknown:

or out of out of Canadians that I've met, whether white or black man is? It Canada is such a friendly country? I mean, racism is everywhere. But I feel like being in Canada, it has that home feeling where I'm from is someplace you can't even go after a certain time. So I feel like Canada definitely evolved more than mistakes when it comes to racism and how minorities handle white people and how white people handle minorities. But I mean, I wouldn't say there's a certain thing that that Canadians can do other than educate themselves. That's probably the one the one thing that Canadians can do is educate themselves just as much as Americans because Americans need to educate themselves too. That's that's probably the one thing that I can say,

Seth Anderson:

looking at it from a community perspective, then obviously, you're you're an influential figure in the communities that you go into increasingly, is there any community causes that you're particularly passionate about when you get into a community? Or what's your approach on that front?

Unknown:

When I got to Edmonton, man, I didn't even know about like the community. I mean, obviously, as a professional team, you're always traveling to schools and stuff like that, because the community mech is what makes up fans. So when I got to Edmonton, man I did, I took it upon myself to just want to get out in the community, pretty much every community event we had, I was there. So whether whether we would go into schools or Boys and Girls Clubs, I was always in attendance. And I do the same thing at home, whether I'm in the gym working out or out running or something like that. I have a lot of kids that come to the gym, just to work out with me, kids from seven to like, 18 and some kids just come here to watch. Like I've had kids just coming out of watching and I had our parents like write me on Facebook or something like thanking me for whatever I did put it I did anything but being an influence. Just having kids around me and and showing them what it takes to get to where I am now is something that I hang my hat on. So I'm definitely proud of myself for that and just try to give back to every community that I go to because like I said the community is what makes what makes the fans so if we can give back and we can look forward to the things given back to us.

Seth Anderson:

I love that and I think one of the cool things about your story You know, all the sports, you know, I think hockey, basketball, you know, they have like a lead programs for 789 year olds, like people paying a lot of money investing, you know, a lot of their hard earned cash into developing their kids. But, you know, you have one of those amazing stories you didn't, you know, start playing organized ball till grade seven. You know, I saw a video of you that sort of day in the life and you were on a court in Edmonton talking about how you wish you would have had something that had like some lines and, and any kind of court. So you know, it is possible if you put the work in, you don't necessarily need to be on all those elite programs or whatever. What advice would you give to, you know, a young up and coming kid in terms of their work ethic and how they can basically be the next Xavier move coming

Unknown:

from where I come from is everyday thing. I'm not being highly recruited not coming from like a big city, like all of it, it's an everyday process. And you have to be willing to get up early, stay up late, putting in the work, to whatever dream you have to accomplish, to change to want to travel the world, my audio type of stuff, you have to be willing to put in the work. It is definitely not gonna come easy. You got more hard days and the easy ones for sure. But the word that you put in will definitely pay off in the end and it'll be well worth it.

Seth Anderson:

That's great advice. What about mindset? How much does that play a role? Do you think it for your journey anyway? Like how much is mindset played a role with everything you've sort of been through and being able to stay positive and stay on the right track.

Unknown:

And that's my set is over half the battle because you got to think about it like I'm in Israel, right now, I'm away from my family, eight to 10 months out of the year, being on my home, being able to stay positive, even with COVID going on, like a whole bunch of negative stuff going on around you, you have to stay positive and you have to stay focused on what it is that you came over here to do. And let's play basketball at a high level. So have your mindset has to be just as strong as your body. I tell people that all the time. Like you can work out in the gym as much as you want to. But if you have a weak mindset, then you're not gonna make it very far.

JP Gaston:

Do you do a lot of mindset training? Like is there anything you do to get your head in that space? You work out in the gym? Obviously a lot for the physical side. But what what kind of things do you do for the for the mental side of the game?

Unknown:

It's crazy, because I don't really, I can't really say that I do like certain exercises or things like that. And like I've just I've learned to control my control my mind like over and over the last couple of years. And one thing Mama told me was being patient, and that was from when I was a freshman in college to now that's probably one of the biggest things he could have ever told me was to be patient. So I've always taken that with me no matter where I where I am, and just try to look at the positive side of everything. So but I wouldn't say this is one specific exercise that I need to keep on my mind. Stay positive. Yeah, I

Seth Anderson:

think it's at least in my journey. It's been a collection of things. You know, some of its podcasts or reading or just surrounding yourself with good people like there's a lot of things you can little things you can do that

Unknown:

add up. I recently started listening to podcasts, muscle, a lot of people talking about it. So I downloaded the app and started listening to a couple podcasts on there just as to listening and pretty much every day Eric Thomas, inky Johnson like all those type of guys just motivational guys, man that just keep you keep you going and keep your head above water. So I definitely think podcasts are a good way to get

