The Biz Dojo

S2E19 - Disciplined Growth w/Damarys Zampini

May 25, 2021 Damarys Zampini Season 2 Episode 19
The Biz Dojo
S2E19 - Disciplined Growth w/Damarys Zampini
Show Notes Transcript

This week in The Biz Dojo, we're joined by Damarys Zampini, CEO of Sustrategy

Damarys shares the story of her upbringing, as a landed immigrant in Alberta. We talk about overcoming language and cultural obstacles, and how leveraging the 'outsider' mentality to form relationships and strengthen values has really helped each of us to develop as adults. We dive into mental wellness and structures for positive balance, and talk a lot about the influence of the martial arts on Damarys' journey through the ranks, and eventually to founding a strategy business of her own!

It also happens to be Mike Myers' birthday today (happy birthday, young man!). So, on the podium - brought to you by Beyond a Beaten Path - Seth and JP share some of their favourite Mike Myers characters.

Prep yourself for wanting to tackle the world after this episode by enjoying some delicious Biz Dojo Coffee (Masters Medium - OR - Dojo Dark) while you listen, and don't forget to visit our social pages below for more great content!

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Seth Anderson:

Welcome to The Biz Dojo with Seth and JP season two episode 19. So close powered by dq grill and chill Airdrie three locations here have a hankering for a blizzard. I went up here I

JP Gaston:

I went and picked one up this weekend.

Seth Anderson:

I do do actually

JP Gaston:

actually the Declan had some his first time having some soft serve ice cream. He loved it just devoured it.

Seth Anderson:

Of course he did. Of course he did. Frozen sugar, I mean,

JP Gaston:

it is delightful. And and actually we try it out try it out the new brownie. Blizzard. Oh, it was so good. And like did not skimp. Yeah, sometimes when you like whenever you go anywhere and you get a mixed frozen beverage, McDonald's, Dairy Queen, whatever. Sometimes you don't get as much in or it all settles at the bottom and just doesn't make sense as well. This brownie Blizzard was like every bite had just it was like packed.

Seth Anderson:

I'm not gonna lie. I had the new girl guide. Been chocolate. That's

JP Gaston:

what I had. Oh, my God. Yes,

Seth Anderson:

it is now the number one but we just did top lizards on chopping it up. I have a new top lizard. Yeah, well, we'll have to muster. Anyway, diving into this week's episode. We had the pleasure of being joined by President and CEO of strategy, the marason peeny. I can't hear strategy without thinking Phil Collins Sudhi. You mentioned that

JP Gaston:

it's a great combination. To be honest.

Seth Anderson:

It was a real pleasure getting to know Damaris a little bit. So she's actually based in Portugal. And she was kind enough to make some time on our anniversary of all days.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, we schedule stuff. We have no regard for what's going on. We just scheduled away. No,

Seth Anderson:

I mean, we've talked a couple of times. Now, you know, this is our fourth or fifth interview that we've had to book overseas. I don't even know what the time zones are anymore. So really appreciate her making the time and know she was busy. And I thought we had a really interesting conversation.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, she dove into a lot about her upbringing, and what it what it was like to come to Canada. She calls Canada home. She lives in Portugal at the moment, but as she says, pays taxes and calls Calgary home. And you know, grew up grew up in Lethbridge, LA,

Seth Anderson:

San la All right. No, I was great. And I think, you know, in a lot of the episodes we've done, where this one's maybe a little bit different is she has a very interesting journey, right. So she emigrated to Canada as a young woman grew up in LA, quote, unquote, in Lethbridge, Alberta, the LA of the North. And then she went into oil and gas for a number of years. And she's really been in the sort of the energy industry for the bulk of her career. And she also spent some time at DHL running their shipping and logistics department, we didn't actually get too much into like the nuts and bolts of her career, talked a lot more about her habits and how she's sort of grown as an individual to get to the place where she started her own business

JP Gaston:

and her mindset, we talked a little bit MMA she's into that you might be surprised to know, but grew up taking different forms of martial arts and continues to take, she just started a new form very recently fantastic. And it's just it set her mind up for what she needs to do and set her on the path to opening her own business and being a very strategic thinker.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, I thought it was really interesting to dive in and hear about her business. One of the coolest things, well, I don't know if it's the coolest thing. But one of the things that resonated with me that she talked about. And now I'm thinking of like three different things, because there were so many things that she said that resonated with me, particularly innovator die, which is, you know, we get into that in the interview, but I won't, so I won't belabor that that one too much. But in the pre discussion with her, she talked about how she had a client at one point who, you know, is basically money was not an issue. But the values didn't necessarily align and making that strategic decision to go another direction, I thought, I don't know, I just she strikes me as a person who has a core value system and sticks with it, regardless of whatever money might get thrown, you know, on the table.

JP Gaston:

As an entrepreneur that can't be easy. Like you've got a contract or you know, money in front of you a sale in front of you, whatever your business happens to be in, because values don't quite line up, you say no, then you turn the other way and had a different direction and let them have their own direction and you part ways with that person. And that's not easy to do.

Seth Anderson:

It's always easier to say stuff, then you actually do that. So I just found, you know, in a couple of conversations that we've had with her that is very real, you know, she's got her values, she sticks to it. And she's also really interested in growth as a person, which I think you You know, some of the stuff that you and I have been doing this last year, we're kind of naturally attracting that vibe, I would say. And so I think she's just kind of fit the mold for who we were looking to have on the show.

JP Gaston:

Well, an interesting teaser, like during our conversation, she talked about how she is much more interested in learning from people and having a differentiated social circle. So she doesn't just have a bunch of people around her. And we've talked about that a few times, where, you know, you really want to try and bring people in who are different than you and have different thought patterns and mindsets and come from different backgrounds and have, you know, complimentary skill sets instead of the exact same skill set. And she lives that and it's, I mean, I think the proof is in the pudding. And we'll hear about it this episode, but I think like like you alluded to, there may very well be season three episode so we can get through the rest of the stuff we wanted to talk about.

Seth Anderson:

I think so I do think this is this is the first part of our interview with the bear cytopenia second part three, you know, we'll see what happens in season three. But let's get into or

JP Gaston:

let's take it there with the steadies

Voiceover:

Welcome to The Biz Dojo. Here are your hosts, Seth Anderson, and JP Gaston.

Seth Anderson:

Welcome to The Biz Dojo with Stephan JP. This week, we're joined by the Maris Zen peeny, all the way from Portugal. Welcome to the dojo.