Seth Anderson:

checked out. The old man in the three with JJ Reddick yet. No, I haven't. But I definitely add that to my list. That's a great pot. And I mean, they've got some great episodes with basketball players, you know, Steve Nash, Redman fleet, a bunch of those guys, but then they've also started dabbling into leadership. So they actually, they interviewed Bob Iger, who is the president of Disney and Matthew McConaughey. So it's a it's really good, I highly recommend it. Definitely check it out. I mean, if they haven't added to my list, you know, one other thing I wanted to just touch on, you know, just because I think we went through a similar experience and both losing our stepfathers. I lost my stepfather when I was 21. And a work accident, obviously, you know, yours as well documented as well. The thing I wanted to talk about there, again, it kind of relates back to mindset, because for me, you know, being 21, and having that suddenly happen, I definitely went down a road that was not very productive, and my mindset diminished, and, you know, it all manifested in me sort of not taking care of myself. And at one point, you know, I'm 310 pounds and not happy with myself in my life. And it was a lot of work for me to kind of rebuild my mindset and kind of get back to that place. And a lot of the roots of that came from that event and not dealing with it at the time. But you're not that far removed from that. But you've you've you've kind of kept working. You're having a lot of success in the basketball world. How have you been able to do that? What's been the key for you,

Unknown:

man? It was I wouldn't say that I went down like a dark, a dark role, but it was tough when it first happened. Like you say me yours your stepfather passed on was like unexpected and saying we mind like, I don't think we're expecting anybody to die. But after it happened, man. It took me some time to like, actually get Back to myself and, and come back to reality like, okay, I still have a life to live myself. So after like the funeral and all that happened, and I think I think the turning point was when I actually went back to school, because I wasn't gonna go back to school. Um, it was the end of the year. But when I, when I got back to school, man, I got my degree. And after I got my agreement, everything else was just like, okay, I've been putting in the work for this long man. So I got to keep going. Like it just, I mean, things happen. So is like, I can't control it. So I just have to keep going. And like I said, Some days are tougher than others. But I just I try to keep keep myself positive, talk to my mom a lot. But other than that, man, it was it was tough. But right now, man, it's every day is dedicated to him. So I mean, if I feel like if I stopped working, then I let them down. So as long as I keep working, I get where I need to get. We all gonna be proud.

Seth Anderson:

That's beautiful. I'm very, very inspired to see what you're doing. And those things, you know, they're tough for everyone. And like you said, Nobody plans for it. But to be able to use it as motivation and fuel and dedicate what you're doing in his memory is very cool. So for sure, in that vein as well. You know, obviously, you start to have a level of success, you know, you're doing pretty well for yourself. We've seen this story happen many times, you know, NBA players that get surrounded by the wrong people and make bad decisions. And all these things happen. How do you stay grounded and make sure that that you're surrounded with the right people,

Unknown:

my family, they never let me get to. They never let me get too low. I'm always talking to them pretty much every day, I talk to somebody from my family every day. So we always have conversations about where I am and where I'm trying to get to and where I came from. And once I'm once I'm home, I think being home is probably the biggest, the biggest challenge as far as like not being around the wrong crowd. Because a lot of the guys that I went to school with are still were back where I live. So it's hard to go home and not hang out with those guys, when they're when they're not probably not doing the right thing. My family is what helps keep me grounded.

Seth Anderson:

That's awesome. And so true. I mean, if you remember where you came from, and you know, obviously, you got some great lessons, and you talked about your mom quite a bit. So that's, that's, that's great. One, you know, a couple other things, and then we'll, we'll let you get back to her. But for those of you who maybe haven't seen you play, you know, the CBl is relatively new in the Canadian landscape, and I think it's going to be a thing that blows up. But for those who maybe haven't seen you play, what is your style, like? Who Who would you sort of compare yourself to as a player,

Unknown:

I get asked these questions a lot. And I don't I feel like I don't I'm not compared to anybody. I mean, it's a it's a couple players that I like to watch but I don't know if I would say I play exactly like those players, Damian Lillard Chris Paul being my favorite player, I'm pretty sure everybody wants to curry and the new guys Trey young and john Moran, but I wouldn't say that my game is modeled out to anybody.

Seth Anderson:

I love that answer. Yeah, you're gonna do you? That's good. If you had to say, you know, what's your on court superpower? That seems to be kind of a term that gets thrown around right now. Like, what what do you think is your The best part of your game from your perspective? Or the most challenging part for someone to defend?

Unknown:

Must be, are they people like always tell me how fast I am. But I can't really tell that I'm fast until I watch myself on the field, in practice. And in games. I kind of I don't feel like I'm reading that fast until I see myself on sale. And then I just hear everybody talking about it like me, are you so fair this? So I would definitely say much B,

Seth Anderson:

we talked to Mike quite a bit about the lamb ending. How do you like that? What is? How do you feel about with the lamb ending?

Unknown:

It was great for the summer series, that was probably the best thing that they implemented for the summer series haven't even made the games a lot more interesting at the end. I feel like they did that at the at the perfect time. So I don't know how everybody else thought about it. But I actually liked it.

Seth Anderson:

I love it. I think it's cool. And we've kind of debated with some of our friends about it. You know, some of them. They're like, Yeah, I don't know. But I think it's cool. I like innovation. I like trying some different stuff,

Unknown:

you have to try something different.

JP Gaston:

I like that there's not a vowel every 13 seconds for the last four minutes of the game. That's my favorite part. That's,

Unknown:

that's what it eliminates. It eliminates the filing, all of that type of stuff. So I mean, you pretty much by the year started how to play the whole game because you don't want to lose a lead at the end.

Seth Anderson:

Does your mindset at the end of the game change with Eli Manning? Or how does that go for you as the player on the court?

Unknown:

Yeah, your whole strategy changes once he starts cuz you got to think about there's no, there's no game clock is just a shot clock. So every possession counts. I mean, maybe you need nine points, maybe you need 19. But whether you're down or whether you have you can't take your foot off the gas because it's easy to come back in the day in basketball, a couple of threes, they call the time out. Now instead of being down 19 you're down to so your whole strategy changes once he starts

Seth Anderson:

and does the defensive intensity pick up a little bit if you're down like the does it give you that extra little bit of motivation.

Unknown:

I feel like Everything picks up all offensively to test the educational intensity. You have teams that can make shots and they have shooters man and they start hitting shots. And you might turn the ball over once or twice. Now notice that now is in game, even if it's still a gap between between the score they get the game is getting real tight, because you know, that shot the game clock at night, right? So, I mean, you go into a target score. So

JP Gaston:

if you can't, if you can't score buckets, if you're turning the ball over, and this other team is farming definitely, definitely gets in the back of your mind like, okay, we might make this game does it change it as the lead team to like, at the beginning of the game? Are you really trying to just score to make as much gap between you and the other team as humanly possible? For sure.

Unknown:

I mean, what once the game starts, I mean, it's pretty much just regular basketball, and you try to outscore another team, so you try to just make sure you're going to eat them and that you have as big as gap as possible. So I feel like if you can get that gap above 10, then going into Elan Indian, like you're pretty much calm. You can write hardcore sets, or, or unless you get transition book. It's worded in that it definitely I don't I don't feel like it, the game changes as much. But anyway, you definitely try to get that gap though.

JP Gaston:

When you're in another country. Like obviously, it's a little bit different right now. Yeah, there's a lot more I will call it hotel work going on than has happened in the past. But when you're in another country, what do you you know, what do you do when you're not at the court? Or, or at the hotel? What are the sorts of things that you do on it,

Unknown:

depending on the country that you're in? Me being here, the weather's always good, and this is raining other than that is pretty much 70 degrees, or So pretty much at the beach, not too much time is open right now. But like I said, it just depends on the country that you're in where you're definitely at the beach, more often than not,

JP Gaston:

there's not a lot of beaches in St. catharines. Ontario, so I can't I can't imagine you spent a lot of I grew up there. So I know, I know what it's like there. So I imagine that there wasn't a heck of a lot to do even if you weren't in a bubble. It definitely wasn't.

Seth Anderson:

Were you able to maybe foster some deeper relationships with your teammates as a result of that? Like, do you maybe get some better relationships with folks being in that bubble? My

Unknown:

experience, you could say that, but like I said, you're pretty much on your own. The Americans had we had our own rooms for those two weeks. But after we got out of your bubble, I mean, after we got out of quarantine, and it was it was pretty much different. I was always with our teammates every day. But everything is is crucial to build a relationship of the court just was on the court.