Damarys Zampini:

Thank you. Thank you very much. I feel like I'm in Calgary, half of me is left there, and half of me is over here. So

Seth Anderson:

yeah, we're super excited to have you here. And, you know, you're this currently the CEO of a company called Seth strategy. And I know we're definitely gonna dive into a bit of a what you're up to there. Also, you have Calgary roots, and we're a Calgary podcast. So we're very excited to virtually have you back in. You consider Calgary a hometown or how does

Unknown:

I do? I do yeah, it is my home is definitely you know, Canada's rapidly my taxes. So you know, there's that whole saying, you know, Home is where the cat is, or Home is where the heart is. And I feel like home is where you pay taxes. No, you know what, also I have to say Home is where the heart is. I was born in Latin America, but I came to Canada as a very young age is actually a refugee. So every is pretty much home. I came as a little girl with zero English and into Lethbridge, la Lethbridge, Alberta. So I went to high school there. And as soon as I finished high school, I headed over to bath had a summer job, spent shy of a year there and then I came to was Mount Royal College back in the day in Calgary. And then I stayed there until two years ago when I moved to Europe. So that's been the trajectory. So Calgary is home and I love Calgary,

Seth Anderson:

you know, the Alberta landscape. Well, that's, that's awesome. like the back of my hand. One of the things that Marisa you know, just off the top here, looking through your LinkedIn profile, your bio and strategy, one of the things that jumped out to me and I know you and I talked about this a little bit in the pre chat, martial arts, very important to you, like, it's the first thing up your martial artist, your black belt goes a little bit more about that. And I'm interested to get some perspective from you on that.

Unknown:

Ah, yeah, and you know, what, that's actually probably one of the big reasons why I said yes to this podcast, because I was like, Oh, my God, I maybe I gotta, you know, prepare for this next tournament, or something like that, that I thought I was gonna have to, you know, train up for this for this. I guess I have been training in indirect ways. But I love the name of it. It's awesome, awesome name, by the way. And you and I talked about how you guys pick the name, and I love it. And yeah, I love martial arts. I started when I was six years old, I think my dad, my mom wanted me to be early and play the piano and learn how to sew and things like that, which are very useful. But I was a little bit rebellious, and I begged my dad to please take me to a karate class. And, and he did. And then that was my start.

Seth Anderson:

You've got your black belt, you've done multiple disciplines. And then you know, when I just looked through your profile, like in the next hour, we're not even going to be able to scratch the surface on all the amazing business things you've been involved in. But you know, I'm curious specifically for martial arts. There are some mindsets or skills that you've developed over the years that you've been able to apply to your business life.

Unknown:

Yeah, absolutely. I think you know, for me, martial arts, it has been very much a foundation, stillness to date. So I started off and very traditional Japanese martial arts. My master and sensei is still an approach actually. Sensei Kinjo very Japanese Okinawan. traditional martial arts and I always remember, you know, We used to say, karate is a lifetime study. And that model has always kind of stuck with me. For us. Life is a lifetime study, right? I mean, or whatever it is you do, I think that is important to always remember, no matter what you do, you know, especially tech, a Keanu is, you know, as a kid, you always, you know, you're getting better, and you're getting tougher, and you're training a lot, like I used to train quite a bit. And, and he said to me, he goes, we know, just remember, there's always going to be somebody bigger, better and faster than you. So you can think you're the best, but then somebody gets faster, or somebody gets stronger. Or maybe you injure yourself, right. And so I there was sort of that sense of humility, that was instilled, and it was actually quite a wise, you know, aspect of martial art that I thought, you know, and this still today, I believe that it's all a lifetime study, you know, we can be pretty good at something be excellent at something. But to claim You're the best, it's a lot to get there. And so that's one thing. And I mean, really the ongoing discipline of training and continuing to learn together, you know, the physical and the mental aspect, I think is amazing. Guys, since switch tonight, it's more sure Oh, can I do a bit of MMA. And fast forward to today, I've done some yoga in between when I was pregnant, with with kids, and so on. And now I'm doing capoeira, which is extremely challenging. They're all very challenging. I respect all martial arts, I used to compete. So I've had my nose broken, I've had a few toes and fingers and Knuckles broken. And I enjoy all of it. But I think, you know, as it relates to life and career, I think you go through the similar things in order to get better and better. But the goal is to always get better and better. My actual personal goal is to be a great martial artist, like into my 90s. You know, am I going to be able to move? I don't know, I hope so. I hope like flexible and I keep address. So that all does align with with the work?

JP Gaston:

Are there any specific mindsets that you pulled away from that you talked a little bit about rigidity around the structure? Are there other frameworks or other mindsets that you've taken away from martial arts that you've been able to, to apply to your your business life or your personal life,

Unknown:

I started off very rigid, like the very traditional, very grounded, very Japanese, very old school. And it's actually quite interesting to see my career evolved with what's today. Because if you take a look at capoeira in, and actually even my own colleagues in better black belts in karate, for example, but look at capoeira and be like, okay, that's like, dancing yoga or something. But it's actually even more challenging to mark a hit and not actually deliver. And I know from experience, so I'm telling the story, because I think that it relates to that today of me, prayer wise, and how, even though they're very structured, very rigid, almost Sargent, like, today is so fluid and so beautiful, and in its own sense. And it's so grounded, and so circular, almost, that you evolve, right. And even if I think if even if I stayed with the same type of martial art, I think that it would be the same. So it's always about being better and better. Keep on learning is number one takeaway, both from a professional life and a personal life. Because you never, you just never know. And I mean, and that's part of my my, my business model is innovator die, if you're not actually getting better at that one thing, you just to me personally, and business wise, I might as well just dig a hole in the ground and just lay there until like, I can't breathe anymore. That to me is the end of life. So I think it's a that never think you're the best and always have the hunger to want to learn more. And even if when you get broken toes, and even when you get broken noses, and even when you can't stand looking at yourself in the mirror, because you think your nose is completely screwed up. Even when you know it's ugly. You gotta always kind of come back to that fundamental, you know, it's a lifetime study. It's okay, I just felt like gotta get up and keep going. Otherwise, you're not going to learn anymore, you're not going to make it better. You're not going to make it more beautiful. You're not going to make it yours. So there's, it's not easy, that's for damn sure. But it's about you know, you got to keep that light and know that there's more right and then there's always more and that's the abundance, thinking of all of it. No, that's awesome. circling back to what you mentioned before as a young woman coming to Canada from Latin America. Just thinking out loud here. I

Seth Anderson:

moved a lot when I was a kid. I think I went to three schools in grade one family situation and I know how difficult That can be showing up, you know, not knowing anybody. What I don't know, or what I can't relate to necessarily is showing up speaking a different language. Maybe not looking like everybody else. Like, what were what were some of the things you learned in those years, you know, I think to like resilience, adaptability, some of the things you've kind of already talked about, but when you look back at those formative years, what are some of the key skills you've gained?

Unknown:

I mean, kids are pretty resilient anyways, right? So you know, you get here, and you're like, you know, in grade six, and no English. So I also think that I was very blessed and lucky to have a good core foundation for my parents, my dad was, and you know, and still is my hero today and his strong values. And he was a businessman, he was a printer, right trade. So back home in El Salvador, where I was born, people just respected him, because he was always kind and caring, and always a good, transparent human being. But he always taught me to look at somebody in the eye when you meet them, and you shake their hand and introduce yourself with your name. And when you look at them in the eyes, you engage and so that's a universal thing, no matter what language I will start from Little young girl secure in herself and to be you are who you are. And so I think that, you know, even though I didn't know my face in the new world, I will do that I would introduce myself, and I knew how to say, you know, Hello, my name is de Maris. What is your name, right. And so even just that, I mean, and maybe I sounded funny, and I, you know, looked weird and looked different, but humans just want to be open, and they want to be heard, and they want to be listened to. And so I was eager to learn, I was eager to learn the new world and see the new places and to hear how they talked and what they thought. I think I was always I always kind of, you know, still had that presence and in myself, but always a little bit of curiosity to learn from others. And I think that those were really good foundational things that I was picked on, for sure. Like, you know, I remember, you know, like my parents again, you know, landed immigrants who didn't have much and back in the day, I remember that was Dr. Martens were the thing. They were the cool things and like plaid shirts, and you know, they were a thing. And in one time, I bought a pair of shoes that were there were some knockoffs and there was these girls that were just, you know, groupies and I talked to everybody. That was the thing I talked to everybody like I talked to, like special ed kids who and when we used to actually get seizures, this 3d sweet girl, I talked to the jocks in sports, because I love sports. And then I also talked to these girls that were like, I thought nice to me. But one day, I remember I, you know, here I am with my knock up doctrines. And I think I gave my shoes, whatever they're like, Dr. Martin was like, oh, but they look like it, right? And it was like, Oh, you know, you think about these things. And then you kind of go, but didn't really matter. Is that how the world is? And you question but you got to keep going forward, right, and I got made fun of my accent, I had actually a girl that put weight out in my hair. Those are some experiences anyways,

Seth Anderson:

I think you, you struck a chord with me that I never really thought about before. And JP knows I get these insights every once in a while, and I just have to share it. But you mentioned how you hung out with everybody. And I remember, you know, again, moving around a lot as a kid and never really fitting into one group. So you know, I'd hang out with the hockey players and hang out sometimes with like the skids. There was this kid with down syndrome that I used to sort of mentor and help them out a little bit. And like, I just hung out with anybody who wanted to hang out. But I never really felt like I belonged to a specific group. So there was like this, looking for this external validation all the time, whether that was through clothing, or being a class clown or whatever. And anyway, it took years and adulthood to kind of figure all this out. But now when I think about my work life, one of the things that I've gotten praise or called out for is collaborating, I will go out and I will talk to anyone I can bring people together, that is a skill. And I never necessarily connected the dots of like that childhood experience of just meeting all these different people and finding, you know, connections between them. Like how useful that's been to me in my work life. So anyway, thank you because that's just totally connected to dots in my brain.

Unknown:

Yeah. And then you and then you become the connector. Right? And it's okay, like there's no again, I also I'm lucky because my parents were I was never into date. And I might have shared this with you Seth for this I don't see in color I don't see in gender I don't see in age I don't see in you know, economic standards. And like I have friends who have been waitresses since the moment I've met them. I still are and they're happy and they're good. And I love them. And I have friends that are multimillionaires that are you know, could be retired, they just work because they you know, they would probably bore the crap out of their family. They didn't. So I don't see in in anything. Like that, it just has never been a barrier for me. If anything, I am more keen to learn about those that are different from me because I think they have so much more insight in their thinking than I have, which is massive. I don't want to be hanging around with people that think the same, because that doesn't make me learn anything. I just, it's just like singing to the choir. And to me, that's boring, right? So it's okay, again, I'm not judging, it's okay. If people want to hang out in the same choir forever. That's totally cool. We need those people to write. But for me, personally, I just don't feel like gain, you know, I gain more from people that are different than I am. And I appreciate them much more. And I'm more curious to know more about them, because I just will be better when i when i do know more about them.

JP Gaston:

So it sounds like you had this really like this just great upbringing, where you started curious early, and you've stayed curious throughout your life. And that's really helped you, you know, personally, professionally probably has helped you when you're in the dojo. Learn it learning from others, yes, it can be really difficult. And I know Seth has experienced this too, to help adults specifically learn more, or pursue some sort of passion for learning. So what sorts of things do you do? And what sorts of things would you recommend to help others kind of push their limits a little bit and continue down that path of constant growth?

Unknown:

innovate or die? Again, this is a big thing for me, but disrupt or be disrupted, right? What are my personal goals, I always tried to learn. So I'm actually I've always been going to school, I have friends that are super brilliant. They're so smart. They're like brainiacs, one of my dearest friends has like five degrees, and one time I went to his office, I'm like, five degrees. But you know, of course to space, I have to bug him, I have to call him a super nerd or something, right, but but my point is, I respect education, he punked me one time he goes, you've never stopped going to school, because I'm always taking courses, I think, now has been probably the longest, I haven't taken an actual official university course or something like that. But now what I've been doing over the last few years is reading more and more. So I'm doing a book a month. Now that's been over the last couple of years. My goal for this year is reading 15 instead of 12. So reading, I think it's important. The curiosity part is important. But of course, you can live a whole life learning new things, it's now that I have done my own learning, instead of Okay, I'm going to go to an institution and go take international business, or take commercial negotiations, or go take, you know, very specific courses that have a label on them, which of course, all of us can do. And I highly encourage and a highly respected. Since the last couple of years, what I've done is I've taken very specific growth and learning around my business, and to augment the services that I'm offering back to my clients, because I love what I do. And so I need to be the best that I can be for what I can give my value to them. So to augment my work, my value and my skills, my knowledge and understanding of where they're coming from genuinely to the level where they're even go, Wow, those I didn't know those stats about my own industry. And I go, oh, and then you know, I'm, I don't say like EA for me, I just internally have a big smile, like, Oh, cool. I'm glad that I did that. Right. I think continuing to read is one thing, but kind of focusing on the things that you really want to learn the most on is really key, and then maybe, you know, for somebody else that may be value for their own job, their own career trajectory, or maybe it's just a personal growth, right? But but it's just that there's so much and now with the digital world, it's just, it's there's so much so much abundant information out there. But one thing I have to say as far as the learning part, and the channels on that, there's 1000, zoom meetings, and webinars and stuff, and they're all amazing, and so on. But again, pick the thing that's good for you. But also, don't be afraid to pick up a good old book, like an old book that is not famous right now, that's not the cool thing that maybe give you insight in something that's totally different. So it's important to, to have a good mix of that to challenge yourself in your belief system. And it's hard, it's not easy. And I'm going through them through that right now. So, so challenging those aspects. I think it's important.