Seth Anderson:

And just sort of on our way out of here. Really appreciate you making the time this has been amazing, wondering, you know, I'm rooting for you and hoping you get you know, another shot at the NBA here. But you know, thinking life after basketball, have you given much thought to where you want to go? I mean, you've you've definitely curated a lot of leadership skills and experience over the last you know, few years. What do you think that translates into? Is it coaching management media? Have you given any thought to that? I actually

Unknown:

think about it all the time. Even though I'm still like in the early stages of my playing career, I always think about what's next like what what can I do after basketball because you never know what will happen or any god forbid something happened and I have to quit playing early but I definitely think about it all the time. Like I told you earlier I'm trying some key is now so back home. So that's definitely something that I'm very interested in doing. What I have time maybe maybe coaching here and there. But I'm not too sure about the coaching part yet but I definitely like training keys and spread the knowledge that I've learned over my years in player Pro,

Seth Anderson:

maybe maybe get into podcasting

Unknown:

and I thought I thought about that too. I thought about that too. It takes a lot of time for that. So I pretty much have a lot of time when the season is going so but maybe after you definitely started out looking too happy to help

Seth Anderson:

you out. We we just started this now six months ago and it's pretty much all we do on evenings and weekends because there's not a whole lot else to do but you get to meet a lot of cool people and have a lot of fun conversations for sure.

Unknown:

Man, I would definitely appreciate it. I guess it is something that that I'll be interested in trying to do any advice that you would give anyone you know who's you know, obviously

Seth Anderson:

yours yours is basketball specific but I think you've got a lot of great insights from from mindset and hard work. Anybody who's kind of getting started in their career or leadership journey, any any advice that you you'd give them

Unknown:

whatever it is that they're dreaming big about and go on and on it like I said it's an everyday process. So you have to make sure that you put in every every every inch of the work and tour or whatever it is that you want to be successful that whether it's basketball or whatever the case maybe you just have to make sure that you're going 100% every day have to work everyday like somebody's trying to take the job because that's that's how I look at everyday everyday is a grind embrace the hard days because everyday will not be easy but the hard days are what make it make especially if you can get through that man you can you do anything.

Seth Anderson:

All right well thank you for joining us today. Like I said really appreciate it wish you the best of luck over in Israel look forward to seeing you when the C CBl gets going again and You know, just just Best of luck to you sir. I definitely appreciate you guys for having me. Our pleasure.

Voiceover:

Thanks to Xavier for joining us today. And now stay tuned for the podium brought to you by beyond a beaten path. Visit Rio the beaten path.ca

Seth Anderson:

this is exactly the moment and you're listening to The Biz Dojo. Well, that was a really fun interview JP absolute pleasure having Xavier in the dojo with us

JP Gaston:

all the way from Israel

Seth Anderson:

all the way from Israel making time for us. We're up first thing crack of dawn on a Saturday morning, but wouldn't have rather been anywhere else. Inspired by that this week, we have another special guest on the podium. Good friend of the show. Good friend of ours. Brian Bettis, welcome, Brian. Seth.

Brian Bettis:

Thanks. Thanks for having me. Seth JP, really, really good to be a part of I've been a longtime listener. First time caller,

Seth Anderson:

I suppose. First first time caller. We've used that line a couple of times. Pleasure to have you in and for those of you who aren't familiar with Brian, Brian, and we all work together in our day job. And Brian's also a basketball enthusiast. I would say go raps go wraps. Although at one point you were cheering for Cleveland. I don't know what

Unknown:

it was on purpose. I like the story. I like the narrative of LeBron going back home and winning the championship. That was a fun, I cheer for stories. Seth, as you know, I'm a big story guy.

Seth Anderson:

Big stories guy. I so with that we had a we were gonna do a podium on Sunday basketball related, but we've decided to take a bit of a left turn to something I think is gonna be a lot of fun. So I'd call it a North turn North turn right up. So what we're gonna do is, we are going to give you our top three, either personal development, business development or financial development opportunities that are going to take you to the moon. Yes, very good. It's gonna be fun. So with that JP is actually going to touch on personal development. And we're going to tie this one back to some of the previous guests we've had in the dojo. So take it away. JP,

JP Gaston:

yeah, I think we've had a lot of folks who have come in the dojo talked a lot about personal development opportunities. We've had feedback from listeners, I could put together like many of our podiums, I could put together a list that has 15 people on it, highlight every one that's ever been in here. But I really think that there's some very specific guests that we have had that would really help you get to the moon, so to speak, when it comes to personal development. So number one, I could have picked Carolyn or Gord for coaching, I guess there's my runner ups. But what I really wanted to do was highlight some of the the creativity and really pursuing your hobbies as a part of your personal development as well. Because it's important that you have that balance between your work and the things that you love and are passionate about at work. And then the things that you know, maybe you do at home that are that are your personal passion. So Earl, who is our most recent guest before Xavier, he really had a great perspective on his whole career really, but where he came from, how he overcame a lot, and how he developed along the way, and he's now a mentor for many new musicians as a sask. mentor. But I mean, he's more than willing to work with just about anybody out there. So Earl is a great person to reach out to whether you're a musician or you're someone who you know, just is just kind of playing a show here or there is interested in getting into shows he would be the most fantastic person to talk to you. Or if you've if you're if you really want to develop an album, he also has a studio. So some definite opportunities there. Number two, I'm gonna I'm gonna go with Bill Baker for number two storyteller. He really talked about how to understand and influence others through your stories and not in a, I guess, persuade others but not in a in a horrible way more of here's how you tell the story, you want to tell to make sure that your message is clear, rather than, you know, leading them down a path they probably shouldn't. And then number number one,