Seth Anderson:

I love what you said there, because it can be easy to get sucked into the latest bestseller. You know, I've I've bought a few in the last little while. Some of them are good. Some of them are not. But I actually randomly came across this book, The Four Agreements. And it's, it's like this, it's not very thick at all. And it's just basically the Four Agreements for a successful life and whatever you deem that to be, and they're super simple, off the top of my head. Don't assume anything about anyone else. Try your best Keep your word. And don't take anything personally. So those are the four agreements. So awesome. I love it. Yeah, there's so simple. But when you actually like, think about your day to day, as simple as those are often, like, if you get caught in your own head, you're probably taking something personally that you shouldn't, you know, did you actually keep your word on the thing you said you were going to do? Like, if you actually like, drill everything down to those four simple tenants. You live a pretty clear, pretty, pretty productive life. Anyway, I never would have read that book. I think it got given to me as like a stocking stuffer randomly.

Unknown:

So God, yes, so good. And you know, and sometimes like, I, I don't pick my own books, I put it out there. And I do I have a, I have a my business Instagram, and I post my just a quick, you know, this was this book was about, and I loved it because of x. And here's a quote that I took from it, for example, but I do I use LinkedIn, and I use my Instagram, LinkedIn I use, I only put my list with the, at the end of the year and say, these are the ones that I read. And then I go on, and then I and people are keen, and they go, Oh, those are cool. And then I say what are some of your favorite? So I pick, you know, I have a list of like, 30 books right now, for example. And I pick from the ones that I think, Okay, this one looks pretty cool. And that's not, you know, some old Miranda, right, but, but in some of them are challenging, like, you know, I come from the energy sector, very old and gas background and, and, you know, I am a huge advocate of the future of energy. And so I'm learning about all energies, and I have over the last probably three years very, very seriously. And I've had people challenge my thinking, and I go, Okay, so I've read, you know, very, very both sides of the spectrum, and, and to kind of look at stats, numbers, reality, and all of in political factors, all of it together, it just, it's hard, it's hard to kind of challenge yourself on that you're thinking right, and so, so it's important. And then and then random books, like I actually had a cousin Give me one a book, she has, she has a restaurant and somebody happened to leave this book there. And it was like this, like, non, you know, now nonwork book, I guess, or whatever. And it was, it was like this novel it but it was very, like, mystical, and it was totally something I would never read. But I loved it, I was I eat it up like crazy, I couldn't put it put it down. So you know, it's, it's all it all. And now I'm reading one, and that's about sleep. And, and I've challenged my own thinking around sleep, because you know, I think I'm the person that says, you know, six, seven hours, I'm good. And I'm not good. And I'm wrong. And so now I'm disrupting myself on that. So it's a really good one. It's called why we sleep. By the way, I highly recommend

JP Gaston:

being a lifelong learner Have you seen, I feel like there's been a shift in what people seek out for learning. Like, it used to be all this knowledge base, you know, you're an engineer, you go and you take engineering courses, you don't stray from that path at all. And I feel like over the last five to 10 years, and I think in part with the push for, you know, things like mindset and personal growth, there's been a shift in the way people learn or what they're learning and start to learn from other industries. I think, in part, that's what our podcast is about to write, like learning, learning from other industries and people that you normally wouldn't have conversations with, but as a lifelong learner, have you have you felt that shift as well? Or have you been inspired over the last few years to pursue more of those, I will call them soft skills, but the less knowledge based skills and kind of the more, you know, getting into yourself for

Unknown:

sure, and I mean, and I think that's a good thing. Luckily, there's a shift even pre COVID there is a shift around consciousness, right? So conscious everything. I mean, you know, now when I have some clients who are raising funds for their respective business, for example, I always say, money's out there money is out there for everybody money didn't go anywhere. If anything, there's more because there's more printed but that's a conscious investor. This pick up conscious partner, the speaker conscious, you know, manufacturing model, right, like all of these things, I think, I think Gone are the days where Yes, of course, money is important me to pay bills, but there's a definite shift and there's there's actual data to prove that right. So the generation stuff today in the workplace are not necessarily about oh, you know, I'm gonna make 200 grand right a friend out of high school or right out of college or university, or what if they got maybe half of that but they got an extra week of vacation and maybe every quarter they got an extra Friday off or something like that, and also being able to learn about themselves like you know, this whole self help thing I think is it's good in the way that I've actually been very lucky and blessed to come from a very again, you know, traditional male driven oil and gas type industry where the nice guy and the guy goes appealed and none of this soft bullshit it's just, you know, get her done to some of those actual total guy guys are like I actually used to play, I work with a guy who used to play hockey. And I remember, you know, hockey player, right? Like a jock. And then he started doing yoga. And because his back was all screwed up, and I remember this is like, I don't know, it doesn't need 15 years ago or something like that. That's like, he ever tried yoga. And of course, back then yoga wasn't, you know, as popular as it is today. And he's like, Oh, God, whatever. And then, and then he ended up trying yoga, and he was embarrassed, I tried yoga can touch my toes, I didn't know I can touch my toes. And, and then he really kind of got into this journey of meditation. And I was so happy like he was he surpassed me in his in his knowledge of that. And I was like, that's awesome. And even today, I literally, I'm lucky to know some incredible posts that come from the financial sector. Some of them are actual, like, Royal, UK Royal Army commando, Navy, commando guy that like, you know, was at war, and is probably one of the most holistic grounded guys that I know, like, meditates. He does yoga exercises. And, and he does, of course, you know, the regular workout hardcore stuff. And that shift is definitely something that's really, really happening today. And, and I think it needs to happen because it in the workplace, it's something that we all want to connect, of course, we want to win, of course, we want to solve the problem, of course, we want to win the deal. But to get there, it can be other really linear and dry, or it can be fun and exciting and unique, and genuine. And I think that ingenuity is something that is definitely here. And hopefully it's here to stay.

Seth Anderson:

And I feel like I could go down that that rabbit hole and it resonates with me. Just like I you know, in my early years, I was in the oil field, steak beer, video games hanging out like guys, guy coach and hockey, like all those things like yoga was like, absolutely out of the question. And now you're more likely to find me eating a salad and doing downward dog and meditating than any of that other stuff. And I feel better, I feel so much

Unknown:

better. Of course, and, and you know, when you can win, that's the thing, right? You know, even with this book, again, you know, before I before strategy was born, I worked at DHL. That was my last, you know, employee life. And I've you know, I remember that, listen, there were some amazing and I still keep in touch with some great folks there. They're very professional, very leaders. They're amazing people, I highly respect them. But there are some folks that are really what I remember. And this was actually a big aha moment for me, in my career, where, you know, I was the director for North America, oil and gas, petrochemicals and mining it was I was made one of maybe a handful, in a big company. So I was I was lucky. I was grateful. I enjoyed it. I learned a ton. But I remember one time my boss, you know, shows up in Calgary, and he had been traveling on and off for the last like 10 days. And he showed up and he was all sneezy. I don't know if was allergy three was sick for you know what it was, but I remember looking at him, and he kind of was doing this sort of like, you know, chest pounding like, hey, well, you know, no, no last, you know, 10 days, I've had an average of four hours sleep a night, and I'm sitting there, I'm going, like, that's not inspiring to me. Like, you're my vice president. If you know, I'm up for a senior director then up over the next couple of years, you're not really inspiring me to be like, right? Like, you're sickly. You don't sleep, you haven't seen your family, your Mr. Your kids, you know, recital? No, like, that's just not okay, me, that's not a cool thing. And then it's so accepted. And it's funny, because, you know, again, back to the book that I'm currently reading, he talks about how the all industries are really broken in this aspect. And even doctors, for example, even when they're going through doctor school, they say, Well, you know, you can't be a doctor on this train all these hours. And, you know, it's like 100 hours a week or something ridiculous. And it's not actually physically feasible. And again, there's data that proves that you don't have to do that. And there's data that proves that actually much better and effective and efficient when you sleep. And, you know, as you are, if you are grounded as you are if you exercise as you are if you eat better. And so, you know, back to the question on the type of education, I think people are seeking to know more about how can I not just make a little bit extra cash at the end of the year, but actually be able to enjoy whatever cash I do make at the end of the here. And actually the back of the experiences that I was able to afford with whatever it is that I made with me, my family and the people that are important.

JP Gaston:

So amazing. I feel like we're on this on the edge of this shift because it's been like I've been doing a ton of Seth, you'll be surprised by this because we always talk about how I don't read but I've been doing a ton of reading and research on the shift from the nine to five. It's been 100 years since we have had a change in the hours that we work or the schedule that we work so You know, a few things have changed since the late 1800s. It's probably worth a revisit, do we need to work Monday to Friday nine to five. And there's a lot of companies now that are challenging that Mike, I know Microsoft did it in Japan, where they shifted their team to a four day workweek they limited meetings to 30 minutes or less, they limited the number of people who can attend meetings to five, yeah, there. There's a lot of stuff like that happening out there, which I think is just amazing right now to rethink how productive people can be. When you do the opposite of what you think when you actually shorten how much they have to work, they're actually able to get more done and feel better about

Unknown:

our client, any man is what it is. And, and then I mean, it's actually called the opinium rhythm in the human. So our kadian rhythm is basically your own clock rate. And everybody's clock is different. And I mean, it actually even talks about like mothers, right? So you know, of course, we are women were the ones who birth, the level of lack of sleep that we have. And then integrating back to work is actually oftentimes extremely dangerous, because we're driving to work, like we're a normal person, but we actually aren't, because our brains are not. And so it's actually the equal of being, like completely inebriated coming to work, trying to do what everybody else is doing that has actually had proper sleep and has their brain on, it's no longer a cool thing, like people are like, Oh, my God, Google does this, and you know, Amazon, or whatever, you know, all of these more, you know, apple, for example, they have all these cool rules, but it's not just because they want to cool is because I've actually looked at the numbers and gone, we need productive people, if we're going to pay somebody, we want them to be good. And we do no hands on task, and actual tasks completed properly, rather than dangerously so. So I think that you know, it is it is something that that is going to become more and more than norm maximizing, and making sure that they focus on quality of quantity, and also the human part of the human resource. I mean, I hate that word, human resource sounds so like slave like, but you know, in a company knowledge drive business, you need so many resources in queue, including your real human skills. And so how do you make sure that those people are highly engaged? And I mean, that's one of the reasons why strategy was born. I came from business development sales commercializing, you know, an oil and gas, you know, my last job it's really an honor gas was with DHL, but also with Flint energy and you know, oil and gas pipelines super old school, right field work, etc. So I would sit and look at it like Eighth Avenue, right? So Eighth Avenue plays back in the day was like hopping party, like, lunches were full pack, you couldn't get into some of these places. And listen, I love networking, I love it. And there's there's merit in it, and so on. And I was a huge networker, still am, I believe in the value of it. But I remember sitting there going, you know, I wonder how many of these receipts I can audit, right? That we're actually just talking a bunch of bullshit. And it's reality of it. And I'm sure there are people, you know, randomly making sales, but none of it had any science to it. And so, when I went to be a child, it was all very metric driven, it was very KPI driven, it was very process driven. And so strategy was born on that basis. How do we, how do we make the whole business growth aspect metric driven KPI driven, lean, and effective? And so as I look back at it, I kind of went, Wow, look at that, like, these people are just talking too much crap. And it's not really their fault. It's actually I put it back on the on the firm's and the companies that didn't actually get there. You know, like, I think it's something like 80 something percent of salespeople that actually never actually read a sales book, which is not even again, their fault half the time because they've been putting these sales jobs without even having merit and be in it, and in it, and then no further training, like, okay, maybe they put them in the boardroom for a couple days away, you know, here's the pumpjack, or here's the down hook tool, or here's, you know, whatever product or service, and here's the pamphlet, or here's the little book, take it home and learn about it, and then we'll sell it, right. And meanwhile, they're expected to go and make a sale. Well, they don't have the skills, they're not engaged. They're don't they're, they're not integrated into the culture into the actual vision of where the company's going. They don't understand they're just being told to do one task with barely any preparation. And so of course, you're not going to deliver results, of course, how are they going to measure? How can you put KPIs into something that you don't even know really fully understand? And so then I went back, and then they were doing these things, and actually having lunches of people trying to close the sale, and they never even ask for the sale because they don't have that type of training. And so you know, it's so redundant. But it comes back to the engagement because oftentimes corporations that I'm not saying, of course, I'm grossly generalizing, I think we've gotten so much better. And it goes back to the question of the reading and what people are trying to learn now. And that is they're trying to learn and how do I keep my people engaged so they know the value proposition so it matters to them, so they're not just selling a thing in order to make the commission But they're selling this thing because they know that it actually is delivering value. And it aligns with their personal values and where they want to go with life, and where they want to grow into whether they want to do this in 10 years or not. But for now, it matters to them because of this, this and that. And, and that takes a lot of investment into your people, and learning and really understanding the whole emotional intelligence aspect

Seth Anderson:

of a human, there's so many, so many things I want to share with you books and resources that I think you'd like. But in that vein, you know, when in our pre chat, you talked about what you value, and what some of your company values are. And one of the things that really hit home with me, is you saying that clients that you work with, there has to be alignment to your values, right? Like, you can't just write a blank chair, throw out a blank cheque, and you'll help them like they got to be aligned to your values. And, you know, some of the ones you mentioned, were around innovation, global potential ROI, cash flow, one of the ones I really wanted to touch on that I think is interesting that you had equally important to all of those was our OSI return on community. Can you tell us a little bit more about that? Because I do think that social responsibility element is that's the future of business. Really. Yeah.