Seth Anderson:

I think I think just quickly on that one, too, with Bill, he runs some great workshops. So if you're looking to develop personally on storytelling, you're in luck because you know, he runs fairly regular. You are definitely in

JP Gaston:

luck. Yeah, check out his website, BB and co storytelling. There's a link there you can join the the newsletter there and it'll let you know when there's upcoming upcoming classes. And then number one, I think it's really important and you talked about this on this podcast. I think it's really important to develop from an early age where opportunity might exist Junior Achievement that free service for school aged kids to really learn and understand not just business. But I know, you know, we're going to talk about finance a little bit here, understanding personal finance early on in life. I had, I had no clue about personal finance until it hit me in the face as I was, you know, in college spending money I didn't have on cards that I didn't know how much you know, 20% interest doesn't sound like much until you've got a couple $1,000 in there, you can't pay back on that monthly. There you go. Yes, yes, exactly. So Melissa from that episode was fantastic. And you're reaching out to her or reaching out to Junior Achievement. And, you know, it might be might be a little beyond most of our listeners, but certainly a lot of our listeners have have kids. And it's a great opportunity right now to get them involved.

Seth Anderson:

If you're a parent, or an aunt or an uncle or grandparent, and you're listening to this, and you've got you know, someone in your life that is in that sort of grade three all the way to grade 12. What better gift than to get them involved in a program like that, where they're going to learn entrepreneurial skills, financial literacy, job readiness, even if they just took one course out of there. Like JP said, it's free. And that's information like every, you know, anybody that I've interacted with, in the last like three weeks since we've did that podcast, and I've been like, if you heard a Junior Achievement, if you haven't, you should probably look into it.

Unknown:

those skills, just they're not taught in school, right? It's part of the challenge, right, is that everybody's a cog in the machine when they come out. And then all of a sudden, you don't know how to write a check. That's still a thing, check.

Seth Anderson:

Sometimes,

JP Gaston:

I have a, I have a book of them. I think I've used to I ordered them like 10 years ago 100 checks that I got 98 laughs

Seth Anderson:

That's awesome. Perfect, thanks up. So yeah, personal development. And you could if you went back and listened to our entire catalogue of guests, you could pull something from all of them. But those those are three great examples. So with that, we'll move on to Brian who's going to bring his perspective, sort of the every man from a financial investing in companies what's what's what's kind of going on out in the market, and you're gonna give us your top three,

Unknown:

if you're one of the things that's been happening in the strange pandemic plagued 18 month windows that we've had is kind of the the revolution of the every man, retail investor. And it's been enabled by apps like quest, trade and wealth simple. Or if you're, if you're in the States, Robin Hood, although I don't want to give them a ton of play here. But you're just the ability to use your phone to invest in the stock market. And this has sparked me as the every man to begin more aggressively investing in the stock market. And one thing I'll start off by saying is, I am not a financial planner, or I have no certifications or qualifications to advise on this. But I will tell you, as somebody who's in that space, there, there's a lot of really awesome kind of lust that happens when you win. And nobody tells you when they lose. So there's kind of this belief that everybody's just winning all the time, and it creates a real fear of missing out. And so if you've been following the news lately, you would have seen all of the Wall Street bet stuff that might be out there and the GameStop stock and going to the moon, right, it's good play there. And so that that inspired me to go look for stocks that maybe aren't so grounded in hyperbole and hype. You know, that GameStop the whole narrative is that it's a video game retailer, a physical brick and mortar retailer that has no digital platform whatsoever, and is quite like literally dying. But for some reason, a shorting and all this kind of stuff that we won't go into here, cause people to buy the stock and drive it up. Instead of taking those type of risky Gamble's, I'd like to recommend three stocks that I've actually done some investigation on and are backed on real fundamentals, not just, you know, hype, but instead, these are solid businesses that not only have growth capabilities now but also into the future. So I'll start with a number one is a stock market darling over the last years. If you bought this stock at its open. A year ago, it was $70.10. us it is now $781 per stock us and that stock is none other than Tesla. Elon Musk's brainchild, of course, they he might know them as a car company that made cars that typically don't drive in the climates that the three of us live in to well, but do well in other places. But the thing about Tesla that's interesting is not that they're a car maker, but that they're a battery company. And if you're looking at the recent events in the media, down with Texas and the power grid challenges that are happening, as we speak, battery power is going to not only revolutionize automobiles, but other industries as well. Things like solar Tesla is incredibly well positioned and the One thing that I love so much about Tesla is not just their battery capability. But you know, because of their cars, they collect data that they're using to funnel into AI. And so there's a really interesting AI implement on Tesla, and they have over 30 billion miles of driving data, which is more than every other car manufacturer in the world combined. And Google just for perspective has about 30 million with an M. So 30 billion is what Tesla has 30 million in Google Maps, and would be the the indicated there. So Tesla not only interesting, because it's a car company. But there's a lot more behind the scenes in that in that organization that makes it not only a good bet, now on a bit of a dip, but also on a long term investment. Number two is a little bit of a wild card here. It's MP materials core. Now, none of you may know anything about MP materials core, but they are the largest rare earth materials producer in the Western Hemisphere. Now, you might say why does that matter? Well, a couple of months back as part of China's trying to first plan China, who is currently the number one development of rare earth elements like, you know, the things that you find in your cell phones, the things that we find in supercomputers and semiconductors, they decided that they're going to start keeping China as the priority instead of exporting all that to the rest of the world. That means that we have to find a new place to harvest these very important materials from that are literally in everything we have. And this this company is a Western Hemisphere base, they have mines in Australia mines in the US. And just recently with the election in the US, Joe Biden has announced that they're going to make rare earth elements and the production of those rare earth elements a national security, defense play. So again, you know, reinforcing the strength of this market, if you had bought this stock a year ago, $9.78 at the open, and a little bit more manageable to get in today at 4505. So you're still looking really good. And it's on a nice j curve trajectory. So there's another one for you. And my third one is, is a little bit of a different ball of wax. And it's a it's an ETF. So it's an extra exchange traded fund, that that invest in a series of different products or different companies as as an investment security index. And so this is a future traded fund, it's looking primarily it all of the different organizations that are going to mold the next. So let's say for example, that you weren't in on Amazon, like me, I wasn't in on Amazon, or Netflix, like me missed that boat to or Nvidia or any of these other, you know very well to do Apple, right. Google early days, if you miss those, this fund is primarily targeted, looking at companies like those and diversifying the portfolio across a significant investment and managing the fund is an actively traded fund, they share what they trade every day. And if you had bought this fund, and 52 weeks ago, it was at $33 a share. And to get as of today, it's 150 to 61. So again, really positive growth on all three and one thing you'll notice about all three is that they are forward looking right? So we're trying to move away from the previous historical big box businesses or mega corpse and look into what the next roadmap is to fund our retirements and pensions and all of those things. So three, three, that you can take your right to the moon.

JP Gaston:

You know who else missed out on Netflix? blockbuster? Yeah.

Unknown:

blockbuster could have bought Netflix three times in its existence and refused every single time.

Seth Anderson:

And I think that went back to they tried streaming and they're like, no, this isn't a thing.

JP Gaston:

I feel like like on the bright side, they do have an Airbnb now. last door, they Yeah, and they turned it into an Airbnb and you can watch every movie, you're it's a pretty good idea, actually.

Seth Anderson:

On terribleness in a COVID age, maybe that's a thing.

Unknown:

As a business idea for yourself. Let's, let's maybe go into the second blockbuster franchise to be reopened.

Seth Anderson:

One One quick question before we move on. Thank you for that, Brian. I wrote all of that down. And I have plans to go to the beach with you. But do you subscribe to sort of the Warren Buffett school of thought on investing in the things that you like or that you use, or?

Unknown:

Yeah, what's your thought that's, that's a great leader. So my belief is is actually very close to Mr. Buffett, who is, you know, a magnate in his own regard with with respect to how I invest, I look at the things that I can know about, or the things that I have some expertise. So, you know, for me personally, I don't really know a ton about banks, right? Like, you know, I know enough to be dangerous, but I'm not aware of, you know, how, what the some the subprime mortgage crisis, the next one is, I'm not looking at that stuff. So the things that I try to invest in are things that I think about know about, you know, I happen to, for my job, be very close to technology. And so as a result, you know, I'm aware of the fact that, hey, these devices that we keep in our pockets are literally the remote controls to our lives, and they're only going to become more of that as we move forward. The same thing with with transport, right, you can see the revolution that's happening in that regard. And then, you know, the future looking pieces around healthcare, like with the ark Innovation Fund, they're looking at genomics, you know, ways that really detect cancer, I think you can never go wrong and investing in healthcare, because healthcare is a constant need. So yeah, absolutely. I'm very, very much aligned with investing in things that at least I have some affinity for.