Unknown:

And again, I think it goes back to my dad and the parents instilling the value of even if you're, you know, as a printer, like he literally did business cards, gonna print a business card, make sure the edges are correctly, make sure that every spelling is right, make sure the quality is there. Because that card may be your contract that they're paying you to do your job. But that card means everything to that individual. Right? So how do you make them better in delivering that service? So and of course, now, the world talks about, you know, social aspect and ESG. So I'm happy again, and in, you know, in alignment with what are people learning, now, people are reading these things, because they do matter, right? So again, coming back to Heavy Industries, you take a look at, you know, mining sector, for example, or even any type of exploration. So I was actually in my last outside of Europe trip, I was actually in Panama, working on a water exploration project with a Canadian technology, that, you know, they had done other exploration jobs all over the world, actually. But for me, taking a look at Panama was how do we do this, right? Not just let's go to the government and say, Hey, we got a solution, we'll find you water, we'll get it done, which is fine, it answers the problem. But for me, I really wanted to engage with all levels. So I went to learn about academia, I also went met with a group that actually manages all seven main indigenous groups of the country. And then I met with another head of one of the biggest indigenous group and in Panama, because I wanted to learn what their land meant that because in this case, you're touching their land, you're gonna find water there, and they've been screwed before. So one example was they built a hydro plant in the north side of the country. And this whole indigenous community was actually displaced. And they were promised all these promises by Hey, you know what, we're gonna move you from here to over here, even though this has always been your land five, you're gonna get electricity now, because we're going to build this great dam and all this, blah, blah, blah, and we're going to give you this, this and that, well, they ended up building the dam. And they basically just routed it so that it would actually go to Costa Rica, and it would benefit and profit more. So they made all this money. And none of the promises were actually fulfilled. So whenever they heard about, you know, somebody coming in, through an exploration, they're like, Been there, done that, right, they're tainted. And so you know, that this is my more recent example, but it merits to tell because I think sometimes people can focus so much on the return on investment in the dollar that they're going to make, that they completely forget. So strategy stands for sustainable strategy, solutions and sustainability, not just about, of course, the trees in the environment. But the business is to be sustainable, because I don't want to you know, as a Canadian business woman, go to any part of the world, rape and pillage, go back to my country, and the world is so much smaller than we think. You know, especially when you're within an industry, for example, and then, you know, five years later, I'm doing another project somewhere else, and I run into those people and they're like, Oh, that was that asshole that came in did that pardon my Spanish but true, because people do that all the time. And, and now I'm not only giving out bad name to me personally, your company or the company I'm working with, but my country in where I come from, and everybody else that I work with. So that sustainability aspect is really really key and important. You could be making those business cards, but you could also you know, be helping the person in other ways. Okay, maybe you're not a counselor or a coach to be human them you know, advice or anything like that, but maybe you can say, you know what, I love your design, but maybe they have like a corner cut out. That would be a really cool thing, trying to do your best to give back to the community or if you know that person's selling flowers, and you notice somebody you know, on the other side of town that needs to have flowers at their front desk, because that's part of their image, make that connection. Now you're offering a service and also giving back to the community in one way or another. So, and of course, you can do that on a bigger scale. But one way or another, there's always a way, no matter what it is that you're doing, whether it's a service or a product or anything, I think there's always a way to leave that place a better place and to do it better than anybody else has before. And we need to responsibly be looking for what that is, you know, we all have a responsibility to deliver a return on investment if the app investors if we have other stakeholders, but the stakeholders, it's not always $1, right. So value is not always $1 value could be planting a tree, helping somebody get their skin, their kids to school, or whatever it may be, there's always something when there's little or big, that we can do better for the community that we're working in.

JP Gaston:

I love that love the view of sort of the the triple bottom line approach. So it's not just how much money you're making back. But it's, you know, what kind of impact Are you having on the environment? What kind of impact Are you having on the people and really having a much more holistic company? You're not just there for $1? That's fantastic. You talked a little bit about the innovator die approach, which I think is pretty amazing. And I'm, and I'm sure having that approach and working with the companies that you work with and some of the industries that you do, there's a lot of innovation, what is the key ingredient to innovation that you've experienced?

Unknown:

That's an excellent question. Innovation could be, you know, you can take this cup, and you know, the lettuce this way, but maybe you're on the other way. Well, it could be that simple. And it's innovative, because now I can drink without spilling on myself, for example, right? innovation can be you know, it's kind of like that, that the books the from good to great, right? If you're good, okay, you'll be good. But eventually good is good, it's almost good enough. And hey, you may float, and that's okay. And some companies may decide, and many people may decide to just be good, but to be great, takes continuous improvement, right? So the whole aspect of continuous improvement is something that we as a professional need to understand, that we need to be looking at. And that's where I tie that to the global thinking, because innovation means that whatever I have today, somebody somewhere in the world has figured out a way to do it better, maybe slightly better, maybe way better. And so that's why I think those two kind of go hand in hand, you know, I think we just responsibly need to be looking at ways to innovate, and it doesn't have to be massive, it is risky, innovating isn't easy, it is a change. But if we all know that we can count on one constant on this planet. That is, of course, we're all gonna die. And but the other one is that there's always going to be changed. And so if there's gonna be change, which is a given, let's make sure that change is for the better, which is evolving progressive, rather than the aggressive. And so that I think, takes work. And there again, maybe not everybody needs to innovate all the time. And I'm not saying innovate everything, I'm not saying go and change everything. Because there needs to be the foundation and there needs to be constants in the business. But look at again, you know, the oil and gas industry and some into some companies in that industry are amazingly innovative, but some of them are not. And it's brutal, because you sit there and they are dying, they are literally dying. And I hate to say it, and I'm heartbroken because I don't want anybody's business to die. You know, and it takes a shake up, right? You know, for example, all the cyber hacking, cyber security and cyber hacking that has happened, since the world is so much more in front of their computers. It was always, you know, okay, say even three, four years ago, things are digital, to an extent because people have to write, to have a cyber security person on staff was like, I don't need a cyber security person. I just, you know, whatever. Figure out when it breaks kind of thing. Now, it's no longer Oh, we don't, we're cool. We got a cyber security guy, or girl. Now, it's like if you don't have a cyber security person, or somebody who at least has a percentage of the responsibility on that. You are literally putting your investors money and your clients services at risk. Because everybody's digital. I mean, okay, not everybody 100% but even the guy that is mowing lawns, has to call, you know, somebody or their clients or go to the bank and deposit that money or whatever. There's always a level of innovation that is happening a one way or another so it doesn't have to be all of your business at once. It doesn't have to be a huge leap. It could be small doses. The funny part is, you know, we always kind of look backwards on technology. Wow, that guy was awesome. He was like, you know, he was a leader or not. He was like one of the first guys that did that. How cool is that? But he's cool after, right during, you know, nobody cares. During nobody else was willing to take the lead. Nobody else was willing to be the first. Right and no no the gas and for instance, there's a lot of Yeah, let somebody else take that chance first. Like, listen, you don't need to move your old company to the cloud, for example, this is everybody's on the cloud now, but this is what they call it three years ago, but maybe do a pilot project. And why not? If it works, awesome, move it along. If it doesn't work, hey, nothing ventured, nothing gained. So I innovation can be done at various levels. But it's our responsibility in order to advance and do better to look at all the ways that we can do that. And in adopting, taking that little chance is important.

Seth Anderson:

Oh, that's, that's awesome. All of that resonates. I think I have so many more questions. I think we're gonna have to do a part two and three, the honest, I think, I think that's gonna have to happen. But where can people learn more about strategy and what you guys are up to and how they could potentially leverage,

Unknown:

I am going to reboot my website, but my website is strategy calm. So su strategy.com. So that's one I'm also on LinkedIn, usually pretty active there. And that's pretty much where I can be found. I'm also I've got an Instagram account as well, one that was mostly for my books, more than anything else. But those are some of the places where I'm around I, you know, I sit on a couple of boards as well, CCA, Canadian Council for the Americas and promoting Alberta businesses, to the Americas. Of course, I also work with the global energy show, I'm a judge there. So anybody in the energy space that wants to participate in global Excellence Awards, they can find me there and I'm happy to bring them in. There's a lot of things around energy. Of course, we all need energy, we wouldn't be here if we didn't have it. And so so those are some of the channels.

Seth Anderson:

Amazing, Bob, we really appreciate you making the time to come to the dojo with us today. And we appreciate that. Thanks. And

JP Gaston:

I appreciate it. And I can't wait to keep learning more from you guys. Take care. Thanks so much

Voiceover:

for joining us today. Now stay tuned for the podium. Brought to you by beyond the beat path visit beyond the beaten path.ca. Bro, you're in grieving and custom gift me It's

Seth Anderson:

alright, well, that was an inspiring episode. JP, I don't know about you. But I took away a lot from that.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, a lot would be an understatement. And as as we closed as we opened with and as we closed out with, there's likely some more to come.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, I was chatting with her a little bit offline after the interview and a I shared a couple books with her. So I got to follow up and see what she thought I shared mindset by Dr. Carol Dweck, I think we talked about that on somewhere at some point. I'm like five hours in on that one. That one's a long one.

JP Gaston:

There's actually there's a number of good TED talks that link back to Carol Dweck work that I've I mean, I think listeners at this point know, I'm not an avid reader, but I am an avid listener and of course taker. So I guess in a roundabout way. I like to read but the longest possible way. No, she, she she has inspired a number of TED talks that have gone through some of the work that she's done with mindset. So yeah, no, maybe we'll maybe we can link some of those in or

Seth Anderson:

maybe in her profile. Maybe that would be cool. Yeah, so I recommended that I also recommended can't hurt me, David Goggins. You know, classic favorite. I don't know. It's classic. It's like two years old, but I guess it's classic nowadays.

JP Gaston:

I love when a movie comes out in a month later, you like that classic?

Seth Anderson:

And the Four Agreements. So that is a well rounded.

JP Gaston:

Talk about the Four Agreements today.

Seth Anderson:

So it is very good. Anyway, none of that again. I feel like I've been saying that a couple times. None of that has anything to do with this week's beyond the beaten path podium.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, this is gonna be a good one. We want to you want to talk a little bit about a birthday boy today. We have I don't think we've done that yet.

Seth Anderson:

I don't think we have this is this is a new one for us. So Happy Birthday to our good friend. I guess. We we wish for end of the show.

JP Gaston:

Mike Meyers

Seth Anderson:

Mike Byers. How old is he turn? Yeah. Do you have that handy on the Google? He's 58. Happy birthday, Mike. And to say that Mike Myers has inspired our lives would not be an understatement.

JP Gaston:

I don't believe I I'm pretty sure that I've gone an entire year without saying my own words and just quoting random stuff. He is played a large part of my life.

Seth Anderson:

Uncle DMX and Uncle Mike Myers, monkey, Mike,

JP Gaston:

monkey Mike and monkey acts.

Seth Anderson:

But for real, we grew up on his movies. I'm a little young for his SNL content. To be honest, I kind of missed that. But you probably

JP Gaston:

I was at the, I'd say tail end ish of it. I mean, I was around for it, obviously. But there's only a couple years between us

Seth Anderson:

little bit for my time, that stuff, but is moving. Right. And

JP Gaston:

even his really bad movies like we were talking earlier about the Love Guru. Really bad. Yeah. You still end up getting quotes out.

Seth Anderson:

I actually do think there was quotes that I was surprised came from that movie.

JP Gaston:

Yes. Yes.

Seth Anderson:

I digress. We're here to talk about the top. Yes. Mike Myers characters. That's what we're doing today.

JP Gaston:

Very, very excited about this mostly because I like to have mine come from a very underrated

Seth Anderson:

it's funny, you have a you have a twofer and I also have a twofer,

JP Gaston:

right. He's going for his Rock paper scissors, right? Okay. 123 shoot.

Seth Anderson:

Okay, so Who's going first? I am. Yes, Yes, you are. Number three. For me. And I actually forgot about this character. But during the COVID at some juncture, I rewatched mystery Alaska, which which holds up pretty good. Really good. Actually.

JP Gaston:

I'm gonna have to go back and

Seth Anderson:

yeah, no, you should go back. It's good. It's a classics. It's

JP Gaston:

more than two years old.