JP Gaston:

Awesome. And as a as a newbie, coming in, what would you recommend to somebody who hasn't used the wealth simple and whatnot in the past? I'm sure that your recommendation is not, hey, go to Google, and type in some things. I'm sure you've got some better sources than that. So is there something you can share that would maybe help someone just getting off the ground with their first couple of shares?

Unknown:

Yeah, I'd say, number one, don't be a day trader, right. So I don't invest to be a day trader, I'm not looking at the stock market every day invest with an intention to let something that's beyond an eight month window. That way, if you see a rise and a fall, you can take advantage of it. And in a way, but you know, this is my strategy is not I don't have the time, honestly, just to sit around and look at it. So that'd be my first tip. And then I'd say, you know, go grab one of these really well accredited apps, there's, there's a handful of them that are well known in Canada, well, simple, and they should sponsor you. By the way, Seth, for this segment. I think they're sponsoring everything right now. But wealthsimple, questrade are both really strong. Personally, myself, I use portfolio management through a bank that I work I work with. But beyond that, Robin Hood in the states is a really good one. And I'd say don't invest with money that you don't have. So one of the reasons that I thought about, you know, bringing the segment and Seth asked me on the show is I've seen all of these cautionary tales of people who have taken out second mortgages, and you know, taken their college funds and invested them thinking, you know, they could ride the Zeitgeist, and that they would triple their money or quadruple their money. And, as I mentioned, the beginning, nobody tells you when they lose on these types of things. So you know, only invest money that you can afford to invest. Because this is gambling, this is this is a different way of gambling. And part of what I shared is really just, they're safer bets than some of this other stuff because they're established credible, and forward looking funds.

Seth Anderson:

Amazing. There you have it, folks. So we're through the personal development, financial development that's gonna take you to the moon, and I'm gonna lead us out with some business development. So for those of you who are in a startup type of an environment, just getting your business going, looking for sort of some of some of the resources that may be available to you from the previous guests we've had on the show, much like JP did, if you're looking for some inspiration, I really liked the mike Murali episode CBl, which is ultimately how we ended up getting introduced to Xavier. But, you know, this is sort of my runner up in that. That's a very impressive like, Brian, he's been to stingers games. Oh, impressive.

Unknown:

I've seen him play. Like, he is incredible. And it's so much fun, you know, we don't we are starved for good basketball, and in Canada, and I think this league fits a really important niche. And, you know, the, to be able to go in an affordable manner and so you know, you can take two people courtside for $100. Wow, like what a great experience.

Seth Anderson:

But and the whole league. I mean, if you look at it from the outside looking in, it looks very impressive. Looks very professional. And it was started over breakfast. Right. So in our in our episode with Mike, we get into that and I just thought that was so inspirational, that everything starts small, right? Everything starts with the first step. And, you know, that's one example. There's many out there, you wouldn't you wouldn't associate such a sort of big league, you know, to being started over breakfast. I thought that's pretty inspirational. You're looking for a little inspiration. I I'd start there. But when we look at tangible things that you're going to need if you're running a small business, and I've been going through this a lot with my wife's business, so that comes to mind. But here's sort of the three guests and what they offer that I think would help you. So number three, I have Rebecca Finley, who works with Finley and Associates, and we had her on in season one. And she runs governance basics, courses, and it's it's sort of a development opportunity, whether it's for an individual for a company, and I haven't had a chance to take the course yet, but you know, just in seeing, in talking with her and getting a chance to meet her, and just thinking through like our day jobs, and what's important, having some governance and some structure, especially in the early days of your business, is really critical, so that you don't end up burning out or getting sort of lost in the weeds. There's another book that I would suggest to go with that, especially for new entrepreneurs, which is called the the E myth, the entrepreneurial myth, and it gives you some really good context on are you working in the business are you working on the business and and really, like when you're, when you're setting your business up, you should actually have like an organizational chart that has all the positions on it, they, you know, you're going to be you and maybe your partner gonna be filling all those roles to start. But if you if you map that out, and you divided amongst each other, and there's clarity on who's working on what, and then eventually you start to fill those roles, you're going to be a lot more effective than everybody just kind of running around doing everything. So governance, I think is key for a successful startup business. And so I'd recommend you give that episode a listen to and I know that Rebecca's got a lot of you know, fairly regular courses that she puts on. Number two, and you know, I was introduced to this company through my wife's startup is tradespace. So we had Daniel Delgado, we didn't have his partner on the show, but Jordan, Daniel and Jordan were on the 40, under 40 for Calgary last year. And they have this really cool co working space that they've developed. And, you know, if you're a startup business, a lot of times, you know, just getting a brick and mortar building of any kind, is just, it's not, it's not realistic, right? Like you got all that overhead cost, you got to be moving a lot of product, you got to be pretty established to be able to take that jump, and they've sort of taken the risk out of that game to some degree, they've got very reasonable rates, you can get a space to store your wares, whether you're, you know, a plumber, a beard oil salesmen used clothing company,