Seth Anderson:

Oh, man. It's so good. Anyway, I digress. Mike Myers had a character in that which was very much like a Don Cherry type persona. And apparently his name was Donnie chisel. Ghazal Hoffer. But he's got some one liners in that that

JP Gaston:

feel like Mike Myers is the type of person who read that name and instantly knew he wanted to be in the movie. Like he didn't read the script. It's just like, Okay, what gear did you want me to read for? Shazam? Yeah, I mean, I'm in.

Seth Anderson:

So that was a great movie. What who's all that Russell Crowe Hank Azaria. Just a really great film. So that's why number three, coming in at number two. I have two characters. And you know, couldn't pick one. But from the Austin power series. I'm not actually going with Austin Powers himself. But I am going with fat bastard. And Dr. Evil. I just think I quote those two more in my life. Any well combined, I'm sure more than any other character from any other show ever.

JP Gaston:

Yeah,

Seth Anderson:

I probably say get in my belly like once a day for like a year. And then what?

JP Gaston:

I know that you say that? Because we used to go for lunch.

Seth Anderson:

shark shark beams with frickin lasers. Like I've said that on this show at least 40 times? Yes, I

JP Gaston:

know. Because every time you say it, it always ends up being an episode of chopping it up where I actually have to make video edits to include plates except it's all your fault.

Seth Anderson:

So that's, that's why number two, I've got two in the spot of number two, but not number two. He's a was not played by Austin. Was he played by?

JP Gaston:

You mean he wasn't played by Mike Myers?

Seth Anderson:

Yes, yes. He wasn't playing

JP Gaston:

the characters in the person. They're just so intertwined.

Seth Anderson:

I'm so intertwined at this point. And All right, we'll finish it off my number one, and it's like by far and it's pretty big. Like say by far considering I just said like I quote the other two. Daily non stop. Yeah, but I'm going with Wayne Campbell.

JP Gaston:

Yes, yes. The only reason Wayne Campbell is not on my list is because he's on your list.

Seth Anderson:

Yes. Yes. The Stairway to Heaven seen the movie Bohemian Rhapsody. See,

JP Gaston:

you know, my favorite scene is

Seth Anderson:

I love donuts.

JP Gaston:

It's Oh, no. It's camera. What camera to camera one. I've quoted that. Maybe not daily, but probably once a month since I saw that movie for the

Seth Anderson:

that's that's a good movie. Anyway, that's it. That's my last seat list.

JP Gaston:

All right. Well, now that I'm thinking about all of the quotes from other movies, I'm going to insert some more into my brain by talking about three different well two different movies. I did not combine my two characters into number two slot.

Seth Anderson:

I mean, you could if you if you have another character, but I

JP Gaston:

know I think I want to keep them separate because they are. They're very separate. They would say styles of acting even. That's true. Yeah. So my Number three is Shrek. Animation has been such a part of my life. Like, I watch Adult Swim still today. There's a whole bunch of stuff that it's just you can't get them. You know real life comedy.

Seth Anderson:

So do you? Do you think Shrek is the richest of his characters? box office wise it's gonna

JP Gaston:

say I mean he is you know running a kingdom so it probably got some box. But box office wise, I Austin Powers

Seth Anderson:

I gotta think it's Shrek. There's like 12 of them, kids. Yeah, that's probably Shrek. Yeah, I put I put money on it. Although I'm reading on IMDB here that there is a an announced Austin Powers for which I did not know about you're getting ready for

JP Gaston:

adding to your list. You're like, Alright, I'm ready for a runner up.

Seth Anderson:

Give me a new character, Mike, a gold member that could have been on anyway, before we get to

JP Gaston:

number two, for me. You know, I'm just gonna say number two and number one, because I quote them both. But they're very different characters. So I don't think I can I don't think I can rank them one and two. I'm just gonna say they're my top two. All right, fair. That's what Yeah. S my top two would be Charlie and Stuart Mackenzie from so I married an axe murdere . Such a great movie. such a great movie. And the father just plays this like, over the like, it's a classic over the top Mike Meyers character. And I've actually I've read a fair bit about the scenes with Stuart. And apparently a lot of the laughter and whatnot that's going on is very real, because it was all improvised. It was all just like, and there's a few scenes where you can see Mike Meyers buddy, or Charlie's buddy sitting on the couch with his dad. And he is like, he is cry laughing with the scenes going on. And it is like a legitimate cry, laugh. And I also think it's very awesome that they shot the scenes in a way where Mike as Charlie and Mike Stewart actually appear in the scene together in the same camera shot. There's not a lot of movies that are willing to do that when one person is playing both characters. And it's I mean, this was not green screen time. No, no, it was some

Seth Anderson:

he did a lot of the duplicate characters. Well, Austin Powers It was like he was he would you

JP Gaston:

seen a movie? You're not? Because $4 million to make and 3.9 of it was just Mike Myers.

Seth Anderson:

Well, I could sit here and talk about our Austin Mike Myers all night long. But that's that's a pretty good that's an impressive list.

JP Gaston:

And and I feel like we've left enough characters that people can jump on our Facebook or Instagram pages and leave some comments about what characters they found to be in their top three and you can repeat that's fine. We enjoy a good repeat. For sure it validates why I'm right. Seth wrong.

Seth Anderson:

I think I would get the popular vote my pick.

JP Gaston:

I'm pretty sure you would I really do think so I married an axe murderer is a super underrated movie that I talk to people all the time. They're like, yeah, I've

Seth Anderson:

never I don't even know what that movie is about. And I'm like you need you need to register if you haven't seen it. Go watch it. I remember it being like one of my favorite movies when I was like 12 I don't know that that's an appropriate movie for a 12 year old favorite movie, but it was so judgment, butchery and

JP Gaston:

poetry. beatnik poetry. It's perfect. It's exactly what every 12 year old should learn if

Seth Anderson:

you want to be in bath.ca. Check them out for all your laser engraving means laser engraving acts.

JP Gaston:

Just don't use it for murder.

Seth Anderson:

No murder. Yeah. You get a custom crimp board with Mike Myers face if you like.

JP Gaston:

Yes, that'd be cool. With all of his face.

Seth Anderson:

All the characters.

JP Gaston:

Let's make a challenge here to be on a beanbag and make a keyboard that has every character Mike Myers has ever done.

Seth Anderson:

The Austin Powers

JP Gaston:

someone ordered 47 characters just from us,

Seth Anderson:

honestly. All right. Well, thanks, everyone for tuning in. We'll see you next week for season two finale.

JP Gaston:

Yeah. stoked about this one?

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, it's gonna be a blast. Cool. We'll see everyone Cheers.