JP Gaston:

he heard of all the options you had there, they weren't good beard oil, they

Seth Anderson:

have a beard oil guy, they're at least when I was last there. But what they do is like, you know, they have the space, so you can store your stuff you have sort of a home base to work out of, but also, you know, they provide you with internet access printing, like all those little administrative things that you you know, add up, right, you got to buy a printer, you got to buy a fax machine, you got to buy, you know, get Wi Fi, all these things, well, they have that all included in your package. And it's a month to month thing, so you can kind of just go in there, that doesn't work out. In our case, you know, it didn't work out. It's staying there long term. But we learned a lot, we got to meet some really cool people. And they've just got a really really cool vibe going there. So if you're in the startup, big game, or even if you're more established, and you're looking to maybe downsize or reduce some of your overhead costs, tradespace is a really cool model, that that's worth looking into. And then my number one, probably just because I'm biased and related, Nate Harper, who has strange giant media, and you know, he's branched out into the freelance world, and can create content for you. So if you're looking to make a commercial or a video to sort of showcase what your business is, any sort of creative aspect that you're going after to take your business to the next level, he can help you with that. And he's worked on some really professional shows the most recent one breast Valley restoration, which is on the History Channel, also a bunch of documentaries, he's got some great experience locally based in Calgary, and you know, we're finding to work with him JP, on doing some things here, it's sort of on the other side of COVID when we can actually kind of get in a room and maybe film some stuff. But you know, if you're looking to take your branding and you want to make a video, corporate video, personal whatever, I think I think enough take it to the moon,

JP Gaston:

though, and and that's important now, like you're not you're probably not getting yourself in front of a lot of customers right now with your store if you have a store. So it's really important to to seek out those sort of digital media advertising, which includes you know, video getting on YouTube, those sorts of things. Like there's a there's a ton of opportunity there to get yourself in front of folks. And I think Nate does a great job I've seen it I've seen not only like the rest Valley restores and, and the Manson interviews and whatnot, but I've also seen you know, some of the some of the other stuff that he's worked on, and it's incredible. Even his family pictures, I've seen some of his family pictures and I'm like, wow, if I could take a picture half that good. My wife would love

Unknown:

don't even let me yourself to thinking about those two, like, if you have a if you're in business, and you have a process that you want to map out, acting it out and walking through the scenarios can often bring those to life too, right? Like, just, there's so many ways you can use that creative avenue to share ideas and improve everything about it.

Seth Anderson:

I think everybody thinks that, you know, I'm creative, I could make a video but like it, there's, it's an art, right? Like, it is an art and a craft. And you know, when people can kind of bring that to life, take your vision in your head, because honestly, you're probably not going to be able to create it without a huge investment of time. Right, you know, and these professionals that exist locally, that can help you out with that. So, yeah.

JP Gaston:

I mean, if you ever doubt that, just scroll through a movie list people read like five or six movies in a row. And you can see there is a very large difference in the creativity of people, even the professionals.

Seth Anderson:

So there you have it, hopefully this was helpful for you. It was kind of a different approach, but sort of bringing the all the well, you know, not all of them, but a few of the wellness factors of, of everyday life and some of the resources that we have experienced with or that we vouch for for. And I feel like this could have almost been a full pod brand.

Unknown:

And maybe maybe if, if the bass likes that we could come back and do some more fun stuff.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, let us know. Share comment BMR stock tip, give us a share of stock tip. There you go. I'm looking, Brian must

JP Gaston:

know, let Brian know,

Seth Anderson:

if you have any, any ideas or any resources that have worked for you in any of these spaces, feel free to share. We're trying to build a community here that that shares with each other. This isn't about, you know who can make the most money or or get the best rating. We honestly just want to create a space where people can share with each other. So if you have any ideas, please feel free to share in the comments. And with that, thanks a lot for coming on this week. Brian. As always, the podium is brought to you by brb path for all your laser goods. Check them out with the V path.ca.

Unknown:

Now I've been to be on the beaten path and they give increasing they get incredible work. incredible work incredible. Yeah.

Seth Anderson:

There you have it. Grown has spoken incredible work beyond the beaten path. Go get some

JP Gaston:

nice bread. Thanks, guys.